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Thurs 21st Oct 2004 Fran Holt

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Agenda
DSL Evolution DSL Introduction DSL Market DSL Variants ADSL Emerging DSL technologies DSL Applications Lucent product placement
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Evolution of Digital Access

100M+ 55M 6M 128K 56K


Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Introduction

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Digital Subscriber Line


DSL is a technology for bringing high-bandwidth info to homes & small businesses over ordinary copper telephone lines. Voice signals (~3.4KHz) use only a fraction of the available capacity on the wires. DSL exploits this remaining capacity to carry digital info on the wire without disturbing the line's ability to carry conversations. DSL (or more specifically ADSL) operates at frequencies of between 100 kHz 1.1 MHz above the voice channel and therefore splits your phone line into a voice channel and a DSL high speed channel which operates at speeds of up to 6 Mbps. DSL is a distance-sensitive technology ie. as the cable length increases, the signal quality and connection speed decrease. ADSL service has a max distance of 18,000 feet between the DSL modem and the DSLAM xDSL refers to different variations of DSL ie. ADSL, HDSL, RADSL etc
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Network

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL - Introduction
Splitters are used at the customer premises split the 0-4kHZ spectrum used for voice from the higher frequencies the DSL modem will use to pass the data traffic (using micro-filters). Factors which affect DSL performance include: Bridge taps (extensions/taps off the link to CO) Loading Coils (small amplifiers used to boost voice signals) Wire Gauges Distance

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSLAM
Aggregates connections from many customers onto a single, highcapacity connection to the IP or ATM network. Flexible and able to support multiple types of DSL in a single central office. Can also be deployed in multi-unit (MxU) environments, which typically consist
commercial multi-tenant unit (MTU) residential multi-dwelling unit (MDU)

Vast majority of DSLAMs utilize ATM-based switch fabrics and WAN uplink interfaces. Internet Protocol (IP)-based DSLAMs, which incorporate IP processing/routing/aggregation capabilities, are gaining increased acceptance, especially in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSLAM & MxU

Central Office / CoCo-Lo


Access to unbundled loops Traditional DSLAM deployment

DLCs in Remote Terminals CO / CLEC Regional Center

Fiber In The Loop


Fiber deeper into the network Shorter Distances / Higher Bandwidth

Remote Terminal

Outdoor configurations Tier 2 & 3 residential suburban and rural

Remote Terminal

Indoor configurations MTU/MDU Tier 1 & 2 urban and suburban Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

12/20/2004

DSL Market

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

123 Million Broadband Subscribers Worldwide Q2 2004


source: DSL Forum

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Technology Split in top 10 Broadband Countries Q2 2004


sourve: DSL Forum

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Top 20 DSL Countries by Total Subscribers Number Q2 2004


source : DSL Forum

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

1,100,000,000 Potential DSL Users World-wide

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Market Trends
[CY 2003] Worldwide DSL POTS + DSL port shipments ~ 20.8Million 80% were POTS, 20% were DSL 5.5 Million shipped to NAR (North America Region) 15.3 Million for the rest of the world

[CY 2003] Lucents market position


2nd to Alcatel in the global ATM DSLAM market (7.3% of the market revenues according to the Synergy Research Group 4th overall behind Alcatel, Huawei and NEC in terms of DSLAM port shipments according to multiple industry sources.

