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BME UNDERGRADUATE COURSES Course Offerings Required

BIM 1 BIM 20 BIM 105 BIM 106 BIM 107 BIM 108 BIM 109 BIM 111 BIM 116* or NPB 101 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 5 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering Fundamentals of Bioengineering Probability and Statistics for Biomedical Engineers Biotransport Phenomena Mathematical Methods for Biological Systems Biomedical Signals and Control Biomaterials BME Senior Design Experience Biomedical Instrumentation Laboratory Physiology for Biomedical Engineers Savageau Yamada Saiz Leach Raychaudhuri Qi Revzin Louie/Passerini Marcu/Pan Louie Fall Spring Fall Winter Winter Spring Spring W/S Winter Fall Specialization Yamada Yokobayashi Yokobayashi Savageau Pan Hawkins Facciotti Parikh Ferrara Benham Saiz Chen-Izu Leach Revzin Chigazola Tran Savageau Fall Fall (odd) Fall (even) Spring (alt.) Winter Winter Spring (even) Winter Spring Spring (odd) Spring (alt.) Spring W (odd) Spring Fall Fall Spring Fall Spring (alt.) B C,S C,S S MD,B B S,C B,C I S S,B S B,C B,C C MD MD MD S

BIM 110 AB 8

Electives - quarter offerings subject to change


Science Electives BIM 102 BIM 161 A BIM 161 L BIM 117 BIM 118 BIM 126 BIM 140 BIM 141 BIM 142 BIM 143 BIM 151 BIM 152 BIM 162 BIM 163 BIM 173 BIM 189A BIM 189C BIM 189C BIM 189C 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 Quantitative Cell Biology Biomolecular Engineering Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory Engineering Electives Analysis of Molecular and Cellular Networks Microelectromechanical Systems Tissue Mechanics Protein Engineering Cell and Tissue Mechanics Principles and Practices of Biomedical Imaging Mechanics of DNA Molecular Control of Biosystems Bioelectricity, Biomechanics, and Signaling Systems Cell and Tissue Engineering Principles and Applications of Biological Sensors
Aspects of Medical Device Design, Manufacturing and Operations

Biomolecular Systems Engineering: Synthetic Biology Facciotti

Introduction to the Biophysics of Molecules and Cells Heinrich

Clinical Applications for Biomedical Device Design Modeling Strategies for BME
Specializations B-Biomechanics, C-Cellular & Tissue, I-Imaging MD-Medical Devices, S-Systems & Synthetic Biology

3/18/2012

Course Descriptions

BIM 1

Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

Units: 2

Fall

Lecture: 2 hours. No prerequisite: Introduction to the field of biomedical engineering with examples taken from the various areas of specialization within the discipline. Areas include: (1) nanobioengineering, (2) cellular bioengineering, (3) tissue bioengineering, (4) computational bioengineering, and (5) biomedical imaging. BIM 20 Fundamentals of Bioengineering Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: PHY 9B, MAT 21D. Credit restriction: Only 2 units for students who have taken ECH 51 or ENG 105. Basic principles of mass, energy and momentum conservation equations applied to solve problems in the biological and medical sciences. BIM 102 Quantitative Cell Biology Units: 4 Fall

Lecture/discussion: 4 hours. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, PHY 9B, MAT 22B, and CHE 8B. Credit restriction: Only 2 units for students who have taken BIS 104 or MCB 143. Fundamental cell biology for bioengineers. Emphasis on physical concepts underlying cellular processes including protein trafficking, cell motility, cell division and cell adhesion. Current topics including cell biology of cancer and stem cells will be discussed. SE BIM 105 Probability and Statistics for BME Units: 4 Fall

Lecture: 3 hours; Discussion:1 hour;. Prerequisite: MAT 21D. Concepts of probability, random variables and processes, and statistical analysis with applications to engineering problems in biomedical sciences. Includes discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions and models, hypothesis testing, statistical inference and Matlab applications. Emphasis on BME applications. BIM 106 Biotransport Phenomena Units: 4 Winter

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: NPB 101 or equivalent, PHY 9B, MAT 22B, and BIM 20 with C- or better. Principles of momentum and mass transfer with applications to biomedical systems; emphasis on basic fluid transport related to blood flow, mass transfer across cell membranes, and the design and analysis of artificial human organs. BIM 107 Mathematical Methods for Biological Systems Units: 4 Winter

Lecture: 3 hours; Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisites: MAT 22B, BIM 20. Mathematical and computational modeling to solve biomedical problems. Topics include stochastic processes and Monte Carlo simulations, and partial differential equations. Students are introduced to numerical techniques in MATLAB. BIM 108 Biomedical Signals and Control Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: ENG 6, ENG 17, and MAT 22B with C- or better. Credit restriction: No credit for students who have taken EEC 150A and only 2 units for students who have taken EME 171. Systems and control theory applied to biomedical engineering problems. Time-domain and frequency-domain analyses of signals and systems, convolution, Laplace and Fourier transforms, transfer function, dynamic behavior of first and second order processes, and design of control systems for biomedical applications.

