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BIG BOOK

(unofficial)

Prologue
Well, for those who are practicing for GRE, the BIG BOOK published by ETS are the only source available practice on some real GRE questions. But the problem is that those are questions administered in GRE 20 or more years ago. Since then the pattern and content of the questions has changed a lot (for example, the quants part got a lot harder). Here are some real GRE questions to practice with (courtesy of http://www.drrajus.com/forum/). These questions came between 2005-2010 at diferent times in GRE. If you want a good score in GRE you SHOULD practise every bit of it. But remember, just practising it won t give you anything. It is not likely that these questions will be reproduced exactly in the exam, but the patte rn, the skills tested is likely to be same. Especially for the verbal parts, I suggest you memorise every word associated with each questions. I recommend you to print this whole on paper and practise; and revise them before the exam. The answers of the verbal parts are absolutely correct, I checked all of them individually. The answer of the quants part is not given because I am not sure about all of them (use your merit and common sense, a good idea would be discussing with ur friends, as there could a lot of ostensible probable answers) GOOD LUCK.

ANOLOGIES
TEST -1 Section -A 8. CHAFF : WHEAT :: (A) spore : seed (B) nucleus : cell (C) sod : flower (D) shell : pecan (E) root : tooth 9. ARRAY : NUMBERS :: (A) body : skeleton (B) formation : soldiers (C) club : members (D) rank : insignia (E) illustration : graphs 10. MASK : FACE :: (A) pseudonym : name (B) caricature : likeness (C) forgery : imitation (D) disguise : detective (E) code : agent 11. INCORRIGIBLE : REFORMED :: (A) inscrutable : understood (B) infallible : corroborated (C) inferior : defeated (D) ingenious : copied (E) infamous : condemned 12. FILIBUSTER : LEGISLATION :: (A) restriction : zone (B) blockade : commerce (C) suspension : sentence (D) denial : accusation (E) prorogue : assembly 13. FROND : LEAF :: (A) larva : grass (B) wasteland : water (C) thicket : shrub (D) river : pond (E) boulder : rock 14. TINT : SUFFUSE :: (A) ponder : yearn (B) regret : undo (C) damp : quench (D) shroud : screen (E) amble : wander 15. MAGAZINE : PERIODICAL :: (A) newspaper : edition (B) mystery : fiction (C) volume : encyclopedia (D) chapter : book (E) article : journal 16. FRANK : SECRETIVENESS :: (A) honest : theft (B) transparent : light (C) free : autocracy (D) callow : maturity (E) confident : intrepidness

8. D

9. B

10. A

11. A

12. B

13. E

14. E

15. B

16. D

TEST -1 Section -B 8. SPLICE : ROPE :: (A) press : shirt (B) caulk : frame (C) weld : metal (D) plaster : wall (E) curl : hair

9. FANATIC : DEVOTED :: (A) prude : proper (B) skeptic : religious (C) cad : devious (D) gourmet : ravenous (E) coquette : graceful 10. CONFLUENCE : STREAMS :: (A) ridge : hills (B) railroad : tracks (C) junction : roads (D) curb : sidewalks (E) park : edges 11. SWAGGER : BRAVADO :: (A) chevron : sergeant (B) sword : bravery (C) salute : disrespect (D) caress : affection (E) sneeze : explosion 12. INDECOROUS : PROPRIETY :: (A) boorish : sensitivity (B) rancorous : hostility (C) stuffy : dignity (D) presumptuous : boldness (E) charismatic : loyalty 13. CAPRICIOUS : WHIM :: (A) conventional : innovation (B) objective : fact (C) satirical : benevolence (D) gloomy : optimism (E) opinionated : rudeness 14. SNOW : PRECIPITATION :: (A) lava : volcano (B) hurricane : cyclone (C) desert : drought (D) seed : germination (E) temperature : season 15. RECALCITRANT : AUTHORITY :: (A) implacable : conciliation (B) remorseful : recompense (C) indomitable : challenge (D) insubordinate : camaraderie (E) enthusiastic : opportunity 16. INKLING : INDICATION :: (A) apprentice : expert (B) theory : hypothesis (C) hunger : thirst (D) orientation : direction (E) lapse : error

8. C

9. A

10. C

11. D

12. A

13. B

14. B

15. A

16. E

TEST -2 Section -A 8. SMALL : MINUSCULE :: (A) yielding : spring (B) crucial : disastrous (C) moist : saturated (D) rectangular : square (E) central : local 9. MOLT : FEATHERS :: (A) shed : hair (B) decay : teeth (C) mildew : humidity (D) plane : shavings (E) cry : eyes 10. YOKEL : SOPHISTICATION :: (A) nomad : direction (B) huckster : salesmanship (C) extrovert : pragmatism (D) coward : courage (E) gambler : luck 11. POROUS : LlQUID :: (A) flimsy : material (B) transparent : light (C) flexible : plastic (D) malleable : shape (E) open-minded : opinion

12. IRK : ENRAGE :: (A) whisper : mumble (B) wait : anticipate (C) invite : entertain (D) soothe : calm (E) suggest : urge 13. COUNTERMAND : ORDER :: (A) trespass : property (B) criticize : judgment (C) renovate : improvement (D) accuse : punishment (E) revoke : license 14. FETID : SMELL :: (A) textured : touch (B) practical : miserliness (C) luxurious : money (D) ugly : appearance (E) anxious : excitement 15. VOLATILE : EVAPORATE :: (A) heavy : collapse (B) essential : generate (C) soluble : dissolve (D) absorbent : melt (E) nutritious : eat 16. CRESCENDO : SOUND :: (A) mute : tone (B) acceleration : tempo (C) syncopation : rhythm (D) wavelength : pitch (E) quantity : quality

8. C

9. A

10. D

11. B

12. E

13. E

14. D

15. C

16. B

TEST -2 Section -B 8. SYMPHONY : CONDUCTOR :: (A) novel : author (B) film : director (C) documentary : collaborator (D) musical : vocalist (E) play : critic 9. REMAINDER : SUBTRACTION :: (A) fulcrum : leverage (B) drip : pool (C) battle : warfare (D) residue : evaporation (E) credit : translation 10. SMUGGLER : IMPORT :: (A) lobbyist : convince (B) analyst : inform (C) embezzler : appropriate (D) theorist : postulate (E) witness : incriminate 11. REPRIEVE : PUNISHMENT :: (A) injunction : prohibition (B) evaluation : assessment (C) investigation : prosecution (D) dare : fight (E) moratorium : activity 12. SNUB : DISDAIN :: (A) forsake : desertion (B) condemn : exasperation (C) incense : tact (D) double-cross : disloyalty (E) lampoon : respect 13. SYNOPSIS : CONDENSED :: (A) summation : definitive (B) outline : intricate (C) prcis : thorough (D) appendix : supplementary (E) oration : redundant 14. FRIABLE : CRUMBLE :: (A) malleable : alter (B) fragile : fortify (C) immutable : change (D) moist : contaminate (E) resilient : injure

15. INTRACTABLE : MANAGE :: (A) compliant : appease (B) phlegmatic : provoke (C) inimical : antagonize (D) interpretive : construe (E) hesitant : pursue 16. STRIDENCY : SOUND :: (A) fluidity : liquid (B) graininess : texture (C) garishness : appearance (D) striation : color (E) aroma : odor

8. B

9. D

10. C

11. E

12. D

13. D

14. A

15. B

16. C

TEST -3 Section A 8. ILLUMINATE : DARKNESS :: (A) educate : ignorance (B) enlighten : scholarship (C) liberate : freedom (D) patronize : dignity (E) protest : oppression 9. INSTRUMENTALIST : ORCHESTRA :: (A) dancer : choreographer (B) actor : troupe (C) conductor : baton (D) singer : composition (E) director : play 10. BOWL : RECEPTACLE :: (A) painting : masterpiece (B) brick : mortar (C) tumbler : crystal (D) can : load (E) bicycle : vehicle 11. CAVERN : SPELUNKER :: (A) wood : carpenter (B) horse : jockey (C) machine : mechanic (D) star : astronomer (E) ocean : diver 12. LIKEN : SIMILARITY :: (A) classify : hierarchy (B) hesitate : reluctance (C) discriminate : difference (D) argue : debate (E) vacillate : decision 13. INSTIGATOR : INCITE :: (A) accomplice : threaten (B) adjudicator : quarrel (C) employee : strike (D) bully : browbeat (E) lawyer : enact 14. GLACIAL : COLD :: (A) opaque : lucid (B) viscid : liquid (C) massive : lengthy (D) profound : deep (E) misshapen : flexible 15. NEPOTISM : RELATIVE :: (A) cronyism : friend (B) elitism : leader (C) narcissism : self (D) recidivism : criminal (E) jingoism : patriot 16. LAW : CRIMINALITY :: (A) ritual : orthodoxy (B) leadership : submission (C) consensus : factionalism (D) lesson : falsehood (E) rehabilitation : vacillation

8. A

9. B

10. E

11. D

12. C

13. D

14. D

15. A

16. D

TEST -3 Section B 8. ORATION : HEARD :: (A) epic : revised (B) ballet : appreciated (C) poem : analyzed (D) movie : directed (E) novel : read 9. OBSERVATORY : ASTRONOMY :: (A) purgatory : remuneration (B) refectory : religion (C) dormitory : university (D) conservatory : music (E) armory : militia 10. PRODIGY : PERSON :: (A) pagan : iconoclast (B) beacon : shadow (C) maniac : obsession (D) traitor : confidence (E) miracle : occurrence 11. MOIST : SODDEN :: (A) warm : inviting (B) surprised : astonished (C) magical : sentimental (D) hopeless : bereft (E) soft : euphonious 12. STATUE : SCULPTURE :: (A) engraving : mural (B) novel : character (C) ode : poem (D) movement : symphony (E) script : play 13. ANNOYING : GADFLY :: (A) brave : underdog (B) conniving : killjoy (C) insipid : bungler (D) rude : churl (E) vicious : manipulator 14. DOSE : MEDICINE :: (A) current : river (B) electricity : shock (C) tremor : earthquake (D) sentence : punishment (E) tempo : music 15. DINGY : GLISTEN :: (A) slippery : adhere (B) coarse : polish (C) sharp : hone (D) shallow : overflow (E) savory : taste 16 MISCALCULATION : JUDGMENT :: (A) breach : fortification (B) fumble : location (C) gaffe : decorum (D) exaggeration : statement (E) default : loan

8. E

9. D

10. E

11. B

12. C

13. D

14. D

15. A

16. C

TEST -4 Section A 8. JOG : EXERCISE :: (A) immunize : disease (B) barter : trade (C) borrow : bank (D) punish : law (E) vote : candidate 9. STERILE : BACTERIA :: (A) moldy : fungus (B) mendacious : lies (C) desiccated : thirst (D) colorless : rainbow (E) impeccable : flaws 10. STOKE : FUEL :: (A) irrigate : water (B) simulate : imitation (C) radiate : steam (D) choke : obstacle (E) propel : force

11. ANECDOTE : AMUSEMENT :: (A) parable : brevity (B) lecture : instruction (C) harangue : complacency (D) caption : illustration (E) slogan : repetition 12. PORTRAIT : PAINTING:: (A) ballet : music (B) meter : poetry (C) solo : ensemble (D) biography : history (E) documentary : event 13. VENERABLE : REVERENCE :: (A) fallible : correction (B) viable : performance (C) despicable : scorn (D) credible : honor (E) amiable : reconciliation 14. DOLDRUMS : ENERGY :: (A) joy : euphoria (B) rehabilitation : discipline (C) hunger : thirst (D) depravity : virtue (E) grief : hope 15. DISINTERESTED : PARTISANSHIP :: (A) meticulous : preservation (B) straightforward : argument (C) adroit : fatigue (D) venal : probity (E) efficient : dispatch 16. MERCENARY : SOLDIER :: (A) amateur : artist (B) apprentice : student (C) pedant : teacher (D) demagogue : leader (E) hack : writer

8. B

9. E

10. A

11. B

12. D

13. C

14. D

15. D

16. E

TEST -4 Section B 8. MARSH : SODDEN :: (A) creek : wide (B) laughter : administration (C) desert : arid (D) question : inaudible (E) fence : short 9. GRIPE : DISCONTENT :: (A) learn : knowledge (B) praise : admiration (C) depart : journey (D) conspire : pact (E) react : response 10. DIRECTOR : SCRIPT :: (A) politician : document (B) conductor: score (C) photographer : picture (D) choreographer : dance (E) historian : genealogy 11. OPPORTUNE : CONVENIENCE :: (A) ineffable : substance (B) impenetrable : durability (C) impermanent : transience (D) excessive : superficiality (E) remediable : effort 12. CIRCULAR : ASYMMETRICAL :: (A) protean : rigid (B) prior : unfinished (C) scarce : withheld (D) unique : rare (E) imminent : impending 13. OPERA : ARIA :: (A) symphony : coda (B) play : monologue (C) concert : encore (D) movie : credits (E) lecture : oration

14. COMMAND : ENTREATY :: (A) threat : antagonism (B) reproach : fault (C) spat : quarrel (D) snare : entrapment (E) goad : enticement 15. GRANDSTAND : IMPRESS :: (A) patronize : alienate (B) hedge : reveal (C) equivocate : deceive (D) presume : disprove (E) upbraid : dislike 16. REPROVE : REPRIMAND :: (A) blame : censure (B) control : contain (C) persuade : convince (D) thwart : confront (E) inconvenience : effect

8. C

9. B

10. B

11. C

12. A

13. B

14. E

15. C

16. A

TEST -5 Section A 8. FOLDER : PAPERS :: (A) drawer : clothing (B) recipe : ingredients (C) cubicle : partitions (D) suitcase : luggage (E) box : lid 9. PROSE : PARAGRAPH :: (A) drama : role (B) message : code (C) fiction : narrator (D) poetry : stanza (E) epic : lyric 10. SPLINT : IMMOBILIZE :: (A) duct : convey (B) bolt : twist (C) lid : screw (D) canopy : expose (E) ruler : fit 11. TACKINESS : ADHESIVE :: (A) temperature : thermometer (B) porosity : rock (C) opacity : solution (D) propulsion : sled (E) sharpness : scalpel 12. SHIFTLESS : AMBITION :: (A) ingenuous : guile (B) inert : composure (C) redundant : repetition (D) comic : laughter (E) methodical : detail 13. HISS : SIBILANT :: (A) staccato : regular (B) moan : stressful (C) yell : sensible (D) drone : monotonous (E) screech : nonverbal 14. FANATIC :ADMIRER :: (A) patient : doctor (B) opponent : challenger (C) connoisseur : enthusiast (D) detractor : advocate (E) zealot : adherent 15. FLUENT : GLIB :: (A) meticulous : finicky (B) dedicated : steadfast (C) humorous : wry (D) miserly : altruistic (E) wise : impartial 16. COVETOUS : DESIRE :: (A) reticent : confide (B) prodigal : spend (C) stoical : rage (D) fretful : despair (E) tolerant : judge

8. A

9. D

10. A

11. E

12. A

13. D

14. E

15. A

16. B

TEST -5 Section B 8. INSECT : PESTICIDE :: (A) antiseptic : germicide (B) preservative : fungicide (C) plant : herbicide (D) blood : coagulant (E) skin : astringent 9. FASCINATION : INTEREST :: (A) laughter : humor (B) adoration : fondness (C) loyalty : admiration (D) innocence : ignorance (E) violence : disaffection 10. MOSAIC : CERAMIC :: (A) sculpture : gallery (B) song : note (C) painting : brush (D) patchwork : cloth (E) seam : stitch 11. FOOT : PERAMBULATE :: (A) nose : pry (B) archive : accumulate (C) text : cite (D) door : shut (E) eye : observe 12. AGRARIAN : FARMING :: (A) urban : society (B) mercantile : trade (C) nautical : sailor (D) pastoral : pasture (E) global : region 13. GULLIBLE : CHICANERY :: (A) servile : domination (B) provincial : cosmopolitanism (C) adventurous : timidity (D) hypochondriacal : infection (E) placid : deliberation 14. LIST : DISCOGRAPHY :: (A) payment : receipt (B) blood : corpuscle (C) tool : hoe (D) music : note (E) amphibian : mammal 15. ALLOY : PURITY :: (A) standardize : conformity (B) compute : accuracy (C) variegate : diversity (D) thin : density (E) experiment : superiority 16. GRAMMAR : LANGUAGE :: (A) pitch : music (B) protocol : conduct (C) stanza : poetry (D) revision : speech (E) oratory : ceremony

8. C

9. B

10. D

11. E

12. B

13. A

14. C

15. D

16. B

TEST -6 Section A 8. SILVER : TARNISH :: (A) gold : burnish (B) steel : forge (C) iron : rust (D) lead : cast (E) tin : shear 9. DISLIKE : LOATHING :: (A) appreciation : gratification (B) hunger : appetite (C) void : dearth (D) pleasure : bliss (E) pain : ache 10. CRAVEN : HEROIC :: (A) unruly : energetic (B) listless : attractive (C) volatile : constant (D) deft : trifling (E) awkward : amusing

11. FILLY : HORSE :: (A) antennae : butterfly (B) pullet : chicken (C) gaggle : goose (D) duck : drake (E) wasp : bee 12. PITHINESS : APHORISM :: (A) craft : art (B) detail : sketch (C) illusion : story (D) exaggeration : caricature (E) sophistication : farce 13. EPHEMERAL : ENDURING :: (A) infirm : healing (B) insensitive : cooperating (C) inanimate : living (D) interminable : continuing (E) ineffectual : proceeding 14. POSTURER : UNAFFECTED :: (A) brat : insolent (B) hypocrite : perceptive (C) grouch : respected (D) bigot : tolerant (E) rogue : empathetic 15. FACETIOUS : SPEECH :: (A) precocious : learning (B) unbecoming : color (C) exemplary : conduct (D) craven : timidity (E) antic : behavior 16. VAGARY : PREDICT :: (A) quotation : misdirect (B) investigation : confirm (C) stamina : deplete (D) turbulence : upset (E) impossibility : execute

8. C

9. D

10. C

11. B

12. D

13. C

14. D

15. E

16. E

TEST -6 Section B 8. HILL : MOUNTAIN :: (A) grass : rocks (B) autumn : winter (C) creek : river (D) star : sun (E) cliff : slope 9. AERATE : OXYGEN :: (A) eclipse : light (B) desiccate : moisture (C) precipitate : additive (D) hydrate : water (E) striate : texture 10. ORCHESTRA : MUSICIAN :: (A) cube : side (B) kilometer : meter (C) sonnet : poem (D) biped : foot (E) pack : wolf 11. EQUIVOCATION : MISLEADING :: (A) mitigation : severe (B) advice : peremptory (C) bromide : hackneyed (D) precept : obedient (E) explanation : unintelligible 12. CENSORSHIP : COMMUNICATION :: (A) propaganda : ideology (B) preservative : decay (C) revision : accuracy (D) rest : atrophy (E) exercise : fitness 13. BUS : PASSENGERS :: (A) flock : birds (B) tanker : liquid (C) envelope : letter (D) bin : coal (E) automobile : gasoline

14. BALLAD : STANZA :: (A) novel : chapter (B) poem : meter (C) play : dialogue (D) movie : script (E) photograph : caption 15. DISABUSE : FALLACY :: (A) cure : disease (B) persevere : dereliction (C) belittle : imperfection (D) discredit : reputation (E) discern : discrimination 16. BLANDISHMENT : CAJOLE :: (A) prediction : convince (B) obstacle : impede (C) embellishment : praise (D) deficiency : compensate (E) compliment : exaggerate

8. C

9. D

10. E

11. C

12. B

13. B

14. A

15. A

16. B

TEST -7 Section A 8. ELEGIAC : SORROW :: (A) polemical : resolution (B) fictional : humor (C) devotional : reverence (D) didactic : inspiration (E) library : emotion 9. ROSTRUM : ORATOR :: (A) stage : audience (B) bench : judge (C) shelf : clerk (D) municipality : citizen (E) crosswalk : pedestrian 10. MISUNDERSTOOD : CLARIFY :: (A) fanatical : espouse (B) popular : renounce (C) fantastic : shock (D) erroneous : retract (E) conspicuous : flaunt 11. REFINERY : PETROLEUM :: (A) mill : grain (B) mine : ore (C) warehouse : merchandise (D) generator : electricity (E) forest : lumber 12. TEDIOUS : ENERGY :: (A) avaricious : satisfaction (B) fractious : irritation (C) disturbing : composure (D) improbable : ambition (E) informed : intelligence 13. GRACEFUL : MOVEMENT :: (A) euphonious : sound (B) forbidding : countenance (C) ephemeral : duration (D) melodramatic : emotion (E) vibrant : color 14. BRAVURA : PERFORMANCE :: (A) extravagant : expenditure (B) elaborate : oration (C) foreseeable : outcome (D) thorough : analysis (E) resplendent : appearance 15. BADGER : BOTHER :: (A) persecute : injure (B) haunt : remember (C) belabor : mention (D) quibble : argue (E) censure : evaluate 16. CONGRUENT : DIMENSIONS :: (A) convenient : time (B) coordinate : axis (C) conglomerate : parts (D) coincident : chance (E) coeval : age

8. C

9. B

10. D

11. A

12. C

13. A

14. E

15. C

16. E

TEST -7 Section B 8. OBSTRUCT : PROGRESS :: (A) reveal : information (B) polish : illumination (C) implicate : guilt (D) inspire : artistry (E) stunt : growth 9. INTERVIEW : APPLICANT :: (A) recital : pianist (B) exercise : athlete (C) audition : actor (D) manuscript : writer (E) flight plan : pilot 10. COMBUSTIBLE : IGNITE :: (A) impermeable : saturate (B) impenetrable : pierce (C) malleable : shape (D) rigid : stretch (E) sterile : extract 11. SLACKEN : TENSION :: (A) rarefy : expansion (B) blunt : sharpness (C) obscure : cloudiness (D) quicken : animation (E) oscillate : rotation 12. BIGOT : TOLERANCE :: (A) scoundrel : misdeed (B) liar : honesty (C) brat : annoyance (D) outcast : respect (E) snitch : information 13. IMPROVEMENTS : MASTERY :: (A) efforts : exertion (B) savings : wealth (C) performance : talent (D) practice : intention (E) diversification : proficiency 14. DILETTANTE : SUPERFICIALITY :: (A) partisan : bias (B) crusader : passivity (C) libertarian : authority (D) champion : restlessness (E) sage : argumentativeness 15. WINNOW : CHAFF :: (A) ferment : alcohol (B) skim : cream (C) pare : fruit (D) refine : oil (E) filter : impurities 16. STANZA : LINE :: (A) essay : theme (B) scene : monologue (C) play : vignette (D) volume : issue (E) concert : program

8. E

9. C

10. C

11. B

12. B

13. B

14. A

15. E

16. D

TEST -8 Section A 8. DIVERGE : APART :: (A) traverse : across (B) suspend :around (C) reverse : beyond (D) repose : beside (E) involve : among 9. ATROCIOUS : BAD :: (A) excessive : adequate (B) momentous : important (C) unavailing : helpful (D) contagious : diseased (E) nominal : satisfactory

10. PATRONIZE : CONDESCENSION :: (A) exasperate : anger (B) deride : mockery (C) compensate : apology (D) hurry : decision (E) encroach : fearlessness 11. FANG : TOOTH :: (A) gum : mouth (B) elbow : arm (C) bank : river (D) finger : digit (E) summit : mountain 12. ANALGESIC : PAIN :: (A) sedative : sleep (B) stimulant : mood (C) antiseptic : odor (D) anesthetic : sensation (E) ointment : skin 13. IMPECCABLE : FLAW :: (A) foreseeable : outcome (B) mundane : substance (C) dishonorable : blemish (D) ingenuous : guile (E) portentous : omen 14. POLEMIC : DISPUTATIOUS :: (A) anachronism : chronological (B) vernacular : unpretentious (C) invective : abusive (D) platitude : insightful (E) eulogy : unrealistic 15. EMBARRASS: SHAME :: (A) coax : reluctance (B) sleep : fatigue (C) doubt : uncertainty (D) belittle : condescension (E) console : comfort 16. ETCH : CORROSIVE :: (A) shrink : diminutive (B) destroy : worthless (C) glue : adhesive (D) sculpt : malleable (E) polish : glossy

8. A

9. B

10. B

11. D

12. D

13. D

14. C

15. E

16. C

TEST -8 Section B 8. TREE : FORESTRY :: (A) tractor : agriculture (B) experiment : laboratory (C) fuel : combustion (D) flower : horticulture (E) generator : electricity 9. COMMAND : REQUEST :: (A) presume : inquire (B) recommend : propose (C) summon : invite (D) refuse : rebel (E) authorize : permit 10. PESTLE : GRIND :: (A) whetstone : sharpen (B) balloon : float (C) mill : turn (D) hinge : fasten (E) switch : conduct 11. ILLITERACY : EDUCATION :: (A) bureaucracy : clarification (B) oppression : agreement (C) vagrancy : travel (D) inequity : redistribution (E) inclement : evasion

12. REVERENCE : RESPECT :: (A) resiliency : vitality (B) appreciation : dependency (C) avidity : enthusiasm (D) imagination : creativity (E) audacity : sentiment 13. APOSTROPHES : WORD :: (A) letters : alphabet (B) verbs : syntax (C) ellipses : sentence (D) comma : punctuation (E) paragraphs : essay 14. EXAGGERATION : CARICATURE :: (A) craft : art (B) detail : sketch (C) illusion : story (D) brevity : epigram (E) sophistication : farce 15. MALLEABLE : SHAPE :: (A) apathetic : emotion (B) irresolution : opinion (C) demonstrable : evidence (D) irredeemable : value (E) gustatory : taste 16. BOLSTER : SUPPORT :: (A) axis : revolve (B) spackle : paint (C) leakage : caulk (D) heat : insulate (E) tackle: hoist

8. D

9. C

10. A

11. D

12. C

13. C

14. D

15. B

16. E

TEST -9 Section A 8. CATASTROPHE : MISHAP :: (A) prediction : recollection (B) contest : recognition (C) humiliation : embarrassment (D) reconciliation : solution (E) hurdle : challenge 9. SONNET : POET :: (A) stage : actor (B) orchestra : conductor (C) music : dancer (D) canvas : painter (E) symphony : composer 10. LOQUACIOUS : SUCCINCT :: (A) placid: indolent (B) vivacious : cheerful (C) vulgar : offensive (D) pretentious : sympathetic (E) adroit : ungainly 11. DEPORTATION : COUNTRY :: (A) evacuation : shelter (B) abdication : throne (C) extradition : court (D) eviction : dwelling (E) debarkation : destination 12. MAELSTROM : TURBULENT :: (A) stricture : imperative (B) mirage : illusory (C) antique : rare (D) myth : authentic (E) verdict : fair 13. ABSTEMIOUS : INDULGE :: (A) affectionate : embrace (B) austere : decorate (C) articulate : preach (D) argumentative : harangue (E) affable : jest 14. BLUSTERING : SPEAK :: (A) grimacing : smile (B) blinking : stare (C) slouching : sit (D) jeering : laugh (E) swaggering : walk

15. SOLACE : GRIEF :: (A) rebuke : mistake (B) mortification : passion (C) encouragement : confidence (D) justification : action (E) pacification : anger 16. INDELIBLE : FORGET :: (A) lucid : comprehend (B) astounding : expect (C) inconsequential : reduce (D) incorrigible : agree (E) fearsome : avoid