[Q1 2004] Lucent increases global ATM DSLAM market revenues to 8.7% (according to Synergy), and has announced several high-profile customer wins and contract expansions in the past few quarters. To date, Lucent has already installed more than 28,000 Stinger access concentrators and more than 6 million ports in more than 25 countries. Worldwide Market Leaders : Leader in POTS => Huawei [36%] (90% of their shipments were in Asia) Leader in DSL => Alcatel [28%] (#1 in NAR) Lucent is listed as #3 outside NAR for POTS/Specials 6.1% Lucent is listed as #2 outside NAR for DSL 17.3%
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Market Trends
Lucent has garnered DSLAM customer wins with o Telefnica de Espaa (Spain) o France Telecom o Telefonica Brasil o EUR 75 million extension of its DSL contract for Telekomunikacja Polska (TP) o Finnet Com OY (Finland) o Uni2 (a France Telecom subsidiary in Spain) o Bell Canada o Portugal Telecom o Swedens Bredbandsbolaget (B2). Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) fo 2003 2008 POTS projected at 6% DSL projected at 8% Lucent faces number of competitive challenges moving forward into 2004. For example, in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region, Lucent must contend with Alcatel, ECI Telecom, Marconi, and Siemens, while Asian vendors such as Huawei, NEC, Samsung, Sumitomo and UTStarcom have already become very serious competitive threats to Lucent in multiple international markets.
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL in Ireland
Many businesses in Ireland are interested in switching to broadband, few have done so yet.
22% of techcentral survey respondents said that their company was now accessing the Internet via a high-speed connection. 18% were using DSL (Digital Subscriber line) 11% had a leased line 7% accessed the Net via a wireless broadband connection 5% through a cable modem. 59% use a dial-up access

Eircom is the leading ISP at present with 48% of small and medium sized companies currently subscribing to one of its services. Approximately, 16% of survey respondents said that they subscribed to services from Eircom's main rival, EsatBT, while 7% were with UTV Internet and 4% with Via Networks. Other ISPs cited by readers included NTL, Skynet, Sprint, IE Internet, ANU and eLive.
Eircom Eircom Broadband Home Starter (4 GB download, 1 GB upload limit) - 39.99 per month Eircom Broadband Home Plus (8 GB download, 1 GB upload limit) - 54.45 per month UTV Internet Clicksilver DSL service (512k download, 128k upload limit) - 47.50 per month Digi-Web DSL Broadband HomeJet (home use, 512K download) - 38.99 per month BizJet (SOHO, 512K download) - 45 per month BizJet Enhanced (small-medium business, 1M download) - 89 per month BizJet Enterprise (large business/school, 2M download) - 169 per month
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Variants

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Variants

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Variants
ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line)
Most popular DSL type. Up to 6.1 megabits per second of data can be sent downstream and up to 640 Kbps upstream.

G.Lite or DSL Lite (DSL Lite, splitterless ADSL or Universal ADSL)


A slower ADSL that doesn't require splitting of the line at the user end but manages to split it for the user remotely at the telephone company. ITU-T standard G-992.2, provides a data rate from 1.544 Mbps to 6 Mpbs downstream and from 128 Kbps to 384 Kbps upstream.

HDSL (High bit-rate Digital Subscriber Line)


One of the earliest forms of DSL, is used for wideband digital transmission Symmetrical - equal amount of bandwidth is available in both directions. HDSL can carry as much on a single wire of twisted-pair cable as can be carried on a T1 line (1.544 Mbps) or an E1 line (2.048 Mbps).

IDSL (ISDN DSL)


IDSL is somewhat of a misnomer since it's really closer to ISDN data rates and service at 128 Kbps than to the much higher rates of ADSL.

RADSL (Rate-Adaptive DSL)


RADSL is an ADSL technology from Westell in which software is able to determine the rate at which signals can be transmitted on a given customer phone line and adjust the delivery rate accordingly. Westell's FlexCap2 system uses RADSL to deliver from 640 Kbps to 2.2 Mbps downstream and from 272 Kbps to 1.088 Mbps upstream over an existing line.
12/20/2004

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

DSL Variants
SDSL (Symmetric DSL)
Similar to HDSL with a single twisted-pair line, carrying 1.544 Mbps (U.S. and Canada) or 2.048 Mbps (Europe) each direction on a duplex line. It's symmetric because the data rate is the same in both directions.

G.SHDSL (single pair Symmetric high data rate DSL)


ITU-T G.991.2 symmetric, multi-rate DSL combining the best of SDSL and HDSL2, aimed at users of DSL for voice, data and Internet access services. Delivers up to 2.3 Mbps per secondcompared to 2.0 Mbps for SDSL/ Can be deployed nearly twice as far from the central office (CO) than SDSL, which is limited to a maximum distance of 18,000 feet. Can operate in 2 & 4-wire bonded modes (up to 4.6Mbps payload).

