Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 20

SOUTH CAROLINAS PREMIER WEEKLY

INDEX | SPORTS | DEATHS |


TO SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
8772076
1,000POINT CLUB
Blue Ridges
Robinson hits
milestone B1
Valeda J. Aston, 88
Wilma Cooper, 76
Eugene B. Holtzclaw, 66
Jay Logan, 71
Robert L. Siegel, 71
Betty M. Suddeth, 77
Betty W. Vaden, 85
NOTABLE |
GRANTED
Foundation
announces winners
A3
INSIDE |
CLASSIFIEDS B5
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2
CRIME A9
ENTERTAINMENT B8
OBITUARIES A6
OPINION A4
OUR SCHOOLS B7
SPORTS B14
WEATHER A6

Registration underway
for spring sports
Registration for youth spring play with
the Greer Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment has begun.
Residents, both in and out of Green-
ville County, have until Feb. 7 to sign up
for Greer Baseball Club (GBC), Foothills
Soccer Club of Greer (FSCG) and girls
softball. These sports are open to youth
ages 3-14.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 4 50 CENTS
TICK TOCK: GLT hosts 24 Hour Play Festival B6
Resident
questions
livestock
laws
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Petitioner Reinaldo Re-
menteria requested coun-
cil consider changing an
ordinance regarding the
possession of livestock
during the Jan. 14 Greer
City Council meeting.
Rementeria asked the
group of elected officials
to consider the allowance
of chickens under similar
guidelines as Greenville
Countys livestock stan-
dards.
The reason Im here
is because I think theres
been a push lately the
City of Greeville has it, the
County of Greenville for
people to have a better
connection to where their
food comes from, Remen-
teria said. I think its a
wonderfully teaching tool
for your children, spe-
cifically my son, to know
where his food comes
from, how to raise the ani-
mals and its not just some
SEE COUNCIL | A7
Not to be
complacent
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
The 12th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
was celebrated by more
than 300 people during a
program at Greer City Hall
Monday, featuring speak-
er Rev. Earl Simmons Sr.
of Maple Creek Baptist
Church.
Thank God for all of
you gathered here today,
Simmons said. This is a
wonderful distinguished
body as I look and see
different people from dif-
ferent backgrounds and
different cultures, surely
symbolic of Dr. Kings
dream.
[MLK] chose to confront
the dangers and unequal
treatment of people of
color and of economically
disadvantaged individuals
throughout the nation
people who have suffered
at the hand of institution-
alized and ugly inhumane
theories of racial superi-
ority for over 300 years
unjust laws, oppressive
policies, insecurities and
fear, he said.
Simmons discussed Rev.
Kings accomplishments
as a result of his advocacy
for racial and economic
equality. Simmons overall
message was this: Weve
come a long way, but were
not there yet.
Fifty years later, gone
are the signs of white only
or colored only drinking
fountains. Gone are the
oppressive policies of Jim
Crowe and years of overt
and extreme racism. Gone
are the marches and pro-
testers holding signs that
read, I am a man. Gone
are the riots, the sit-ins,
police dogs, National
Guards, night raids of
the hooded cowards with
burning crosses that terri-
fied men and women and
children all across Ameri-
ca, Simmons said.
Simmons said the coun-
try has come a long way in
the last half-century.
Yes, gone are the unjust
laws and policies regard-
ing mens right to vote,
so much so that today we
can celebrate the two-term
election of the first African
American man to the high-
est office in the land, the
most powerful position in
the free world, President
Barack Hussein Obama.
50 years later, we can cel-
SEE MLK | A7
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
An annual disc golf event to beneft Greer Relief is slated
for Feb. 1.

MLK event challenges attendees
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Ed Driggers, left, and Wayne Grif n enjoy a laugh at Greers
annual MLK Day of Celebration.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Rev. Earl Simmons of Maple Creek Baptist Church delivered a message of hope in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day at
Greer City Hall.


As we celebrate the
passing of these
difficult days, I
stopped by to tell
you that
were
not there
yet.
Rev. Earl Simmons
Maple Creek Baptist Church
Riverside
shopping
center is
possible
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
By the first quarter of
2015, Riverside Crossing,
a potential shopping cen-
ter, may be constructed
on Hammett Bridge and E.
Suber Road near Riverside
High School. The shopping
center was addressed at
the Jan. 16 Planning Ad-
visory meeting, and the
nine-building retail and
restaurant center already
has confirmed a grocery
store tenant.
Representatives declined
to disclose specifics about
tenants that may open
shop at the center.
Towns at Riverside Park,
a town home community
at 1249 Suber Road, and
a subdivision to be built
on Snow Road were ad-
dressed at the Planning
Advisory meeting as well,
and developers were ad-
vised they would have to
prove their constructed
homes would not cause
any harm to the surround-
ing homes due to storm
water runoff issues. There
presently isnt a date set
to start construction and
Greer City Council will ad-
dress the properties dur-
ing the Jan. 28 meeting.
The Vien Quong Monas-
tery, a Buddhist Temple,
will be constructed at
SEE PLANNING | A10