8. C

9. E

10. E

11. D

12. B

13. B

14. E

15. E

16. B

TEST -9 Section B 8. TERROR : FEAR :: (A) craving : desire (B) inclination : liking (C) sympathy : empathy (D) urgency : lack (E) alibi : excuse 9. FEED : HUNGER :: (A) reassure : uneasiness (B) penetrate : inclusion (C) abandon : desolation (D) transfer : location (E) fertilize : growth 10. PESTLE : GRIND :: (A) scissors : sharpen (B) spice : flavor (C) spoon : stir (D) hammer : swing (E) fan : rotate 11. DISSEMBLE : HONESTY :: (A) smile : amiability (B) snub : politeness (C) disagree : error (D) flee : furtiveness (E) elate : exuberance 12. SYNOPSIS : CONCISENESS :: (A) distillate : purity (B) mutation : viability (C) replication : precedence (D) illusion : quickness (E) icon : charity 13. MEDIATION : COMPROMISE :: (A) exclamation : remark (B) approbation : acclaim (C) election : legislation (D) prosecution : conviction (E) conclusion : evaluation 14. DEMOGRAPHY : POPULATION :: (A) agronomy : farm (B) astronomy : planets (C) chemistry : heat (D) meteorology : weather (E) genetics : adaption 15. EQUIVOCATION : TRUTH :: (A) rhetoric : persuasion (B) obfuscation : clarity (C) metaphor :description (D) repetition : boredom (E) conciliation : appeasement 16. CRAVEN : ADMIRABLE :: (A) unruly : energetic (B) listless : attractive (C) deft : awkward (D) trifling : amusing (E) volatile : passionate

8. A

9. A

10. C

11. B

12. A

13. D

14. D

15. B

16. C

TEST -10 Section A 8. FLAG : COUNTRY :: (A) dialect : region (B) handshake : greeting (C) trademark : company (D) patent : product (E) souvenir : vacation 9. IRON : METAL :: (A) granite : rock (B) fragment : block (C) mine : ore (D) shale : petroleum (E) glacier : mountain 10. STENCIL : LETTERING :: (A) skillet : heating (B) pattern : sewing (C) plow : farming (D) music : singing (E) hammer : building 11. SWILL : SIP :: (A) orate : listen (B) gobble : nibble (C) strut : walk (D) wink : glance (E) say : whisper 12. GLADE : FOREST :: (A) river : bank (B) summit : valley (C) shore : lake (D) oasis : desert (E) field : furrow 13. EXULT : SATISFACTION :: (A) crave : longing (B) banter : conversation (C) emote : affectation (D) venture : rashness (E) bore : weariness 14. INDUSTRIOUSNESS : ACTIVITY :: (A) kindliness : animosity (B) anxiousness : apathy (C) boldness : strength (D) purposefulness : enthusiasm (E) fastidiousness : selectivity 15. TRUCULENT : GENTLENESS :: (A) gullible : belief (B) fervent : zeal (C) forthright : trust (D) gluttonous : appetite (E) unregenerate : remorse 16. STRIDENCY : SOUND :: (A) fluidity : liquid (B) graininess : texture (C) garishness : appearance (D) variegation : color (E) aroma : odor

8. C

9. A

10. B

11. B

12. D

13. A

14. E

15. E

16. C

TEST -10 Section B 8. BALLAST : STABILITY :: (A) girder : support (B) camouflage : location (C) buoy : channel (D) hinge : door (E) staircase : banister 9. SMUGGLER : TARIFF :: (A) embezzler : funds (B) burglar : entry (C) stowaway : fare (D) impersonator : credentials (E) shoplifter : prosecution 10. LIMBER : FLEXIBILITY :: (A) mutable : uniformity (B) spindly : frailty (C) jagged : regularity (D) decrepit : vitality (E) truncated : continuity

11. FOIBLE : FLAW :: (A) example : generalization (B) quibble : objection (C) fever : delirium (D) dinner : banquet (E) agreement : treaty 12. EXTRAVAGANCE : EXPENDITURE :: (A) bias : judgment (B) exaggeration : deception (C) inducement : invitation (D) loquaciousness : talk (E) distortion : paraphrase 13. SEQUESTER : SECLUSION :: (A) shun : infamy (B) persuade : coercion (C) endow : gratitude (D) admonish : instruction (E) endanger : jeopardy 14. OBSEQUIOUS : FAWN :: (A) unsuccessful : achieve (B) conscientious : shirk (C) compliant : yield (D) staid : laugh (E) amenable : argue 15. ELLIPSIS : WORD :: (A) apostrophe : letter (B) period : sentence (C) asterisk : footnote (D) noun : adjective (E) syllable : vowel 16. TACITURN : CHATTER :: (A) covert : detect (B) profligate : exhaust (C) secretive : examine (D) insufferable : tolerate (E) magnanimous : begrudge

8. A

9. C

10. B

11. B

12. D

13. E

14. C

15. A

16. E

TEST -11 Section A 8. SLIPPERY : ELUDE :: (A) dangerous : distract (B) hidden : alarm (C) temporary : erase (D) alluring : entice (E) overwrought : exclaim 9. RAINCOAT : RAIN :: (A) wages : inflation (B) prevention : cure (C) prediction : weather (D) insurance : loss (E) work : unemployment 10. DECIPHER : HIEROGLYPH :: (A) transcribe : recording (B) separate : component (C) transmute : metal (D) break : code (E) edit : text 11. FROND : FERN :: (A) pod : weed (B) needle : pine (C) thorn : rose (D) bulb : lily (E) root : potato 12. PILLORY : RIDICULE :: (A) badge : challenge (B) guillotine : execute (C) rope : chastise (D) knife : frighten (E) cell : blame 13. DITTY : ORATORIO :: (A) satire : parody (B) libretto : opera (C) anecdote : novel (D) fresco : panorama (E) sonnet : madrigal

14. OLFACTION : ODOR :: (A) classification : object (B) articulation : sound (C) predilection : observation (D) vision : detection (E) gustation : flavor 15. HUBRIS : PRIDE :: (A) flattery : praise (B) revenge : jealousy (C) whim : humor (D) awe : prestige (E) dread : courage 16. FRIEZE: BUILDING :: (A) illumination: manuscript (B) roof : foundation (C) shading : drawing (D) column : pillar (E) melody : rhythm

8. D

9. D

10. D

11. B

12. B

13. C

14. E

15. A

16. A

TEST -11 Section B 8. RIPEN : MATURITY :: (A) harden : solidity (B) soften : rigidity (C) wither : humidity (D) specify : entirety (E) identify : category 9. CROWD : PEOPLE :: (A) library : books (B) field : hay (C) school : fish (D) theater : plays (E) office : desks 10. ENUNCIATE : MUMBLING :: (A) draw : depicting (B) run : falling (C) organize : unsettling (D) etch : deteriorating (E) clarify : confusing 11. LAW : JUDGMENT :: (A) jury : verdict (B) data : collection (C) information : decision (D) news : message (E) sample : population 12. MACABRE : SHUDDER :: (A) hilarious : laugh (B) vain : preen (C) nostalgic : cry (D) tedious : smirk (E) timid : dare 13. IMPRESARIO : ENTERTAINMENT :: (A) pugilist : peace (B) magnate : diplomacy (C) usher : concert (D) athlete : contest (E) broker : trade 14. MOTIVE : DEED :: (A) goal : need (B) means : method (C) regret : retribution (D) doubt : question (E) hope : fulfillment 15. DIARY : BIOGRAPHER :: (A) cards : dealer (B) scripture : theologian (C) notebook : stenographer (D) caption : cartoonist (E) primer : teacher 16. CORONA : SUN :: (A) wheel : axle (B) spark : flame (C) kernel : corn (D) comet : tail (E) atmosphere : planet

8. A

9. C

10. E

11. C

12. A

13. E

14. D

15. B

16. E

TEST -12 Section 8. DISPERSE : RECONVENE :: (A) believe : persuade (B) explain : understand (C) tell : know (D) dismiss : reinstate (E) increase : recombine 9. AUTOBIOGRAPHY : REMINISCE :: (A) satire : dally (B) manual : confirm (C) will : recant (D) eulogy : praise (E) testimony : admonish 10. BACTERIUM : COLONY :: (A) army : invasion (B) citizen : nation (C) resident : apartment (D) furniture : house (E) wheel : automobile 11. LARDER : FOOD :: (A) depository : storage (B) terminal : aircraft (C) garage : mechanics (D) armory : munitions (E) factory : tools 12. TONIC : STIMULATE :: (A) sedative : invigorate (B) placebo : inculcate (C) antidote : poison (D) toxin : palliate (E) analgesic : deaden 13. ILLUSION : PERCEPTION :: (A) lapse : miscalculation (B) justice : impartiality (C) cunning : truth (D) gaffe : judgment (E) forcefulness : coercion 14. AMULET : EVIL :: (A) helmet : injury (B) antibiotic : health (C) garment : modesty (D) incentive : discouragement (E) diversion : worry 15. CIRCUMSPECT : PRUDENCE :: (A) penurious : generosity (B) brusque : spite (C) urbane : polish (D) stalwart : indecision (E) affected : presence 16. TACITURN : CHATTER :: (A) covert : detect (B) dissolute : exhaust (C) secretive : examine (D) insufferable : tolerate (E) magnanimous : begrudge

8. D

9. D

10. B

11. D

12. E

13. D

14. A

15. C

16. E

TEST -13 Section-A 8. INDECIPHERABLE : DECODED :: (A) indecisive : advised (B) insensitive : criticized (C) unlawful : apprehended (D) unimaginative : stimulated (E) unmanageable : controlled 9. TWIG : LIMB :: (A) microbe : slide (B) galaxy : star (C) doggerel : poetry (D) plant : root (E) brook : river 10. APATHETIC : EMOTION : : (A) curious : self-control (B) chary : caution (C) imprudent : discretion (D) charming : affectation (E) garrulous : patience

11. OBSERVE : SCRUTINIZE :: (A) sing : harmonize (B) question : grill (C) glance : gape (D) walk : stroll (E) speak : whisper 12. GRATING : SOUND :: (A) dysfunctional : design (B) fetid : smell (C) piquant : flavor (D) asymmetrical : shape (E) numb : sensation 13. HEDONISTIC : PLEASURE :: (A) narcissistic : self (B) aesthetic : love (C) laconic : words (D) democratic : justice (E) pragmatic : intellect 14. TRUMPET : HORN :: (A) note : scale (B) pedal : piano (C) bow : violin (D) tambourine : drum (E) instrument : orchestra 15. SYCOPHANT : FLATTERY :: (A) extortionist : intimidation (B) champion : dispiritedness (C) arsonist : retribution (D) sociopath : nonconformity (E) intellectual : speciousness 16. EPITOMIZE : BREVITY :: (A) propose : agreement (B) bicker : seriousness (C) tremble : anxiety (D) embellish : ornamentation (E) store : surplus

8. E

9. E

10. C

11. B

12. B

13. A

14. D

15. A

16. D

TEST -13 Section-B 8. IMPECCABLE : FAULT :: (A) unalloyed : purity (B) unblemished : imperfection (C) precise : conformity (D) meticulous : ornamentation (E) ostentatious : excess 9. DISJOINTED : COHERENCE :: (A) nondescript : clarity (B) banal : originality (C) uniform : consistency (D) tenable : credibility (E) paradoxical : duality 10. WAIT : LURK :: (A) speak : stutter (B) save : hoard (C) walk : crawl (D) risk : hedge (E) discover : expose 11. OPACITY : LIGHT :: (A) incombustibility : powder (B) stability : pendulum (C) impermeability : fluid (D) brittleness : sponge (E) density : stone 12. THEATER : PERFORMANCE :: (A) kitchen : food (B) movie : acting (C) market : commerce (D) raft : swimming (E) family : outing 13. LUSTROUS : POLISH :: (A) pure : refine (B) transparent : obscure (C) iridescent : paint (D) precise : embellish (E) stinking : smell

14. REGIMEN : HEALTH :: (A) budget : solvency (B) prescription : medicine (C) agenda : priority (D) roster : personnel (E) index : content 15. COLLAPSE : VOLUME :: (A) ventilate : breathing (B) irrigate : torrent (C) attenuate : thickness (D) initiate : climax (E) quarantine : disease 16. ASCETIC : LUXURY :: (A) pauper : wealth (B) prisoner : liberty (C) beggar : food (D) teetotaler : alcohol (E) novice : experience

8. B

9. B

10. B

11. C

12. C

13. A

14. A

15. C

16. D

TEST -14 Section-A 8. TRIPOD : CAMERA :: (A) scaffolding : ceiling (B) prop : set (C) easel : canvas (D) projector : film (E) frame : photograph 9. AQUATIC : WATER :: (A) cumulus : clouds (B) inorganic : elements (C) variegated : leaves (D) rural : soil (E) arboreal : trees 10. EMOLLIENT : SUPPLENESS :: (A) unguent : elasticity (B) precipitant : absorption (C) additive : fusion (D) desiccant : dryness (E) retardant : permeability 11. DRAW : DOODLE :: (A) talk : whisper (B) travel : ramble (C) run : walk (D) calculate : add (E) eat : gobble 12. CONSPICUOUS : SEE :: (A) repulsive : forget (B) prohibited : discount (C) deceptive : delude (D) impetuous : disregard (E) transparent : understand 13. IMMATURE : DEVELOPED :: (A) accessible : exposed (B) theoretical : conceived (C) tangible : identified (D) irregular : classified (E) incipient : realized 14. PERSPICACITY : ACUTE :: (A) adaptability : prescient (B) decorum : complacent (C) caprice : whimsical (D) discretion : literal (E) ignorance : pedantic 15. PLAYFUL : BANTER :: (A) animated : originality (B) exaggerated : hyperbole (C) insidious : effrontery (D) pompous : irrationality (E) taciturn : solemnity 16. QUARANTINE : CONTAGION :: (A) blockage : obstacle (B) strike : concession (C) embargo : commerce (D) vaccination : inoculation (E) prison : reform

8. C

9. E

10. D

11. B

12. E

13. E

14. C

15. B

16. C

TEST -14 Section-B 8. CHUCKLE : LAUGHING :: (A) uproar : shouting (B) whisper : speaking (C) hum : whistling (D) lecture : conversing (E) murmur : mimicking 9. PARAGRAPH : ESSAY :: (A) object : verb (B) phrase : preposition (C) interjection : parenthesis (D) clause : sentence (E) colloquialism : expression 10. STUPOR : ALERT :: (A) rebellion : defiant (B) despair : hopeful (C) expectation : unfulfilled (D) circumspection : careful (E) ennui : listless 11. PAEAN : JOY :: (A) dirge : grief (B) oratory : persuasion (C) aria : opera (D) chant : choir (E) lecture : instruction 12. RENEGADE : ALLEGIANCE :: (A) revolutionary : reform (B) aesthete : discernment (C) apostate : faith (D) politician : challenge (E) criminal : imprisonment 13. DEVOTED : ZEALOUS :: (A) affectionate : demonstrative (B) animated : lively (C) rabid : extreme (D) objective : indifferent (E) careful : fastidious 14. VESTIGE : REMAINDER :: (A) figurine : statue (B) knife : cutlery (C) hub : wheel (D) angle : slope (E) inventory : goods 15. EPHEMERAL : ENDURE :: (A) insensitive : cooperate (B) infirm : react (C) ineffectual : proceed (D) inelastic : stretch (E) inflammable : ignite 16. MISDEMEANOR : CRIME :: (A) interview : conversation (B) lapse : error (C) oath : promise (D) rebuke : criticism (E) vendetta : feud

8. B

9. D

10. B

11. A

12. C

13. E

14. A

15. D

16. B

TEST -15 Section-A 8. EARPLUG : NOISE :: (A) saw : wood (B) detonation : explosion (C) clothes : covering (D) liquid : flask (E) shield : impact 9. REVISE : MANUSCRIPT :: (A) retouch : picture (B) replicate : experiment (C) repair : hammer (D) replace : book (E) restore : masterpiece

10. DAREDEVIL : AUDACITY:: (A) malcontent : dissatisfaction (B) perfectionist : patience (C) cynic : indiscretion (D) melancholic : bitterness (E) hedonist : ambition 11. CALCIUM : MINERAL :: (A) sugar : carbohydrate (B) salt : solution (C) enzyme : food (D) milk : cheese (E) calorie : diet 12. DIRGE : GRIEF :: (A) diatribe : uneasiness (B) parody : cruelty (C) paean : praise (D) testimonial : veracity (E) anthem : seriousness 13. ABANDON : INHIBITION :: (A) ascendancy : effort (B) prickliness : sensation (C) surrender : resignation (D) reversal : instigation (E) tranquility : agitation 14. INAUGURATION : OFFICIAL :: (A) instruction : lecturer (B) election : politician (C) pilgrimage : devotee (D) dispute : arbitrator (E) matriculation : student 15. SCORN : REJECT :: (A) adulate : flatter (B) conjecture : forecast (C) pledge : renege (D) allege : declare (E) disparage : ignore 16. PROFLIGATE : SOLVENT :: (A) mercurial : committed (B) caustic : rational (C) indecisive : confused (D) cautious : uncertain (E) practical : seemly

8. E

9. A

10. A

11. A

12. C

13. E

14. E

15. E

16. A

TEST -15 Section-B 8. CONDUCTOR : INSTRUMENTALIST :: (A) director : actor (B) sculptor : painter (C) choreographer : composer (D) virtuoso : amateur (E) poet : listener 9. QUARRY : ROCK :: (A) silt : gravel (B) sky : rain (C) cold : ice (D) mine : ore (E) jewel : diamond 10. STICKLER : EXACTING :: (A) charlatan : forthright (B) malcontent : solicitous (C) misanthrope : expressive (D) defeatist : resigned (E) braggart : unassuming 11. WALK : AMBLE :: (A) dream : imagine (B) talk : chat (C) swim : float (D) look : stare (E) speak : whisper 12. JAZZ : MUSIC :: (A) act : play (B) variety : vaudeville (C) portraiture : painting (D) menu : restaurant (E) species : biology

13. REPATRIATE : EMIGRATION :: (A) reinstate : election (B) recall : impeachment (C) appropriate : taxation (D) repeal : ratification (E) appeal : adjudication 14. PLACEBO : INNOCUOUS :: (A) antibiotic : viral (B) vapor : opaque (C) salve : unctuous (D) anesthetic : astringent (E) vitamin : synthetic 15. DISSEMINATE : INFORMATION :: (A) amend : testimony (B) analyze : evidence (C) investigate : crime (D) prevaricate : confirmation (E) foment : discontentment 16. VOICE : QUAVER :: (A) pace : quicken (B) cheeks : dimple (C) concentration : focus (D) hand : tremble (E) eye : blink

8. A

9. D

10. D

11. B

12. C

13. D

14. C

15. E

16. D

TEST -16 Section-A 8. WALLET : MONEY :: (A) bank : vault (B) suitcase : clothing (C) checkbook : balance (D) wealth : prestige (E) envelope : stamp 9. INSTRUMENTALIST : SYMPHONY :: (A) author : drama (B) photographer : cinema (C) composer : concerto (D) artist : painting (E) dancer : ballet 10. PLATEAU : CHANGE :: (A) respite : activity (B) asylum : security (C) terminus : journey (D) interval : time (E) lull : rest 11. ISTHMUS : LAND :: (A) peninsula : island (B) canal : river (C) stratosphere : air (D) strait : water (E) tunnel : mountain 12. EMBARGO : COMMERCE :: (A) abstention : election (B) strike : lockout (C) boycott : development (D) quarantine : contact (E) blockade : port 13. DILATORY : PROCRASTINATE :: (A) recalcitrant : comply (B) malcontent : complain (C) ambivalent : decide (D) inept : modify (E) credulous : learn 14. NOMINAL : SIGNIFICANCE :: (A) titular : honor (B) ephemeral : brevity (C) divisible : continuity (D) anomalous : distinction (E) disjunctive : unity 15. PLAGIARISM : IDEAS :: (A) libel : words (B) forgery : documents (C) arson : buildings (D) kidnapping : ransom (E) rustling : cattle

16. POLITIC : OFFEND :: (A) distressing : terrify (B) aloof : associate (C) misunderstood : surmise (D) vacuous : deplete (E) trivial : bore

8. B

9. E

10. A

11. D

12. D

13. B

14. E

15. E

16. B

TEST -16 Section-B 8. CANDY : SUGAR :: (A) chick : egg (B) tire : rubber (C) pen : ink (D) mushroom : spore (E) rag : scrap 9. SCRIPT : DRAMA :: (A) theater : play (B) movement : symphony (C) photograph : scene (D) map : town (E) score : music 10. AMBIGUOUS : UNDERSTAND :: (A) veracious : defend (B) blatant : ignore (C) prosaic : classify (D) arcane : conceal (E) plausible : believe 11. MERCURIAL : MOOD :: (A) callous : emotion (B) doleful : energy (C) jaundiced : attitude (D) whimsical : behavior (E) unversed : experience 12. PRISTINE : DECAY :: (A) adequate : imprecision (B) stable : fluctuation (C) volatile : force (D) symmetric : flaw (E) valid : exception 13. DIGRESS : EXCURSIVE :: (A) improvise : studied (B) reiterate : redundant (C) excise : prolix (D) refute : plausible (E) accede : contentious 14. PONTIFICATE : SPEAK :: (A) indoctrinate : preach (B) impersonate : imitate (C) obey : listen (D) soar : fly (E) strut : walk 15. OFFICIOUS : MEDDLE :: (A) disaffected : rebel (B) bustling : excel (C) profligate : conserve (D) subservient : esteem (E) acrimonious : soothe 16. ATTENUATE : THICKNESS :: (A) separate : substance (B) ventilate : circulation (C) vaccinate : immunity (D) transfer : location (E) cool : temperature

8. B

9. E

10. B

11. D

12. B

13. B

14. E

15. A

16. E

TEST -17 Section-A 8. EXEMPT : LIABILITY :: (A) flout : authority (B) bestow : reward (C) permit : request (D) restrain : disorder (E) pardon : penalty 9. FULL-BODIED : FLAVOR :: (A) penetrating : vision (B) humorous : character (C) salacious : language (D) nostalgic : feeling (E) resonant : sound 10. LEGACY : PREDECESSOR :: (A) gift : donor (B) gratuity : service (C) contribution : charity (D) receipt : customer (E) loan : collector 11. HERO : ADMIRABLE :: (A) critic : capricious (B) braggart : surly (C) eccentric : unconventional (D) anarchist : powerful (E) enemy : immoral 12. GALVANIZE : STIMULATE :: (A) agitate : occlude (B) incubate : humidify (C) sterilize : separate (D) irrigate : flush (E) purify : amalgamate 13. MANIFEST : PERCEIVE :: (A) porous : tear (B) renovated : improve (C) doubtful : assess (D) brittle : break (E) elite : qualify 14. LOOSE : CONFINEMENT :: (A) forgive : injury (B) promulgate : rule (C) disabuse : misconception (D) redress : allegation (E) disengage : independence 15. BLANDISHMENT : COAX :: (A) prevarication : deceive (B) reverie : dream (C) persuasion : coerce (D) enticement : impoverish (E) explanation : mislead 16. CONVULSION : CONTRACTION :: (A) aggression : attack (B) sulkiness : punishment (C) persistence : acquiescence (D) frenzy : emotion (E) indifference : greeting

8. E

9. E

10. A

11. C

12. D

13. D

14. C

15. A

16. D

TEST -17 Section-B 8. FATIGUE : REST :: (A) gravity : weight (B) friction : heat (C) dehydration : water (D) dizziness : vertigo (E) radiation : light 9. RECYCLE : DISPOSAL :: (A) recommend : insistence (B) reciprocate : treatment (C) rehabilitate : demolition (D) attach : conquest (E) offer : sale 10. DICTIONARY : ALPHABETICAL :: (A) map : contoured (B) diary : anecdotal (C) outline : detailed (D) narrative : prosaic (E) annals : chronological

11. ATTENUATE : THICKNESS :: (A) separate : substance (B) ventilate : circulation (C) vaccinate : immunity (D) relocate : site (E) debilitate : strength 12. SATTRE : RIDICULE :: (A) oration : enmity (B) lullaby : dream (C) parody : praise (D) elegy : sorrow (E) sonnet : remembrance 13. STOIC : PERTURB :: (A) perplexed : enlighten (B) nondescript : neglect (C) tranquil : pacify (D) avaricious : satisfy (E) daunting : bewilder 14. EXCULPATORY : ABSOLVE :: (A) motivational : stir (B) conventional : resist (C) rhetorical : speak (D) pedantic : learn (E) ponderous : choose 15. MODERATE : INTENSITY:: (A) extenuate : seriousness (B) separate : distance (C) indulge : chaos (D) commemorate : memorial (E) disparage : animosity 16. JOLT :MOVE :: (A) possess : acquire (B) arrive : remain (C) check : stop (D) spiral : turn (E) rattle : hear

8. C

9. C

10. E

11. E

12. D

13. D

14. A

15. A

16. C

TEST -18 Section-A 8. OIL : LUBRICATE :: (A) preservative : desiccate (B) wine : ferment (C) honey : pollinate (D) antiseptic : disinfect (E) soil : fertilize 9. CONSTRUCT : REMODEL :: (A) exhibit : perform (B) compose : edit (C) demolish : repair (D) quantify : estimate (E) predict : assess 10. SPOKE : HUB :: (A) radius : center (B) parabola : equation (C) line : point (D) vector : direction (E) slope : change 11. ILLUSTRATE : PICTURES :: (A) particularize : details (B) abridge : texts (C) parse : sentences (D) regularize : inconsistencies (E) economize : words 12. PANTRY : FOOD :: (A) museum : replicas (B) ship : cargo (C) office : business (D) armory : weapons (E) warehouse : storage 13. MIRTH : LAUGHTER :: (A) uncertainty : nod (B) approval : applause (C) danger : alarm (D) labor : sweat (E) love : respect

14. ABRADED : FRICTION :: (A) refined : combustion (B) attenuated : coagulation (C) diluted : immersion (D) strengthened : compression (E) desiccated : dehydration 15. PARSIMONY : MISER :: (A) temerity : despot (B) belligerence : traitor (C) remorse : delinquent (D) equanimity : guardian (E) rebelliousness : insurgent 16. NITPICK : CRITICIZE :: (A) mock : imitate (B) complain : argue (C) interrogate : probe (D) fret : vex (E) cavil : object

8. D

9. B

10. A

11. A

12. D

13. B

14. E

15. E

16. E

TEST -18 Section-B 8. PROGRAM : CONCERT :: (A) bibliography : book (B) menu : entree (C) questionnaire : poll (D) platform : campaign (E) agenda : meeting 9. EMBRACE : AFFECTION :: (A) prediction : memory (B) innuendo : secrecy (C) shrug : indifference (D) conversation : familiarity (E) vote : unanimity 10. ENTHUSLASM : MANIA :: (A) idea : inspiration (B) nightmare : hallucination (C) failure : disgust (D) suspicion : paranoia (E) energy : fitness 11. ANONYMOUS : IDENTIFY :: (A) nonchalant : excite (B) repressed : constrain (C) misled : trust (D) annoying : assist (E) unremarkable : please 12. CARTOGRAPHER : MAP :: (A) astronomer : stars (B) carpenter : wood (C) lumberjack : saw (D) tailor : clothing (E) weaver : loom 13. EXEMPLARY : IMITATION :: (A) venerable : denigration (B) novel : duplication (C) redoubtable : regard (D) challenging : determination (E) creditable : verification 14. INSENSITIVE : BOOR :: (A) spontaneous : extrovert (B) mischievous : imp (C) conformist : ally (D) officious : zealot (E) extravagant : miser 15. LABYRINTHINE : SIMPLICITY :: (A) epic : scope (B) digressive : motive (C) heretical : sincerity (D) austere : design (E) jejune : interest 16. EUPHEMISM : OFFENSIVE :: (A) rhetoric : persuasive (B) aphorism : diffuse (C) metaphor : descriptive (D) repetition : fatiguing (E) conciliation : appeasing