UDSL (Unidirectional DSL)


is a proposal from a European company. It's a unidirectional version of HDSL.

VDSL (Very high data rate DSL)


is a developing technology that promises much higher data rates over relatively short distances (between 51 and 55 Mbps over lines up to 1,000 feet or 300 meters in length). It's envisioned that VDSL may emerge somewhat after ADSL is widely deployed and co-exist with it.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL
What is it ? ADSL depends upon advanced digital signal processing and creative algorithms to squeeze information through twisted-pair telephone lines. ADSL is the most standardized DSL type & has the potential to supply B-ISDN services (video on demand, HDTV, LAN interconnection etc) all over the POTS line. The ITU approved industry standard for full-rate ADSL is known as G.992.1, or G.dmt Capabilities An ADSL circuit connects an ADSL modem on each end of a twisted-pair telephone line, creating three information channels a high speed downstream channel (1.5Mbps to 8.0Mbps) a medium speed duplex channel (16 to 832Kbps) a POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) or an ISDN channel. The POTS/ISDN channel is split off from the digital modem by filters, thus guaranteeing uninterrupted POTS/ISDN, even if ADSL fails. Downstream data rates depend on a number of factors, including the length of the copper line, its wire gauge presence of bridged taps.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

An ADSL Network
Customer #1 POTS 1 Internet Access Server POTS ATU-R

Central Office

TCP/IP Router Work-at-Home Server

DSLAM

ATU-C 1

M U X

ATU-C n Video on demand Server ATM Switch

Customer #n

Info & Advertiser Server

ATU-R POTS n

POTS

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DMT Line Code How the bits are sent


The 2 prevalent Line codes used are
DMT (Discrete Multi-tone) [the open standard chosen by ANSI T1.413 & ITU for full-rate ADSL] CAP (similar to QAM) Carrierless Amplitude/Phase Modulation

The ANSI standard requires that DMT ADSL both FDM & Echo Cancellation techniques are commonly used : FDM (frequency division multiplexing) ie. the freq range is split into upsteam & downstream bandwidths. Echo Cancellation ie. eliminate the possibility of a signal in one direction being confused with a signal in the opposite direction, and being echoed back.

DMT divides the upstream and downstream bands into a collection of smaller frequency ranges of approximately 4 kHz each, called sub channels. During transmission, each 4 kHz sub channel carries a portion of the total data rate. By dividing the transmission bandwidth into a collection of subchannels, DMT is able to adapt to the distinct characteristics of each telephone line and maximize the data transmission rate.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DMT Frame Structure How the bits are organised


ADSL is a Framed transport; the bit stream within the ADSL frame can be divided into a max of 7 bearer channels
4 uni-directional downstream bearers (AS0-AS3) 3 duplex upstream/downstream bearers (LS0-LS2) Fast data buffer (delay sensitive, noise tolerant data eg. audio/video services) Interleave data buffer (data is reqd to be protected from errors eg. Internet access). A SuperFrame carries 68 ADSL frames Each SuperFrame is sent every 17ms (each frame is sent every 250us)
One ADSL SuperFrame every 17 milli-seconds

There are 2 major bit categories :

The individual ADSL frames are organised into ADSL SuperFrames.


Frame 1

Frame 2

Frame 3

Frame 34

Frame 67

Sync

Fast Byte

Fast Data Buffer

FEC

Interleaved Data Buffer

One ADSL Frame every 250usecs (1/4000 sec)

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Code & Error Correction

ADSL uses consellation encoding and decoding of to rebuild damaged data on the line this ensures very high reliability. To improve the performance of ADSL system some companies use 16 state 4 dimensional trellis code on top of the consellation encoding. Another useful method to increase the ADSL systems reliability is Forward Error Correction (FEC), which is based on Reed Solomon coding method . As indicated, the data frame gets its information from two data buffers (interleaved buffer and fast buffer) which are scrambled - this scrambling method makes the error correction and coding more efficient.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL network types


ADSL for TCP/IP: End to End Mode
All traffic inside the ADSL Frames are TCP/IP packets. TCP messages are placed inside IP packets, which are then placed in PPP frames. The DSLAM places the PPP frame inside the ADSL SuperFrame. PPP can generate idle bit patterns (7E) when not transmitting IP packets to maintain the continous always on connection.