Disc golf
benefits
Greer Relief
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
In February, disc golf,
chili and charity will all
come together in the third
annual Brrr in Grrr Ice
Bowl.
Greer Relief has benefit-
ed from the event all three
years.
Weve been very blessed
great guys and they are
just cool to hang out with,
said Caroline Robertson,
Greer Relief executive di-
rector. They have a chili
cook-off at lunch time, so
they feed themselves. Its
really cool.
Last year, 72 disc golf-
ers participated, raising
$2,143 and 1,600 pounds
of food. This year, John
Ludwig, Brrr in Grrr direc-
tor and Greer Disc Golf
Club president, hopes at
least $2,400 and 1,700
pounds of non-perishable
items will be collected.
Ludwig hopes to attract
more business sponsor-
ships as well.
They have lofty goals
for their food and finan-
cial contributions and I
have all confidence, no
doubt whatsoever, that
theyll reach their goals,
Robertson said.
Ice Bowls are national
events.
Every Ice Bowl is sup-
posed to fund a charity
organization that helps lo-
cal citizens, Ludwig said.
Thats one of the caveats
of running an Ice Bowl.
The event also features
prizes for players, includ-
ing an Innovista DISCatch-
er.
Every year weve had
at least five or six partici-
pants in (the chili cook-
off), Ludwig said. Each
player will bring in their
chili and then it feeds
the entire field of play-
ers. Unfortunately, I have
not won. I dont feel too
bad because people bring
some amazingly tasty chili
every year.
SEE BENEFIT | A6
Annual Brrr in Grrr
Ice Bowl approaching
WANT TO GO? |
What: Brrr in Grrr Ice Bowl
When: Saturday, Feb. 1
Registration 8:30 a.m.
Tee Of 10:15 a.m.
Where: Century Park
Cost: $20 and fve-canned
goods
For info: discgolfunited.com
On Facebook: Greer Disc Golf
Call: 318-243-3932
GODS PANTRY
REQUESTS DONATIONS
Gods Pantry needs non-
perishable food donations.
Items can be dropped off
at: 100 Enoree Road, Greer,
on Thursdays from 10 a.m.
noon, 2481 Racing Road,
Greer, on Thursdays 1
4 p.m. or 700 E. Main St.,
Duncan, on Wednesdays 9
11 a.m.
For questions or to vol-
unteer call Wendy at 963-
4441.
GCM NEEDS
SERVERS, FOOD
GCM seeks two servers
that can work in the kitch-
en on Thursdays on the
line getting meals ready
for Meals on Wheels cli-
ents. Call Ellen at 877-1937
for more information.
GCM is in need of beef
stew, spaghetti sauce, oat-
meal, grits and boxed cere-
al. Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
Monday Thursday 8 a.m.
3 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m.
1 p.m. For more informa-
tion call at 879-2254.
GREER MEALS ON
WHEELS SEEKS DRIVERS
GCMs Meals on Wheels
program needs drivers for
a number of routes, in-
cluding weekly, monthly
or as substitutes. A MOW
driver must be a qualified
driver with a valid drivers
license and have a heart
for serving others. MOW
has 19 delivery routes in
the greater Greer area.
Meals are delivered Mon-
day through Friday. For
more information contact
at 879-2254 or 877-1937.
FAMILY MINISTRIES
COAT DRIVE
As the weather gets
colder outside, District
Five Families Ministries
is sponsoring an ongoing
coat drive. New or gen-
tly used coats for men,
women and children are
accepted. Please drop off
at MTCC, 84 Groce Road,
Lyman, to help a family in
need. Call the center for
pickup at 439-7760.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
NEEDS DRIVERS
The American Cancer So-
ciety needs volunteer driv-
ers to transport patients
to local treatment centers.
Anyone interested in vol-
unteering as a driver must
have a good driving re-
cord, valid drivers license,
automobile insurance and
a vehicle in good working
condition. The American
Cancer Society provides
free training for this pro-
gram.
For more information on
becoming a Road to Recov-
ery volunteer, contact the
local office at 627-8289.
EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION
CLASS JAN. 22
Learn about the compo-
nents of a safe exercise
program on Wednesday,
Jan. 22, 9:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m., at GHS Life
Center. The class is free.
Call 455-4037 to register.
CAREGIVING ABCS
BEGINS JAN. 22
The five-week program
gives information and
support to those caring
for a loved one with de-
mentia. The program be-
gins Wednesday, Jan. 22, 6
8 p.m., at GHS Patewood
Medical Campus. Visit ghs.
org/healthevents to regis-
ter.
GREAT BAY OYSTER
HOUSE GIVE A SHUCK
On Jan. 23 the Great
Bay Oyster House Give a
Shuck will be held from
7 9 p.m. Call Diane
Christoferson at 905-6806
for more information.
DIABETES 101 ON JAN. 24
AT GHS LIFE CENTER
Learn the basics about
diabetes on Friday, Jan. 24,
1 p.m., at GHS Life Center.
The class is free and regis-
tration isnt required. Call
455-8722 for more infor-
mation.
NUTRITION CLASS
OFFERED JAN. 27
More than Fat, a class
about heart healthy ben-
efits of specific foods and
nutrients, will be held on
Monday, Jan. 27, 8:30 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. at
GHS Life Center.
The class is free. Call
455-4010 to register.
MEET THE MIDWIVES
JAN. 28
Learn about GHS
nurse-midwifery program
on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 6
8 p.m., at Greenville Mid-
wifery Care. The session is
free.
Call 877-447-4636 or
visit ghs.org/healthevents
to register.
COFFEE AND
CONVERSATION
Jan. 29 at noon
Moms on the go are in-
vited for coffee and a con-
versation about womens
health issues on Wednes-
day, Jan. 29, noon 1p.m.
at Starbucks on Fairview
Road in Simpsonville. The
event is free. Visit ghs.org/
healthevents to register.
METABOLIC SYNDROME
INFORMATIONAL CLASS
Learn about the risk
factors that make up the
metabolic syndrome and
steps to take to prevent
or control diabetes, heart
disease and stroke at this
free class on Wednesday,
Jan. 29, 8:30 a.m., 9:30
a.m. or 12:30 p.m. at the
GHS Life Center. Call 455-
4001 to register.
LELAND BURCH TO
HOLD BOOK SIGNING
The Greer Heritage Mu-
seum will host a book
signing and photography
exhibit Saturday, Feb 1.
Leland Burch will sign cop-
ies of his new book Greer,
SC: the Center of the Uni-
verse from 11:00 a.m.
- 1:00 p.m. Books will be
available for purchase.
The museum located at
106 S Main St. is open to
the public free of charge
Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00
pm. Call 877-3377.
GHS GENTLE
BALLET CLASSES
Gentle Ballet classes of-
fered on Saturdays now
through Feb. 1, 10 11 a.m.
at the GHS Life Center. The
classes teach the graceful
basics of classical ballet.
Cost is $40 for members,
$50 for non-members, or
$15 per class. Call 455-
4001 to register.
GIRLS ON
THE RUN
Girls on the Run and
Girls on Track will com-
bine training for 5K with
workouts for girls ages 8
15. A free training ses-
sion will take place Jan. 26
and Feb. 2, and sessions
begin Feb. 5. Cost is $199.
Scholarships and payment
plans available. Register
at ghs.org/girlsontherun.
Volunteer coaches are
needed. To volunteer, call
455-4001.
GERMANAMERICAN
CLUB, FEB. 7
German-American Club
Stammtisch on Feb. 7 at 6
p.m. at Four Seasons Res-
taurant, 1071 fernwood
Glendale Road, Spartan-
burg.
Open to the public. Call
699-9730 for more infor-
mation.
COMMUNITY NIGHT
ON FEB. 27
Always Best Care Senior
Service and the Manning
House of Greer are host-
ing Community Night on
Feb. 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Manning House of Greer,
10 Companion Court.
Guest speaker is Marilyn
Smedberg-Gobbett. Limit-
ed seating is available and
registration is required.
For more information call
Manning House of Greer at
989-0707 or email eharri-
son@alcco.com.