8. E

9. C

10. D

11. A

12. D

13. C

14. B

15. E

16. B

TEST -19 Section-A 8. CENSUS : POPULATION :: (A) interrogation : guilt (B) survey : price (C) interview : personality (D) questionnaire : explanation (E) inventory : stock 9. AUTHENTICITY : FRAUDULENT :: (A) morality : utopian (B) intensity : vigorous (C) sincerity : hypocritical (D) particularity : unique (E) plausibility : narrated 10. VARNISH : GLOSSY :: (A) sharpen : blunt (B) measure : deep (C) sand : smooth (D) approximate : precise (E) anchor : unstable 11. AMENITY : COMFORTABLE :: (A) tact : circumspect (B) nuisance : aggravated (C) honorarium : grateful (D) favorite : envious (E) lounge : patient 12. PAIN : ANALGESIC :: (A) energy : revitalization (B) interest : stimulation (C) symptom : palliative (D) despair : anxiety (E) reward : incentive 13. VOICE :SHOUT :: (A) ear : overhear (B) eye : see (C) hand : clutch (D) nerve : feel (E) nose : inhale 14. PONTIFICATE : SPEAK :: (A) strut : walk (B) stare : look (C) patronize : frequent (D) eulogize : mourn (E) reciprocate : give 15. BIBLIOPHILE : BOOKS :: (A) environmentalist : pollution (B) zoologist : animals (C) gourmet : food (D) calligrapher : handwriting (E) aviator : aircraft 16. INDIGENT : WEALTH :: (A) presumptuous : independence (B) imperturbable : determination (C) inevitable : inescapability (D) indigestible : sustenance (E) redundant : indispensability

8. E

9. C

10. C

11. C

12. C

13. C

14. A

15. C

16. E

TEST -19 Section-B 8. REPELLENT : ATTRACT :: (A) elastic : stretch (B) sensitive : cooperate (C) progressive : change (D) flammable : ignite (E) ephemeral : endure

9. ANARCHIST : GOVERNMENT :: (A) legislator : taxation (B) reformer : bureaucracy (C) jurist : law (D) suffragist : voting (E) abolitionist : slavery 10. ADMONISH : DENOUNCE :: (A) challenge : overcome (B) reward : praise (C) control : contain (D) persuade : convince (E) punish : pillory 11. JOKE : PUNCH LINE :: (A) sermon : congregation (B) conceit : allegory (C) rhetoric : persuasion (D) conspiracy : arrest (E) plot : denouement 12. VEER : DIRECTION :: (A) align : connection (B) filter : contamination (C) convert : belief (D) deflect : motivation (E) substantiate : authenticity 13. REPROBATE : MISBEHAVE :: (A) sycophant : fawn (B) critic : rebuke (C) ruffian : tease (D) cynic : brood (E) narcissist : covet 14. IMPERVIOUS : PENETRATE :: (A) ineluctable : avoid (B) ineradicable : damage (C) boorish : flatter (D) irrepressible : censure (E) disruptive : restrain 15. CONSENSUS : FACTIONALISM :: (A) ritual : orthodoxy (B) reality : plausibility (C) reason : thought (D) clarity : confusion (E) leadership : subordination 16. MARTINET : DISCIPLINE :: (A) illusionist : misdirection (B) dilettante : commitment (C) renegade : allegiance (D) pedant : learning (E) hack : writing

8. E

9. E

10. E

11. E

12. C

13. A

14. A

15. D

16. D

ANTONYMS
TEST -1 Section -A 28. SYMMETRY : (A) separateness (B) corruption (C) mutability (D) imprecision (E) disproportion 29. DIVERGENCE : (A) peacefulness (B) control (C) stipulation (D) contentment (E) unification 30. OBSTRUCTIONIST : (A) one who governs (B) one who welcomes (C) one who repents (D) one who facilitates (E) one who trusts 31. DIURNAL : (A) nomadic (B) aggressive (C) cold-blooded (D) chiefly active at night (E) often randomly distributed 32. AXIOMATIC : (A) controversial (B) peremptory (C) uncomplicated (D) vestigial (E) amalgamated 33. SUBVERT : (A) increase (B) replace (C) reinforce (D) oversee (E) expose 34. FOMENT : (A) simplify (B) rectify (C) isolate (D) explain (E) stifle 35. ENNUI : (A) annoyance (B) excitement (C) sympathy (D) misery (E) assurance 36. EQUABLE : (A) boundless (B) intemperate (C) tangential (D) flimsy (E) pernicious 37. HUBRIS : (A) mockery (B) calm (C) confusion (D) approval (E) humility 38. SURFEIT : (A) select (B) caution (C) repose (D) starve (E) console

28. E

29. E 38. D

30. D

31. D

32. A

33. C

34. E

35. B

36. B

37. E

TEST -1: SECTION-B 28. MODISH : (A) eliciting admiration and joy (B) avoiding harm and danger (C) lacking style and fashionableness (D) providing vitality and fortitude (E) destroying usefulness and serviceability

29. SPINY: (A) heavy (B) placid (C) smooth (D) terse (E) single 30. SCRUTINIZE : (A) demur (B) dispute (C) condone (D) elaborate on (E) gloss over 31. INCLEMENT : (A) torpid (B) truculent (C) buoyant (D) balmy (E) bucolic 32. RAZE : (A) build (B) strengthen (C) impede (D) refurbish (E) stabilize 33. PANDEMIC : (A) unaware (B) disapproving (C) soothing (D) faultless (E) limited 34. EXCORIATE : (A) accept conditionally (B) praise lavishly (C) esteem grudgingly (D) permit (E) relax 35. GILD : (A) prepare carelessly (B) offer hesitantly (C) represent accurately (D) speak forcibly (E) organize coherently 36. RAREFY : (A) concentrate (B) modulate (C) diversify (D) leave (E) waste 37. ASPERSION : (A) mandate (B) covenant (C) heartfelt gratitude (D) solemn declaration (E) glowing tribute 38. PERSPICUITY : (A) opacity (B) unrelatedness (C) fragility (D) unfamiliarity (E) deviance

28. C

29. C 38. A

30. E

31. D

32. A

33. E

34. B

35. C

36. A

37. E

TEST -2: SECTION-A 28. MICROSCOPIC : (A) predominant (B) salient (C) dilated (D) elephantine (E) universal 29. LURCH : (A) divide equally (B) relate dishonestly (C) formulate hypothetically (D) progress smoothly (E) accomplish handily 30. CURTAIL : (A) coax (B) include (C) prolong (D) elevate (E) externalize 31. SEPTIC : (A) stable (B) glistening (C) of unknown cause (D) uniform in composition (E) free of infection

32. LIABILITY : (A) sanction (B) profusion (C) enormity (D) criminality (E) immunity 33. RESILIENCE : (A) stillness (B) emptiness (C) uncertainty (D) inelasticity (E) ineffectiveness 34. FEIGNED : (A) cheerful (B) free (C) genuine (D) amused (E) relaxed 35. FALLACY : (A) valid reasoning (B) supporting testimony (C) plausible hypothesis (D) unqualified assertion (E) intricate argumentation 36. DEFT : (A) crumpling (B) awkward (C) close (D) sane (E) quiet 37. RANKLE : (A) entice (B) condone (C) pacify (D) recruit (E) extend 38. COUNTENANCE : (A) remove from office (B) apprise of developments (C) proceed with caution (D) regard with disfavor (E) charge with negligence

28. D

29. D 38. D

30. C

31. E

32. E

33. D

34. C

35. A

36. B

37. C

TEST -2: SECTION-B 28. INGENUITY : (A) lack of gratitude (B) lack of inventiveness (C) lack of emotion (D) lack of clarity (E) lack of honor 29. MELD : (A) destroy (B) reduce (C) yield (D) open (E) separate 30. PROPENSITY : (A) antipathy (B) violation (C) competence (D) independence (E) penalty 31. CIRCUMLOCUTION : (A) introspection (B) wittiness (C) resourcefulness (D) succinctness (E) adroitness 32. ETCH : (A) perform diligently (B) approach cautiously (C) simplify (D) efface (E) bias 33. NASCENT : (A) protruding (B) diminished (C) mature (D) flexible (E) native 34. DIURNAL : (A) slow to change (B) hard to decipher (C) devoid of symmetry (D) quick to develop (E) occurring at night

35. INTIMATE : (A) communicate directly (B) act promptly (C) avoid attention (D) prove inadequate (E) respond harshly 36. EVANESCENT : (A) gradual (B) retrograde (C) flammable (D) luminous (E) permanent 37. DISSEMBLING : (A) proficient (B) candid (C) expressive (D) defiant (E) outgoing 38. COUNTENANCE : (A) forbid (B) expose (C) repel (D) assuage (E) deceive

28. B

29. E 38. A

30. A

31. D

32. D

33. C

34. E

35. A

36. E

37. B

TEST -3: SECTION-A 28. VERSATILE : (A) challenging accepted beliefs (B) having limited applications (C) making clear distinctions (D) excessive (E) unreliable 29. EXCRETE : (A) choose selectively (B) coalesce tightly (C) ingest (D) impair (E) restrain 30. CIRCUMVENTION : (A) plain language (B) needed action (C) careless inattention (D) primary means (E) direct encounter 31. PREPOSTEROUS : (A) monotonous (B) philosophical (C) commonsensical (D) pusillanimous (E) unpretentious 32. VOLITION : (A) ineligibility to negotiate (B) inability to choose (C) indifference to shock (D) indignity of frustration (E) inadequacy in socializing 33. EXHILARATE : (A) sadden (B) invalidate (C) minimize (D) demean (E) incriminate 34. DISGORGE : (A) inter (B) swallow (C) solidify (D) replace (E) include 35. SUMMARY : (A) tenuous (B) extenuating (C) nominal (D) austere (E) protracted 36. VIRTUOSITY : (A) immorality (B) mediocrity (C) timidity (D) inconstancy (E) virulence 37. SUBLIME : (A) weak (B) austere (C) simple (D) base (E) abnormal

38. SEMINAL : (A) oblique (B) provincial (C) incomplete (D) fluctuating (E) derivative

28. B

29. C 38. E

30. E

31. C

32. B

33. A

34. B

35. E

36. B

37. D

TEST -3: SECTION-B 28. FIASCO : (A) a realistic goal (B) a notable success (C) a strong premonition (D) a conciliatory announcement (E) an unexpected development 29. HARBOR : (A) evict (B) disenchant (C) take note of (D) be surprised by (E) have doubts about 30. STRATIFY : (A) abridge (B) duplicate (C) homogenize (D) elevate (E) devel op 31. EXOTIC : (A) unessential (B) implicit (C) reticent (D) immutable (E) indigenous 32. COALESCE : (A) ossify (B) dislocate (C) multiply (D) disaggregate (E) enervate 33. DOGMA : (A) heresy (B) indecency (C) self-interest (D) mythical tale (E) humorous gesture 34. PEEVISH : (A) self-assured (B) good-natured (C) high-minded (D) up-front (E) well-groomed 35. SPLEEN: (A) submissiveness (B) volubility (C) goodwill (D) sophistication (E) indecision 36. COUNTENANCE : (A) feign reluctance (B) decide impetuously (C) condemn (D) affront (E) divert 37. BUCOLIC : (A) cynical (B) cultivated (C) mythical (D) urban (E) gentle 38. PURLIEU: (A) infrequently visited place (B) ineptly understood idea (C) specifically noted error (D) quickly absorbed substance (E) easily re cognized condition 28. B 29. A 38. A 30. C 31. E 32. D 33. A 34. B 35. C 36. C 37. D

TEST -4: SECTION-A 28. UNSUBSTANTIATED : (A) having unknown consequences (B) carefully done (C) modified (D) minimized (E) verified 29. CHICANERY : (A) public praise (B) unimpassioned declaration (C) honest dealing (D) extemporaneous argument (E) consistent action 30. VIABILITY: (A) inability to change (B) inability to breathe (C) inability to live (D) state of frivolity (E) state of immobility 31. PROTUBERANT : (A) depressed (B) slick (C) desiccated (D) contorted (E) opaque 32. CURSORY : (A) extremely delicate (B) unusually brilliant (C) completely natural (D) painstakingly thorough (E) overwhelmingly emotional 33. AMELIORATE : (A) preserve (B) participate (C) aggravate (D) implement (E) implicate 34. STIPULATION: (A) heated discussion (B) demanding task (C) erroneous interpretation (D) tacit requirement (E) paramount concern 35. ABDICATE : (A) assume (B) resist (C) defend (D) propose (E) dictate 36. RESTIVENESS : (A) contentment (B) heartiness (C) smugness (D) bashfulness (E) urbanity 37. FORESTALL : (A) defend (B) abet (C) renounce (D) accept (E) badger 38. GRANDILOQUENT : (A) precious (B) ambiguous (C) colloquial (D) secretive (E) ribald

28. E

29. C 38. D

30. C

31. A

32. D

33. C

34. D

35. A

36. A

37. B

TEST -4: SECTION-B 28. AWE : (A) compassion (B) eclecticism (C) irreverence (D) guilt (E) nervousness 29. AGGREGATE : (A) belittle (B) return (C) disperse (D) confuse (E) alleviate

30. BOON : (A) misfortune (B) imbroglio (C) hopeless situation (D) acrimonious debate (E) callous behavior 31. ARTIFICE : (A) contentment (B) self-assurance (C) candor (D) temerity (E) reticence 32. VESTIGIAL: (A) uniform in shape (B) fully developed (C) turgid (D) moribund (E) malleable 33. MOLLIFY : (A) rouse (B) refute (C) renounce (D) oppose (E) criticize 34. FERAL : (A) beneficial (B) cultivated (C) bold (D) anticipated (E) primary 35. RUEFUL : (A) secretly envious (B) gravely thoughtful (C) openly ambitious (D) impenitent (E) vengeful 36. SCRAPPY: (A) charming (B) timorous (C) conventional (D) canny (E) confused 37. COZEN : (A) deal with forthrightly (B) invite reluctantly (C) urge forward (D) yield copiously (E) deny emphatically 38. TRITE : (A) far-reaching (B) concrete (C) organized (D) original (E) explicit

28. C

29. C 38. D

30. A

31. C

32. B

33. A

34. B

35. D

36. B

37. A

TEST -5: SECTION-A 28. STAGNANT : (A) towering (B) drenched (C) flowing (D) soft (E) contained 29. ALLUDE : (A) mention explicitly (B) request insistently (C) prepare carefully (D) speak slowly (E) regret deeply 30. HAVOC : (A) serenity (B) refuge (C) destitution (D) apex (E) contemplation 31. REPRESS : (A) review (B) foster (C) extol (D) salvage (E) exhaust 32. UTTER : (A) skewed (B) valid (C) concrete (D) partial (E) direct 33. SHOAL : (A) refined (B) straight (C) deep (D) secure (E) simple 34. BAWDY : (A) decorous (B) ridiculous (C) soulful (D) reliable (E) poignant

35. BADINAGE : (A) literal translation (B) clear reference (C) serious conversation (D) detailed description (E) ardent supporter 36. MARTINET : (A) unskilled laborer (B) indulgent individual (C) malicious opponent (D) reliable agent (E) ardent supporter 37. EMBOLDEN : (A) lop (B) cow (C) warp (D) demote. (E) defraud 38. ESTRANGEMENT : (A) rapprochement (B) familiarization (C) equanimity (D) nonchalance (E) recompense

28. C

29. A 38. A

30. A

31. B

32. D

33. C

34. A

35. C

36. B

37. B

TEST -5: SECTION-B 28. DISDAIN : (A) draw out (B) refer to (C) confer about (D) treat favorably (E) work diligently 29. INDUBITABLE : (A) skeptical (B) questionable (C) anticipated (D) optional (E) undisclosed 30. CURMUDGEON : (A) talented professional (B) agreeable person (C) useful artifact (D) recent acquaintance (E) festival occasion 31. MOGUL : (A) iota (B) outlaw (C) nonentity (D) city dweller (E) conscientious worker 32. CONCATENATE : (A) liquidate (B) vacillate (C) initiate (D) moderate (E) separate 33. PROMULGATE : (A) keep secret (B) render difficult (C) lose control (D) make worse (E) single out 34. GOAD : (A) ameliorate (B) lull (C) exonerate (D) welcome (E) compliment 35. PROLIXITY : (A) allusiveness (B) legibility (C) inanity (D) conciseness (E) equivocation 36. SYNCHRONOUS : (A) involuntary (B) noncontemporaneous (C) hereditary (D) disintegrating (E) aberrant

37. SPURIOUS : (A) tentative (B) severe (C) conventional (D) understated (E) genuine 38. DESULTORY : (A) carefully planned (B) cheerfully stated (C) flattering (D) docile (E) correct

28. D

29. B 38. A

30. B

31. C

32. E

33. A

34. B

35. D

36. B

37. E

TEST -6: SECTION-A 28. PREFACE : (A) improvisation (B) burlesque (C) epilogue (D) tangent (E) backdrop 29. DEBILITATE : (A) implicate (B) invigorate (C) obfuscate (D) realign (E) encumber 30. TASTY : (A) uninteresting (B) unfamiliar (C) unexpected (D) understated (E) undervalued 31. ABNEGATE : (A) refresh (B) reaffirm (C) relieve (D) react (E) reform 32. SERRIED: (A) partially formed (B) widely separated (C) narrowly missed (D) extremely grateful (E) reasonably clean 33. BOMBASTIC : (A) unflappable (B) uninspired (C) unpretentious (D) inscrutable (E) incisive 34. BANAL : (A) comfortable (B) novel (C) equal (D) fatal (E) competent 35. LANGUISH : (A) agitate (B) wander (C) relieve (D) discomfit (E) thrive 36. ENNUI : (A) intimidation (B) sleaze (C) faint recollection (D) keen interest (E) deep reservation 37. DAUNTLESS : (A) sophomoric (B) trifling (C) pusillanimous (D) specious (E) parsimonious 38. TEMERITY : (A) credibility (B) authority (C) celebrity (D) acrimony (E) circumspection 28. C 29. B 38. E 30. A 31. B 32. B 33. C 34. B 35. E 36. D 37. C

TEST -6: SECTION-B 28. DEBUT : (A) collaboration (B) monologue (C) farewell performance (D) repertoire standard (E) starring role 29. WITHER : (A) disagree (B) shine (C) plant (D) adhere (E) revive 30. BUCK : (A) cover over (B) assent to (C) brag about (D) improve (E) repair 31. MEAN : (A) trusting (B) ardent (C) clever (D) incautious (E) noble 32. ADJUNCT : (A) expert appraisal (B) generous donation (C) essential element (D) mild reproof (E) impartial judgment 33. CANONICAL : (A) imprecise (B) ubiquitous (C) superfluous (D) nontraditional (E) divisive 34. TICKLISH : (A) heavy-handed (B) significant (C) tolerant (D) impartial (E) imperturbable 35. PREVALENT : (A) invasive (B) inconsistent (C) indistinct (D) unpalatable (E) unusual 36. PENURY : (A) approbation (B) affluence (C) objectivity (D) compensation (E) grandiosity 37. MINATORY : (A) convenient (B) nonthreatening (C) straightforward (D) fastidious (E) rational 38. CALUMNIOUS : (A) adept (B) aloof (C) quaint (D) decorous (E) flattering

28. C

29. E 38. E

30. B

31. E

32. C

33. D

34. E

35. E

36. B

37. B

TEST -7: SECTION-A 28. PROCRASTINATION : (A) diligence (B) complacence (C) reasonableness (D) allegiance (E) rehabilitation 29. CIRCUITY : (A) straightforwardness (B) inventiveness (C) authenticity (D) insightfulness (E) practicality

30. CONCLUDE : (A) foster (B) frequent (C) emanate from (D) empower lo (E) embark on 31. RITE : (A) coherent interpretation (B) improvised act (C) deductive approach (D) casual observation (E) unnecessary addition 32. BLATANT : (A) indecisive (B) perceptive (C) unobtrusive (D) involuntary (E) spontaneous 33. PONTIFICATE : (A) request rudely (B) glance furtively (C) behave predictably (D) work efficiently (E) speak modestly 34. POSIT : (A) deceive (B) begrudge (C) deny (D) consent (E) reinforce 35. FETTER : (A) justify (B) comfort (C) intrude (D) liberate (E) optimize 36. SYNERGIC : (A) natural in origin (B) fragile in structure (C) untainted (D) inessential (E) antagonistic 37. DEPRIVATION : (A) sanity (B) awareness (C) surfeit (D) fecundity (E) health 38. CORPOREAL : (A) unreliable (B) unscientific (C) indistinguishable (D) inanimate (E) immaterial

28. A

29. A 38. E

30. E

31. B

32. C

33. E

34. C

35. D

36. E

37. C

TEST -7: SECTION-B 28. EVOKE : (A) try to hinder (B) fail to elicit (C) refuse to implore (D) pretend to agree (E) attempt to calm 29. OSTENTATION : (A) austerity (B) wisdom (C) illumination (D) superficiality (E) agitation 30. BRISTLE : (A) cower (B) feint (C) equivocate (D) coerce (E) apprise 31. BROAD : (A) consequential (B) subtle (C) corrupt (D) decisive (E) perceptive 32. ENDEMIC : (A) undeniable (B) intermittent (C) anomalous (D) foreign (E) unexpected

33. BELLICOSE : (A) enervated (B) disloyal (C) honest (D) likely to be generous (E) inclined to make peace 34. ABJURE : (A) affirm (B) cajole (C) insist (D) pronounce (E) shout 35. SALUTARY : (A) unexpected (B) transitory (C) unhealthy (D) disoriented (E) dilapidated 36. LUGUBRIOUSNESS : (A) orderliness (B) shallowness (C) believability (D) cheerfulness (E) dedication 37. PRESCIENCE : (A) acuity (B) myopia (C) vacillation (D) tardiness (E) inhibition 38. INVETERATE : (A) arbitrary (B) occasional (C) obvious (D) progressive (E) compelling

28. B

29. A 38. B

30. A

31. B

32. D

33. E

34. A

35. C

36. D

37. B

TEST -8: SECTION-A 28. COMPRESSION : (A) increase in volume (B) change of altitude (C) toss of stability (D) absence of matter (E) lack of motion 29. REFINE : (A) loosen (B) obscure (C) destabilize (D) decrease size (E) reduce purity 30. BALK : (A) extend (B) derive (C) deserve (D) plan ahead carefully (E) move ahead willingly 31. ANTIPATHY : (A) affection (B) courtesy (C) exasperation (D) obstinacy (E) cynicism 32. PATHOLOGICAL : (A) acute (B) normal (C) adequate (D) variable (E) temporary 33. REIN : (A) prod (B) assess (C) engulf (D) commend (E) affirm 34. MELLIFLUOUS : (A) obtuse (B) ineffable (C) raspy (D) deranged (E) uproarious 35. IMPUGN : (A) abandon (B) anticipate (C) enable (D) clarify (E) endorse

36. PERTINACITY : (A) liability (B) simplicity (C) vacillation (D) eccentricity (E) misrepresentation 37. GAINSAY : (A) speak kindly of (B) tell the truth about (C) forecast (D) affirm (E) reiterate 38. ABSOLUTE : (A) interior (B) tolerant (C) qualified (D) preliminary (E) immeasurable

28. A

29. E 38. C

30. E

31. A

32. B

33. A

34. C

35. E

36. C

37. D

TEST -8: SECTION-B 28. RECORD : (A) postpone (B) disperse (C) delete (D) delay (E) devise 29. EMBED : (A) induce (B) extend (C) extract (D) receive (E) diverge 30. WHOLESOME : (A) deleterious (B) submissive (C) provoking (D) monotonous (E) rigorous 31. EXTINCTION : (A) immunity (B) mutation (C) inhibition (D) formulation (E) perpetuation 32. CURSE : (A) exoneration (B) untruth (C) redress (D) benediction (E) separation 33. DECORUM : (A) constant austerity (B) false humility (C) impropriety (D) incompetence (E) petulance 34. AGGRANDIZE : (A) misrepresent (B) disparage (C) render helpless (D) take advantage of (E) shun the company of 35. VIGILANT : (A) reluctant (B) haphazard (C) gullible (D) ignorant (E) oblivious 36. FASTIDIOUS : (A) coarse (B) destructive (C) willing (D) collective (E) secret 37. TRACTABLE : (A) indefatigable (B) incorrigible (C) insatiable (D) impractical (E) impetuous 38. RESCISSION : (A) expansion (B) enactment (C) instigation (D) stimulation (E) abdication

28. C

29. C 38. B

30. A

31. E

32. D

33. C

34. B

35. E

36. A

37. B

TEST -9: SECTION-A 28. CUMBERSOME : (A) likely to succeed (B) reasonable to trust (C) valuable to have (D) easy to handle (E) important to know 29. INDUCEMENT : (A) reproof (B) deterrent (C) partiality (D) distinction (E) consideration 30. STARTLE : (A) appease (B) lull (C) reconcile (D) dally (E) slumber 31 ANOMALY : (A) derivation from estimates (B) conformity to norms (C) return to origins (D) adaptation to stresses (E) repression of traits 32. RECIPROCATING : (A) releasing slowly (B) calculating approximately (C) accepting provisionally (D) moving unidirectionally (E) mixing thoroughly 33. MOLLYCODDLE : (A) talk boastfully (B) flee swiftly (C) treat harshly (D) demand suddenly (E) adjust temporarily 34. SURFEIT : (A) affirmation (B) compromise (C) dexterity (D) deficiency (E) languor 35. SANGUINE : (A) morose (B) puzzled (C) gifted (D) witty (E) persistent 36. RETROSPECTIVE : (A) irresolute (B) hopeful (C) unencumbered (D) evanescent (E) anticipatory 37. ENCOMIUM : (A) biased evaluation (B) polite response (C) vague description (D) harsh criticism (E) sorrowful expression 38. FACTIONAL : (A) excessive (B) undistinguished (C) disdainful (D) disinterested (E) disparate

28. D

29. B 38. D

30. B

31. B

32. D

33. C

34. D

35. A

36. E

37. D

TEST -9: SECTION-B 28. FLIPPANCY : (A) temperance (B) reliability (C) seriousness (D) inflexibility (E) reticence 29. FACETIOUS : (A) uncomplicated (B) prideful (C) earnest (D) laconic (E) forbearing 30. BUNGLE : (A) bring off (B) bail out (C) give in (D) pull through (E) put together 31. STODGY : (A) nervous (B) incisive (C) exciting (D) talkative (E) happy 32. INIMITABLE : (A) enviable (B) reparable (C) amicable (D) unwieldy (E) commonplace 33. SERE : (A) lush (B) obstinate (C) immersed (D) fortunate (E) antiquated 34. VACUOUS : (A) courteous (B) exhilarated (C) modest (D) intelligent (E) emergent 35. PEDESTRIAN : (A) concise (B) attractive (C) mobile (D) delicate (E) imaginative 36. APPOSITE : (A) disposable (B) adjacent (C) vicarious (D) parallel (E) extraneous 37. BOMBAST : (A) kindness (B) nonthreatening motion (C) great effort (D) down-to-earth language (E) good-natured approval 38. LIMPID : (A) unfading (B) coarse (C) elastic (D) murky (E) buoyant

28. C

29. C 38. D

30. A

31. C

32. E

33. A

34. D

35. E

36. E

37. D

TEST -10: SECTION-A 28. INVARIANCE : (A) deficiency (B) inequality (C) outcome (D) fluctuation (E) minority 29. INTRINSIC : (A) exceptional (B) exemplary (C) extraneous (D) inopportune (E) indefinite