ADSL for ATM: Full Service Network


ATM excels at delivering combined traffic streams (voice/video/data) ATM cells are sent inside ADSL SuperFrames ie. there is a continous flow of fixed-length 53 byte ATM cells packed head-to-tail. ATM idle cells are used when no data is to be transmitted.

PPP over ATM


ATM carries IP packets & PPP frames inside ATM cells using AAL5 This is achieved by using PVCs over the ADSL links & through the ATM enabled DSLAM. The DSLAM uses VPIs (defines the site-to-site connectivity) & VCIs (defines the deviceto-device connectivity) in the ATM cell headers to create the path from the CPE to the ATM backbone.

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL vs Cable

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Emerging DSL Technologies

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL2+
ADSL2+ is the new standard consented by the ITU in January 2003. It is based on ADSL2 and doubles the maximum frequency used for downstream data transmission from 1.1 MHz to 2.2 MHz. As a result, downstream data rates are increased to up to 24 Mbps on phone lines as long as 3,000 feet, and 20 Mbps on lines as long as 5,000 feet.

Benefits Superior rate/reach performance Enhanced diagnostic capabilities Improved power management Bonding for higher data rates Improved interoperability Reduces cross-talk
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL2+
Power Enhancements: ADSL transceivers operate in full-power mode day and night, even when not in use. ADSL2+ standard brings in power management modes that help reduce overall power consumption while maintaining ADSLs always-on functionality for the user - enters into a sleep mode when the connection is not being used for extended periods of time. Rate Adaption: Telephone wires are bundled together in multi-pair binders containing 25 or more twisted wire pairs. As a result, electrical signals from one pair can electromagnetically couple onto adjacent pairs in the binder (known as known as crosstalk and can impede ADSL data rate performance). ADSL2 simply detects changes in the channel conditions -- for example, a local AM radio station turning off its transmitter for the evening and adapts the data rate to the new channel condition. ADSL technology standards

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL2+
ADSL Annexes : ADSL standards include annexes that specify ADSL operation for particular applications and regions around the world.
Annex A is designed to work on phone lines enabled POTS. It is the most common application of ADSL, used throughout North America and much of Europe and Asia. Annex B works similarly to Annex A, though it is designed to work on phone lines enabled with ISDN instead of POTS, which is common in Germany and other regions. Annex C is designed specifically for use in Japan. It allows ADSL to operate with Japans special version of ISDN called TCM-ISDN. Annex I doubles the downstream of the Annex C, much like ADSL2+ doubles the downstream of ADSL2. ADSL2 (G.992.3) Annex L: Reach Extended ADSL2 (RE-ADSL2) provide increased performance on long lines under various crosstalk conditions. (re-adsl2 extends coverage area of 768 kbps service approvimately 37%)

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

ADSL2+

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

VDSL
Very-High-Speed Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL) provides 13-to-55Mbps downstream and 1.5-to-26Mbps upstream of data over distances of up to 4,500 feet. Typical downstream speeds over loop length are :
12.96Mbps 13.8Mbps 25.92Mbps 27.6Mbps 51.84Mbps 55.2Mbps 4.5kft 3.0kft 1.0kft

VDSL can be symmetrical and asymmetrical. VDSL performance enables service providers to deliver a combination of digital television, data and regular telephone service on a single twisted-pair copper wire ie. It is intended for (ATM)B-ISDN service deployment. Because VDSL is capable of transmitting only over a shorter distance, it will require service providers to deploy fiber optic cable closer to the end user. VDSL is well suited to full-service networks with 2 channels of HDTV possible at the highest VDSL bit rates. Two competing consortiums are pushing to standardize VDSL. VDSL Alliance supports VDSL using a carrier system called Discrete MultiTone (DMT) ,excellent performance even under extreme noise conditions. VDSL Coalition favors a line coding scheme based on Quadature Amplitude Modulation (QAM), a single-carrier system that is less expensive and consumes less power.
12/20/2004