BIM 109

Biomaterials

Units: 4

Spring

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisite: BIM 106. Introduce important concepts most important for design, selection and application of biomaterials. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the subject, principles of polymer science, surface science, materials science and biology will be integrated into the course.
BIM 110 AB

Biomedical Engineering Senior Design Experience

Units: 44 Winter/Spring

Lecture/discussion: 1 hour; Project: 9 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 107, BIM 108, and BIM 109. Application of bioengineering theory and experimental analysis culminating in the design of a unique solution to a problem. Design may be geared towards current applications in biotechnology or medical technology. Deferred grading pending completion of sequence. BIM 111 Biomedical Instrumentation Laboratory Units: 6 Winter

Lecture: 4 hours; Lab: 6 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 105, BIM 107, BIM 108; ENG 100 or EEC 100; and NPB 101 or equivalent. Basic biomedical signals and sensors. Topics include analog and digital records using electronic, hydrodynamic, and optical sensors, and measurements made at cellular, tissue and whole organism level. BIM 116
Physiology for Biomedical Engineers

Units: 5

Fall

Lecture: 2 hours; Discussion: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, MAT 22B, and PHY 9C. Basic human physiology for the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, and endocrine systems. Emphasis on small group design projects and presentations in interdisciplinary topics relating biomedical engineering to medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. BIM 117 Analysis of Molecular and Cellular Networks Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 3 hours; Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisite: MAT 22A and BIS 2A with C- or better in both.. Network themes in biology, emphasizing metabolic, genetic, and developmental networks. Mathematical and computational methods for analysis of such networks. Elucidation of design principles in natural networks. Engineering and ethical issues in the design of synthetic networks. Offered alternate years. EE BIM 118 Microelectromechanical Systems Units: 4 Winter

Lecture: 2 hours; Discussion: 1 hour; Laboratory: 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2A; ENG 100 or EEC 100. Introduction to the theory and practice of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), including fundamentals of micro-nanofabrication, microscale sensing and actuation, self assembly, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip. Weekly hands-on laboratory sections are emphasized on implementation and utilization of MEMS technologies. EE BIM 126 Tissue Mechanics Units: 3 Winter

Lecture: 2 hours; Laboratory/Discussion: 3 hours. Prerequisites: EXB 103 and/or ENG 45 or equivalent. Cross listed with EXB 126. Structural and mechanical properties of biological tissues, including bone, cartilage, ligament, tendon, nerve, and skeletal muscle. EE BIM 140 Protein Engineering Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 3 hours; Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, CHE 8B. Introduction to protein structure and function. Modern methods for designing, producing, and characterizing novel proteins and peptides. Design strategies, computer modeling, heterologous expression, in vitro mutagenesis. Protein crystallography, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods for characterization, and other techniques. Offered alternate years. EE

BIM 141

Cell and Tissue Mechanics

Units: 4

Lecture: 3 hours; Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisites: PHY 9C, ENG 35, or equivalent. Mechanical properties that govern blood flow in the microcirculation. Concepts in blood rheology and cell and tissue viscoelasticity, biophysical aspects of cell migration, adhesion, and motility. Offered irregularly. EE BIM 142 Principles and Practices of Biomedical Imaging Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: PHY 9D, MAT 22B, and BIM 108 (may be taken concurrently). Basic physics, engineering principles, and applications of biomedical imaging techniques including x-ray imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and nuclear imaging. EE BIM 143
Biomolecular Systems Engineering: Synthetic Biology

Units: 4

Spring

Lecture: 3 hours, Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, MAT 16C or equivalent; and CHE 8A or equivalent. Includes analysis, design, construction and characterization of molecular systems. Process and biological parts standardization, computer aided design, gene synthesis, directed evolution, protein engineering, issues of human practice, biological safety, security, innovation, and ethics are covered. Offered alternate years. EE BIM 151 Mechanics of DNA Units: 3

Lecture: 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, MAT 22B. Structural, mechanical and dynamic properties of DNA. Topics include DNA structures and their mechanical properties, in vivo topological constraints on DNA, mechanical and thermodynamic equilibria, DNA dynamics, and their roles in normal and pathological biological processes. Offered irregularly. EE BIM 152 Molecular Control of Biosystems Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 3 hours, Discussion, 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, PHY 9B, and MAT 22B. Fundamentals of molecular biomedicine covering state-of-the-art methods for quantitative understanding of gene regulation and signal transduction networks at different levels of organization in health and disease. Topics include classic genetic systems, synthetic circuits, networks disrupted in disease and cancer. EE BIM 161 A Biomolecular Engineering Units: 4 Fall