30. EXUDE : (A) absorb (B) ignite (C) infest (D) depress (E) agitate 31. AFFINITY : (A) displeasure (B) aversion (C) moroseness (D) bad luck (E) unacceptable behavior 32. POTABLE : (A) dissolved (B) crystallized (C) undrinkable (D) carbonated (E) diluted 33. EXTEMPORIZE : (A) create order (B) assist others (C) act timidly (D) remain on time (E) follow a script 34. CURSORY : (A) overestimated (B) irrevocable (C) immediately effective (D) slow and thorough (E) large and unwieldy 35. INDURATE : (A) incandescence (B) impede (C) soften (D) deflect (E) inspire 36. PERTURBATION : (A) amity (B) altruism (C) felicity (D) equanimity (E) generosity 37. INIMICAL : (A) histrionic (B) joyful (C) ordinary (D) friendly (E) nave 38. DISSEMBLING (A) proficient (B) candid (C) expressive (D) defiant (E) outgoing

28. D

29. C 38. B

30. A

31. B

32. C

33. E

34. D

35. C

36. D

37. D

TEST -10: SECTION-B 28. GARGANTUAN : (A) lackadaisical (B) minuscule (C) unconvivial (D) illusory (E) unconcerned 29. EXCAVATE : (A) fill in (B) spill over (C) move through (D) slide down (E) pass over 30. DEBUT : (A) retrospective (B) rehearsal (C) soliloquy (D) cameo role (E) farewell performance 31. EXONERATE : (A) prove guilty (B) hamper progress (C) place inside (D) recommend (E) reinstate 32. DELICACY : (A) disparity (B) flamboyance (C) crudity (D) simplicity (E) expansiveness

33. ARCANE : (A) controversial (B) avid (C) romantic (D) well-known (E) allconsuming 34. INSENTIENT : (A) perceiving (B) plant (C) inconsistent (D) innate (E) lethargic 35. EVINCE : (A) complain (B) irritate (C) misinterpret (D) keep hidden (E) keep separate 36. SOLICITUDE : (A) indifference (B) resignation (C) perversity (D) mortification (E) recalcitrance 37. ACCRETE : (A) wear away (B) slip off (C) fall down (D) seep out (E) dry out 38. PATINA : (A) recent implementation (B) partial completion (C) chance occurrence (D) essential quality (E) incidental observation

28. B

29. A 38. D

30. E

31. A

32. C

33. D

34. A

35. D

36. A

37. A

TEST -11: SECTION-A 28. EXACTITUDE : (A) terseness (B) dishonesty (C) imprecision (D) tendency to concede (E) lack of relevance 29. STYMIE : (A) capture (B) organize (C) reveal (D) gain (E) promote 30. DERIVATIVE : (A) polished (B) magnetic (C) creditable (D) recent (E) innovative 31. DISGORGE : (A) imprint (B) suture (C) convulse (D) ingest (E) enlarge 32. OBDURATE : (A) candid (B) amenable (C) talkative (D) optimistic (E) carefree 33. TOUT : (A) denounce (B) modify (C) restrain (D) adhere to (E) retreat from 34. LUCUBRATION : (A) cursory consideration (B) lengthy explanation (C) lucidity (D) rejection (E) inquisition 35. TRUCULENCE : (A) general competence (B) sporadic quirkiness (C) brittleness (D) kindness (E) fragility

36. ARREST : (A) inoculate (B) vitalize (C) reproduce (D) engage (E) retrieve 37. JUDICIOUSNESS : (A) deceptiveness (B) aloofness (C) unorthodoxy (D) uncertainty (E) indiscretion 38. BELLICOSE : (A) abashed (B) pacific (C) exemplary (D) ingenuous (E) platonic

28. C

29. E 38. B

30. E

31. D

32. B

33. A

34. A

35. D

36. B

37. E

TEST -11: SECTION-B 28. MONGREL: (A) predator (B) purebred (C) nocturnal creature (D) sentient being (E) domestic animal 29. INCONSONANT : (A) in agreement (B) in control (C) within reach (D) realistic (E) opportune 30. FETTER : (A) set free (B) be serious (C) remain (D) uncover (E) lose 31. OBSESSION : (A) chagrin (B) aplomb (C) intense disgust (D) perfunctory interest (E) consummate rudeness 32. RIVEN: (A) balanced (B) dried (C) Intact (D) stripped (E) elastic 33. ENSCONCE : (A) avert (B) impoverish (C) displace (D) discourage (E) demolish 34. INVEIGLE : (A) praise excessively (B) refuse to compromise (C) stubbornly insist (D) openly seek to persuade (E) attempt to blame 35. GRATUITOUS : (A) warranted (B) commercial (C) overbearing (D) secretive (E) inexpensive 36. HALCYON : (A) sequential (B) astonishing (C) insidious (D) preposterous (E) tempestuous 37. EXONERATE : (A) denigrate (B) subjugate (C) inculpate (D) mediate (E) incapacitate 38. EXHAUSTIVE : (A) partial (B) beneficial (C) irrational (D) imaginative (E) worthwhile

28. B

29. A 38. A

30. A

31. D

32. C

33. C

34. D

35. A

36. E

37. C

TEST -12: SECTION 28. VARIABLE : (A) quantity with a fixed value (B) rare but comprehensible phenomenon (C) frequency greater than chance (D) unexplained event (E) probable cause 29. OBFUSCATE : (A) restate fully (B) proclaim emphatically (C) refute utterly (D) confront angrily (E) explain clearly 30. PROLIFERATE : (A) decelerate. (B) disengage (C) diverge (D) dwindle (E) dispose 31. ACQUIESCE : (A) surmount (B) refute (C) resist (D) rescind (E) demand 32. DETRITUS : (A) valuable product (B) antique object (C) ordinary matter (D) unwieldy material (E) stylized artifact 33. JOCUND : (A) angular (B) untried (C) unsound (D) narrow (E) dreary 34. CORPOREAL : (A) intangible (B) infinitesimal (C) moderate (D) inviolate (E) solitary 35. ENNUI : (A) exuberance (B) confusion (C) openness (D) trepidation (E) unwillingness 36. ALACRITY : (A) kindness (B) recalcitrance (C) subservience (D) lack of direction (E) good intentions 37. GLIB : (A) youthful (B) awkward (C) devoted (D) subversive (E) thoughtless 38. MINATORY : (A) characteristic (B) inadvertent (C) conspicuous (D) unthreatening (E) influential

28. A

29. E 38. D

30. D

31. C

32. A

33. E

34. A

35. A

36. B

37. B

TEST -13: SECTION-A 28. DIVERSITY : (A) depletion (B) uniformity (C) novelty (D) careful planning (E) harmonious coexistence 29. FLOUNDER : (A) abandon (B) thicken (C) vanquish (D) neglect willfully (E) act gracefully 30. DILAPIDATED : (A) directed (B) restored (C) honed (D) reconciled (E) disentangled 31. PLENITUDE : (A) dearth (B) flaw (C) malaise (D) postponement (E) havoc 32. FINESSE : (A) hesitation (B) vulnerability (C) ineptitude (D) simplicity (E) dependability 33. ROIL : (A) alter (B) spin (C) settle (D) change course (E) stop growth 34. STONEWALL : (A) requite (B) inspire (C) cooperate fully (D) regulate carefully (E) oppress severely 35. EXCULPATE : (A) commend (B) concur (C) mollify (D) enervate (E) indict 36. PAN : (A) extol (B) abet (C) intervene (D) relax (E) permit 37. PROSAIC : (A) integral (B) extraordinary (C) capricious (D) voluble (E) inconsistent 38. PEREMPTORY : (A) reckless (B) unversed (C) captious (D) willing to forgive (E) open to challenge

28. B

29. E 38. E

30. B

31. A

32. C

33. C

34. C

35. E

36. A

37. B

TEST -13: SECTION-B 28. SUMMON : (A) overlook (B) subtract (C) discourage (D) dismiss (E) refuse 29. IMPEL : (A) restrain (B) extract (C) alternate (D) expand (E) modify 30. NEOLOGISM : (A) colloquial phrase (B) profound statement (C) grammatical construction (D) well-established expression (E) redundant wording

31. PUNCTILIOUS : (A) provocative (B) slipshod (C) insistent (D) bewildering (E) serene 32. VARIEGATION : (A) ambiguity (B) refinement (C) adverse effect (D) uniform coloration (E) concise description 33. CLEMENCY : (A) loquacity (B) deviousness (C) capriciousness (D) convenience (E) ruthlessness 34. SUBLIME : (A) regulated (B) despicable (C) unknown (D) visible (E) weak 35. BIFURCATE : (A) disagree (B) complement (C) coalesce (D) validate (E) mitigate 36. IGNOMINIOUS : (A) unfashionable (B) uninspired (C) memorable (D) honorable (E) voluntary 37. INVIDIOUS : (A) transient (B) abundant (C) shallow (D) conspicuous (E) beneficial 38. PAEAN : (A) ungenerous offer (B) formal apology (C) harsh lampoon (D) stiff acceptance (E) long-winded explanation

28. D

29. A 38. C

30. D

31. B

32. D

33. E

34. B

35. C

36. D

37. E

TEST -14: SECTION-A 28. IGNITE : (A) amplify (B) douse (C) obscure (D) blemish (E) replicate 29. MUTATE : (A) recede (B) grow larger (C) link together (D) remain the same (E) decrease in speed 30. FRAGMENT : (A) ensue (B) revive (C) coalesce (D) balance (E) accommodate 31. OSTENSIBLE : (A) gargantuan (B) inauspicious (C) intermittent (D) perpetual (E) inapparent 32. PROLIXITY : (A) ceremoniousness (B) flamboyance (C) succinctness (D) inventiveness (E) lamentation

33. CONCERTED : (A) meant to obstruct (B) not intended to last (C) enthusiastically supported (D) run by volunteers (E) individually devised 34. FORBEARANCE : (A) fragility (B) impatience (C) freedom (D) nervousness (E) tactlessness 35. COSSETED : (A) unspoiled (B) irrepressible (C) serviceable (D) prone to change (E) free from prejudice 36. PROBITY : (A) timidity (B) sagacity (C) impertinence (D) uncertainty (E) unscrupulousness 37. ESCHEW : (A) habitually indulge in (B) take without authorization (C) leave unsaid (D) boast about (E) handle carefully 38. REDOUBTABLE : (A) trustworthy (B) unschooled (C) credulous (D) not formidable (E) not certain

28. B

29. D 38. D

30. C

31. E

32. C

33. E

34. B

35. A

36. E

37. A

TEST -14: SECTION-B 28. PREOCCUPATION : (A) finality (B) innocence (C) liberality (D) unconcern (E) tolerance 29. CHROMATIC : (A) opaque (B) colorless (C) lengthy (D) profound (E) diffuse 30. PEDESTRIAN : (A) widely known (B) strongly motivated (C) discernible (D) uncommon (E) productive 31. EQUIVOCATE : (A) communicate straightforwardly (B) articulate persuasively (C) instruct exhaustively (D) study painstakingly (E) reproach sternly 32. DENUDE : (A) crowd out (B) skim over (C) change color (D) cover (E) sustain 33. RANCOR : (A) deference (B) optimism (C) courage (D) superiority (E) goodwill 34. OSSIFIED : (A) vulnerable to destruction (B) subject to illusion (C) worthy of consideration (D) capable of repetition (E) amenable to change

35. CONTROVERT : (A) substantiate (B) transform (C) ameliorate (D) simplify (E) differentiate 36. PROTRACT : (A) thrust (B) reverse (C) curtail (D) disperse (E) forestall 37. ABRADE : (A) unfasten (B) prolong (C) augment (D) extinguish (E) transmit 38. APOLOGIST : (A) egotist (B) wrongdoer (C) freethinker (D) detractor (E) spendthrift

28. D

29. B 38. D

30. D

31. A

32. D

33. E

34. E

35. A

36. C

37. C

TEST -15: SECTION-A 28. DRONE : (A) behave bestially (B) decide deliberately (C) err intentionally (D) speak animatedly (E) plan inefficiently 29. CERTAINTY: (A) obstinacy (B) impetuosity (C) recklessness (D) indecision (E) indifference 30. MORIBUND : (A) fully extended (B) automatically controlled (C) loosely connected (D) completely dispersed (E) increasingly vital 31. PROFANE : (A) approach expectantly (B) punish mildly (C) appease fully (D) treat reverently (E) admonish sternly 32. PERSONABLE : (A) unrefined (B) unselfish (C) unattractive (D) uncommitted (E) undistinguished 33. MIRE : (A) straighten (B) fracture (C) extricate (D) elevate (E) augment 34. CONCEPTUAL : (A) proven (B) effective (C) manageable (D) concrete (E) punctilious 35. SURFEIT : (A) precise length (B) delayed increment (C) obtainable quantity (D) unascertained limit (E) insufficient supply 36. TENACITY : (A) vacillation (B) servility (C) temerity (D) perversity (E) diversity 37. APPOSITE : (A) irrelevant (B) nameless (C) tentative (D) disfavored (E) lavish

38. STYMIE : (A) ponder (B) predict (C) divulge (D) abet (E) explain

28. D

29. D 38. D

30. E

31. D

32. C

33. C

34. D

35. E

36. A

37. A

TEST -15: SECTION-B 28. SUSPEND : (A) force (B) split (C) tilt (D) slide down (E) let fall 29. CREDULITY : (A) originality (B) skepticism (C) diligence (D) animation (E) stoicism 30. MILD : (A) toxic (B) uniform (C) maximal (D) a symptomatic (E) acute 31. IMPLEMENT : (A) distort (B) foil (C) overlook (D) aggravate (E) misinterpret 32. DIFFIDENCE : (A) trustworthiness (B) assertiveness (C) lack of preparation (D) resistance to change (E) willingness to blame 33. BYZANTINE : (A) symmetrical (B) variegated (C) discordant (D) straightforward (E) unblemished 34. PROCLIVITY : (A) confusion (B) deprivation (C) obstruction (D) aversion (E) hardship 35. PROTRACT : (A) treat fairly (B) request hesitantly (C) take back (D) cut short (E) make accurate 36. VAUNTING : (A) plucky (B) meek (C) chaste (D) cowardly (E) ardent 37. HALE : (A) unenthusiastic (B) staid (C) odious (D) infirm (E) uncharacteristic 38. SEMINAL : (A) derivative (B) substantiated (C) reductive (D) ambiguous (E) extremist

28. E

29. B 38. A

30. E

31. B

32. B

33. D

34. D

35. D

36. B

37. D

TEST -16: SECTION-A 28. STRINGENT : (A) lax (B) harsh (C) impartial (D) evident (E) vast 29. INTERIM : (A) obscure (B) permanent (C) prudent (D) resolute (E) secure 30. SCATHING : (A) easily understood (B) politely cooperative (C) intentionally involuted (D) calmly complimentary (E) strongly partisan 31. CAPITULATE : (A) enjoin (B) resist (C) observe closely (D) consider carefully (E) appraise critically 32. RECONSTITUTE : (A) detail (B) invent (C) spoil (D) conform (E) dehydrate 33. REPUTE : (A) lack of caution (B) lack of knowledge (C) lack of emotion (D) lack of generosity (E) lack of distinction 34. TAME : (A) resolute (B) ruinous (C) racy (D) erratic (E) experienced 35. INDURATE : (A) soften (B) puncture (C) denude (D) immure (E) exchange 36. PROLIXITY : (A) succinctness (B) profundity (C) persuasiveness (D) complacency (E) cleverness 37. CALLOW : (A) displaying keen intelligence (B) behaving with adult sophistication (C) reacting cheerfully (D) showing foresight (E) deciding quickly 38. FRIABLE : (A) not easily crumbled (B) not easily torn (C) not easily melted (D) not easily eroded (E) not easily punctured

28. A

29. B 38. A

30. D

31. B

32. E

33. E

34. C

35. A

36. A

37. B

TEST -16: SECTION-B 28. ACCESSORY : (A) insubordinate (B) invisible (C) of high quality (D) of massive proportions (E) of primary importance 29. CHAMPION : (A) emulate (B) disparage (C) compel (D) anticipate (E) disappoint 30. DECADENCE : (A) cheerfulness (B) promptness (C) cleanliness (D) wholesomeness (E) carefulness

31. OPACITY : (A) transparency (B) smoothness (C) colorlessness (D) elongation and thinness (E) hardness and durability 32. MISGIVING : (A) consistency (B) certainty (C) generosity (D) loyalty (E) affection 33. HARANGUE : (A) overtly envy (B) intermittently forget (C) gratefully acknowledge (D) speak temperately (E) sacrifice unnecessarily 34. GERMANE : (A) unproductive (B) irregular (C) indistinguishable (D) irrelevant (E) unsubstantiated 35. IMPUGN : (A) rectify (B) classify (C) vindicate (D) mollify (E) chastise 36. INEXORABLE : (A) discernible (B) quantifiable (C) relenting (D) inspiring (E) revealing 37. RESTIVE : (A) necessary (B) interesting (C) calm (D) healthy (E) deft 38. BAIT : (A) perplex (B) disarm (C) delude (D) release (E) fortify

28. E

29. B 38. E

30. D

31. A

32. B

33. D

34. D

35. C

36. C

37. C

TEST -17: SECTION-A 28. GROUNDED : (A) attendant (B) flawless (C) effective (D) aloft (E) noteworthy 29. DISCHARGE : (A) retreat (B) hire (C) insist (D) circulate (E) pause 30. INTERMITTENT : (A) compatible (B) constant (C) neutral (D) unadulterated (F) indispensable 31. APT : (A) exceptionally ornate (B) patently absurd (C) singularly destructive (D) extremely inappropriate (E) fundamentally insensitive 32. JUSTIFY : (A) misjudge (B) ponder (C) terminate (D) argue against (E) select from 33. TEDIOUS : (A) intricate (B) straightforward (C) conspicuous (D) entertaining (E) prominent

34. INTEGRAL : (A) profuse (B) superfluous (C) meritorious (D) neutral (E) displaced 35. COWED : (A) unencumbered (B) untired (C) unversed (D) unworried (E) undaunted 36. CONCORD : (A) continuance (B) severance (C) dissension (D) complex relationship (E) unrealistic hypothesis 37. FRIABLE : (A) substantial (B) inflexible (C) easily contained (D) slow to accelerate (E) not easily crumbled 38. DERACINATE : (A) illuminate (B) quench (C) amplify (D) polish (E) plant

28. D

29. B 38. E

30. B

31. D

32. D

33. D

34. B

35. E

36. C

37. E

TEST -17: SECTION-B 28. CELEBRITY : (A) eccentricity (B) informality (C) obscurity (D) aloofness (E) nonchalance 29. CHRONIC : (A) imminent (B) asynchronous (C) sequential (D) sporadic (E) spontaneous 30. ACCUMULATION : (A) severance (B) dissipation (C) reciprocity (D) absolution (E) remuneration 31. CALCIFICATION : (A) forgetfulness (B) abundance (C) streamlining (D) clairvoyance (F) flexibility 32. MIGRATORY : (A) speculative (B) transitory (C) sedentary (D) kinetic (E) convergent 33. CIVILITY : (A) impassivity (B) rudeness (C) indiscretion (D) dubiety (E) indolence 34. VARIANCE : (A) contingency (B) congruity (C) encumbrance (D) usefulness (E) distinctness 35. GENIAL : (A) dyspeptic (B) ceremonious (C) wistful (D) ravishing (E) variable

36. DIURNAL : (A) predictable (B) ephemeral (C) primitive (D) nocturnal (E) vestigial 37. APOLOGIST : (A) accompanist (B) protagonist (C) supplicant (D) critic (E) conspirator 38. VIRULENT : (A) auspicious (B) polite (C) salubrious (D) vanquished (E) intermittent

28. C

29. D 38. C

30. B

31. E

32. C

33. B

34. B

35. A

36. D

37. D

TEST -18: SECTION-A 28. SWERVE : (A) maintain direction (B) resume operation (C) slow down (D) divert (E) orient 29. HUSBAND : (A) rearrange (B) alarm (C) assist (D) prize (E) squander 30. DEACTIVATE : (A) palpate (B) alleviate (C) inhale (D) articulate (E) potentiate 31. INTRANSIGENT : (A) accustomed to command (B) qualified to arbitrate (C) open to compromise (D) resigned to conflict (E) opposed to violence 32. OCCLUDED : (A) unvaried (B) entire (C) functional (D) inverted (E) unobstructed 33. ASSUAGE : (A) intensify (B) accuse (C) correct (D) create (E) assert 34. QUIXOTIC : (A) displaying consistently practical behavior (B) considering several points of view (C) expressing dissatisfaction (D) suggesting uneasiness (E) acting decisively 35. PELLUCID : (A) stagnant (B) murky (C) glutinous (D) noxious (E) rancid 36. LACONISM : (A) temerity (B) vacuity (C) dishonesty (D) immaturity (E) verbosity 37. REFRACTORY : (A) active (B) productive (C) energetic (D) responsive (E) powerful 38. DEFINITIVE : (A) prosaic (B) convoluted (C) unusual (D) provisional (E) vast

28. A

29. E 38. D

30. E

31. C

32. E

33. A

34. A

35. B

36. E

37. D

TEST -18: SECTION-B 28. MISREAD : (A) refocus (B) approve (C) predict (D) explain succinctly (E) interpret correctly 29. DISSIPATE : (A) gather (B) seethe (C) relax (D) exert (E) incite 30. ENUNCIATE : (A) mumble (B) disclaim (C) dissuade (D) bluster (E) commend 31. TAUTEN : (A) rarefy (B) coarsen (C) force (D) loosen (E) constrain 32. ZEALOTRY : (A) pessimism (B) generosity (C) gullibility (D) lack of fervor (E) excess of confidence 33. REDOLENT : (A) cheerful (B) resolute (C) unscented (D) uncovered (E) untainted 34. GLUTINOUS : (A) nonviscous (B) nonporous (C) antitoxic (D) catalytic (E) alkaline 35. PANEGYRIC : (A) covenant (B) recantation (C) enigma (D) termination (E) anathema 36. AWASH : (A) fouled (B) quenched (C) rigid (D) dry (E) sturdy 37. UNTOWARD : (A) direct (B) fortunate (C) tangential (D) decisive (E) effective 38. SUPERCILIOUS : (A) castigating (B) obsequious (C) reclusive (D) rambunctious (E) abrasive

28. E

29. A 38. B

30. A

31. D

32. D

33. C

34. A

35. E

36. D

37. B

TEST -19: SECTION-A 28. SLOUCH : (A) stand erect (B) move unhesitatingly (C) stretch languidly (D) scurry (E) totter

29. CLAIM : (A) renounce (B) repeal (C) deter (D) hinder (E) postpone 30. EXPEDITE : (A) impeach (B) deflect (C) resist (D) retard (E) remove 31. VALEDICTION : (A) greeting (B) promise (C) accusation (D) denigration (E) aphorism 32. FACTORABLE : (A) absorbent (B) magnifiable (C) simulated (D) irreducible (E) ambiguous 33. CONVOKE : (A) disturb (B) impress (C) adjourn (D) extol (E) applaud 34. REND : (A) sink (B) unite (C) find (D) spend (E) unleash 35. CONTRAVENE : (A) condescend (B) embark (C) support (D) offend (E) amass 36. NADIR : (A) summit (B) impasse (C) sanctuary (D) weak point (E) direct route 37. ABSTRACT : (A) deny (B) organize (C) elaborate (D) deliberate (E) produce 38. MENDACIOUS : (A) assured (B) honest (C) intelligent (D) fortunate (E) gracious

28. A

29. A 38. B

30. D

31. A

32. D

33. C

34. B

35. C

36. A

37. C

TEST -19: SECTION-B 28. FICTITIOUS : (A) classical (B) natural (C) factual (D) rational (E) commonplace 29. BRIDLED : (A) without recourse (B) without restraint (C) without meaning (D) without curiosity (E) without subtlety 30. CAPTIVATE : (A) repulse (B) malign (C) proscribe (D) send out (E) deliver from 31. DISSIPATE : (A) accumulate (B) emerge (C) overwhelm (D) adhere (E) invigorate 32. OSTRACIZE : (A) clarify (B) subdue (C) welcome (D) renew (E) crave

33. LOATH : (A) clever (B) reasonable (C) fortunate (D) eager (E) confident 34. VITIATE : (A) ingratiate (B) convince (C) regulate (D) fortify (E) constrict 35. LAVISH : (A) insist (B) criticize (C) undermine (D) stint (E) waste 36. VITUPERATIVE : (A) complimentary (B) demagogic (C) hopeful (D) admirable (E) veracious 37. MORIBUND : (A) discontinuous (B) natural (C) nascent (D) rational (E) dominant 38. CATHOLIC : (A) narrow (B) soft (C) trivial (D) calm (E) quick

28. C

29. B 38. A

30. A

31. A

32. C

33. D

34. D

35. D

36. A

37. C

SENTENCE COMPLETIONS
TEST -1 Section-A 1. The corporation expects only ------- increase in sales next year despite a yearlong effort to revive its retailing business. (A) unquestionable (B) sequential (C) modest (D) exaggerated (E) groundless 2. No computer system is immune to a virus, a particularly malicious program that is designed to ------- and electronically ------- the disks on which data are stored. (A) prepare. .improve (B) restore. .disable (C) infect. .damage (D) preserve. .secure (E) invade. .repair 3. Recent research indicates that a system of particles which has apparently decayed to randomness from ------- state can be returned to that state: thus the system exhibits a kind of memory of its ------- condition. (A) an equilibrium. .lesser (B) an ordered. .earlier (C) an unusual. .settled (D) a chaotic. .last (E) a higher. .present 4. A number of writers who once greatly -------the literary critic have recently recanted, substituting ------- for their former criticism. (A) lauded. .censure (B) influence. .analysis (C) simulated. .ambivalence (D) disparaged. .approbation (E) honored. .adulation 5. She writes across generational lines, making the past so ------- that our belief that the present is the true locus of experience is undermined. (A) complex (B) distant (C) vivid (D) mysterious (E) mundane 6. Individual freedom of thought should be ------- more absolutely than individual freedom of action, given that the latter, though also desirable, must be ------- the limits imposed by the rights and freedom of others. (A) protected. .subject to (B) assessed. .measured by (C) valued. .superior to (D) exercised. .indifferent to (E) curtailed. .conscious of 7. Their ------- was expressed in quotidian behavior: they worshipped regularly, ------- all the regenerative processes of nature respect, and even awe. (A) selflessness. .reserving to (B) moderation. .extending to (C) reverence. .exacting from (D) piety. .according (E) serenity. .refusing 1. C 2. C 3. B 4. D 5. C 6. A 7. D

TEST -1 Section-B 1. My family often found others laughable, but I learned quite early to be ------while people were present, laughing only later at what was funny and mocking what to us seemed -------. (A) polite. .bizarre (B) impatient. .unfortunate (C) facetious. .enviable (D) wistful. .extraordinary (E) superficial. .deplorable 2. The technical know-how, if not the political -------, appears already at hand to feed the world? s exploding population and so to ------- at least the ancient scourges of malnutrition and famine. (A) will. .weaken (B) expertise. .articulate (C) doubt. .banish (D) power. .denounce (E) commitment. .eradicate 3. In small farming communities, accident victims rarely sue or demand compensation: transforming a personal injury into a ------- someone else is viewed as an attempt to ------- responsibility for one's own actions. (A) conspiracy against. .assume (B) claim against. .elude (C) boon for. .minimize (D) distinction for. .shift (E) trauma for. .proclaim 4. Dominant interests often benefit most from ------- of governmental interference in business, since they are able to take care of themselves if left alone. (A) intensification (B) authorization (C) centralization (D) improvisation (E) elimination 5. The "impostor syndrome" often afflicts those who fear that true self disclosure will lower them in others' esteem: rightly handled, however, ------may actually ------- one's standing. (A) willfulness. .consolidate (B) imposture. .undermine (C) affectation. .jeopardize (D) candor. .enhance (E) mimicry. .efface 6. The pungent verbal give-and-take among the characters makes the novel ------ reading, and this very ------- suggests to me that some of the opinions voiced may be the author's. (A) disturbing. .flatness (B) tedious. .inactiveness (C) lively. .spiritedness (D) necessary. .steadiness (E) rewarding. .frivolousness 7. The fortress like faade of the Museum of Cartoon Art seems calculated to remind visitors that the comic strip is an art form that has often been ------- by critics. (A) charmed (B) assailed (C) unnoticed (D) exhilarated (E) overwhelmed 1. A 2. E 3. B 4. E 5. D 6. C 7. B