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

VDSL
The key to VDSL is that the telephone companies are replacing many of their main feeds with fiber-optic cable eg. Fiber to the Curb (FTTC) or Fiber to the Neighborhood (FTTN). A VDSL transceiver is placed in your home and a VDSL gateway in a nearby junction box. The VDSL gateway converts the data received from the transceiver into pulses of light that can be transmitted over the fiber-optic system to the central office. When data is sent back to you, the VDSL gateway converts the signal from the fiber-optic cable and sends it to your VDSL transceiver Benefits
Excellent performance, even under extreme channel and noise conditions Robust performance when line conditions change Line testing and probing capabilities, which simplify service provisioning and troubleshooting for operators Interoperability with ADSL, which is the most widely deployed DSL

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSL Applications

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

New Applications

High-speed business access and next-generation services QoS DSL Products and Services

integrated voice, video, data and fax solutions

Business solutions

Home solutions
video-on-demand, voice and other applications
12/20/2004

office buildings, apartment buildings, hotel and campus solutions


Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Multi-Dwelling Unit solutions

Part of an End-to-End DSL Solution

End-user Locations
CellPipe ADSL G.lite

Carrier Location
DS3 Voice Gateway

PSTN

Stinger DLSAM

ISP 1

OC-3c SDSL HDSL2

ATM Core Network


GX 550/ CBX 500

DS3

ISP 2

Integrated Access Device (IAD) NavisAccess PathStar

PSTN

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

End-to-End Service Provider Solutions


ISP 1

End user location


CellPipe and 3rd-party vendors

Network service provider (CLEC, ILEC, IXC) location

Voice
RADIUS Server OC-3 DS-3 ISP 2 DSL Terminator

ADSL

DS-3

SDSL OC-3 ADSL

ATM Network

Router

Provides end-to-end solution from CPE (CellPipe) to COE (Stinger) to circuit aggregation and termination (Terminator) Gives Service Providers the choice of integrated layer 3 (via T-1000 module) or distributed (via Terminator) Interoperates with Pathstar access server to provide end-to-end feature rich packet VoDSL solution
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

IAD

DS-3

PathStar Access Server

Stingers
12/20/2004

PSTN

Voice and Data Solutions

Provider
Class 5 Switch

Subscriber

PSTN

Internet

Video

Business Data (AAL5) ILEC CO


T1/E1 Trunks (GR-303)

LAN 1-24 Voice


SDSL IAD ADSL

Loop Voice (AAL2) Voice Gateway


Voice Packet

Stinger

ATM

CBX-500 Switch
Fax

Subscriber

CLEC Switching Center

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

End-User Applications
Home/Tenant Solutions Business Solutions

Ethernet Combined Voice, Video & Data Loop ATM/ADSL VC1 Data (UBR) VC2 Video (CBR) VC2 Voice (rt -VBR) (rtIAD Ethernet Combined Voice, Video & Data Loop ATM/SDSL VC1 Data (UBR) VC2 Video (CBR) VC2 Voice (rt -VBR) (rtIAD

MPEG2 decoder

TV/Video

Applications supported:
h h h h Integrated Data/Voice over DSL Local & Cable TV channels Interactive video-on-demand Internet Access

Applications supported:
h h h h Integrated Data/Voice over DSL Fax over IP Multimedia collaboration Internet Access
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

12/20/2004

Multi-Tenant and Multi-Dwelling Buildings (MTU & MDU)


Fewer regulatory issues. Faster return on investment. Less complexity in infrastructure. Tenants are a captive audience for market testing and selling additional services. High concentration of end users in a limited area. Ability to target specific customer types is increased because similar types of customers lease similar properties. Space is less of an issue (for equipment).

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Lucent Product Placement


Lucent Broadband Access Solutions

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Stinger FS / FS+

Stinger FS / LS / RT / CR/ MRT


Complete line of DSL Access Concentrators. Central Office, remote terminal and MTU/MDU deployments. Segment-leading port densities.