Lecture: 3 hours, Discussion: 1 hour. Prerequisites: BIS 2A, CHE 8B. Introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of biomolecular engineering such as recombinant DNA technology, protein engineering, and molecular diagnostics. Offered alternate years. SE BIM 161 L Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory Units: 3 Fall

Laboratory: 4.5 hours, Lecture/discussion: 1.5 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 161A, or BIS 101. Introduction to the basic techniques in biomolecular engineering. Lecture, laboratory and discussion sessions will cover basic techniques in DNA cloning, bacterial cell culture, protein expression, and data analysis. Offered alternate years. SE BIM 162
Introduction to the Biophysics of Molecules and Cells

Units: 4

Winter

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: MAT 22B, PHY 9C. Introduction to fundamental physical mechanisms governing structure and function of biomacromolecules. Emphasis on a quantitative understanding of the nano- to microscale biomechanics of interactions between and within individual molecules, as well as of their assemblies, in particular membranes. Offered alternate years. EE

BIM 163

Bioelectricity, Biomechanics, and Signaling Systems

Units: 4

Spring

Lecture: 2 hours, Discussion: 1 hour, Project: 1 hour. Prerequisites: MAT 22B with a C- or Better; BIM 116 or equivalent. Fundamentals of bioelectricity in cells, the calcium signaling system, and mechanical force generation in muscle. Combination of lecture and projects to promote learning of important concepts in hands-on projects using neurons and muscle as microcosms. EE BIM 173 Cell and Tissue Engineering Units: 4 Fall

Lecture/discussion: 4 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 106 and BIM 109 with a grade of a C- or better in both courses. Engineering principles to direct cell and tissue behavior and formation. Cell sourcing, controlled delivery of macromolecules, transport within and around biomaterials, bioreactor design, tissue design criteria and outcomes assessment. EE BIM 189 Topics in Biomedical Engineering Units: 1 - 5

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in Biomedical Engineering. (A) Cellular and Molecular Engineering (B) Biomedical Imaging (C) Biomedical Engineering. These new courses with temporary 189 listings may have the same numbers. To distinguish them, check the title and the instructors name. BIM 189A
Principles and Applications of Biological Sensors (Revzin)

Units: 4

Fall

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 106 and BIM 109 both with a C- or better. This course will address three major types of biological sensors: electrochemical, optical, and affinity-based. These methods are central for converting biological events into recordable signals. In addition to these transduction methods, emphasis will also be placed on methods for immobilizing sensing elements (e.g. enzymes, antibodies) to create functional biosensors. The course will also cover how semiconductor fabrication techniques are being applied to miniaturize and multiplex biosensors. Offered alternate years. EE BIM 189C
Aspects of Medical Device Design, Manufacturing and Operations (Chigazola)

Units: 1

Spring

Lecture: 1 hour. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. A general survey course of medical device design activities and their impact on manufacturing operations. The course also provides an introduction of lean manufacturing and lean design concepts. EE BIM 189C
Clinical Applications for Biomedical Device Design (Tran)

Units: 4

Fall

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: BIM 116 or NPB 101 or consent of instructor. Basic concepts in the pathogenesis of disease and how these mechanisms drive development of modern diagnostic technology. Contemporary diseases and the device design process including needs assessment, development, pointof-care testing, validation, and implementation. EE BIM 189C Modeling Strategies for BME (Savageau) Units: 4 Spring

Lecture: 4 hours. Prerequisites: BIS 2A and MAT 22A both with a C- or better, or consent of instructor. Modeling strategies for biomedical engineering systems. An introduction covering general issues is followed by a case-study approach covering several areas of biomedical engineering. Cases will make the general issues more concrete and provide examples of interest to the broad spectrum of students in biomedical engineering. Students working in groups will formulate models of their own for class presentations. Offered alternate years. EE BIM 192 Internship in BME Units: 1-12

Internship: 3-36 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, upper division majors. Supervised work experience in the Biomedical Engineering field. May be repeated for credit. P/NP

BIM 199

Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates Lab Credit

Units: 1-5

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. 3 hours of lab work = 1 unit. Petition to be filed every quarter with UG Advisor at beginning of quarter. May be repeated for credit. P/NP BIM 199
Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates: Engineering or Science Elective Credit

Units: 4

Prerequisite: Upper division standing. 3 hours of lab work=1 unit. 2 units/quarter for 2 consecutive quarters for a total of 4 units. Petition to be filed with UG Advisor at beginning of quarter. Part I: Research project. Clear research plan must be attached to original petition.: Part II: Presented results. Either 30 minute presentation, or 10 page paper, or 15 minute presentation and 5 page paper. Must be attached to final petition. May not be repeated. P/NP