TEST -2 Section-A 1. According to the newspaper critic, the performances at the talent contest last night ------- from acceptable to excellent. (A) varied (B) receded (C) swept (D) averaged (E) declined

2. For more than a century, geologists have felt comfortable with the idea that geological processes, although very -------, are also ------- and so are capable of shaping the Earth, given enough time. (A) minute. .sporadic (B) slow. .steady (C) complex. .discernible (D) unpredictable. .constant (E) ponderous. .intermittent 3. While not ------- with the colorfully obvious forms of life that are found in a tropical rain forest, the desert is ------- to a surprisingly large number of species. (A) brimming. .foreign (B) endowed. .detrimental (C) imbued. .hostile (D) teeming. .host (E) confronted. .home 4. Speakers and listeners are often at odds: language that is easy for the receiver to understand is often difficult to -------, and that which is easily formulated can be hard to -------. (A) estimate. .confirm (B) transmit. .defend (C) produce. .comprehend (D) suppress. .ignore (E) remember. .forget 5. The current demand for quality in the schools seems to ask not for the development of information and active citizens, but for disciplined and productive workers with abilities that contribute to civic life only -------, if at all. (A) indirectly (B) politically (C) intellectually (D) sensibly (E) sequentially 6. Because of its lack of theaters, the city came, ironically, to be viewed as an ------ theater town, and that reputation led entrepreneurs to believe that it would be ------- to build new theaters there. (A) unprofitable. .risky (B) untapped. .pointless (C) unappreciated. .difficult (D) unlikely. .appropriate (E) unimpressed. .shrewd 7. He felt it would be -------, in view of the intense ------- that would likely follow, to make the sacrifice required in order to gain such little advantage. (A) charitable. .growth (B) welcomed. .prejudice (C) futile. .encouragement (D) academic. .acclaim (E) unrealistic. .turmoil

1. A

2. B

3. D

4. C

5. E

6. A

7. E

TEST -2 Section-B 1. The academic education offered to university students is essential and must not be -------, but that does not mean university should ------- the extracurricular, yet still important, aspects of university life. (A) impeded. .promote (B) debated. .victimize (C) protected. .broaden (D) maximized. .continue (E) compromised. .neglect

2. To understand fully the impact of global warming on the environment, one must recognize that the components of the problem are ------- and, therefore, a change in any one component will ------- the others. (A) distinct. .influence (B) unique. .clarify (C) linked. .affect (D) cyclical. .negate (E) growing. .exacerbate 3. Although the Impressionists painters appeared to earlier art historians to be ------- in their methods, recent analyses of their brush work suggest the contrary ? that, in fact, their technique was quite -------. (A) unstudied. .sophisticated (B) idiosyncratic. .effective (C) eclectic. .nave (D) lax. .fashionable (E) careless. .unpremeditated 4. Increased government alarm about global warms ------- the concern among scientists that such warming is occurring, though when to expect major effects is still -------. (A) echoes. .agreed on (B) precludes. .under consideration (C) reflects. .in dispute (D) obviates. .in doubt (E) encourages. .confirmed 5. For someone as ------- as she, who preferred to speak only when absolutely necessary, his relentless chatter was completely -------. (A) ingenuous. .ignorant (B) curt. .enchanting (C) cheerful. .idle (D) laconic. .maddening (E) forward. .pointless 6. Future generations will probably consider current speculations about humanity's place in the universe to be ------- omissions and errors: even rigorous scientific views change sometimes overnight. (A) immune from (B) marred by (C) uncorrupted by (C) correct despite (E) abridged by 7. Marshal Philippe Petain, unlike any other French citizen of this century, has been paradoxically object of both great veneration and great -------. (A) reverence (B) interest (C) empathy (D) contempt (E) praise

1. E

2. C

3. A

4. C

5. D

6. B

7. D

TEST -3 Section-A 1. In some cultures the essence of magic is its traditional integrity: it can be efficient only if it has been ------- without loss from primeval times to the present practitioner. (A) conventionalized (B) realized (C) transmitted (D) manipulated (E) aggrandized

2. Although skeptics say financial problems will probably ------- our establishing a base on the Moon, supporters of the project remain -------, saying that human curiosity should overcome such pragmatic constraints. (A) beset. .disillusioned (B) hasten. .hopeful (C) postpone. .pessimistic (D) prevent. .enthusiastic (E) allow. .unconvinced 3. Before the Second World War, academics still questioned whether the body of literature produced in the United States truly ------- a ------- literature or whether such literature was only a provincial branch of English literature. (A) symbolized. .local (B) constituted. .national (C) defined. .historical (D) outlined. .good (E) captured. .meaningful 4. Many more eighteenth-century novels were written by women than by men, but this dominance has, until very recently, been regarded merely as ------ fact, a bit of arcane knowledge noted only by bibliographers. (A) a controversial (B) a statistical (C) an analytical (D) an explicit (E) an unimpeachable 5. All ------- biological traits fall into one of two categories: those giving their possessors greater ------- the environment and those rendering them more independent of it. (A) widespread. .detachment from (B) beneficial. .control over (C) successful. .freedom from (D) neutral. .compatibility with (E) harmful. .advantage in 6. One of archaeology's central dilemmas is now to reconstruct the ------- of complex ancient societies from meager and often ------- physical evidence. (A) riddles. .obsolete (B) details. .irrefutable (C) intricacies. .equivocal (D) patterns. .flawless (E) configuration. .explicit 7. Just as the authors' book on eels is often a key text for courses in marine vertebrate zoology, their ideas on animal development and phylogeny ------teaching in this area. (A) prevent (B) defy (C) replicate (D) inform (E) use

1. C

2. D

3. B

4. B

5. B

6. C

7. D

TEST -3 Section-B 1. What is most important to the monkeys in the sanctuary is that they are a group; this is so because primates are inveterately ------- and build their lives around each other. (A) independent (B) stable (C) curious (D) social (E) proprietary

2. Often the difficulties of growing up in the public eye cause child prodigies to ------- the world of achievement before reaching adulthood: happily, they sometimes later return to competition and succeed brilliantly. (A) ridicule (B) conquer (C) retire from (D) antagonize (E) examine 3. In scientific studies, supporting evidence is much more satisfying to report than are discredited hypotheses, but, in fact, the ------- of errors is more likely to be ------- than is the establishment of probable truth. (A) formulation. .permitted (B) correction. .ignored (C) detection. .useful (D) accumulation. .agreeable (E) refinement. .conditional 4. Professional photographers generally regard inadvertent surrealism in a photograph as a curse rather than a blessing: magazine photographers in particular, consider themselves ------- to the extent that they can ------- its presence in their photographs. (A) skillful. .enhance (B) inadequate. .eliminate (C) original. .demonstrate (D) fortunate. .minimize (E) conventional. .highlight 5. Marison was a scientist of unusual -------- and imagination who had startling success in ------- new and fundamental principles well in advance of their general recognition. (A) restiveness. .acknowledging (B) precision. .coordinating (C) aggression. .resisting (D) candor. .dispelling (E) insight. .discerning 6. Unenlightened authoritarian managers rarely recognize a crucial reason for the low levels of serious conflict among members of democratically run work groups: a modicum of tolerance for dissent often prevents -------. (A) demur (B) schism (C) cooperation (D) compliance (E) shortsightedness 7. Arruthers' latest literary criticism ------- her reputation for trenchant commentary: despite its intriguing title and the fulsome praise on its dust jacket, it is nothing more than a collection of -------. (A) reinforces. .pronouncements (B) belies. .platitudes (C) prejudices. .insights (D) advances. .aphorisms (E) undermines. .judgments

1. D

2. C

3. C

4. D

5. E

6. B

7. B

TEST -4 Section-A 1. If those large publishers that respond solely to popular literary trends continue to dominate the publishing market, the initial publication of new

writers will depend on the writers' willingness to ------- popular tastes. (A) struggle against (B) cater to (C) admire (D) flout (E) elude 2. Candidates who oppose the present state income tax must be able to propose ------- ways to ------- the financing of state operations. (A) intelligent. .initiate (B) individual. .diversify (C) innovative. .alleviate (D) arbitrary. .maintain (E) alternate. .continue 3. Although strong legal remedies for nonpayment of child support are ---------, the delay and expense associated with these remedies make it ------- to develop other options. (A) unpopular. .useful (B) required. .impossible (C) available. .imperative (D) unavailing. .impractical (E) nonexistent. .ridiculous 4. Calculus, though still indispensable to science and technology, is no longer ------; it has an equal partner called discrete mathematics. (A) preeminent (B) pertinent (C) beneficial (D) essential (E) pragmatic 5. Demonstrating a mastery of innuendo, he issued several ------- insults in the course of the evening's conversation. (A) blunt (B) boisterous (C) fallacious (D) veiled (E) embellished 6. The ------- of gamblers' unsuccessful decision strategies is one ------- of the illusions built into games of chance in order to misguide players and take their money. (A) distortion. .outcome (B) restriction. .result (C) maintenance. .function (D) prediction. .accomplishment (E) demonstration. .prerequisite 7. The natures of social history and lyric poetry are -------, social history always recounting the ------- and lyric poetry speaking for unchanging human nature, that timeless essence beyond fashion and economics. (A) predetermined. .bygone (B) antithetical. .evanescent (C) interdependent. .unnoticed (D) irreconcilable. .unalterable (E) indistinguishable. .transitory

1. B

2. E

3. C

4. A

5. D

6. C

7. B

TEST -4 Section-B 1. Exposure to low-intensity gamma radiation slows the rate of growth of the spoilage microorganisms in food in much the same way that the low heat used in pasteurization ------- the spoilage action of the microorganism in milk. (A) precludes (B) initiates (C) inhibits (D) isolates (E) purifies

2. In today's world, manufacturers' innovations are easily copied and thus differences between products are usually -------; advertisers, therefore, are forced to ------- these differences in order to suggest the uniqueness of their clients' products. (A) crucial. .downplay (B) minimal. .reduce (C) slight. .exaggerate (D) common. .emphasize (E) intrinsic. .create 3. To avoid annihilation by parasites, some caterpillars are able to ------periods of active growth by prematurely entering a dormant state, which is characterized by the ------- of feeding. (A) curtail. .suspension (B) foster. .continuation (C) prevent. .stimulation (D) mediate. .synthesis (E) invert. .simulation 4. Prior to the work of Heckel, illustrations of fish were often beautiful but rarely -------; this fact, combined with the ------- nature of most nineteenthcentury taxonomic descriptions, often kept scientists from recognizing differences between species. (A) impressive. .inaccurate (B) realistic. .detailed (C) traditional. .progressive (D) precise. .inexact (E) distinctive. .sophisticated 5. Experienced and proficient, Susan is a good, ------- trumpeter; her music is often more satisfying than Carol's brilliant but ------- playing. (A) virtuoso. .inimitable (B) mediocre. .eccentric (C) competent. .influential (D) amateur. .renowned (E) reliable. .erratic 6. In the midst of so many evasive comments, this forthright statement, whatever its intrinsic merit, plainly stands out as -------. (A) a paradigm (B) a misnomer (C) a profundity (D) an inaccuracy (E) an anomaly 7. Marshall's confrontational style could alienate almost anyone: he even antagonized a board of directors that included a number of his supporters and that had a reputation for not being easily -------. (A) intimidated (B) mollified (C) reconciled (D) provoked (E) motivated

1. C

2. C

3. A

4. D

5. E

6. E

7. D

TEST -5 Section-A 1. Paradoxically, England's colonization of North America was ------- by its success; the increasing prosperity of the colonies diminished their dependence upon, and hence their loyalty to their home country. (A) demonstrated (B) determined (C) altered (D) undermined (E) distinguished

2. Although Harry Stank Sullivan is one of the most influential social scientists of this century, his ideas are now so ------- in our society that they seem almost -------. (A) novel. .antiquated (B) revolutionary. .fundamental (C) commonplace. .banal (D) disputed. .esoteric (E) obscure. .familiar 3. Her first concert appearance was disappointingly perfunctory and derivative rather than the ------- performance in the ------- style we had anticipated. (A) talented. .tenuous (B) prosaic. .classic (C) artistic. .mechanical (D) inspired. .innovative (E) literal. .enlightened 4. As is often the case with collections of lectures by ------- authors, the book as a whole is -------, although the individual contributions are outstanding in themselves. (A) different. .disconnected (B) incompetent. .abysmal (C) famous. .systematic (D) mediocre. .unexciting (E) various. .coherent 5. Although some consider forcefulness and -------to be two traits desirable to the same degree, I think that making a violent effort is much less useful than maintaining a steady one. (A) promptness (B) persistence (C) aggression (D) skillfulness (E) lucidity 6. The popularity of pseudoscience and quack medicines in the nineteenth century suggests that people were very -------, but the gullibility of the public today makes citizens of yesterday look like hard-nosed -------. (A) cautious. .educators (B) sophisticated. .realists (C) rational. .pragmatists (D) naive. .idealists (E) credulous. .skeptics 7. Though extremely ------- about his own plans, the man allowed his associates no such privacy and was constantly ------- information about what they intended to do next. (A) idiosyncratic. .altering (B) guarded. .eschewing (C) candid. .uncovering (D) reticent. .soliciting (E) fastidious. .ruining

1. D

2. C

3. D

4. A

5. B

6. E

7. D

TEST -5 Section-B 1. Having sufficient income of her own constituted for Alice ------independence that made possible a degree of ------- in her emotional life as well. (A) a material. .security (B) a profound. .conformity (C) a financial. .economy (D) a psychological. .extravagance (E) an unexpected. .uncertainty

2. Copyright and patent laws attempt to encourage innovation by ensuring that inventors are paid for creative work, so it would be ------- if expanded protection under these laws discouraged entrepreneurial innovation by increasing fears of lawsuits. (A) desirable (B) coincidental (C) ironic (D) natural (E) sensible 3. Unfortunately, since courses in nutrition are often ------- medical school curriculums, a family physician is ------- to be an enlightening source of general information about diet. (A) questioned by. .encouraged (B) encountered among. .unable (C) unappreciated by. .expected (D) neglected in. .unlikely (E) squeezed into. .intended 4. The success of science is due in great part to its emphasis on -------: the reliance on evidence rather than ------- and the willingness to draw conclusions even when they conflict with traditional beliefs. (A) causality. .experimentation (B) empiricism. .facts (C) objectivity. .preconceptions (D) creativity. .observation (E) conservatism. .assumptions 5. James had idolized the professor so much for so long that even after lunching with her several times he remained quite ------- in her presence, and as a result, he could not really be himself. (A) pleased (B) disregarded (C) heartened (D) relaxed (E) inhibited 6. However ------- they might be, Roman poets were bound to have some favorite earlier author whom they would -------. (A) subservient. .imitate (B) independent. .inspire (C) original. .emulate (D) creative. .admire (E) talented. .neglect 7. Human nature and long distances have made exceeding the speed limit a ------ tradition in the state, so the legislators surprised no one when, acceding to public practice, they -------increased penalties for speeding. (A) disquieting. .endorsed (B) long-standing. .considered (C) controversial. .suggested (D) cherished. .rejected (E) hallowed. .investigated

1. A

2. C

3. D

4. C

5. E

6. C

7. D

TEST -6 Section-A 1. Because the monkeys under study are ------- the presence of human beings, they typically ------- human observers and go about their business. (A)

ambivalent to. .welcome (B) habituated to. .disregard (C) pleased with. .snub (D) inhibited by. .seek (E) unaware of. . avoid 2. Given her previously expressed interest and the ambitious tone of her recent speeches, the senator's attempt to convince the public that she is not interested in running for a second term is -------. (A) laudable (B) likely (C) authentic (D) futile (E) sincere 3. Many of her followers remain ------- to her, and even those who have rejected her leadership are unconvinced of the ------- of replacing her during the current turmoil. (A) opposed. .urgency (B) friendly. .harm (C) loyal. .wisdom (D) cool. .usefulness (E) sympathetic. .disadvantage 4. Unlike many recent interpretations of Beethoven's piano sonatas, the recitalist's performance was a delightfully free and introspective one; nevertheless, it was also, seemingly paradoxically, quite -------. (A) appealing (B) exuberant (C) idiosyncratic (D) unskilled (E) controlled 5. Species with relatively ------- metabolic rates, including hibernators, generally live longer than those whose metabolic rates are rapid. (A) prolific (B) sedentary (C) sluggish (D) measured (E) restive 6. Belying his earlier reputation for ------- as a negotiator, Morgan had recently assumed a more ------- stance for which many of his erstwhile critics praised him. (A) intransigence. .conciliatory (B) impropriety. .intolerant (C) inflexibility. .unreasonable (D) success. .authoritative (E) incompetence. .combative 7. Although Irish literature continued to flourish after the sixtee nth century, a ------ tradition is ------- in the visual arts: we think about Irish culture in terms of the word, not in terms of pictorial images. (A) rich. .superfluous (B) lively. .found (C) comparable. .absent (D) forgotten. .apparent (E) lost. .extant

1. B

2. D

3. C

4. E

5. C

6. A

7. C

TEST -6 Section-B 1. Although sales have continued to increase since last April, unfortunately the rate of increase has -------. (A) resurged (B) capitulated (C) retaliated (D) persevered (E) decelerated

2. Although the mental process that creates a fresh and original poem or drama is doubtlessly ------- that which originates and elaborates scientific discoveries, there is clearly a discernible difference between the creators (A) peripheral to (B) contiguous with (C) opposed to (D) analogous to (E) inconsistent with 3. It is disappointing to note that the latest edition of the bibliography belies its long-standing reputation for ------- by ------- some significant references to recent publications. (A) imprecision. .appropriating (B) relevance. .adding (C) timelessness. .updating (D) meticulousness. .revising (E) exhaustiveness. .omitting 4. Although Simpson was ingenious at ------- to appear innovative and spontaneous, beneath the rule he remained uninspired and rigid in his approach to problem-solving. (A) intending (B) contriving (C) forbearing (D) declining (E) deserving 5. She was criticized by her fellow lawyers not because she was not -------, but because she so ------- prepared her cases that she failed to bring the expected number to trial. (A) well versed. .knowledgeably (B) well trained. .enthusiastically (C) congenial. .rapidly (D) hardworking. .minutely (E) astute. .efficiently 6. Schlesinger has recently assumed a conciliatory attitude that is not ------- by his colleagues who continue to ------- compromises. (A) eschewed. .dread (B) shared. .defend (C) questioned. .reject (D) understood. .advocate (E) commended. .disparage 7. The National Archives contain information so ------- that researchers have been known never to publish because they cannot bear to bring their studies to an end. (A) divisive (B) seductive (C) selective (D) repetitive (E) resourceful

1. E

2. D

3. E

4. B

5. D

6. E

7. A

TEST -7 Section-A 1. Though ------- to some degree, telling a small lie sometimes enables one to avoid ------- another's feelings. (A) necessary. .mollifying (B) regrettable. .harming (C) unfortunate. .exaggerating (D) attractive. .considering (E) difficult. .resisting

2. Perhaps because scientists have been so intrigued by dogs' superior senses of smell and hearing, researchers have long ------- their eyesight, assuming that they inhabit a drab, black-and-white world, devoid of color. (A) studied (B) coveted (C) appreciated (D) resented (E) underestimated 3. Despite a string of dismal earnings reports, the two-year-old strategy to return the company to profitability is beginning to -------. (A) falter (B) disappoint (C) compete (D) work (E) circular 4. The President reached a decision only after lengthy -------, painstakingly weighing the ------- opinions expressed by cabinet members. (A) deliberation. .divergent (B) confrontation. .unanimous (C) relegation. .consistent (D) speculation. .conciliatory (E) canvassing. .arbitrary 5. Although just barely ------- as a writer of lucid prose, Jones was an extremely ------- editor who worked superbly with other writers in helping them improve the clarity of their writing. (A) deficient. .muddling (B) proficient. .contentious (C) adequate. .capable (D) appalling. .competent (E) engaging. .inept 6. The accusations we bring against others should be ------- ourselves; they should not ------- complacency and easy judgments on our part concerning our own moral conduct. (A) definitions of. .produce (B) instructions to. .equate (C) denigrations of. .exclude (D) warning to. .justify (E) parodies of. .satirize 7. Although the meanings of words may necessarily be liable to change, it does not follow that the lexicographer is therefore unable to render spelling, in a great measure, -------. (A) arbitrary (B) superfluous (C) interesting (D) flexible (E) constant

1. B

2. E

3. D

4. A

5. C

6. D

7. E

TEST -7 Section-B 1. Some activists believe that because the health-care system has become increasingly ------- to those it serves, individuals must ------- bureaucratic impediments in order to develop and promote new therapies. (A) attuned. .avoid (B) inimical. .utilize (C) unresponsive. .circumvent (D) indifferent. .supplement (E) sensitized. .forsake 2. The acts of vandalism that these pranks had actually ------- were insignificant compared with those they had ------- but had not attempted. (A) hidden.

.renounced (B) advocated. .meditated (C) inflicted. .dismissed (D) committed. .effected (E) perpetrated. .contemplated 3. Though one cannot say that Michelangelo was an impractical designer, he was, of all nonprofessional architects known, the most ------ in that he was the least conserved by tradition or precedent. (A) pragmatic (B) adventurous (C) empirical (D) skilled (E) learned 4. Before adapting to changes in values, many prefer to -------, to ------- the universally agreed-on principles that have been upheld for centuries. (A) innovate. .protect (B) resist. .defend (C) ponder. .subvert (D) vacillate. .publicize (E) revert. .ignore 5. Although the records of colonial New England are ------- in comparison with those available in France or England, the records of other English colonies in America are even more -------. (A) sporadic. .irrefutable (B) sparse. .incontrovertible (C) ambiguous. .authoritative (D) sketchy. .fragmentary (E) puzzling. .unquestionable 6. High software prices are frequently said to ------ widespread illegal copying, although the opposite?that high prices are the cause of the copying?is equally plausible. (A) contribute to (B) result from (C) correlate with (D) explain (E) precede 7. Because early United States writers thought that the mark of great literature was grandiosity and elegance not to be found in common speech, they ------- the vernacular. (A) dissected (B) avoided (C) misunderstood (D) investigated (E) exploited

1. C

2. E

3. B

4. B

5. D

6. B

7. B

TEST -8 Section-A 1. Because modern scientists find the ancient Greek view of the cosmos outdated and irrelevant, they now perceive it as only of ------- interest. (A) historical (B) intrinsic (C) astronomical (D) experimental (E) superfluous 2. Religious philosopher that he was, Henry More derived his conception of an infinite universe from the Infinite God in whom he believed a benevolent God of ------- whose nature was to create -------. (A) plenitude. .abundance (B)

vengeance. .justice (C) indifference. .suffering. (D) indulgence. .temperance (E) rectitude. .havoc 3. While some argue that imposing tolls on highway users circumvents the need to raise public taxes for road maintenance, the phenomenal expense of maintaining a vast network of roads ------- reliance on these general taxes. (A) avoids (B) diminishes (C) necessitates (D) discourages (E) ameliorates 4. Although they were not direct -------, the new arts of the Classical period were clearly created in the spirit of older Roman models and thus------- many features of the older style. (A) impressions. .introduced (B) translations. .accentuated (C) copies. maintained (D) masterpieces. .depicted (E) borrowings. .improvised 5. In spite of the increasing ------- of their opinions, the group knew they had to arrive at a consensus so that the award could be presented. (A) impartiality (B) consistency (C) judiciousness (D) incisiveness (E) polarity 6. By forcing our surrender to the authority of the clock, systematic timekeeping has imposed a form of -------. (A) anarchy (B) permanence (C) provincialism (D) tyranny (E) autonomy 7. Our highly ------- vocabulary for street crime contrasts sharply with our ------vocabulary for corporate crime, a fact that corresponds to the general public's unawareness of the extent of corporate crime. (A) nuanced. .subtle (B) uninformative. .misleading (C) euphemistic. .abstract (D) differentiated. .limited (E) technical. .jargon-laden

1. A

2. A

3. C

4. C

5. E

6. D

7. D

TEST -8 Section-B 1. We first became aware that her support for the new program was less than ------- when she declined to make a speech in its favor. (A) qualified (B) haphazard (C) fleeting (D) unwarranted (E) wholehearted 2. When a person suddenly loses consciousness, a bystander is not expected to ------- the problem but to attempt to ------- its effects by starting vital functions if they are absent. (A) cure. .precipitate (B) minimize. .predict (C) determine. .detect (D) diagnose. .counter (E) magnify. .evaluate

3. The remark was only slightly -------, inviting a chuckle, perhaps, but certainly not a -------. (A) audible. .reward (B) hostile. .shrug (C) amusing. .rebuke (D) coherent. .reaction (E) humorous. .guffaw 4. Doors were closing on our past, and soon the values we had lived by would become so obsolete that we would seem to people of the new age as ------- as travelers from an ancient land. (A) elegant (B) ambitious (C) interesting (D) comfortable (E) quaint 5. Ability to ------- is the test of the perceptive historian: a history, after all, consists not only of what the historian has included, but also, i n some sense, of what has been left out. (A) defer (B) select (C) confer (D) devise (E) reflect 6. Some artists immodestly idealize or exaggerate the significance of their work: yet others, ------- to exalt the role of the artist, reject a transcendent view of art. (A) appearing (B) disdaining (C) seeking (D) failing (E) tending 7. Estimating the risks of radiation escaping from a nuclear power plant is ------ question, but one whose answer then becomes part of a value -laden, emotionally charged policy debate about whether to construct such a plant. (A) an incomprehensible (B) an undefined (C) an irresponsible (D) a divisive (E) a technical

1. E

2. D

3. E

4. E

5. B

6. B

7. E

TEST -9 Section-A 1. What these people were waiting for would not have been apparent to others and was perhaps not very ------- their own minds. (A) obscure to (B) intimate to (C) illusory to (D) difficult for (E) definite in 2. The attempt to breed suitable varieties of jojoba by using hybridization to ------ favorable traits was finally abandoned in favor of a simpler and much faster -------: the domestication of flourishing wild strains. (A) eliminate. .alternative (B) reinforce. .method (C) allow. .creation (D) reduce. .idea (E) concentrate. .theory 3. According to one political theorist, a regime that has as its goal absolute ------, without any ------- law or principle, has declared war on justice. (A) respectability. .codification of (B) supremacy. .suppression of (C) autonomy.