A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
AFTER HOURS
FAMILY PRACTICE
OF GREER
AFFORDABLE Health Care For The UNINSURED
*** LOW FEES ***
* Routine Health Care
* Labwork
* Womens Health
* DOT Physicals
* Employee Physicals
* School Physicals
14332 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer, SC 29652
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
12:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
864-655-5875
WALK-IN ONLY
ACROSS FROM KIA OF GREER WE ACCEPT CASH, CHECK, CREDIT CARDS
Keep Current & Plug In
for a Valentines Day
Microcurrent
Special
Improve
muscle tone
in your face
and neck,
lift jowls
and eyebrows,
reduce wrinkles
and ne lines,
and much more.
$75 per treatment
Call for appointment 727-243-6681
Deb Mays - Licensed Esthetician
Its Only Skin Deep
Shoppes on Trade
211 Trade St.
Greer, SC 29651
Evelyn Bishop Horton cel-
ebrated a milestone on Jan,
17, turning 100-years-old.
She is a mother and
grandmother.
Note from the family:
Happy 100th Birthday.
As we celebrate your life
today, thank you for the
time you gave, the shar-
ing of your talents in the
beautiful gifts you made.
For you have blessed so
many and blessed the Lord
above. Using your gifts to
bless another reflects the
Fathers love. We love you
so very much, family and
friends.
Horton
celebrates
100 years
Evelyn B. Horton
COMMUNITY
NEWS
TODAY, JAN. 22
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
KIWANIS CLUB at 6:30 p.m.
at Laurendas Family Restau-
rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich
at 349-1707.
THE SOAR BINGO CLUB
from 10 a.m. - noon at Victor
Gym. The cost is 50 cents per
card.
FRIDAY, JAN. 24
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its monthly dinner
at 6:30 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
SATURDAY, JAN. 25
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
MONDAY, JAN. 27
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONY
MOUS at 7 p.m. at the Greer
Recreational Center.
TUESDAY, JAN. 28
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONY
MOUS at 7 p.m. at the Greer
Recreational Center.
THE ROTARY CLUB of Greater
Greer at 7:15 a.m. at Southern
Thymes. Call 334-6177.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further information
or to schedule a performance
contact Wesley Welsh, Presi-
dent, at 877-5955.
GIG GLUTEN INTOLER
ANCE GROUP of Greenville
meets at the Taylors Library,
316 W. Main St. The group
meets from 7- 8:30 p.m.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. All list-
ings are subject to editing
and/or omission due to
space constraints. Please
submit information about
area events, meetings, etc.
to Amanda Irwin at 877-
2076, email to abradford@
greercitizen.com or mail
to The Greer Citizen P.O.
Box 70 Greer, SC 29652.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR




T
his past Tuesday,
Jan. 14, 2014, the SC
General Assembly
returned to Columbia
for the 120th Legislative
Session.
This is the second year
of the two-year session
and, in addition to bills
that were unfinished and
carried over from last
year, almost 200 addi-
tional bills were pre-filed.
This year is also an elec-
tion year for the House of
Representatives and all
statewide constitutional
officers.
At the end of last years
session, a conference
committee was tasked
with addressing the
differences between the
House and Senate legisla-
tion that would create
a Department of Ad-
ministration (S.22). The
committee reached an
agreement earlier this
week and the legislation is
expected to be approved
by the House and Senate
this week.
The legislation creates
a Department of Admin-
istration that reports
directly to the Governor
and handles administra-
tive functions of govern-
ment. The newly created
department will include
an executive budget
and screening planning
office, general services
and consolidated human
resources. It also creates
a new Legislative Ser-
vices Agency that will be
responsible for all fiscal
and revenue impact state-
ments. State agencies will
not have the ability to run
deficits unless approved
by the legislature and
the Generally Assembly
will be required to review
state agency programs
every five year.
Gov. (Nikki) Haley
released her FY 2014-
2015 Executive Budget
earlier this past week. Her
budget includes funding
for her K-12 Education Re-
form Initiative that she re-
leased this past week. She
also included additional
revenue for infrastructure
funding by proposing
that all of the growth in
revenue as a result of of-
ficial projections between
January and May be spent
on roads. At an average
of $106 million per year,
Gov. Haley believes that
adds more than $1 billion
over a decade.
The Senate spent this
past week debating legis-
lation to allow concealed
weapons permit holders
to legally carry firearms
in restaurants and bars.
S.308 includes language
that would replace the
current prohibition
on carrying a pistol or
firearm into a business,
which sells alcoholic
liquor, beer, or wine for
on-premises without the
midnight curfew that
Senate Democrats had
insisted on last year. The
bill, which passed the
Senate by a 34-3 vote and
now returns to the House,
would allow people who
have licenses to carry
concealed weapons to
carry guns into bars or
restaurants as long as
they do not drink alcohol.
Businesses could, how-
ever, post signs to not
allow firearms on their
property.
The business commu-
nity is continuing to push
the legislature to make
infrastructure funding
a priority. H. 3412, the
transportation funding
bill that passed the House
of Representatives last
year and was amended by
the Senate Finance com-
mittee, remains on the
Senate calendar. The plan
uses a combination of
funding options. H. 3412
is expected to be debated
in the Senate this year.
Remember you can go
to www.sc.gov and click
on live House and Senate
and listen to the debate
each Tuesday, Wednesday
or Thursday. A lot of com-
mittee work is being done
in these first 3 weeks.
Please know I am
here to serve you and
your family. Contact me
anytime at 909-1092 or
RitaAllison@schouse.gov.
Beginning the 120th Legislative Session
LEVER NAMED FOR THIRD
TERM WITH GIRL SCOUTS
Rebecca Lever, chair of
the Girl Scouts of South
Carolina Board of Direc-
tors, Greer, was recently
elected to serve her third,
two-year term.
She is gen-
eral man-
ager of con-
s t r u c t i o n
and main-
tenance for
Duke Ener-
gy. She re-
ceived a B.S.
in Mathematics from Pres-
byterian College, served as
chair of the Development
Committee and previously
served as chair of the Audit
Committee and co-chair of
the Property Committee.
She was a board member,
treasurer and chair of the
Finance Committee of the
Legacy Girl Scouts of the
Old 96 Council, and she
worked with United Way
of Greenville County in a
number of roles.
Lever is a previous
member of the Board of
Directors for Greenville
Literacy Association and
Greenvilles Child. She
also served as chair of the
South Carolina Governors
Council for Workforce Ex-
cellence.
PEOPLE
Lever
YOUR VOICE
IN COLUMBIA
REPRESENTATIVE
RITA ALLISON
The Senate spent
this past week
debating legislation
to allow concealed
weapons permit
holders to legally
carry firearms in
restaurans and bars.
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
The Greater Greer Edu-
cation Foundation award-
ed $16,550 in grants to
schools in Greenville and
Spartanburg counties.
Now in its fourth year,
the amount granted has
grown. The organization
awarded $6,500 in grants
its first year.
David Dolge, the foun-
dations grants commit-
tee chair, wants to see
the funding continue to
increase.
I would to see it contin-
ue growing, he said. This
year, we were able to give
out $16,550. Id love to see
us next keep increasing.
The process of apply-
ing for grants is an open
forum, according to Mar-
garet Burch, Greater Greer
Education Foundation
chair.
Its important because
its an open forum for
them to say these are our
needs, Burch said. We
dont tell any school they
can only submit one. We
say the grant proposal
period is open. The most
unique thing about us is
that we dont sit around
and talk about them all.
We all score them by a
rubric. Then we all get
together and call out our
first, second, third.
Tigerville Elementary
received three grants:
$1,500 for iPad minis,
$500 to purchase Leveled
Reader sets to support
science standards and an-
other $450 for iPad minis
for instructional centers
and small groups in Susan
Wards fourth grade class.
Ward said her class of
24 is at different ability
levels.
My intention for the
iPad is to use it for centers
and to use it as a digital
reader, Ward said. Chil-
dren today love to read
electronically, so Im going
to use it for math centers,
for language centers.
Without the iPads, the
school would have to pur-
chase hard copies of Level
Readers, which are more
expensive than the free
apps, according to Diane
Jackson, Tigerville Elemen-
tary principal.
Both Tigerville educa-
tors said children are
more enthusiastic about
schoolwork on iPads than
on traditional pencil and
paper.
Thats the way right
now, Jackson said. Al-
though you have a hard
copy of a Leveled Reader,
when you show them same
book, the excitement, es-
pecially in your reluctant
readers they want that
technology.
Funding comes from
the money raised at the
gala and from donations.
Scholarships are awarded
later during the year.
The Middle Tyger Com-
munity Center received
$1,500 for adult educa-
tion, childcare and par-
ent and child enrichment.
Chandler Creek Elemen-
tary received $1,500 to
create a new tutoring and
mentoring program. Re-
idville Elementary School
received $1,500 to pro-
mote science learning by
increasing access to an
interactive, hands-on sci-
ence program. Greer Mid-
dle received $1,480 to in-
corporate technology and
engineering concepts.
Skyland Elementary re-
ceived $1,450 to engage
students through litera-
ture and music. Mountain
View Elementary received
$1,350 to incorporate
Hooked with Nooks in
the classroom. Greer High
received $1,270 for iPads
for the Teacher Cadet pro-
gram to create lessons for
elementary and middle
schools. Byrnes Freshman
Academy received $1,250
to increase engagement
in learning math concepts
and skills through use of
an Interwrite board. Ly-
man Elementary received
$1,100 to improve math
and science skills in third
grade with hands-on ac-
tivities.
Greer High received
$800 to incorporate Sen-
teo Interactive Response
System, which allows
teachers to create ques-
tions students can answer
electronically with a wire-
less clicker. Byrnes High
received $500 to continue
its FIGHT weight-loss and
fitness program. Dunbar
Child Development Center
received $400 to purchase
a Sono Flex app to help
students develop a core
vocabulary.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY WILLIAM BUCHHEIT
STAFF WRITER
Its been 94 years since
the first seeds of Compass
of Carolina were planted
in the Upstate. It was dur-
ing WWI, when the Girls
Protective Bureau opened
a home for young women
in downtown Greenville.
A few years later, the
house began serving boys
as well, and by the 1930s,
had merged with the citys
Family Welfare Society. In
the eight decades since,
the organization has
served the needs of strug-
gling women, children
and families throughout
Greenville County.
With programs to pre-
vent and fight domestic
violence, gang involve-
ment and financial irre-
sponsibility, Compass of
Carolina (COC) attempts
to strengthen our commu-
nity by strengthening in-
dividuals and families. It
is a non-profit agency that
relies on grants and do-
nations to keep its doors
open.
Its important annual
fundraiser, Chase Away
the Blues, is set for the
weekend of February 21
and 22 at The Handlebar
in Greenville.
One of the things we
do with our fundraiser is
try to raise money so that
we can pay the counselors
salaries and try to keep
our programs affordable,
said COC Board Chair
Carol Tarwater, who has
lived in Greer and served
several terms on the board
since the mid-90s.
2014 marks the 17th
anniversary of the event,
a two-night music festival
headlined by barbeque
and rock music. Tickets
for Friday nights concert,
featuring classic rockers
Black Oak Arkansas, are
$24 and tickets for Satur-
days show featuring local
band The Blue Dogs are
$18. Tickets include bar-
becue, provided by Table
301 Catering.
Tarwater said this years
fundraiser is especially im-
portant, considering that
the federal sequestration
cut $40,000 from the non-
profits operating budget
in 2013. COC charges cli-
ents for their services, but
on a sliding scale, meaning
much of its funding must
come from outside contri-
butions.
Among the agencys
newest programs are Sec-
ond Chance, a course for
at-risk youth, and Roller-
coasters, an eight-week
class for kids age 5-12 who
are coping with parental
divorce or separation.
A lot of times they (chil-
dren) dont know who to
turn to. They dont have
anyone to talk to. They
just get caught in the mid-
dle, Tarwater explains.
Our child therapist is ex-
cellent. She does a great
job with the kids.
Compass also recently
launched its Represen-
tative Payee Program, a
financial guidance course
for local citizens receiving
Social Security, SSI and/or
V.A. benefits.
Doors open at 7 p.m.
both nights for Chase
Away the Blues, with food
being served until eight,
when the opening musical
act is set to take the stage.
Black Oak Arkansas and
The Blue Dogs will come
on at 9 p.m.
For tickets, contact Com-
pass of Carolina at 467-
3434 or The Handlebar at
233-6173.
wbuchheit@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A3
HOME LOANS & SAVINGS
Keeping It Simple
Since 1907.
With security breaches and identity theft ever-present in this
digital age, its good to know you can still choose a financial
institution that practices personal banking, the old fashioned
way. Face to face, neighbor to neighbor, handshake by
handshake, Citizens Building & Loan has built relationships
of trust with our customers and served as a source of financial
strength in the Greater Greer community for over 100 years.
Simple choices and satisfied customersthats how we
operate at Citizens Building & Loan.
CBLGreer.com
229 Trade Street | Greer, SC | 877-2054
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Compass of Carolina is hosting Chase Away Blues,
featuring rock band Black Oak Arkansas.
Compass of
Carolina event
will Chase
Away Blues
Over the next five
weeks, Greer Community
Ministries (GCM) is asking
for donations of essential
food items. The Fab Five
(cereal, oatmeal, grits, beef
stew and spaghetti sauce)
go out with every food
pantry client and repre-
sent the items that run out
most often.
Donations of canned
fruits and vegetables are
more consistent, and we
seldom have to make an
emergency grocery store
run for them, said Cindy
Simpler, GCM executive
director. We have a more
difficult time keeping suf-
ficient quantities of the
Fab Five available for the
families we serve.
Greer Community Minis-
tries sends out around 200
food orders per month.
That means at least 200
of each of these essential
items must come in each
month to keep the food
pantry stocked.
When you see a featured
item of the week, please
add it to your grocery list.
We have one supporter
who buys one for each of
their grandchildren as way
of both honoring them
and teaching them the im-
portance of helping oth-
ers. GCM needs your help
to provide good nutrition
to every family we serve,
Simpler said.
The challenge is as fol-
lows:
Week one: Boxed cereal
(12.25 oz boxes)
Week two: Oatmeal (16
oz. container or 10-pack
individual servings)
Week three: Grits (18 oz.
container or 10-pack indi-
vidual servings)
Week four: Beef stew (20
oz. cans)
Week five: Spaghetti
sauce (24 oz. cans or jars)
Please bring donations
to Greer Community Min-
istries, located at 738
S. Line Street Extension,
Greer. Hours are from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
GCM needs the essential food items for pantry
GCM CHALLENGE |
Week 1: Boxed cereal
Week 2: Oatmeal
Week 3: Grits
Week 4: Beef stew
Week 5: Spaghetti sauce
Carol Tarwater
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Greater Greer Education Foundation awarded more than $16,000 worth of grants to
local educators in Greenville and Spartanburg counties.