Stinger LS 12/20/2004

Stinger RT

Stinger CR

Stinger MRT Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Broadband Broadband Access Access Stinger Stinger Product Product Line Line

Stinger FS, FS+


Highest Density DSLAM in the industry since 1999 Unmatched features and performance 1,008 ports per FS+

Stinger LS
MTU/MDU Shallow depth (10) Two models (19 and 23) 360 ports - 19 LS 504 ports - 23 LS

Stinger RT
Outdoor cabinet deployments Environmentallyhardened versions of the two LS models 360 ports per 19 RT, 504 ports per 23 RT

Stinger MRT
36 & 48 ports ADSL 36 ports SHDSL Rural deployments Small Offices MTU/MDU
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

23 and 19 models

12/20/2004

Broadband Broadband Access Access Stinger Stinger Product Product Line Line

Stinger Compact Remote


Environmentally hardened enclosure. Enables use of standard LIM cards. Extends DSL services closer to subscriber. 1 Stinger FS+ supports 8 Compact Remotes.
12/20/2004 Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Control Modules (CM)


In FS and FS+, Control Modules occupy the center two slots in the front of the chassis In LS and RT, Control Modules occupy the 3rd and 4th right-most slots Simplex or duplex operation with independent paths to LIMs and TMs supported Control Module functions (common to all CM types): 1.6 Gbps ATM switching fabric Monitors all slot cards, controls redundancy/protection switching Software maintained on CM (TAOS), and downloads SW to LIMs when they initialize System management via: NAVIS Access, Command Line Interface SNMP 2 PCMCIA slots (for software downloads) 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port and craft console port
12/20/2004 Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

FS, FS+

LS, RT

Control Module Family:


STGR-CM-A . . . base Control Module STGR-CM-B . . . same as STGR-CM-A but includes integrated 56K modem STGR-CM-C . . . same as STGR-CM-B but includes stratum-3 clock

STGRRT-CM-A . . . same as STGR-CM-A but environmentally hardened for use in the Stinger RT STGRRT-CM-B . . . same as STGR-CM-B but environmentally hardened for use in the Stinger RT STGRRT-CM-C . . . same as STGR-CM-C but environmentally hardened for use in the Stinger RT STGR-CM-IP2000-C . . . IP-2000 with copper Gigabit Ethernet (1000BaseT) interface STGR-CM-IP2000-F . . . IP-2000 with optical Gigabit Ethernet interface, requires purchase of SFP optical module STGR-SFP-LX . . . Long-haul single-mode fiber (1000BaseLX) module STGR-SFP-SX . . . Short-haul multi-mode fiber (1000BaseSX) module
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Trunk Modules (TMs)


In FS and FS+, Trunk Modules occupy the center two slots in the rear of the chassis In LS and RT, Trunk Modules occupy the rightmost slots Simplex or duplex (redundant) operation supported Trunk Modules are available with: 1 or 2 port DS3 or E3 (coax) 1 or 2 port OC3c/STM1 (single-mode fiber, and multimode versions) TRAM - 2 OC3cs and 4 DS3s OC12c available in 2003 FS, FS+
Rear View

LS, RT

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Trunk Module Family:


STGR-TM-OC3-1 . . . single-port OC3c/STM1 . . . single-mode/intermediate-reach STGR-TM-OC3-2 . . . dual-port OC3c/STM1 . . . single-mode/intermediate-reach STGR-TM-OC3-1L . . . single-port OC3c/STM1 . . . single-mode/long-reach STGR-TM-OC3-2L . . . dual-port OC3c/STM1 . . . single-mode/long-reach STGR-TM-OC3-1M . . . single-port OC3c/STM1 . . . multi-mode STGR-TM-OC3-2M . . . dual-port OC3c/STM1 . . . multi-mode STGR-TM-DS3-1 . . . single-port DS3 STGR-TM-DS3-2 . . . dual-port DS3 STGR-TM-E3-1 . . . single-port E3 STGR-TM-E3-2 . . . dual-port E3 STGR-TRAM-D4-O2 . . . Four-port DS3 and two-port OC3c . . . only for use in FS/FS+ STGR-TRAM-E4-O2 . . . Four-port E3 and two-port STM1 . . . only for use in FS/FS+