.accountability to (D) fairness. .deviation from (E) responsibility. .prioritization of 4. Despite its -------, the book deals ------- with a number of crucial issues. (A) optimism. .cursorily (B) importance. .needlessly (C) virtues. .inadequately (D) novelty. .strangely (E) completeness. .thoroughly 5. Although frequent air travelers remain unconvinced, researchers have found that, paradoxically, the ------ disorientation inherent in jet lag also may yield some mental health-------. (A) temporal. .benefits (B) acquired. .hazards (C) somatic. .disorders (D) random. .deficiencies (E) typical. .standards 6. Ironically, the proper use of figurative language must be based on the denotative meaning of the words, because it is the failure to recognize this ------ meaning that leads to mixed metaphors and their attendant incongruity. (A) esoteric (B) literal (C) latent (D) allusive (E) symbolic 7. Although it seems ------- that there would be a greater risk of serious automobile accidents in densely populated areas, such accidents are more likely to occur in sparsely populated regions. (A) paradoxical (B) axiomatic (C) anomalous (D) irrelevant (E) portentous

1. E

2. B

3. C

4. C

5. A

6. B

7. B

TEST -9 Section-B 1. If the theory is self-evidently true, as its proponents assert, then why does ------ it still exist among well informed people? (A) support for (B) excitement about (C) regret for (D) resignation about (E) opposition to 2. Although the ------- of cases of measles has -------, researchers fear that eradication of the disease, once believed to be imminent, may not come soon. (A) occurrence. .continued (B) incidence. .declined (C) prediction. .resumed (D) number. .increased (E) study. .begun 3. Nothing ------- his irresponsibility better than his ------- delay in sending us the items he promised weeks ago. (A) justifies. .conspicuous (B) characterizes. .timely (C) epitomizes. .unnecessary (D) reveals. .conscientious (E) conceals. .inexplicable

4. The author did not see the ------- inherent in her scathing criticism of a writing style so similar to her own. (A) disinterest (B) incongruity (C) pessimism (D) compliment (E) symbolism 5. Whereas the Elizabethans struggled with the transition from medieval ------experience to modern individualism, we confront an electronic technol ogy that seem likely to reverse the trend, rendering individualism obsolete and interdependence mandatory. (A) literary (B) intuitive (C) corporate (D) heroic (E) spiritual 6. Our biological uniqueness requires that the effects of substance must be verified by -------experiments, even after thousands of tests of the effects of that substance on animals. (A) controlled (B) random (C) replicated (D) human (E) evolutionary 7. Today water is more ------- in landscape architecture than ever before, because technological advances have made it easy, in some instances even ------, to install water features in public places. (A) conspicuous. .prohibitive (B) sporadic. .effortless (C) indispensable. .intricate (D) ubiquitous. .obligatory (E) controversial. .unnecessary

1. E

2. B

3. C

4. B

5. C

6. D

7. D

TEST -10 Section-A 1. Contrary to the popular conception that it is powered by conscious objectivity, science often operates through error, happy accidents, -------and persistence in spite of mistakes. (A) facts (B) controls (C) hunches (D) deductions (E) calculations 2. The transition from the Paleolithic to the Neolithic era is viewed by most art historians as a -------, because, instead of an increasingly------- pictorial art, we find degeneration. (A) milestone. .debased (B) consolidation. .diverse (C) calamity. .aberrant (D) regression. .sophisticated (E) continuation. .improved 3. Salazar's presence in the group was so ------- the others that they lost most of their earlier -------;failure, for them, became all but unthinkable. (A) reassuring to. .trepidation (B) unnoticed by. .curiosity (C) unusual to. .harmony (D) endearing to. .confidence (E) unexpected by. .exhilaration

4. The eradication of pollution is not merely a matter of -------, though the majestic beauty of nature is indeed an important consideration. (A) economics (B) legislation (C) cleanliness (D) aesthetics (E) restoration 5. Despite an agreement between labor and management to keep the print and electronic media ------- developments, the details of the negotiations were ------- all but a few journalists from the major metropolitan newspapers. (A) abreast of. .disclosed to (B) involved in. .leaded to (C) apprised of. .withheld from (D) speculating about. .denied to (E) ignorant of. .suppressed by 6. Word order in a sentence was much freer in Old French than it is in French today; this ------- disappeared as the French language gradually lost its case distinctions. (A) restriction (B) license (C) similarity (D) rigidity (E) imperati ve 7. Whereas biologists must maintain a ------- attitude toward the subjects of their research, social scientists must, paradoxically, combine personal involvement and scholarly -------. (A) scrupulous. .sympathy (B) careful. .abandon (C) casual. .precision (D) passive. .passion (E) disinterested. .detachment

1. C

2. D

3. A

4. D

5. C

6. B

7. E

TEST -10 Section-B 1. Read's apology to Heflin was not exactly abject and did little to ------- their decades-long quarrel, which had been as ------- as the academic etiquette of scholarly journals permitted. (A) encourage. .sporadic (B) dampen. .courteous (C) obscure. .ceremonious (D) resolve. .acrimonious (E) blur. .sarcastic 2. Certain weeds that flourish among rice crops resist detection until maturity by ------- the seedling stage in the rice plant's life cycle, thereby remaining indistinguishable from the rice crop until the flowering stage. (A) deterring (B) displacing (C) augmenting (D) imitating (E) nurturing 3. Although the architect's concept at first sounded too ------- to be -------, his careful analysis of every aspect of the project convinced the panel that the proposed building was indeed, structurally feasible. (A) mundane. .attractive (B) eclectic. .appealing (C) grandiose. .affordable (D) innovative. .ignored (E) visionary. .practicable

4. Gould claimed no ------- knowledge of linguistics, but only a hobbyist's interest in language. (A) manifest (B) plausible (C) technical (D) rudimentary (E) insignificant 5. An obvious style, easily identified by some superficial quirk, is properly ------as a mere mannerism, whereas a complex and subtle style------- reduction to a formula. (A) avoided. .risks (B) decried. .resists (C) prized. .withstands (D) identified. .consists of (E) cultivated. .demands 6. If efficacious new medicines have side effects that are commonly observed and -------, such medicines are too often considered -------, even when laboratory tests suggest caution. (A) unremarkable. .safe (B) unpredictable. .reliable (C) frequent. .outdated (D) salutary. .experimental (E) complicated. .useful 7. Although a few delegates gave the opposition's suggestions a ------response, most greeted the statement of a counter position with -------. (A) favorable. .approval (B) dispirited. .reluctance (C) surly. .resentment (D) halfhearted. .composure (E) vitriolic. .civility

1. D

2. D

3. E

4. C

5. A

6. A

7. E

TEST -11 Section-A 1. A good doctor knows that knowledge about medicine will continue to ------and that, therefore, formal professional training can never be an ------- guide to good practice. (A) vary. .adaptable (B) change. .absolute (C) ossify. .inflexible (D) pertain. .invaluable (E) intensify. .obsolescent 2. Foucault's rejection of the concept of continuity in Western thought, though radical, was not unique; he had ------- in the United States who, without knowledge of his work, developed parallel ideas. (A) critics (B) counterparts (C) disciples (D) readers (E) publishers 3. In retrospect, Gordon's students appreciated her ------- assignments, realizing that such assignments were specifically designed to ------original thought rather than to review the content of her course. (A) didactic. .ingrain (B) intimidating. .thwart (C) difficult. .discourage (D) conventional. .explicate (E) enigmatic. .stimulate

4. In sharp contrast to the intense ------- of the young republic, with its utopian faith in democracy and hopes for eternal human progress, recent developments suggest a mood of almost unrelieved -------. (A) idealism. .cynicism (B) individualism. .escapism (C) sectarianism. .recklessness (D) assertiveness. .ambition (E) righteousness. .egalitarianism 5. Old age, even in cultures where it is -------, is often viewed with -------. (A) venerated. .ambivalence (B) rare. .surprise (C) ignored. .condescension (D) feared. .dismay (E) honored. .respect 6. Unlike the easily studied neutral and ionized ------- that compose the primary disk of the Milky Way itself, the components of the -------surrounding our galaxy have proved more resistant to study. (A) figments. .envelope (B) essences. .fluctuations (C) elements. .problems (D) calculations. .perimeter (E) materials. .region 7. Although normally -------, Alison felt so strongly about the issue that she put aside her reserve and spoke up at the committee meeting. (A) diffident (B) contentious (C) facetious (D) presumptuous (E) intrepid

1. B

2. B

3. E

4. A

5. A

6. E

7. A

TEST -11 Section-B 1. Contrary to the antiquated idea that the eighteenth ce ntury was a ------island of elegant assurance, evidence reveals that life for most people was filled with uncertainty and insecurity. (A) clannish (B) declining (C) tranquil (D) recognized (E) sprawling 2. The insecticide proved -------; by killing the weak adults of a species, it assured that the strong ones would mate among themselves and produce offspring still more ------- to its effects. (A) ineffective. .hostile (B) cruel. .vulnerable (C) feasible. .susceptible (D) necessary. .immune (E) counterproductive. .resistant 3. Many industries are so ------- by the impact of government sanctions, equipment failure, and foreign competition that they are beginning to rely on industrial psychologists to ------- what remains of employee morale. (A) estranged. .guard (B) beleaguered. .salvage (C) overruled. .undermine (D) encouraged. .determine (E) restrained. .confirm

4. Fashion is partly a search for a new language to discredit the old, a way in which each generation can ------- its immediate predecessor and distinguish itself. (A) honor (B) repudiate (C) condone (D) placate (E) emulate 5. Although ------- is usually thought to spring from regret for having done something wrong, it may be that its origin is the realization that one's own nature is irremediably -------. (A) contrition. .resilient (B) certitude. .confident (C) skepticism. .innocent (D) remorse. .flawed (E) resignation. .frivolous 6. Numerous historical examples illustrate both the overriding influence that scientists' ------- have on their interpretation of data and the consequent ------of their intellectual objectivity. (A) prejudices. .impairment (B) instruments. .abandonment (C) theories. .independence (D) conclusions. .coloration (E) suppositions. .reinforcement 7. From the outset, the concept of freedom of the seas from the proprietary claims of nations was challenged by a contrary notion?that of the ------- of the oceans for reasons of national security and profit. (A) promotion (B) exploration (C) surviving (D) conservation (E) enclosure

1. C

2. E

3. B

4. B

5. D

6. A

7. E

TEST -12 Section A 1. The fact that a theory is ------- does not necessarily ------- its scientific truth, which must be established by unbiased controlled studies. (A) plausible. .ensure (B) popular. .limit (C) venerable. .override (D) cohesive. .undermine (E) cumbersome. .alleviate 2. It is difficult to distinguish between the things that charismatic figures do ------ and those that are carefully contrived for effect. (A) formally (B) publicly (C) prolifically (D) spontaneously (E) willfully 3. The development of containers, possibly made from bark or the skins of animals, although this is a matter of -------, allowed the extensive sharing of forage foods in prehistoric human societies. (A) record (B) fact (C) degree (D) importance (E) conjecture 4. Although the young violinist's ------- performance with the orchestra demonstrated his technical competence, his uninspired style and lack of interpretive maturity labeled him as a novice musician rather than as a truly ---

---- performer. (A) spectacular. .conventional (B) blundering. .artistic (C) marginal. .inept (D) steady. ..accomplished (E) dazzling. .unskilled 5. Even though political editorializing was not------- under the new regime, journalists still experienced -------, though perceptible, governmental pressure to limit dissent. (A) restricted. .clear (B) encouraged. .strong (C) forbidden. .discreet (D) commended. .overt (E) permitted. .regular 6. The trick for Michael was to ------- his son an illusory orderliness; only alone at night, when the boy was asleep, could Michael ------- the chaos he kept hidden from his son. (A) explore with. .demonstrate (B) conjure for. .acknowledge (C) conceal from. .dispel (D) demystify for. .escape (E) endure with. .abandon 7. The ------- costumes of Renaissance Italy, with their gold and silver embroidery and figured brocades, were the antithesis of Spanish -------, with its dark muted colors, plain short capes, and high collars edged with small ruffs. (A) striking. .obliqueness (B) extravagant. .profligacy (C) austere. .informality (D) unpretentious. .asceticism (E) sumptuous. .sobriety

1. A

2. D

3. E

4. D

5. C

6. B

7. E

TEST -13 Section-A 1. Though environmentalists have targeted some herbicides as potentially dangerous, the manufacturers, to the environmentalists' dismay, ------- the use of these herbicides on lawns. (A) defy (B) defer (C) defend (D) assail (E) disparage 2. To believe that a culture's achievement can be measured by the ------- of its written material requires one to accept that a page of junk mail is as ------- as a page of great literature. (A) nature. .readable (B) quality. .prevalent (C) timelessness. .understandable (D) applicability. .eloquent (E) volume. .valuable 3. Given the failure of independent laboratories to replicate the results of Dr. Johnson's experiment, only the most ------- supporters of her hypothesis would be foolish enough to claim that it had been adequately -------. (A) fastidious. .defined (B) partisan. .verified (C) vigilant. .publicized (D) enlightened. .researched (E) fervent. .undermined

4. Roman historians who study the period B.C.30 to A.D.180 can ------- the "Augustan peace" only by failing to recognize that this peace in many respects resembled that of death. (A) decry (B) applaud (C) ridicule (D) demand (E) disprove 5. Although Tom was aware that it would be ------- to display annoyance publicly at the sales conference, he could not ------- his irritation with the client's unreasonable demands. (A) inadvisable. .evince (B) efficacious. .suppress (C) pragmatic. .counter (D) captious. .express (E) impolitic. .hide 6. It is no accident that most people find Davis' book disturbing, for it is ------to undermine a number of beliefs they have long -------. (A) calculated. .cherished (B) annotated. .assimilated (C) intended. .denied (D) anxious. .misunderstood (E) reputed. .anticipated 7. One virus strain that may help gene therapists cure genetic brain diseases can enter the peripheral nervous system and travel to the brain, ------- the need to inject the therapeutic virus directly into the brain. (A) suggesting (B) intensifying (C) elucidating (D) satisfying (E) obviating

1. C

2. E

3. B

4. B

5. E

6. A

7. E

TEST -13 Section-B 1. Artificial light ------- the respiratory activity of some microorganisms in the winter but not in the summer, in part because in the summer their respiration is already at its peak and thus cannot be -------. (A) stimulates. .lessened (B) inhibits. .quickened (C) reflects. .expanded (D) elevates. .measured (E) enhances. .increased 2. Doreen justifiably felt she deserved recognition for the fact that the research institute had been ------- a position of preeminence, since it was she who had ------- the transformation. (A) reduced to. .controlled (B) raised to. .observed (C) mired in. .imagined (D) maintained in. .created (E) returned to. .directed 3. The prospects of discovering new aspects of the life of a painter as thoroughly studied as Vermeer are not, on the surface, -------. (A) unpromising (B) daunting (C) encouraging (D) superficial (E) challenging

4. Even those siblings whose childhood was ------- familial feuding and intense rivalry for their parents' affection can nevertheless develop congenial and even ------- relationships with each other in their adult lives. (A) scarred by. .vitriolic (B) dominated by. .intimate (C) filled with. .truculent (D) replete with. .competitive (E) devoid of. .tolerant 5. Because they have been so dazzled by the calendars and the knowledge of astronomy possessed by the Mayan civilization, some anthropologists have ------ achievements like the sophisticated carved calendar sticks of the Winnebago people. (A) described (B) acknowledged (C) overlooked (D) defended (E) authenticated 6. Aptly enough, this work so imbued with the notion of changing times and styles has been constantly ------- over the years, thereby reflecting its own mutability. (A) appreciated (B) emulated (C) criticized (D) revised (E) reprinted 7. The sea was not an ------- the ------- of the windmill; on the contrary, while the concept of the new invention passed quickly from seaport to seaport, it made little headway inland. (A) element in. .evolution (B) issue in. .acceptance (C) aid to. .designers (D) obstacle to. .diffusion (E) impediment to. .creation

1. E

2. E

3. C

4. B

5. C

6. D

7. D

TEST -14 Section-A 1. A computer program can provide information in ways that force students to ------- learning instead of being merely ------- of knowledge. (A) shore up. .reservoirs (B) accede to. .consumers (C) participate in. .recipients (D) compensate for. .custodians (E) profit from. .beneficiaries 2. The form and physiology of leaves vary according to the ------- in which they develop: for example, leaves display a wide range of adaptations to different degrees of light and moisture. (A) relationship (B) species (C) sequence (D) patterns (E) environment 3. One theory about intelligence sees ------- as the logical structure underlying thinking and insists that since animals are mute, they must be ------- as well. (A) behavior. .inactive (B) instinct. .cooperative (C) heredity. .thoughtful (D) adaptation. .brutal (E) language. .mindless

4. Though ------- in her personal life, Edna St. Vincent Millay was nonetheless ------ about her work, usually producing several pages of complicated rhyme in a day. (A) jaded. .feckless (B) verbose. .ascetic (C) vain. .humble (D) impulsive. .disciplined (E) self-assured. .sanguine 5. The children's ------- natures were in sharp contrast to the even-tempered dispositions of their parents. (A) mercurial (B) blithe (C) phlegmatic (D) introverted (E) artless 6. By ------- scientific rigor with a quantitative approach, researchers in the social sciences may often have ------- their scope to those narrowly circumscribed topics that are well suited to quantitative methods. (A) undermining. .diminished (B) equating. .enlarged (C) vitiating. .expanded (D) identifying. .limited (E) imbuing. .broadened 7. As early as the seventeenth century, philosophers called attention to the ------ character of the issue, and their twentieth century counterparts still approach it with -------. (A) absorbing. .indifference (B) unusual. .composure (C) complex. .antipathy (D) auspicious. .caution (E) problematic. .uneasiness

1. C

2. E

3. E

4. D

5. A

6. D

7. E

TEST -14 Section-B 1. Since most if not all learning occurs through -------, relating one observation to another, it would be strange indeed if the study of other cultures did not also illuminate the study of our own. (A) assumptions (B) experiments (C) comparisons (D) repetitions (E) impressions 2. The new ------- of knowledge has created -------people: everyone believes that his or her subject cannot and possibly should not be understood by others. (A) specialization. .barriers between (B) decline. .associations among (C) redundancy. .complacency in (D) disrepute. .concern for (E) promulgation. .ignorance among 3. If a species of parasite is to survive, the host organisms must live long enough for the parasite to -------; if the host species becomes-------, so do its parasites. (A) atrophy. .healthy (B) reproduce. .extinct (C) disappear. .widespread (D) succumb. .nonviable (E) mate. .infertile

4. The author argues for serious treatment of such arts as crochet and needlework, finding in too many art historians a cultural blindness ------- to their ------- textiles as a medium in which women artists predominate. (A) traceable. .prejudice against (B) opposed. .distrust of (C) referring. .need for (D) reduced. .respect for (E) corresponding. .expertise in 5. Those who fear the influence of television deliberately ------- its persuasive power, hoping that they might keep knowledge of its potential to effect social change from being widely disseminated. (A) promote (B) underplay (C) excuse (D) laud (E) suspect 6. Because the high seriousness of their narratives resulted in part from their metaphysics, Southern writers were praised for their ------- bent. (A) technical (B) discursive (C) hedonistic (D) philosophical (E) scientific 7. Far from being -------, Pat was always ------- to appear acquiescent. (A) unctuous. .loath (B) brazen. .reluctant (C) ignoble. .concerned (D) obsequious. .eager (E) gregarious. .willing

1. C

2. A

3. B

4. A

5. B

6. D

7. A

TEST -15 Section-A 1. It is assumed that scientists will avoid making ------- claims about the results of their experiments because of the likelihood that they will be exposed when other researchers cannot------- their findings. (A) hypothetical. .evaluate (B) fraudulent. .duplicate (C) verifiable. .contradict (D) radical. .contest (E) extravagant. .dispute 2. As long as the nuclear family is ------- a larger kinship group through contiguous residence on undivided land, the pressure to ------- and thus to get along with relatives is strong. (A) nurtured among. .abstain (B) excluded from. .compromise (C) embedded in. .share (D) scattered throughout. .reject (E) accepted by. .lead 3. In contrast to the substantial muscular activity required for inhalation, exhalation is usually a ------- process. (A) slow (B) passive (C) precise (D) complex (E) conscious

4. The documentary film about high school life was so realistic and ------- that feelings of nostalgia flooded over the college-age audience. (A) logical (B) pitiful (C) evocative (D) critical (E) clinical 5. Although Georgia O'Keeffe is best known for her affinity with the desert landscape, her paintings of urban subjects ------- her longtime residency in New York City. (A) condemn (B) obfuscate (C) attest to (D) conflict with (E) contend with 6. Even though the survey was designated as an interdisciplinary course, it involved no real------- of subject matter. (A) encapsulation (B) organization (C) synthesis (D) discussion (E) verification 7. The failure of many psychotherapists to ------- the results of pioneering research could be due in part to the specialized nature of such findings: even ------ findings may not be useful. (A) understand. .baffling (B) envision. .accessible (C) utilize. .momentous (D) reproduce. .duplicated (E) affirm. .controversial

1. B

2. C

3. B

4. C

5. C

6. C

7. C

TEST -15 Section-B 1. In the nineteenth century, novelists and unsympathetic travelers portrayed the American West as a land of ------- adversity, whereas promoters and idealists created ------- image of a land of infinite promise. (A) lurid. .a mundane (B) incredible. .an underplayed (C) dispiriting. .an identical (D) intriguing. .a luxuriant (E) unremitting. .a compelling 2. Honeybees tend to be more ------- than earth bees: the former, unlike the latter, search for food together and signal their individual findings to one another. (A) insular (B) aggressive (C) differentiated (D) mobile (E) social 3. Joe spoke of superfluous and ------- matters with exactly the same degree of intensity, as though for him serious issues mattered neither more nor less than did -------. (A) vital. .trivialities (B) redundant. .superficialities (C) important. .necessities (D) impractical. .outcomes (E) humdrum. .essentials 4. The value of Davis' sociological research is compromised by his unscrupulous tendency to use materials ------- in order to substantiate his own claims, while ------- information that points to other possible conclusions. (A)

haphazardly. .deploying (B) selectively. .disregarding (C) cleverly. .weighing (D) modestly. .refuting (E) arbitrarily. .emphasizing 5. Once Renaissance painters discovered how to ------- volume and depth, they were able to replace the medieval convention of symbolic, two-dimensional space with the more ------- illusion of actual space. (A) reverse. .conventional (B) portray. .abstract (C) deny. .concrete (D) adumbrate. .fragmented (E) render. .realistic 6. He had expected gratitude for his disclosure, but instead he encountered ------ bordering on hostility. (A) patience (B) discretion (C) openness (D) ineptitude (E) indifference 7. The diplomat, selected for her demonstrated patience and skill in conducting such delicate negotiations, ------- to make a decision during the talks because any sudden commitment at that time would have been -------. (A) resolved. .detrimental (B) refused. .apropos (C) declined. .inopportune (D) struggled. .unconscionable (E) hesitated. .warranted

1. E

2. E

3. A

4. B

5. E

6. E

7. C

TEST -16 Section-A 1. While scientists dismiss as fanciful the idea of sudden changes in a genetic code (spontaneous mutation), it is possible that nature, like some master musician, ------- on occasion, departing from the expected or predictable. (A) repeats (B) improvises (C) ornaments (D) corrects (E) harmonizes 2. Despite the ------- of time, space, and history, human societies the world over have confronted the same existential problems and have come to remarkably ------- solutions, differing only in superficial details. (A) continuity. .identical (B) uniformity. .diverse (C) actualities. .varied (D) contingencies. .similar (E) exigencies. .unique 3. Although he was known to be extremely -------in his public behavior, scholars have discovered that his diaries were written with uncommon-------. (A) reserved. .frankness (B) polite. .tenderness (C) modest. .lucidity (D) reticent. .vagueness (E) withdrawn. .subtlety

4. With the ------- of scientific knowledge, work on the new edition of a textbook begins soon after completion of the original. (A) limitation (B) culmination (C) veneration (D) certainty (E) burgeoning 5. She is most frugal in matters of business, but in her private life she reveals a streak of -------. (A) antipathy (B) misanthropy (C) virtuosity (D) equanimity (E) prodigality 6. If the state government's latest budget problems were -------, it would not be useful to employ them as ------- examples in the effort to avoid the inevitable effects of shortsighted fiscal planning in the future. (A) typical. .representative (B) exceptional. .aberrant (C) anomalous. .illuminating (D) predictable. .helpful (E) solvable. .insignificant 7. Just as some writers have ------- the capacity of language to express meaning, Giacometti ------- the failure of art to convey reality. (A) scoffed at. .abjured (B) demonstrated. .exemplified (C) denied. .refuted (D) proclaimed. .affirmed (E) despaired of. .bewailed

1. B

2. D

3. A

4. E

5. E

6. C

7. E

TEST -16 Section-B 1. In spite of the fact that it is convenient to divide the life span of animals into separate stages such as prenatal, adolescent, and senescent, these periods are not really -------. (A) advanced (B) variable (C) repeatable (D) connected (E) distinct 2. Although the number of reported volcanic eruptions has risen exponentially since 1850, this indicates not ------- volcanic activity but rather more widespread and ------- record keeping. (A) abating. .detailed (B) increasing. .systematic (C) substantial. .erratic (D) stable. .superficial (E) consistent. .meticulous 3. The challenge of interpreting fictional works written under politically repressive regimes lies in distinguishing what is ------- to an author's beliefs, as opposed to what is -------. by political coercion. (A) innate. .understood (B) organic. .imposed (C) contradictory. .conveyed (D) oblique. .captured (E) peripheral. .demanded

4. I am often impressed by my own ------- other people's idiocies : what is harder to ------- is that they, in their folly, are equally engaged in putting up with mine. (A) analysis of. .justify (B) forbearance toward. .underestimate (C) exasperation with. .credit (D) involvement in. .allow (E) tolerance of. .appreciate 5. Despite vigorous protestations, the grin on the teenager's face ------- her denial that she had known about the practical joke before it was played on her parents. (A) belied (B) illustrated (C) reinforced (D) exacerbated (E) trivialized 6. Far from undermining the impression of permanent decline, the ------statue seemed emblematic of its ------- surroundings. (A) indecorous. .opulent (B) grandiose. .ramshackle (C) pretentious. .simple (D) ungainly. .elegant (E) tawdry. .blighted 7. Despite the fact that it is almost universally -------, the practice of indentured servitude still ------- in many parts of the world. (A) condemned. .abates (B) tolerated. .survives (C) proscribed. .persists (D) mandated. .lingers (E) disdained. .intervenes

1. E

2. B

3. B

4. B

5. A

6. E

7. C

TEST -17 Section-A 1. While many Russian composers of the nineteenth century contributed to an emerging national style, other composers did not ------- idiomatic Russian musical elements, ------- instead the traditional musical vocabulary of Western European Romanticism. (A) utilize. .rejecting (B) incorporate. .preferring (C) exclude. .avoiding (D) repudiate. .expanding (E) esteem. .disdaining 2. Because the painter Albert Pinkham Ryder was obsessed with his ------perfection, he was rarely ------- a painting, creating endless variations of a scene on one canvas on top of another. (A) quest for. .satisfied with (B) insistence on. .displeased with (C) contempt for. .disconcerted by (D) alienation from. .immersed in (E) need for. .concerned with 3. Objectively set standards can serve as a ------- for physicians, providing them -------unjustified malpractice claims. (A) trial. .evidence of (B) model. .experience with (C) criterion. .reasons for (D) test. .questions about (E) safeguard. .protection from

4. In spite of ------- reviews in the press, the production of her play was ------almost certain oblivion by enthusiastic audiences whose acumen was greater than that of the critics. (A) lukewarm. .condemned to (B) scathing. .exposed to (C) lackluster. .rescued from (D) sensitive. .reduced to (E) admiring. .insured against 5. The passions of love and pride are often found in the same individual, but having little in common, they mutually -------, not to say destroy each other. (A) reinforce (B) annihilate (C) enhance (D) weaken (E) embrace 6. The necessity of establishing discrete categories for observations frequently leads to attempts to make absolute ------- when there are in reality only -------. (A) analyses. .hypotheses (B) correlations. .digressions (C) distinctions. .gradations (D) complications. .ambiguities (E) conjectures. .approximations 7. A unique clay disk found at the Minoan site of Phaistos is often ------- as the earliest example of printing by scholars who have defended its claim to this status despite equivalent claims put forward for other printing artifacts. (A) questioned (B) overlooked (C) adduced (D) conceded (E) dismissed

1. D

2. A

3. E

4. C

5. D

6. C

7. C

TEST -17 Section-B 1. Punishment for violating moral rules is much more common than reward for following them: thus, ------- the rules goes almost ------- in society. (A) association with. .undefended (B) adherence to. .unnoticed (C) affiliation of. .uncorrected (D) opposition to. .unchecked (E) ignorance of. .unresolved 2. Compassion is a great respect of justice: we pity those who suffer -------. (A) shamelessly (B) unwittingly (C) vicariously (D) intensively (E) undeservedly 3. No work illustrated his disdain for a systematic approach to research better than his dissertation, which was rejected primarily because his bibliography constituted, at best, ------- survey of the major texts in his field. (A) an unimaginative (B) an orthodox (C) a meticulous (D) a comprehensive (E) a haphazard 4. In contrast to the ------- with which the acquisition of language by young children was once regarded, the process by which such learning occurs has now become the object of -------. (A) intensity. .fascination (B) incuriosity.