Greater Greer Education
Foundation awards $16,550


I
t was during our Saturday night tradi-
tion of watching our favorite recorded
Brit-coms with a generous gin and
tonic each that my phone rang and I
made the motion to answer it.
Why dont you turn off the ringer?
Paul asked, slightly annoyed as he put
Doc Martin on pause.
Because, I reminded him, as both our
moms reside at a retirement facility, we
always want to be available in case of an
emergency. But this number, I squinted
at the phone, was coming in from New
York and Im sorry to say my curiosity
got the better of me and I answered it.
Hello, Pam, my name is Andy and I
used to own your horse, Forrest, came
the kindly voice on the other end. I
tracked you down through Rerun Thor-
oughbred rescue and thought you might
like to know Forrests backstory as its
quite amazing.
Its about Forrest! I mouthed to Paul,
who rolled his eyes and muttered, Oh,
great, horses. Again.
We have a few race horses that weve
bred and raised ourselves, and when For-
rest was born, Andy began as I turned
my back on Paul and listened hard, it
was a difficult birth and my trainer
called to tell us he showed no interest in
nursing and didnt look good. We took
him to the clinic in Rhinebeck and the
vets there told us his kidneys were in
bad shape and he was failing.
When Forrest was born, he was dy-
ing! I whispered hoarsely to Paul who,
now checking Facebook, replied, Well,
we all are, after were born.
I asked the vets if they could save
him, Andy continued, and they said,
we can try, and I asked how much it
would cost because if it was going to be
hugely expensive, like, $10 grand, then,
you know, he trailed off.
Sure, I agreed.
But they said it would be about a
thousand a day, so, I said, go for it.
A thousand a day! I eeked to Paul,
who said, You do realize you have a
speaker button on your phone, right?
Oh, yeah.
So Forrest stayed there for awhile
and, after a few days, he began to rally
and surprised everyone by recover-
ing, but the problem was, because of
his difficult delivery, his front legs
were so crooked, so over in the knee,
Andy explained, describing a condi-
tion where the front legs look bent at
the knees even when a horse is stand-
ing as straight as it can, that then the
vets had to custom-make special braces,
splints, for him to wear on his legs for
six months.
Just like Forrest Gump! I gasped to
Paul who reminded me with a pointed
finger that I had the speaker on.
And I thought, this horse is just like
Forrest Gump as a kid! Andy echoed.
And when the braces came off? I
urged, leaning forward slightly.
When the braces came off, he was
turned out with the other youngsters
in the field, but was pretty much the
low man on the totem pole, and it was
even more like the movie, getting picked
on all the time. However, he was com-
pletely normal and galloped around, so
I thought Id call him Run Forrest Run,
but that name was already taken, so we
chose Go Forrest Go. Anyway, its just
amazing that he survived at all. He did
race at Belmont and finished fourth,
and I had an offer on him. But, I didnt
want to see him go to the minor leagues,
in claiming races, and be raced til he
broke down, so we just gave him and his
brother, Eli, to Rerun and asked Lisa to
find good homes for them. And were
just delighted hes with you.
Even Paul looked moved at this last bit
of information.
I thanked Andy, not only for this
wonderful tale about my new horse, but
for being one of the good guys: the race
owners that truly care about their ani-
mals. The ones that dont send them to
auction to be bought up by the slaugh-
terhouses, the ones that dont grab a
quick buck, but are true horsemen, in
every sense of the word.
And, Andy, Forrest sure thanks you,
too.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014



All advertisements are accepted and published
by the Publisher upon the representation that
the advertiser/agency is authorized to publish
the entire contents and subject matter thereof.
It is understood that the advertiser/agency will
indemnify and save the Publisher harmless from
or against any loss or expense arising out of
publication of such advertisements, including,
without limitation, those resulting from claims
of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism
and copyrights infringement. All material in
this publication may not be used in full or in
part without the expressed written consent of
management.
Established 1918
The Greer Citizen
The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
The Greer Citizen, Inc.
317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
Telephone 877-2076
Periodicals Postage Paid at Greer, S.C.
Publication No. 229500
POSTMASTER - Send address changes to
The Greer Citizen, P.O. Box 70
Greer, S.C. 29652
Preston Burch Photographer
Phil Buchheit Photographer
William Buchheit Staf Reporter
Katie Jones Staf Reporter
Amanda Irwin Staf Reporter
Mail subscription rate
Greenville and Spartanburg Counties..................................... $29/year
Elsewhere in South Carolina................................................... $39/year
Elsewhere in Continental U.S. ................................................ $49/year
By Carrier and On Newsstand
50 Cents Per Copy
Steve Blackwell | Publisher
Billy Cannada | Editor