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Line Interface Modules (LIMs)


In FS and FS+, LIMs occupy the seven slots to the left and to the right of the Control Modules In LS and RT, LIMs occupy the 5 or 7 slots to the left of the Control Modules, and alternate slots with LPMs LIMs in conjunction with LPMs provide the DSL subscriber interfaces (and DS1/E1 IMA) LIMs have 155 Mbit/s serial data path to each Control Module LIMs provide aggregation with ATM traffic management for QoS (CBR, VBR-rt, VBR-nrt, UBR) 1:n LIM redundancy via use of PSM FS, FS+ LS, RT

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Line Interface Module (LIM) Family:


STGR-LIM-SQ-48 STGR-LIM-AD-48 STGR-LIM-AD-72 STGR-LIM-AB-48 STGR-LIM-SL-48 STGR-LIM-SL-72 STGR-LIM-H2-32 STGR-LIM-ID-32 48-port SDSL 48-port ADSL Annex A 72-port ADSL Annex A 48-port ADSL Annex B 48-port SHDSL 72-port SHDSL 32-port SHDSL/HDSL2 32-port IDSL 2B1Q SDSL up to 2.3 Mbps Full-rate and G.Lite, line sharing with POTS Full-rate and G.Lite, line sharing with POTS Full-rate ADSL, line sharing with ISDN G.shdsl, supports 2-wire and 4-wire mode G.shdsl, supports 2-wire and 4-wire mode HDSL2/G.shdsl Frame Relay (or PPP) over IDSL w/interworking to ATM

STGR-LIM-T1-8 STGR-LIM-T1-24 STGR-LIM-E1-8 STGR-LIM-E1-24


12/20/2004

8-port T1 IMA 24-port T1 IMA 8-port T1 IMA 24-port T1 IMA


Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Line Protection Modules (LPMs)


In FS and FS+, LPMs occupy the seven slots to the left and to the right of the Truck Modules in the rear of the chassis In LS and RT, LPMs occupy the 5 or 7 slots to the left of the Control Modules, and alternate slots with LIMs LPMs provide over-voltage protections, relays for test access and LIM protection switching LPMs contain the connectors for the copper pair terminations

FS, FS+
Rear View

LS, RT

Line Protection Module Family:


STGR-LPM-48 STGR-LIM-48-RP STGR-LPM-72 STGR-LIM-72-RP STGRFS-LEM-2 48-port LPM with no relays (see not below) 48-port LPM with relays 72-port LPM with no relays 72-port LPM with relays 2-port 10/100 Line Ethernet Module used in conjunction with the T1000 LIM

Note: LPMs with no relays are for applications without LIM card protection switching Lucent Technologies - Proprietary
12/20/2004

Path Selector Module (PSM) and Copper Loop Test (CLT) Modules
Occupies a LPM slot corresponding to a spare LIM PSM function allows protection switching of failed LIM ports to spare LIM on a port-by-port basis CLT contains PSM function, but adds integrated loop test capability

FS, FS+
Rear View

LS, RT

PSM and CLT Family:


STGR-PSM STGR-PSM2 STGR-CLT STGR-CLTE Supports port-level redundancy for up to 48 ports simultaneously when used in conjunction with STGR-LPM(2)-nn-RP. Also provides access for an external CLT to a subscriber line. Supports port-level redundancy for up to 72 ports simultaneously when used in conjunction with STGR-LPM(2)-nn-RP. Also provides access for an external CLT to a subscriber line. Provides 48-port Path Selector Module plus an integrated test head for remotely controlled loop qualification and maintenance Provides 72-port Path Selector Module plus an enhanced integrated test head for remotely controlled loop qualification and maintenance
Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Circuit Pack Summary for FS/FS+


Line Interface Modules (14)

Dual PCMCIA Slots 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port Serial Craft Port

Rear View
Control Modules (2) Cooling Assembly

Front View

50 -pin connectors -48VDC Line Filters Alarm Module

Line Protection Modules (14) Trunk Modules (2)

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Stinger MRT
23 Model 19 Model

Stinger MRT Family:


MRT-AD-36S-SR-56K 23 MRT base unit: 36 ADSL ports w/Splitters and 56K modem MRT-TM-OC3-2 MRT-TM-DS3-2 MRT-TM-T1E1 MRT19-AD-48 MRT19-TM-OC3-2 MRT19-TM-DS3-2 MRT19-TM-T1E1 Dual-port OC-3c Trunk Module Dual-port DS3 Trunk Module T1/E1 Trunk Module (number of T1/E1 ports enabled and IMA via software option) 19 MRT base unit: 48 ADSL ports Dual-port OC-3c Trunk Module Dual-port DS3 Trunk Module T1/E1 Trunk Module (number of T1/E1 ports enabled and IMA via software option)

19 MRT with 36 SHDSL ports available March 2003 onwards


Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

DSLAM Redundancy Architecture


= STS-3c Serial Link (155 Mbits/sec) = Utopia2 16 bits at 50 MHz
Trunk Module 2:1 Trunk Module 2:1

Control Module

Control Module

LIM

LPM

PSM

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

LIM Port Redundancy via PSM

LIM

LPM

PSM

LIM

LIM (spare) Mid-plane Redundancy Path

LIM

LIM (spare)

LPM

PSM

LPM

PSM

12/20/2004

Normal Operation

To CLT

Redundant Operation To CLT

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Network

Trunk Module

Trunk-to-CPE direction
Switching Prioritized output queuing Explicit forward congestion indication Early packet discard Partial packet discard O, A & M cell filtering and insertion Explicit rate marking De-aggregation Prioritized output queuing Explicit forward congestion indication Early packet discard Peak cell rate shaping Frame or cell output AAL5 serialization

CPE-to-Trunk direction
Switching Weighted round-robin output queuing Explicit forward congestion indication Early packet discard Partial packet discard Peak cell rate shaping O, A & M cell filtering and insertion Explicit rate marking Aggregation Frame or cell input Policing Prioritized output queuing Explicit forward congestion indication Early packet discard Peak cell rate shaping

Control Module

Line Interface Module

Line Protection Module

CPE
12/20/2004

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

Functional Relationship Between DSLAM Modules

CPE

Line Protection Module

Line Interface Module Ripper Ripper

Switching & Control Module Magic

Trunk Module
Network

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary 12/20/2004

Stinger CR Deployment Scenarios


Pole Mount Strand Mount

Power Node Stinger FS+ w/ Optical LIM


FDI / RT Mount

Rural deployments Street cabinet, Pole mounted etc.. Price / Performance Improvement Two-fiber spans per Stinger Compact Remote - 15 km reach Options for remote or local powering
12/20/2004

Pedestal Mount

Lucent Technologies - Proprietary

CellPipe Portfolio
Residential ADSL annex A
OW N ble a l i ava

ATM CPE

CellPipe 20A-USB USB Bridge Modem (ADSL annex A) USB 1.1

CellPipe 20A-GX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex A) Ethernet

CellPipe 22A-GX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex A) Ethernet and USB 1.1

CellPipe 22A-EX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex A) 4 port Ethernet switch

CellPipe Portfolio
Residential ADSL annex B
OW N ble a l i ava

ATM CPE

CellPipe 20A-BX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex B) Ethernet

CellPipe 21A-BX Bridge (ADSL annex B) Ethernet

CellPipe 22A-BX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex B) Ethernet and USB 1.1

CellPipe 22A-FX Bridge/Router (ADSL annex B) 4 port Ethernet switch

CellPipe Portfolio
Business
lab i a av
Frame Relay CPE

O le N

ATM CPE

DSLPipe-HST-xx (SDSL)

ADSL
CellPipe 55A-GX High End Router+ VPN Gateway with extended Security and ISDN backup port (ADSL annex A) CellPipe 55A-BX High End Router + VPN Gateway with extended Security and ISDN backup port (ADSL annex B)

SHDSL
CellPipe 20H Bridge/Router (2-wire SHDSL) CellPipe 20H-4 Bridge/Router (4-wire SHDSL bonding) CellPipe 40H-CES CES Bridge/Router for T1/E1, LAN (SHDSL)