.scrutiny (C) anxiety. .criticism (D) reverence. .admiration (E) impatience. .training 5. The senator's remark that she is ambivalent about running for a second term is ------- given the extremely ------- fund-raising activities of her campaign committee. (A) disingenuous. .reluctant (B) futile. .clandestine (C) sincere. .visible (D) persuasive. .apathetic (E) straightforward. .energetic 6. Until quite recently research on diabetes had as a kind of holding action attempted to refine the------- of the disease primarily because no preventive strategy seemed at all likely to be -------. (A) definition. .necessary (B) anticipation. .acceptable (C) understanding. .costly (D) treatment. .practicable (E) symptoms. .feasible 7. Most plant species exhibit ------- in their geographical distribution: often a given species is found over a large geographical area, but individual populations within that range are widely -------. (A) discontinuity. .separated (B) density. .dispersed (C) symmetry. .observed (D) uniformity. .scattered (E) concentration. .adaptable

1. B

2. E

3. E

4. B

5. D

6. D

7. A

TEST -18 Section-A 1. There is hardly a generalization that can be made about people? s social behavior and the values informing it that cannot be ------- from one or another point of view, or even ------- as simplistic or vapid. (A) accepted. .praised (B) intuited. .exposed (C) harangued. .retracted (D) defended. .glorified (E) challenged. .dismissed 2. Although any destruction of vitamins caused by food irradiation could be ------ the use of diet supplements, there may be no protection from carcinogens that some fear might be introduced into foods by the process. (A) counterbalanced by (B) attributed to (C) inferred from (D) augmented with (E) stimulated by 3. Though he refused any responsibility for the failure of the negotiations, Stevenson had no right to ------- himself: it was his ------- that had caused the debacle. (A) blame. .skill (B) congratulate. .modesty (C) berate. .largesse (D) accuse. .obstinacy (E) absolve. .acrimony

4. The prevailing union of passionate interest in detailed facts with equal devotion to abstract ------- is a hallmark of our present society: in the past this union appeared, at best, -------.and as if by chance. (A) data. .extensively (B) philosophy. .cyclically (C) generalization. .sporadically (D) evaluation. .opportunely (E) intuition. .selectively 5. A century ago the physician? s word was -------;to doubt it was considered almost sacrilegious. (A) inevitable (B) intractable (C) incontrovertible (D) objective (E) respectable 6. So much of modern fiction in the United States is autobiographical, and so much of the autobiography fictionalized, that the ------- sometimes seem largely -------. (A) authors. .ignored (B) needs. .unrecognized (C) genres. .interchangeable (D) intentions. .misunderstood (E) misapprehensions. .uncorrected 7. Robin? s words were not without emotion: they retained their level tone only by a careful ------ imminent extremes. (A) equipoise between (B) embrace of (C) oscillation between (D) limitation to (E) subjection to

1. E

2. A

3. E

4. C

5. C

6. C

7. A

TEST -18 Section-B 1. That she seemed to prefer ------- to concentrated effort is undeniable: nevertheless, the impressive quality of her finished paintings sugge sts that her actual relationship to her art was anything but -------. (A) preparation. .passionate (B) artfulness. .disengaged (C) dabbling. .superficial (D) caprice . considered (E) indecision. .lighthearted 2. Because of the excellent preservation of the fossil, anatomical details of early horseshoe crabs were ------- for the first time, enabling experts to ------the evolution of the horseshoe crab. (A) scrutinized. .ensure (B) verified. .advance (C) identified. .distort (D) obscured. .illustrate (E) cl arified. .reassess 3. The philosopher claimed that a person who must consciously ------- his or her own indifference before helping another is behaving more nobly than one whose basic disposition allows such an act to be performed without -------. (A) feign. .enthusiasm (B) censure. .comment (C) embrace. .duplicity (D) suffer. .effort (E) overcome. .deliberation

4. The senator? s attempt to convince the public that he is not interested in running for a second term is ------- given the extremely ------- fund-raising activities of his campaign committee. (A) futile. .clandestine (B) sincere. .visible (C) specious. .apathetic (D) disingenuous. .public (E) straightforward. .dubious 5. Although a change in management may appear to ------- a shift in a company? s fortunes, more often than not its impact is -------. (A) hinder. .measurable (B) promote. .demonstrable (C) accelerate. .profound (D) betray. .fundamental (E) augur. .inconsiderable 6. The skeleton of ------- bird that was recently discovered indicated that this ancient creature ------- today? s birds in that, unlike earlier birds and unlike reptilian ancestors, it had a tooth in its head. (A) a primeval. .obscured (B) a unique. .preempted (C) a primitive. .anticipated (D) a contemporary. .foreshadowed (E) an advanced. .differed from 7. While many people utilize homeopathic remedies to treat health problems, other people do not ------- such alternative treatments, ------- conventional medical treatments instead. (A) distrust. .employing (B) embrace. .eschewing (C) reject. .envisioning (D) countenance. .relying on (E) recommend. .turning from

1. C

2. E

3. E

4. D

5. B

6. C

7. D

TEST -19 Section-A 1. As businesses become aware that their advertising must ------- the everyday concerns of consumers, their commercials will be characterized by a greater degree of -------. (A) allay. .pessimism (B) address. .realism (C) evade. .verisimilitude (D) engage. .fancy (E) change. .sincerity 2. Because the lawyer's methods were found to be -------, the disciplinary committee ------- his privileges. (A) unimpeachable. .suspended (B) ingenious. .withdrew (C) questionable. .expanded (D) unscrupulous. .revoked (E) reprehensible. .augmented 3. People of intelligence and achievement can nonetheless be so ------- and lacking in ------- that they gamble their reputations by breaking the law to further their own ends. (A) devious. .propensity (B) culpable. .prosperity (C) obsequious. .deference (D) truculent. .independence (E) greedy. .integrity

4. A number of scientists have published articles ------- global warming, stating ------- that there is no solid scientific evidence to support the theory that the Earth is warming because of increases in greenhouse gases. (A) debunking. .categorically (B) rejecting. .paradoxically (C) deploring. .optimistically (D) dismissing. .hesitantly (E) proving. .candidly 5. The senator's attempt to convince the public that she is not interested in running for a second term is as -------- as her opponent's attempt to disguise his intention to run against her. (A) biased (B) unsuccessful (C) inadvertent (D) indecisive (E) remote 6. Mac Rory? s conversation was --------: she could never tell a story, chiefly because she always forgot it, and she was never guilty of a witticism, unless by accident . (A) scintillating (B) unambiguous (C) perspicuous (D) stultifying (E) facetious 7. Despite its many --------, the whole-language philosophy of teaching reading continues to gain -------- among educators. (A) detractors. .notoriety (B) adherents. .prevalence (C) critics. .currency (D) enthusiasts. .popularity (E) practitioners. .credibility

1. B

2. D

3. E

4. A

5. B

6. D

7. C

TEST -19 Section-B 1. That she was ------- rock climbing did not diminish her ------- to join her friends on a rock-climbing expedition. (A) attracted to. .eagerness (B) timid about. .reluctance (C) fearful of. .determination (D) curious about. .aspiration (E) knowledgeable about. .hope 2. Data concerning the effects on a small population of high concentrati ons of a potentially hazardous chemical are frequently used to ------- the effects on a large population of lower amounts of the same chemical. (A) verify (B) redress (C) predict (D) realize (E) augment 3. Conceptually, it is hard to reconcile a defense attorney's ------- to ensure that false testimony is not knowingly put forward with the attorney's mandate to mount the most ------- defense conceivable for the client. (A) efforts. .cautious (B) duty. .powerful (C) inability. .eloquent (D) failure. .diversi fied (E) promises. .informed

4. The term "modern" has always been used broadly by historians, and recent reports indicate that its meaning has become more ------- than ever. (A) precise (B) pejorative (C) revisionist (D) acceptable (E) amorphous 5. He would ------- no argument, and to this end he enjoined us to -------. (A) brook. .silence (B) acknowledge. .neglect (C) broach. .abstinence (D) fathom. .secrecy (E) tolerate. .defiance 6. Originally, most intellectual criticism of mass culture was ------- in character, being based on the assumption that the wider the appeal, the more ------- the product. (A) unpredictable. .undesirable (B) ironic. .popular (C) extreme. .outlandish (D) frivolous. .superfluous (E) negative. .shoddy 7. Surprisingly, given the dearth of rain that fell on the corn crop, the yield of the harvest was -------; consequently, the corn reserves of the country have not been -------. (A) inadequate. .replenished (B) encouraging. .depleted (C) compromised. .salvaged (D) abundant. .extended (E) disappointing. .harmed

1. C

2. C

3. A

4. E

5. A

6. E

7. B

ANALYTICAL WRITING
Issue Topic:
1. "In most professions and academic fields imagination is more important than knowledge." 2. "Governments should focus more on solving the immediate problems of today rather than trying to solve the anticipated problems of the future." 3. "To truly understand your own cultureno matter how you define itrequires personal knowledge of at least one other culture, one that is distinctly different from your own." 4. "High-speed electronic communications media, such as electronic mail and television, tend to prevent meaningful and thoughtful communication." 5. "Many people know how to attain success, but few know how to make the best use of it." 6. "Money spent on research is almost always a good investment, even when the results of that research are controversial." 7. People are mistaken when they assume that the problems they confront are more complex and challenging than the problems faced by their predecessors. This illusion is eventually dispelled with increased knowledge and experience." 8. "All students should be required to take courses in the sciences, even if they have no interest in science." 9. "Public figures such as actors, politicians, and athletes should expect people to be interested in their private lives. When they seek a public role, they should expect that they will lose at least some of t heir privacy." 10. "The most essential quality of an effective leader is the ability to remain consistently committed to particular principles and objectives. Any leader who is quickly and easily influenced by shifts in popular opinion will accomplish little." 11. "The best way to understand the character of a society is to examine the character of the men and women that the society chooses as its heroes or its heroines." 12. Most of the people go for economically healthy, stable and risk free life, very few go for something that they really want to do and do best.

13. "Students should bring a certain skepticism to whatever they study. They should question what they are taught instead of accepting it passively." 14. The well-being of a society is enhanced when many of its people question authority." 15. "In most professions and academic fields, imagination is more important than knowledge." 16. "It is possible to pass laws that control or place limits on people's behavior, but legislation cannot reform human nature. Laws cannot change what is in people's hearts and minds." 17. "The surest indicator of a great nation is not the achievements of its rulers, artists, or scientists, but the general welfare of all its people." 18. "Children must be brought up well by the parents to ensure a better society, which the parents fail to do" 19. "There are two types of laws: just and unjust. Every individual in a society has a responsibility to obey just laws and, even more importantly, to disobey and resist unjust laws." 20. "Only through mistakes can there be discovery or progress." 21. "Although many people think that the luxuries and conveniences of contemporary life are entirely harmless, in fact, they actually prevent people from developing into truly strong and independent individuals." 22. "Such nonmainstream areas of inquiry as astrology, fortune-telling, and psychic and paranormal pursuits play a vital role in society by satisfying human needs that are not addressed by mainstream science." 23. "The true value of a civilization is reflected in its artistic creations rather than in its scientific accomplishments." 24. "Facts are stubborn things. They cannot be altered by our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions." 25. "Too much emphasis is placed on role models. Instead of copying others, people should learn to think and act independently and thus make the choices that are best for them." 26. An individual's greatness cannot be judged objectively by his or her contemporaries; the most objective evaluators of a person's greatness are people who belong to a later time. 27. It is the artist, not the critic, who gives society something of lasting value. 28. "In any professionbusiness, politics, education, governmentthose in power should step down after five years. The surest path to success for any enterprise is revitalization through new leadership."

29. "It is easy to welcome innovation and accept new ideas. What most people find difficult, however, is accepting the way these new ideas are put into practice." 30. "The study of history has value only to the extent that it is relevant to our daily lives." 31. To truly understand your own cultureno matter how you define it requires personal knowledge of at least one other culture, one that is distinctly different from your own. 32. Governments should focus more on solving the immediate problems of today rather than trying to solve the anticipated problems of the future. 33. "Only through mistakes can there be discovery or progress." 34. "It is a grave mistake to theorize before one has data."

Argument Topic:
1. The following appeared in the business section of a newspaper. "Given that the number of people in our country with some form of arthritis is expected to rise from 40 million to 60 million over the next twenty years, pharmaceutical companies that produce drugs for the treatment of arthritis should be very profitable. Many analysts believe that in ten years Becton Pharmaceuticals, which makes Xenon, the best-selling drug treatment for arthritis, will be t he most profitable pharmaceutical company. But the patent on Xenon expires in three years, and other companies will then be able to produce a cheaper version of the drug. Thus, it is more likely that in ten years the most profitable pharmaceutical company will be Perkins Pharmaceuticals, maker of a new drug called Xylan, which clinical studies show is preferred over Xenon by seven out often patients suffering from the most extreme cases of arthritis." 2. Claitown University needs both affordable housing for its students and a way to fund the building of such housing. The best solution to this problem is to commission a famous architect known for experimental and futuristic buildings. It is common knowledge that tourists are willing to pay money to tour some of the architect's buildings, so it can be expected that tourists will want to visit t his new building. The income from the fees charged to tourists will soon cover the building costs. Furthermore, such a building will attract new students as well as donations from alumni. And even though such a building will be much larger than our current need for student housing, part of the building can be used as office space. 3. "Over 80 percent of the respondents to a recent survey indicated a desire to reduce their intake of foods containing fats and cholesterol, and today low-fat products abound in many food stores. Since many of the food products currently marketed by Old Dairy Industries are high in fat and cholesterol, the company's sales are likely to diminish greatly and their profits will no doubt decrease. We therefore advise Old Dairy stockholders to sell their shares and other investors not to purchase stock in this company." 4. The following appeared in a letter to the editor of the Balmer Island Gazette. "The population of Balmer Island increases to 100,000 during the summer months. To reduce the number of accidents involving mopeds and pedestrians, the town council of Balmer Island should limit the number of mopeds rented by each of the island's six moped and bicycle rental companies

from 50 per day to 30 per day during the summer season. By limiting the number of rentals, the town council is sure to attain the 50 percent reduction in moped accidents that was achieved last year in the neighboring island of Torseau, when Torseau's town council enforced similar limits on moped rentals." 5. The following appeared in a newspaper feature story. "At the small, nonprofit hospital in the town of Saluda, the average length of a patient's stay is two days; at the large, for-profit hospital in the nearby city of Megaville, the average patient stay is six days. Also, the cure rate among patients in the Saluda hospital is about twice that of the Megaville hospi tal. The Saluda hospital has more employees per patient than the hospital in Megaville, and there are few complaints about service at the local hospital. Such data indicate that treatment in smaller, nonprofit hospitals is more economical and of better quality than treatment in larger, for-profit hospitals." 6. In a study of reading habits of Leeville citizens conducted by the University of Leeville, most respondents said they preferred literary classics as reading material. However, a follow-up study conducted by the same researchers found that the type of book most frequent ly checked out of each of the public libraries in Leeville was the mystery novel. Therefore, it can be concluded that the respondents in the first study had misrepresented their reading habits. 7. The following appeared in the annual report from the president of the National Brush Company. "In order to save money, we at the National Brush Company have decided to pay our employees for each brush they produce instead of for the time they spend producing brushes. We believe that this policy will lead to the production of more and better brushes, will allow us to reduce our staff size, and will enable the company factories to operate for fewer hours resulting in savings on electricity and security costs. These changes will ensure that the best workers keep their jobs and that the company will earn a profit in the coming year." 8. The following is a recommendation from the director of personnel to the president of Professional Printing Company. "In a recent telephone survey of automobile factory workers, older employees were less likely to report that having a supervisor present increases their productivity. Among workers aged 18 to 29, 27 percent said that they are more productive in the presence of their immediate supervisor, compared to 12 percent for those aged 30 or over, and only 8 percent for those aged 50 or

over. Clearly, if our printing company hires mainly older employees, we will increase productivity and save money because of the reduced need for supervisors. " 9. The following appeared in a memo from the manager of television station KICK. "A nationwide survey reveals that a sizeable majority of men would like to see additional sports programs on television. After television stati on WACK increased its sports broadcasts, its share of the television audience in its viewing area almost doubled. To gain a larger audience share in our area, and thus increase company profits, KICK should also revise its broadcast schedule to include more sports coverage." 10. Thirteen years ago, researchers studied a group of 25 infants who showed signs of mild distress when exposed to unfamiliar stimuli such as an unusual odor or a tape recording of an unknown voice. They discovered that these infants were more likely than other infants to have been conceived in early autumn, a time when their mothers' production of melatonin a hormone known to affect some brain functions would naturally increase in response to decreased daylight. In a follow-up study conducted earlier this year, more than half of these children now teenagers who had shown signs of distress identified themselves as shy. Clearly, increased levels of melatonin before birth cause shyness during infancy and this shyness continues into later life. 11. The following report appeared in a memo from the vice president of the Southside Transportation Authority. "We should abandon our current five-year plan to purchase additional buses to serve the campus of Southside University, because students there are unlikely to use them. Consider the results of the recent campaign sponsored by the Environmental Club at Southside University: in a program on the campus radio station, the club asked students to call in and pledge that they would commute to school by bus instead of by automobile at least one day per week. Only ten percent of the students called in and pledged. In view of the campaign's lack of success, we can assume that the bus service we currently offer will continue to be sufficient to serve the university." 12. Humans arrived in the Kaliko Islands about 7,000 years ago, and within 3,000 years most of the large mammal species that had lived in the forests of the Kaliko Islands had become extinct. Yet humans cannot have been a factor in the species' extinctions, because there is no evidence that the humans had any significant contact with the mammals. Further, archaeologists have

discovered numerous sites where the bones of fish had been discarded, but they found no such areas containing the bones of large mammals, so the humans cannot have hunted the mammals. Therefore, some climate change or other environmental factor must have caused the species' extinctions. 13. The following appeared in a newsletter offering advice to investors. "Over 80 percent of the respondents to a recent survey indicated a desire to reduce their intake of foods containing fats and cholesterol, and today low-fat products abound in many food stores. Since many of the food products currently marketed by Old Dairy Industries are high in fat and cholesterol, the company's sales are likely to diminish greatly and their profits will no doubt decrease. We therefore advise Old Dairy stockholders to sell their shares and other investors not to purchase stock in this company." 14. The following appeared in an editorial in a Prunty County newspaper. "In an attempt to improve highway safety, Prunty County recently lowered its speed limit from 55 miles per hour to 45 on all major county roads. But the 55 mph limit should be restored, because this safety effort has failed. Most drivers are exceeding the new speed limit and the accident rate throughout Prunty County has decreased only slightly. If we want to improve the safety of our roads, we should instead undertake the same ki nd of road improvement project that Butler County completed five years ago: increasing lane widths and resurfacing rough roads. Today, major Butler County roads still have a 55 mph speed limit, yet there were 25 percent fewer reported accidents in Butler County this past year than there were five years ago." 15. The following appeared as part of a letter to the editor of a local newspaper. "During her three years in office, Governor Riedeburg has shown herself to be a worthy leader. Since she took office, crime has decreased, the number of jobs created per year has doubled, and the number of people choosing to live in our state has increased. These trends are likely to continue if she is reelected. In addit ion, Ms. Riedeburg has promised to take steps to ke ep big companies here, thereby providing jobs for any new residents. Anyone who looks at Ms. Riedeburg's record can tell that she is the best-qualified candidate for governor." 16. The following recommendation was made by the Human Resources Manager to the board of directors of the Fancy Toy Company.

"In the last three quarters of this year, under the leadership of our president, Pat Salvo, our profits have fallen considerably. Thus, we should ask for her resignation in return for a generous severance package. In Pat's place, we should appoint Rosa Winnings. Rosa is currently president of Starlight Jewelry, a company whose profits have increased dramatically over the past several years. Although we will have to pay Rosa twice the salary that Pat has been receiving, it will be well worth it because we can soon expect our profits to increase considerably." 17. As people grow older, an enzyme known as PEP increasingly breaks down the neuropeptide chemicals involved in learning and memory. But now, researchers have found compounds that prevent PEP from breaking neuropeptides apart. In tests, these compounds almost completely restored lost memory in rat s. The use of these compounds should be extended to students who have poor memory and difficulty in concentrating and therefore serious problems in school performance. Science finally has a solution for problems neither parents nor teachers could solve. 18. The following appeared in a memorandum written by the vice president of Nature's Way, a chain of stores selling health food and other health-related products. "Previous experience has shown that our stores are most profitable in areas where residents are highly concerned with leading healthy lives. We should therefore build our next new store in Plainsville, which has many such residents. Plainsville merchants report that sales of running shoes and exercise clothing are at all-time highs. The local health club, which nearly closed five years ago due to lack of business, has more members than ever, and the weight training and aerobics classes are always full. We can even anticipate a new generation of customers: Plainsville's schoolchildren are required to participate in a 'fitness for life' program, which emphasizes the benefits of regular exercise at an early age." 19. The following appeared in a memo from the owner of Green Thumb Gardening Center, a small business serving a suburban town. "There is evidence that consumers are becoming more and more interested in growing their own vegetables. A national survey conducted last month indicated that many consumers were dissatisfied with the quality of fresh vegetables available in supermarkets. And locally, the gardening magazine Great Gardens has sold out at the Village News stand three months in a row. Thus, we at Green Thumb Gardening Center can increase our profits by greatly expanding the variety of vegetable seeds we stock for gardeners this coming spring."

20. The following is a recommendation from the director of personnel to the president of Professional Printing Company. In a recent telephone survey of automobile factory workers, older employees were less likely to report that having a supervisor present increases their productivity. Among workers aged 18 to 29, 27 percent said that they are more productive in the presence of their immediate supervisor, compared to 12 percent for those aged 30 or over, and only 8 percent for those aged 50 or over. Clearly, if our printing company hires mainly older employees, we will increase productivity and save money because of the reduced need for supervisors. 21. The following appeared as part of a letter to the editor of a local newspaper. "During her three years in office, Governor Riedeburg has shown herself to be a worthy leader. Since she took office, crime has decreased, the number of jobs created per year has doubled, and the number of people choosing to live in our state has increased. These trends are likely to continue if she is reelected. In addition, Ms. Riedeburg has promised to take steps to keep big companies here, thereby providing jobs for any new residents. Anyone who looks at Ms. Riedeburg's record can tell that she is the best-qualified candidate for governor." 22. The following is a memorandum from the director of personnel to the president of Get-Away Airlines. "Since our mechanics are responsible for inspecting and maintaining our aircraft, Get-Away Airlines should pay to send them to the Quality-Care Seminar, a two-week seminar on proper maintenance procedures. I recommend this seminar because it is likely to be a wise investment, given that the automobile racing industry recently reported t hat the performance of its maintenance crews improved markedly after their crews had attended the seminar. These maintenance crews perform many of the same functions as do our mechanics, including refueling and repairing engines. The money we spend on sending our staff to the seminar will inevitably lead to improved maintenance and thus to greater customer satisfaction along with greater profits for our airline."

VOCABULARY
(Some words tested in recent GRE)

Abase Abdicate Aberrant Abet Abstain Abstruse Accord Accrue Acrid Acumen Adamant Adept Adulation Afflatus Agenda Agitator Allegiance Alleviate Altruistic Amalgamate Ambiguous

Amelioration Anathema Annex Annihilate Annuity Antiquated Apathetic Appendix Arduous Audacious Augment Avaricious Aversion Baleful Banal Barb Belligerent Benevolent Berate Biracial Blare

Blatant Bliss Bombastic Bravado Brittle Brook Buttress Camouflage Cantankerous Cassette Caustic Censure Cession Chagrin Chary Chromatic Chrome Circuitous Clairvoyance Clout Cognitive

Cognizant Concession Condescending Condolence Congenital Conspiracy Contrite Contumacious Copious Cosseted Craven Curb Cursory Dawdle Debilitate Decay Deft Delude Deplore Deprecate Desiccate Destitute Didactic Digression Dilapidated

Diligence Din Dirge Disapprobation Discernment Discombobulate Disingenuous Disparate Divulge Dote Edify Egalitarian Elemental Emancipate Embezzlement Enchant Encumbrance Ensile Entangle Epithet Equivocate Erudite Espouse Esteem Estranged

Eulogy Evanescent Exacerbate Exaggerated Exasperate Excoriate Exculpate Exhorted Exigency Exonerate Extortive Faculty Fail-safe Fatigue Fatuous Feasible Fecund Fervent Filigree Flaw Fleck Folly Forbidden Freight Fret

Fretful Frivolous Frugality Furtive Futile Futility Gainsay Garrulous Gasconade Gaudy Gibe Glacier Gobble Gregarious Grill Gripe Gullibility Gullible Gust Hairbreadth Hamstring Harangue Harbor Hardy Haughtiness

Havoc Hedge Hodgepodge Homogenize Hone Hortatory Imminent Impeccable Implore Impugn Incantation Inceptive Incipient Indict Indomitable Inert Inhibit Inimical Insouciant Intransigent Intricate Inured Invective Irascible Irrational

Irrevocable Jealous Jest Jubilation Knotty Labyrinth Lament Lampoon Languish larval Laud Lectern Lethargy Limp Lode Lofty Ludicrous Lull Majestic Manifold Meddlesome Melancholy Melancholy Meretricious Metaphor

Meticulous Mettlesome Misconstrue Molt Mortify Mournful Mundane Munificent Mystic Nadir Nebulous Nibble Nuance Nuisance Oblivious Obsequiousness Obsequy Omnipotent Onomatopoeia Opulence Ostentatious Palatial Palpitate Pan Pandemic

Parochial Parse Parsimonious Pathetic Pathological Penchant Penetrating Pernicious Pertinent Perturb Philistine Phlegmatic Pinnacle Pomp Pompous Pontific Preamble Precipitate Prehensile Prescient Prescient Presumptuous Pretentious Prevaricate Pristine

Procrastinate Prodigal Prodigy Profligate Prolific Prolixity Prominent Pugnacious Pulchritude Pulmonary Putrefaction Quaff Qualms Rambunctious Ravenous Rebut Recalcitrant Recant Recantation Rectitude Redundant Relinquish Remonstrance Renege Repel

Repudiate Rescind Resolute Resplendent Reticent Retraction Retrieve Revere Revert Sacrilege Sage Salubrious Saunter Scanty Scurvy Seditious Sham Shard Shattered Shrewd Simile Sip Skepticism Skimp Skimpy

Slapdash Slovenly Sly Spend thrift Sporadic Squabble Stamina Stanza Stasis Statute Stolid Stricture Stupefy Submissive Succinct Succulent Superfluous Supplant Supple Suppliant Surfeit Sustenance Symbiosis Taciturn Tangential

Tangible Tantamount Tawdry Tedious Tenuous Thwart Timorous Torpid Transience Trepidation Trespass Trial Truculent Tumultuous Unbridled Underscore Unflappable Unintimidating Unpretentious Vacillation Vaporous Veracity Verity Vexatious Vile

Vilify Vindicate Vitality Vivacious Voracious

Waif Wane Whelp Whimsical Wholesome

Winnow Winsome Yielding Distend Extant

QUANTITATIVE
Quantitative Problems 1. Given 0 > x > -1, which of the following must be the greatest? A.x B. 2x C. x 1 etc. 2. Given that in the two names JULLIE and LILLY, if one letter is picked from both simultaneously at random, then find the probability that the letters is same? 3. In a rectangular coordinate system, if the point P is at -5 on the x-axis and the point R is at 10 on the x-axis. The point Q is situated in between P and R such that the ratio of distance between P and Q to the distance between R and Q is 2 is to 3. Find the x-coordinate of point Q? 4. Given the standard deviation of set of three numbers x + 6, y + 6 and z + 6 is k, what would be the standard deviation of set x, y and z? 5. Given a set of numbers from 1 to 10, if two numbers are to be selected from these 10 numbers with replacement, what is the probability that at least one of them is even? 6. Given that a person walks to a city at the rate of 4km/hr and returns back at the rate of 6km/hr. If the tot al travelling time is 5hrs, find the distance he walked? 7. Given that (3)^(a-b) = 1/81 Col A : a Col B: b 8. Given |x + 2|< 4. Find the range of x value?