The Greer Citizen

Shaun Moss Advertising
Suzanne Traenkle Advertising
Julie Holcombe Graphic Artist
Mandy Ferguson Photographer
T
he Greer Citizen accepts Let-
ters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
mailed to 317 Trade St., Greer
29651.
Submission guidelines
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
Just like Forrest Gump!
MLK: The civil rights
leader who sacrifced all
In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day busi-
nesses and government activity ceased and
citizens took time to reflect on the impact this
single man had on the civil rights movement.
King committed his life to shattering the ra-
cial and economical barriers that resulted in un-
equal rights through non-violent action. He par-
ticipated in numerous marches and protests,
including the bus boycott, the lunch counter sit-
in, the March on Washington and the Freedom
Walk. He was jailed several times for his efforts,
and he was responsible for delivering some of
the most recognizable speeches in American
history, including his I have a Dream speech,
delivered in 1963 and his Ive been on the
Mountaintop speech, delivered 1968 the
same year he died.
In that speech, King said: Weve got some dif-
ficult days ahead. But it really doesnt matter
with me now, because Ive been to the moun-
taintop. And I dont mind. Like anybody, I
would like to live a long life. Longevity has its
place. But Im not concerned about that now. I
just want to do Gods will. And Hes allowed me
to go up to the mountain. And Ive looked over.
And Ive seen the Promised Land. I may not get
there with you. But I want you to know tonight,
that we, as a people, will get to the promised
land!
While King is responsible for valiantly propel-
ling the civil rights movement forward, during
his lifetime he faced more opposition than sup-
port from both white and black people. Oppo-
nents often stood on one of two sides against
King: they either accepted segregation as an
inevitable part of life and didnt want to face
the possible consequences that would form as
from protest, or they believed that Kings vision
couldnt be accomplished through the nonvio-
lent approach he so publicly advocated. Its for
these reasons Kings dream was all the more dif-
ficult to envision and he was often alienated in
his civil rights journey. But, he wasnt in search
of validation of his beliefs.
I come here tonight and plead with you, be-
lieve in yourself and believe that youre some-
body, King said. As I said to a group last night,
nobody else can do this for us. No document
can do this for usIf the negro is to be free
he must move down into the inner resources
of his own soul and sign with a pen and ink of
self-asserted manhood his own emancipation
proclamation.
King advocated for racial and economic
equality, but the significance of Kings journey
doesnt only relate to these aspects. Kings lega-
cy also represents the possibility of change in a
democratic society and a turning point in Amer-
ican history. Despite his oppressors, King made
an uphill climb to the mountaintop alongside
many others who sacrificed their lives, never
seeing the result of their efforts. In 1968, after
King was fatally shot in Memphis, Tenn., and
within a week after his assassination, the Open
Housing Act King advocated for was passed by
Congress. The act prohibited discrimination in
the sale or rental of a private home based on
race.
King left behind a legacy that continues to
impact the way we live our lives today, and its
for this reason his holiday should be remem-
bered and honored, not only by Greer, but by
the United States.
To hear
the word
Read James 2:1-9
H
as not God chosen the
poor in the world to be
rich in faith and to be
heirs to the kingdom that he
has promised to those who love
him? -James 2:5 (NRSV)
Our young-adult Bible study
group sat outside a sandwich
shop in downtown Washing-
ton, D.C. We were beginning
our discussion of the letter of
James when a man approached
our table. Excuse me, he said.
Are you studying the Bible?
One of us hesitantly an-
swered, Yes.
May I join you? he respond-
ed. We glanced at each other.
How could we say no?
The man sat down and asked
if we would read the passage
again. We did, and it was stun-
ning. James indicts his audi-
ence for showing favoritism
to the rich while neglecting
the poor. Ray, the man who
had just joined us, listened
intently as we read. Then he
told us about being homeless
and going into churches and
being ignored or even asked to
leave because he wasnt well-
dressed or well-groomed. The
worst part of being homeless,
he said, is having nowhere to
hear the word. He meant the
word of God; but he could
also have meant any word at
all. Too often, people who are
homeless are ignored; no one
speaks to them. After studying
the Bible and sharing a meal,
we asked Ray if we could pray
for him; but he prayed for us.
Christ visited us that night.
How many other nights have
we received a visit from Christ
and not realized it?
Prayer: God of the poor, help
us to see your face in everyone
who is in need. Amen.
An unfulfilled
dream
I
had the honor of attending
the MLK event at Greer City
Hall on Monday, and it left
an impression. The singers
gave riveting performances
that moved everyone in the
room. The conviction in the
dramatic interpretations per-
formed by students gave me
chills, and speaker Rev. Earl
Simmons left me with a mes-
sage I carried home: Were not
there yet.
King didnt only fight for
racial equality, but also eco-
nomic equality. He opposed
capitalism and believed it
allowed for systematic op-
pression and promoted greed
and profit over the individual.
Time has proven him correct.
King opposed the allowance
of poverty, as its a manmade
struggle that can only exist if
society lets it. For this reason,
King called for a revolution of
values that would restructure
society and eliminate poverty.
Were not there yet.
Weve made progress, but
to believe inequality doesnt
still resonate in our policies
and practices is foolish. Today,
nearly 47 million people are
living below the poverty level.
While our government recog-
nizes corporations as people
allowing them tax breaks, fast
food workers fight for living
wages because as the cost of
living rises, minimum wage
remains stagnant. Corporations
continue to export industrial
jobs, contributing to the 7.6
percent unemployment rate.
American-based franchises
fill their stores with products
made abroad to increase their
profit margin, and as a result,
condemn local businesses.
Women remain underpaid, as
we make 78 percent of what
men do, and that gap increases
for women who arent white.
The time has come for us to
civilize ourselves by the total,
direct and immediate abolition
of poverty, King said. Were
not there yet.
Refusing to learn from our
mistakes, history repeats itself
as we discriminate against ho-
mosexuals the latest target
of our oppression. We righ-
teously deny their rights with
the same bigoted beliefs we
used to justify the suppression
of African-American citizens.
We deny these rights under the
guise of religion, when in truth,
its merely fear-fuled hate.
I have decided to stick with
love. Hate is too great a burden
to bear, King said. Were not
there yet.
The worst part of being
homeless is having
nowhere to hear the
word.
Opponents often stood on one
of two sides against King: they
either accepted segregation as
an inevitable part of life...or they
believed that Kings vision couldnt
be accomplished through the
nonviolent approach he so publicly
advocated.
Local residents will have
the opportunity to meet
with potential employers
today (Wednesday, Jan.
22) in Greenville.
Proterra Inc, the leading
provider of zero-emission
battery-electric transit so-
lutions, is hosting a job
fair to find qualified can-
didates to fill full-time
mechanical and electrical
assembly openings.
The job fair, held in con-
junction with HTI Employ-
ment Solutions, lasts from
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Em-
bassy Suites.
The main highlight of
the job fair will include
giving dedicated and tal-
ented job seekers the op-
portunity to meet with
recruiters who are looking
to fill open positions for
one of the Upstates larg-
est manufacturers.
HTI Employment Solu-
tions will be accepting ap-
plications and conducting
interviews for mechanical
assemblers and electrical
assemblers. Comprehen-
sive benefits packages
including medical, dental,
and vision insurance and
401k are available. All
qualified candidates must
have a high school diplo-
ma or GED.
Due to the exceptional
growth at Proterra, we
are looking to fill several
open positions to support
our operations. The col-
laborative effort between
Proterra and HTI will help
identify top talent in the
Greenville area to ensure
our continued success,
said Cissy Reid, director
of human resources for
Proterra.
Embassy Suites is located
at 670 Verdae Boulevard,
Greenville. Interested can-
didates that cannot attend
the job fair can visit www.
htijobs.com/job-openings
to apply online.
Proterra is a leader in
the design and manufac-
ture of clean technology
and clean energy, provid-
ing zero emissions vehi-
cles that enable bus fleet
operators to significantly
reduce operating cost
while delivering clean,
quiet power to the com-
munity. Headquartered in
Greenville, HTI Employ-
ment Solutions is a multi-
faceted human resource
advisory firm providing
professional recruiting,
industrial staffing, cor-
porate staffing/executive
search, human resource
consulting, and outplace-
ment services.
BUSINESS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A5
Pay the
IRS first!
Q: My husband has his
own business installing
windows. As a result, we
now have IRS and state
tax debt. Were managing
the payments, but where
should these debts be
placed in the debt snow-
ball plan?
DR: I dont usually cheat
on the smallest to largest
progression of the debt
snowball, but Id recom-
mend moving these debts
to the top of the list.
Both state and fed-
eral taxes come with
ridiculous penalties and
interest rates, and the
authorities at either level
have virtually unlimited
power at their disposal
to screw with your life if
something bad happens.
The IRS can actually take
your money without suing
you. So, you dont want
to become a blip on their
radar screen by being late
with payments.
Get it cleaned up as
quickly as possible, Olivia.
You dont want to mess
around with these guys!
Check on the
checking
account
Q: My husband died
eight years ago, and I
never closed his bank ac-
counts that were opened
when we lived in another
state. We lived in Florida
before moving to Oregon.
I didnt probate the es-
tate, and he did not have
a will. Im trying to work
with the banks to get this
settled, but theyre giving
me the runaround. Do you
have any advice?
DR: The first thing you
need to do is contact an
attorney who handles
estate planning. If the
accounts were opened in
Florida, but you both lived
in Oregon at the time of
his death, technically the
estate would be probated
in Oregon. That may be
what has to happen. If
so, a judge would ap-
point you as executor. As
executor, you can close
the accounts and disperse
any money to the rightful
heirwhich is you.
Be prepared, though.
It may take somewhere
between $250 and $500
in attorney fees and court
costs to make this hap-
pen. If youre lucky, you
might get a simple motion
from the court that would
cost you next to nothing.
But find a good estate
planning attorney who
knows Oregon law inside
and out. Estate laws and
probate laws differ from
state to state, and Florida
and Oregon both have
some weird laws in these
areas.
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY


Coldwell
Banker
hires
Howle
Coldwell Banker Com-
mercial Caine recently wel-
comed Graham Howle as
its new commercial sales
agent for the companys
Greenville office.
Howle has expertise in
deal structuring, negotiat-
ing and investing. He has
been in the real estate
business as an investor
since 2002. Prior to his
real estate career, Howle
was president of Mosaic
Management LLC.
He graduated from
Clemson University with
a Bachelor of Science in
economics. He also holds
certifications in lean man-
agement and time man-
agement.
In the Greenville com-
munity, he is a member of
Buncombe Street United
Methodist Church.
We are excited about
the opportunities that
are available to Graham
given his comprehensive
knowledge of business
and real estate, said Brad
Halter, chairman of Cold-
well Banker Commercial
Caine. And we are con-
fident that he will have a
long and successful career
with us at Coldwell Banker
Commercial Caine.
With an office in Greer,
Coldwell Banker Commer-
cial Caine services busi-
nesses across Greenville,
Spartanburg, Oconee and
Pickens counties. Family
owned and operated, the
company has been provid-
ing service to the Upstate
community since 1933.
At Tuesdays
Presbyterian
College event
Minor Shaw, chair of The
Daniel-Mickel Foundation
and 2012 South Carolina
Business Hall of Fame in-
ductee, will deliver Presby-
terian Colleges Robert M.
Vance Lecture on Business
Ethics.
Shaw will speak from 11
a.m. to noon on Tuesday,
Jan. 28 in Edmunds Hall
as part of the event, host-
ed by the Department of
Business Administration
and Economics.
Shaw was instrumen-
tal in bringing Southwest
Airlines to South Carolina
while serving as chair of
the Greenville-Spartanburg
Airport Commission. She
also served as a founder
of the Roper Mountain Sci-
ence Center and the South
Carolina Governors School
for the Arts & Humanities,
described by Columbia
Metropolitan magazine as
two staples of the Upstate
community bringing great
value to students and awe
to children and families.
Shaw serves on numer-
ous boards, including the
Greenville Chamber of
Commerce, the South Car-
olina Governors School
for the Arts Foundation,
The Palmetto Institute,
BlueCross BlueShield of
South Carolina, Piedmont
Natural Gas and Columbia
Mutual Funds. She is a for-
mer board member of C&S
National Bank of South
Carolina and Interstate Se-
curities.
Recognized as one of the
countrys leading business
individuals, Shaw current-
ly is president of Micco,
LLC, a private investment
company located in Green-
ville. She previously served
as president of both Micco
Corporation and Mickel
Investment Group, also
private Greenville busi-
nesses.
She attended Randolph-
Macon Womans College
and received her bachelor
of arts degree from the
University of North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill.
The Robert M. Vance
Lecture on Business Eth-
ics was created to honor
its namesake, who consid-
ered ethics, honesty and
integrity to be extremely
important. The lecture,
funded by the Bailey Foun-
dation, is a tribute to the
late businessmans legacy
and his numerous con-
tributions to the Clinton
community.
Limited seating is avail-
able for the lecture. For
tickets and information,
contact Christie Mueller
by phone at 833-8700 or
by email at clmueller@
presby.edu.
Founded in 1880, Pres-
byterian College is a Carn-
egie One liberal arts col-
lege and is fully accredited
by the Commission on Col-
leges of the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and
Schools.
Graham Howle
1921 Hwy. 101 South
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
Greer, SC 29651
864-968-1133
CIGARS
S.C.s Largest Humidor
Shaw is featured lecturer