Quantitative Problems 1. Given the area of the triangle as 12, find the value of x?

2. Given 0 < 7/m < m/7 Col A : m Col B: 7 3. Given that A B = BC and A C > 4 +{(1/3)(Length of A B or BC)}. Find the value of AC?

4. Given Z = (123)^4 (123)^3 + (123)^2 123, find the remainder when 'Z' is divided by 122? 5. Col A : Standard deviation of set: {1, 2, 3, 4} Col B: 1/2(Standard deviation of set: {2, 4, 6, 8} 6. Given radius of the circle as r, if the length of the arc is /2 and area of the sector is 2, then the find the value of r?

7. Find the value of cube root of (-10)? 8. Given w = 3^8 1. Which of the following options can be the f actor of w? A . 39 B. 49 C. 41 etc.

Quantitative Problems 1. Given xyz = odd integer, then which of the following is even? I. x(y + z) II. xy + z III. yz +x A . Only I B. Only II C. Only I and II D. Only III 2. Col A : |-2.4|+ |4.8| Col B: 2

3. A s shown, if d is the diagonal of the square A BCD, t hen find the area of the square?

4. Col A : y + z

Col B: w

5. The discount on a certain product is x% in June and it is followed by another discount of x% in July. If the resulting price is 81% of the original price, then Col A : x Col B: 10% 6. Given the standard deviation of set of three numbers w + 6, s + 6 and p + 6 as k, then what will be the standard deviation of set w, s and p?

Quantitative Problems 2. Given 0.01786 < x < 0.01896, then Col A : The thousandth place of x

Col B: 8

4. Given 2^(x y) = 1/64. Col A : x + y

Col B: 8

5. Col A : x

Col B: y

6. If the arithmetic mean of set: {10, 20, x} is equal to median of set, then find the value of x?

7. Col A : x

Col B: y

8. If 5x^2 + 2x + 7 = 5x^2 + 9, then find the value of x? 9. Given the original price of furniture as $54.00. Because the manager of the furniture store thought he could get more money f or the furniture, he increased the price of the furniture to 10% of its original price. After a week, the furniture had not sold, so t he manager then discounted the price by 8% and the furniture was finally sold. At what price was the furniture sold? 10. Given a figure of a square A BCD like above. E is the midpoint of A B. If the area of the square is 24, find the area of the shaded region?

11. What is the ratio of 1/3 to 3/8?

Quantitative Problems 1. Which of the following is greater? A . {1/(30)^2} + 1 B. {1/(30)^2} 2 C. {1/(30)^3} + 1

2. Given 2 > a > 3 > b > 4. Col A : ab/c Col B: c 3. Col A : |10^-3| 4. Given w > 0 and z > 0 Col A : w^4 + z^3 Col B: 10^(-3)

Col B: w^2 + z

6. Given a series 1,-3, 5, -7, 9 and tn = [(-1)^(n 1)] * (2n 1). Find the sum of first 25 terms? 7. Given x > 2 and y > 2. Col A : xy Col B: 24 8. Col A: Area of three non-touching circles of radius 1 each Col B: 3

9. In company, 25% of the members work in receiving calls. If the average of the calls is 3.67, then Col A : The number of people who work in receiving calls Col B: 2 10. A company manufactures 2000 toys. If 3/4th of the toys are donated and 3/40th of the toys are sold, then Col A : The number of toys that are stored Col B: 3,250 11. Col A : 0.07 + 0.06 + 0.05 + 0.04 + 0.03 + 0.02 + 0.01 Col B: 0.07 * 0.06 * 0.05 * 0.04 * 0.03 * 0.02 * 0.01 12. Given roots of an equation as -1 and 1/2, which of the following equations have the same roots? A . 2x^2 + x 1 B. 2x^3+ x^2 + 1 C. x^2 + x + 1 13. Given area of a parallelogram and asked to find the diagonal length? 14. Given 2^(2x + 1) 2^2x = 2^1000. Find the value of x? 15. Col A : 17.3 * 3.1 Col B: (17 * 3.1) + (1.3 * 3.1)

Quantitative Problems 3. Given a figure like below. I. x p = q y II. x + p = 90

III. y = q

A. Only I B. Only II C. I and III 4. A semicircle is drawn on a triangle as shown in the figure. If the circumference of circle is 16, then

Col A : The area of triangle ABC Col B: 25 5. Given that a person A can sow his field in 12 days and person B can sow his field in 13 days. If they work together, in how many days they can complete the work? 6. A committee of 9 members is to be formed from a group of 25 members with 16 females and 9 males. Find the number of ways of forming a committee, such that 4 females are always to be included? 7. Col A : 1/(0.02)^-1 + 1/(0.04)^-1 Col B: [0.02 + 0.04]^(-1)

8. Given [(x + 1)/x]/(x + 1) = 99, find the value of [(x 1)/x]/ (x 1)?

9. If the area of the circle is 16, find t he area of the shaded region?

10. Given vertices of a triangle as (4, 3), (0, 0) and (8, 0). Find the perimeter of the triangle? 11. If a sum of money triples itself in 10 years, then by how many years it becomes 4 times?

Quantitative Problems 1. Col A : The remainder when (7^0 + 7^1 + 7^2 + .. + 7^19) /14 Col B: 7 2. Which cant be the factor of (2^n)*( 3^k), where n and k are both positive integers? A.8 B. 24 C. 42 3. Given f (n) = [ (-1) ^n]*c*n, where c is the cost. If f (1), f (2) and f (3) are the similar functions and the difference between the largest and smallest among f (1), f (2) and f (3) is 20, then Col A : f (4) Col B: 16 4. Given that there are 10 numbers in a sequence starting with 5, the rest are obtained by doubling the preceding number and subtracting 3. What is the 4th number? 5. Given area of the triangle DEC as 10 and side of square as 10. Find AE length?

6. What is the value of x?

8. By selling two articles for Rs. X each a shopkeeper gains 30% on one and looses 30% on the other, find the profit /loss percentage? 9. What is the length of segment 'PT'?

10. Given S1: {10, 15, 20, 25, 30} and S2 = {15, 20, 25, 30, 35}. I. Mean of S1 and S2 is same. II. If S1 is divided by 5 and S2 is divided by 5, then the mean of S1 and S2 is same. A . Only I B. Only II C. I and II D. None

Quantitative Problems 1. If a number is divided by 24, the remainder is 21, then the number should be divisible by which of the following? A.3 B. 4 C. 5 D. 6 E. 7 2. Given a figure of a trapezoid, inside a rectangle. The trapezoid shared two complete sides of the rectangle half or more in other side o ther side was just joined from the half to the starting point. The sides of the rectangle are given. The question was to find the area of trapezoid? 3. Given 3x = 4y = 10z, find the least value of z? 5. Given 0.60 > x > 0.70. Which of the following is greater? A . sqrt(x) B. 1/x C. x^2

7. Given average of a set: {x1, x2, x3, x4, x5} as S and average of another set: {y1, y2, y3} as T, then find the average of {x1, x2, x3, x4, x5, y1, y2, y3}? A .S+T B. 5S + 37 C. (5S + 3T)/8 D. (S + T)/2 8. What is the mean of 5 integers (closest to the nearest integer) if the median is 7, mode is 4 and the arithmetic mean of the largest and smallest integer in the series is 20? A . 7 B. 9 C. 11 D. 13 E. 15

Quantitative Problems 1. Given that a line passes through the points (-10,-18 ), (20, 22) and (x, 2). Find the value of x? 3. Given range of a set of numbers 5, 9, 7, -2, x as 12. Find the value of x? 4. Given that there are 10 balls in a bag, 3 red, 2 green and 5 blue. Find the probability of selecting two balls that are green? 6. Given that a lady gets an income say x dollars. If she spends some money for her livings, then she is left with y dollars at the end of month. Col A : x y Col B: y 7. A certain sum of amount doubles in 10 years. Find its rate of interest? 8. Given that a < b < c, then Col A : ab Col B: bc

Quantitative Problems 1. What is the unit digit of expression (537)^343 x (231)^54 x (234)^87 ? 2. If the average of set {y1, y2, y3, y4, y5} is 36 and of set {x1, x2, x3, y1, y2, y3, y4, y5} is 72,then what is the average of set {x1, x2, x3}? 3. Given a circle with diameter in the figure and two triangles are formed on each side of diameter. If diameter is AB and the triangles formed are ACB on one side and ADB on the other, then what is the sum of angle CAD and CBD? 4. If -1 < x < 0, then Col A : x^5 Col B: x^7

6. In a group of 80 people, 1/4th of t hem male singers. After few days, 60 new people joined in the group then the fraction of singers changed from 1/4 to 1/6 of the total. How many people are non-singers? 7. Col A : (0.001)^(-30) Col B: (10)^(30)

8. Given that there were around 20 numbers and we have to determine that, if one of the numbers is changed, what will be the difference in both the averages? 9. Given a set of five numbers {x, x + 1, x + 2, 3x + 4, 4x + 3) Col A : The mode of the set Col B: The median of the set 10. Given an equation of a line as y = kx - 5. If the x-intercept of the line is -4/3, find the slope of the line? 11. Given -1 < x < 0. Col A : x^2 12.

Col B: 2x

Col A: Unit digit of the expression (431)x(729)x(543) Col B: Unit digit of the expression (248 )^2

13. Given two sides of a triangle as 3, 4. Find the range of third side?

Quantitative Problems 1. Given x, y, z are positive integers and if 3x = 4y = 10z, then what is the least possible value of z? 2. Given 2^(2x+3) = 64 * 128. Find the value of x? 3. Given a figure of a circle (with diameter A D) and rectangle A BCD. If the area of the rectangle is 50, find the area of the shaded region?

4. Given two sets S: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} and T: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. If a new set P is formed from the product of sets 'S' and 'T', then how many distinct values are possible in set P?

5. Given three arcs of three circles, if the radius of all the ci rcles is r, find the

sum of lengths of three arcs? 8. Given that a sum of $2000 is given at the rate of 'r%' f or 1year on simple interest and at t he end of 1 year, if $150 is the interest, then find value of r? 9. If -1 < x < 0, then Col A : x^5

Col B: x^7

10. Given that 0.6 < x < 0.7 Col A : sqrt(x) Col B: 0.73 11. 12. Col A: 0.9999/0.9998 Col A : |1 - 2! + 3| Col B: 1.0002/1.0001 Col B: 1! - 2! + 3!

13. Given five terms a1, a2 , a3 , a4 , a5 and if an = n(-1 + (-1)^(1)), what is the difference between greatest and least value? 14. Given that s = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, t = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9} and if p= s*t, how many distinct values of 'p' are possible? 15. Given |2x + 7| < 13, find how many values of x are possible? 16. Given -1 < x < 0 Col A : sqrt(x)

Col B: x^2

Quantitative Problems 1. A circle is inscribed in a square, which is inscribed in another circle. Find the ratio of areas of smaller circle to the larger circle? 2. Given a point on the x-axis (-k, 0) at point 'R' and another point S (m,0) on xaxis which is not shown in the figure is given. If RS = k^4, then Col A : m Col B: 0

3. Given the age of a person X as f our times the age of his son. After ten years, if the age of X is twice the age of his son, then what is the present age of his son? 4. Given that two cyclists are moving towards each other at speed of 20 miles/hour and they are about 100 miles apart. At this instance a fly starts from one cyclist and move towards other and moves to and fro till the two cyclists meet each other. If the fly is moving at 30 miles/hour, what is the total distance covered by the fly? 6. If x < y < z, then Col A : xy

Col B : yz

7. When a number is divided by 12, the remainder is 5. What is the remainder when the square of that number is divided by 8?

Quantitative Problems 1. If 4y 1 > 9, then Col A : y 2.

Col B: 3 Col B: 1/500 of 4

Col A : 0.2% of 4

3. A square is formed by joining midpoints of another square as shown in figure. If the perimeter of larger square is X, then Col A : Perimeter of smaller square Col B: X/2 4. Given that in a pack of plates, 1/3 plates are damaged, 2/3 plates are cracked and 1/3 of them are damaged and cracked. If 80 are not hampered, then what is the number of total plates? 5. In a set of numbers from 1 to 10. If two numbers are to be selected from these 10 numbers with replacement, then what is the probability that at least one of them is even? 6. Given d as the standard deviation of set:{ x, y, z}, then Col A : The standard deviation of x +2, y+2 and z+2 Col B: d + 2

Quantitative Problems 1. Given that there are three couples, who are to be arranged in 6 seats. Find how many ways they can be arranged, such that husband and wife sit together? 2. Given a figure of semicircle like above with the radius of circle given and the angle of the sector is also given. Find the area of the shaded region?

3. A person X sells his TV set to another person Y at a loss of 15%, but Y sells it to another person Z at a profit of 10%. If Z pays $9350 to Y, then Col A : The amount Y pays to X Col B: 8500 4. Given few numbers like 2, 5, 6, 7, 9. Find the number of ways of arranging a five digit even number from the given numbers? 5. In how many ways, 7 gents and 4 ladies can be arranged circularly in a meeting? 7. Given that there are two light poles, one pole is having bulb A and another is having bulb B such that the first pole is 60 ft and second pole is 100 ft height. If the distance between two poles is 30 ft, then find the distance between A and B? 8. Given a sequence like x, w, y, z, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3. Find the value of x? 9. Col A : (10)^-2 Col B: 0

10. From the set of numbers: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}, how many different sums can be formed by summing up any two numbers in the set?

11. Given a figure of a square like above. Find the area of the shaded region?

Quantitative Problems 1. Given x = [root (200) root (8 )] / root2 Col A : x Col B: 8 2. Given circumference of a circle as pie and area as 3*pie/2. Find the radius of the circle? 3. Given a figure like above. If the area of the shaded region is 1, then find radius of circle?

4. Given two sets S={2, 4, 6} and T={2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12}. If M is a new set, such that S is subset of M and M is subset of T, then fi nd how many values can set M have? 5. Given xy not equal to 0 and x not equal to y. If x/y = y/x, then Col A : x + y Col B: 0 6. Given 31345x69 is divisible by 3. Find the least possible value of x? 7. Given that a solution contains 33 percent of alcohol, 12 salt and rest water. What is the ratio of alcohol to salt to water? 8. Given ab = b+1 and a(b + c) = ab + c. Col A : c Col B: a/(b+1)

9. Given length of the diagonal of the square as 162, then find the radius of the circle?

10. Given GCM and LCM of k and n are given. Calculate n when k is also given? 11. 1/2 is what percent of 2/3? 12. Given x^2 + y^2 = 2xy Col A : x Col B: y 13. Given a rectangle of length L and width is 20% of length. If the area of the rectangle is x, then find its perimeter in terms of x? 14. Given f (x) = 4x^2 + 20x + 25, where x is an integer. Col A : Minimum value of f (x) Col B: 0 15. A ball is dropped from height of 6 meters and ball bounce back not more than 90% of height. Find the height after 5th bounce? 16. If |2x - 3|= 7. Find the possibilities of x?

Quantitative Problems 1. Given x = 10^20 + 1. Col A : The remainder when x is divided by 11 Col B: 2 4. If 0 < r < t, then Col A : r + rt^2

Col B: 1

5. Given n is an integer, such that <n> = (-1)^n, which one is true, I. <a + b> = <a> + <b> II. <a * b> = <a> * <b> III. <a + b> = <a> * <b> A . I only B. II only C. I and III only D. I, II and III E. None

6. Given that three couples are to be seated in a row, such that husband and wife should always sit together. Find the number of ways the arrangement can be done? 7. Col A : Least prime factor of 7! + 7 Col B: Greatest prime factor of 7!

8. Given a figure of a circle with a square inscribed in it, whose diagonal length is 16*root(2). Find the radius of the circle?

Quantitative Problems 1. Find the value of [sqrt(200) sqrt (8 )] / sqrt(2)? 2. Given a figure like above. Find the area of the figure?

3. Given a series 1, 2, 3, 4. n. If 1=2 and n = (n -1) + 3, then find the value of 100?(Note: Here 1, 2, 3, 4, n -1, n are suffixes) 4. A person plans a party where he has to select 2 out of 4 sweet varieties and 4 out of 5 curries. Find the number of ways he can select them? 5. On a rectangular coordinate a line k passes through (1, 2) and another line m passes through (2, 1). Col A : Slope of line k Col B: Slope of line m 6. Given ab0, a b and a/b = b/a. Col A : a + b Col B: 0 7. Find the sum of the common prime factors of 51 and 204? 8. Given that a travels at 30miles/hr and b travels at 60miles/hr. If b travels T miles in 3 hours, then how much distance can a travel in the same time? 9. Given a set, S = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}. How many four digit numbers can be formed from the set S without repetition?

10. Given that a point p(3, 2) lie on a circle whose centre is ( -2, -3), find the circumference of the circle? 11. Given 0 < x < 1. Which of the following has the greatest value? A . 1/x B. 1/x^2 C. x D. x^2 E. 1 12. 150 square feet is equal to how many square yards (Given 1 yard = 3 feet)? 13. Col A : sqrt[a + b + 2sqrt(ab)] Col B: sqrt(a) + sqrt(b) Col A : Standard Deviation of 16, 5, 14, 5, 8, 16 Col B: Standard Deviation of 6, 8, 18, 14, 18, 8

14.

15. Given that P and N are integers. If 5N = P^ 2, then Col A : N Col B: 3 16. Given a figure similar to above, if the distance between k and some point m on the number line is k^4, then

Col A : m

Col B: 0

Quantitative Problems 1. Given A 's speed as 50 km/h and B's spe ed as 55 km/h. If A covers a distance in 7 hours, then how much time B takes to cover the same distance? 2. What is the value of |7| + |3| - |-10| ? 3. Given a quarter circle (90 degrees) with radius of the circle as 's'. Col A : Area of the sector Col B: Some value. 4. Given a set of numbers k - 1, k, k + 1, k + 2, k + 3, k + 4, k + 5. Find the ratio of mean to median? 5. Given there are 'n' employees of which 70% are lawyers and 55% of these are females. How many percentage of these 'n' employees are male lawyers?

6. Given P = (x) (x + 1) (x + 2) (x + 3), where x is a positive integer. Col A : The remainder when P is divided by 3 Col B: 1 7. Col A : 1.5% of 0.4% of 500 Col B: 15% of 4% of 5

Quantitative Problems 1. Given a figure of a square with a circle inscribed in it. If the area of the shaded region is 1, then find the area of the circle?

A . pi/4 D.1/2(pi-4)

B. pi C. pi/(pi-4) E. pi/(pi-4)^2

2. Given N = 10 power 22 + 1. If N is divided by 11, then Col A : The remainder Col B: 2 3. Given M = 5 power k 3; K>0 Col A : Units place of M

Col B: Tens place of M

4. A person J travel speed is 35mph and A travel speed is 60mph. If A completes a distance in T hrs, then find the time taken f or J to travel the same distance as A ? A . T/ (35)(60) B. T (35)/ 60 C. 15 T/ 60 D. 60T/ 35 E. 60 * 35/ T 5. Find the value of (sqrt200 - sqrt2)/sqrt2? 6. In the set -14, -11, -7, 9, 10, 13, which of the following is true? I. Median is greater than mean II. Standard Deviation is greater than range III. Mean is greater than median. A . I only B. II only C. I and II only D. I, II and III only E. None of these

Quantitative Problems 1. Given 1/x - 1/y = xy Col A : y Col B: x+1 2. What percent of 1/2 is 2/3? 3. An equilateral triangle with sides is given and in opt ions rectangles with sides were given. We have to choose t he rectangle whose area is equal area to triangle? 4. Col A : 7^37 - 7^36 Col B: 6(7^6)^6

6. If K, L and M are three prime numbers greater than 10, then Col A : Number of factors of KLM and 1 inclusive Col B: 8 7. Given a series 2, x, 7,.... In the following series, if every term is the addition of the preceding term and a constant, find the constant? 8. Given two cylinders A and B and if the cylinders A 's radius and height are half that of cylinder B, then Col A : Area of Cylinder A Col B: 4(area of Cylinder B) 9. Given an equilateral triangle A BC of side 5. If the vertex A is at origin, B is at (0, 5) and C is in the first quadrant, find the slope of BC? 10. If 5 < x < 1, then Col A : x 11. Given a - b = 2 Col A : 25^a/5^b

Col B: 1/x

Col B: 5^a

12. Given w = 10^4 and 0 < x < 10^(-4). Find an approximate value of (w + x)/3w?

Quantitative Problems 1. Given length of the diagonal of the square as 162, then find the radius of

the circle? 2. Col A : [3 ^ (- 8 )] - [3 ^ (- 9)] - [3 ^ (- 9)] Col B: [3 power (- 9)] 4. Col A : 10% of sqrt (54372.19) Col B: sqrt (5437.219)

5. Given m/n = n/r = 5/4. What can be the value of r? 6. Col A : [1/(x) power (-2)] whole power (-3) Col B: [1/x] whole power (-6)

7. Given that three machines can produce one job of widgets in 4, 6 and 8 hours respectively. If three of the machines work on a single job, then what is the contribution of the fastest machine?

Quantitative Problems 1. Col A : sqrt [1 + sqrt {a + sqrt (2)}] Col B: sqrt[sqrt(2) + sqrt{(sqrt(2) + 1) /sqrt(2)}] 2. A person store T pens. Of that he sells 135 pens at t he cost of $0.25 each. A t what cost should he sell the remaining pens to get the same amount? 4. Col A : 1 Col B: 2

5. Given standard deviation of a set r is 13 and of a set t is 7. Col A : Mean of r Col B: Mean of t 6. Given an = a(n-1) a(n-2), a1 = -5 and a2 = 4. Find the sum of first 100 terms? 7. Given that there are a total of n sets of twins in a hospital. If b is the set of only boy twins and g is the set of only girl twins, then Col A : The total number of boys Col B: n b + g 8. Find the value of [sqrt(100) sqrt (8 )] / sqrt(2) ? 9. Col A : Volume of a cube of surf ace area 150*y^2 Col B: 125*y^3

10. A tank consists of G gallons of water. If the water fills at the rate of x and leaks out at the rate of y(y > x), then what is the time t aken to empty half of the tank (G/2) in terms of x and y? 12. If the area of the shaded region is 1 sq.cm, find the area of the circle?

A . pi/4 D. pi /(4 - pi)

B. pi

C. pi / (pi - 4)

13. Given a set s = {5, 6, 7, 8, 9} Col A : The number of five digit numbers that can be formed using the digits from the set S Col B: (5)(6)(7)(8)(9) 14. The value of |-7| + |3| - |10| is ________ 15. The budget of a class trip is $x and each student was supposed to pay $c. Because of some inconvenience, 20% of them missed the trip, while t he total budget remained the same. How much did it actually cost per head in terms of c? 17. Given a line with x-intercept -7 and y-intercept 8. Col A: Angle a (where a is the obtuse angle between the line & y-axis) Col A: Angle b (where b is the obtuse angle between the line & x-axis)

18. Given an arc length of a circle as and its sector has an area of 3 /2. Find the radius of the circle? 19. Given |2x+3| < 7 Col A : x^2

Col B: 4

20. Given two sets S = {2, 4, 6} and T = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12}. Find the number of values of set M, such that S is subset of M and M is subset of T? 21. Given two cylinders A and B, if the cylinder B radius and height are half that of cylinder A , then Col A : Area of Cylinder A Col B: 4(Area of Cylinder B)

Quantitative Problems 1. Given a figure of a semi-circle and a square like above. If the radius of the circle is 1 and length of the side of the square is 2, then find the perimeter of the shaded region?

2. Given x>y and x=! 0, then Col A : xy Col B: x/y 3. Col A : Mean of t he set {6, 12, 18, 24, 30} Col B: Median of the set {12, 18, 24, 30} 4. Given that a person sells two items at same price. One he sells at 25% loss and other at 25% profit. Find the profit/loss percentage? 5. Find the equation of the line passing through (2,2) and origin? A . 2x + 2y = 0 B. x y= 0 C. x + y 1 = 0 6. Col A : 30% of 75 Col B: 75% of 30

7. Given a series a1, a2, .an. If a1= 1 and an = 24*a(n -1) + 8, find the remainder when a66 is divided by 6? [ Here 1,2,66,(n -1),n are suffixes]

Quantitative Problems 1. Given that a person sells two vehicles f or $1500 each. If he gains 25% on one vehicle and on the other if he losses 20%, then what is the gain/loss percentage in that? 2. Given equation of a line as 5x y =10, find the slope of a line perpendicular to the given line? 3. Given a1= 1 and a(n+1) = a(n)/2 + 4. Find the approximate value of a(100)? (Here 1, 100, n, n+1 are suffixes) 4. If a(m) = (m+1)/m. Find the product of 100 terms of the series? 5. Given -2 < x < -1 Col A : x^-3

Col B: x^-1

6. Find the value of the expression {4^(-3) + (4)^12) / (32^-2)}? 7. Given mean of a set of three numbers x, 10 x and 2x + 3 as 24. Find the median of the set?

Quantitative Problems 1. Find the value of the expression |2 1/2|+|2 7/2|? 2. Given the prices of 5 boats as $1200, $700, $1500, $1400 and $1100. Col A : The standard deviation of the prices, if the service charge of $150 is added to each boat price. Col B: The standard deviation of the prices, if the service charge of 10% of the price of each boat is added. 3. A person A has 6 Canadian dollars and y Australian dollars. If more than 3/8 of them are Australian dollars, then what is the minimum number of dollars A has? 4. Given x > 1. For what value of x the expression R = 5/((3/x -1) 2) is cannot be determined Col A : x Col B: 2 5. The cost of purchasing x items is given by 0.0001x^3 0.06x^2 + 12x + 100. Col A : Cost of purchasing 100 items Col B: $1200

6. If -1 < y < 0, then which of the following must be true? A . y^3 < y < y^4 < y^2 B. y < y^3 < y^2 < y^4 C. y^4 < y < y^3 < y^2 D. y < y^3 < y^4< y^2

7. Given BD parallel t o CE. Find the length of ED?

Quantitative Problems 1. In a yard, there are two sets of balls. One set are white balls and one set are red balls. If the probability of drawing a white ball is 4/9, find how many red balls should be removed f or the probability of drawing white ball to increase to 4/5? 2. If the base length of the triangle is 12, then find the area of the shaded region?

3. Given a figure like above. L and M are two parallel lines. Find <PQR?

4. Given |y|< 1 and z > 1. Which of the following is negative? A . (x y)^2 B. (x^2 y^2) C. (y^2 x^2) 5. Given -8 < = y < = 10 and x + y = 4. Find the least possible value of xy? 6. Given a series a1, a2, a3, .a100, an. If a1 = 0 and an = 1/2(a(n-1) + 4), find the value of a100? (1, 2, 100, (n-1), n are suffixes) 7. Given a set of five numbers, if 7 is the median, 4 is the mode and mean of the largest and second largest number is 20, find the average of five numbers?

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