Minor Shaw
Greenville job fair set for Wednesday

Allows
mobile
banking
Greer State Bank re-
cently launched its new
mobile banking applica-
tion, designed to provide
customers with on-the-go
banking.
The mobile application
enables customers to ac-
cess their bank, pay bills
and credit card accounts
anytime, anywhere. The
application allows the
customer to view upcom-
ing bills and get notifica-
tions about payments and
real time confirmations
that payments have been
scheduled. Cash flow and
account balances can be
checked in real time.
The banking app pro-
vides a comprehensive
view of account transac-
tions including merchant
details, available cash,
available credit and more
through the app dash-
board. All activity is fully
secure, which allows cus-
tomers to transfer funds
and move money where
they need it.
People are constantly
on the go, but not always
able to visit one of our
branch locations, said Vic
Grout, chief banking of-
ficer at Greer State Bank.
The convenience of mo-
bile banking lets a cus-
tomer easily manage their
finances whenever they
choose to best fit their
schedule. This new mobile
app is just another one of
the tools we provide to en-
hance the banking experi-
ence for our customers.
The Greer State Bank
mobile banking applica-
tion is currently available
at the Apple App Store
and Google Play for online
banking customers. The
download is free.
Now in its twenty-sixth
year of operations, Greer
State Bank serves the
Greer community with
three branch offices and
a fourth branch office in
the Taylors community.
More information on the
company can be found at
http://www.GreerState-
Bank.com.
Greer State Bank launches app

People are constantly on the go, but not
always able to visit one of our branch
locations. The convenience of mobile
banking lets a customer easily manage
their finances whenever they choose to
best fit their schedule.
Vic Grout
Chief banking of cer, Greer State Bank
Veleda J. Aston
Veleda Jackson Aston,
88, of Greer, widow of W.L.
Bill Aston, died Jan. 18,
2014 at Alpha Health and
Rehab.
A native of Greenville
County, daughter of the
late Thurlow Quain and
May Gibson Jackson, she
attended Anderson Col-
lege and was a member of
Greer First Baptist church
where she taught in the
Beginner Sunday School
class and GAs for many
years.
Surviving are one daugh-
ter Beth Aston of Greer
and one sister Cornelia Ki-
nard of Greer.
Graveside services were
held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday
at Mountain View Cem-
etery conducted by Dottie
Bryson.
The family greeted
friends after the service at
the gravesite.
In lieu of flowers, the
family respectfully re-
quests that memorials
be made to the charity of
ones choice.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com
Wilma Cooper
Wilma Jean Phillips Coo-
per, 76, of 211 Lanford St.,
Greer, died Jan. 19, 2014
at Greenville Memorial
Hospital.
A proud native of Greer,
daughter of the late Wood-
row and Mattie Lou Pear-
son Phillips, she was a
homemaker and a member
of Victor Baptist Church.
She was a loving mother, a
poet, a seamstress, a cook,
and very patriotic.
Surviving are her daugh-
ter, Carol Wilson and her
husband, Ryan of Greer;
two sisters, Gail Reeves
and her husband, Lewis
of Greer, Carolyn Edwards
and her husband, Earl of
Greer; a brother, Richard
Phillips, Sr. and his wife,
Anna of Altoona, Penn-
sylvania; and a beloved
grandson, Aaron Wilson.
Funeral services will
be held 2 p.m. Thursday
at The Wood Mortuary,
conducted by Rev. David
Cobb. Burial will follow in
Wood Memorial Park.
Visitation will be held 6-
8 p.m. Wednesday at The
Wood Mortuary.
The family is at the
home of her daughter,
Carol Wilson, 13 Kimbrells
Cove Lane, Greer.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com.
Eugene B. Holtzclaw
Veteran
Eugene Branan Gene
Holtzclaw, 66, of 123
Meadow View Lane, died
Tuesday, Jan.
14, 2014 at
his home sur-
rounded by his loving
family and mortuary staff.
Born in Summerville, he
was a son of the late James
T. Holtzclaw and Frances
Branan Cannon.
He graduated from
Greer High School, attend-
ed Gardner Webb College,
and was a 1988 Graduate
of Gupton Jones College of
Mortuary Science. He was
a licensed funeral director
since 1971 and was owner
of Liberty Mortuary, Inc.
Gene was a United States
Army veteran of the Viet-
nam War where he served
in Saigon.
Funeral services to hon-
or the life of Mr. Holtzclaw
will be 2 p.m. Friday, Janu-
ary 17, 2014 at East Side
Baptist Church conducted
by Rev. Dr. Royce Addis,
and Rev. Dr. Rick Lee.
Burial will be at Liberty
Memorial Gardens.
The family will receive
friends Thursday evening
from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at
the Liberty Mortuary.
Surviving are his wife
of 42 years, Pat Newton
Holtzclaw of the home; a
son, Brad Holtzclaw and
his wife Christina of Lib-
erty; two grandchildren,
Madison and Connor
Holtzclaw; two aunts, Mil-
dred Van Patten and Lucile
Campbell both of Greer.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded in
death by his father and
mother in law, Peter Jack
and Ethell Rogers Newton.
Flowers will be accept-
ed or memorials may be
made to Pickens County
Meals On Wheels, P.O. Box
184, Easley S.C. 29641.
The family would like to
extend their sincere appre-
ciation to his nurses from
Providence Care Hospice,
Pam, Alexia, and Kayla, for
all of their kind love and
support during this time.
The family will be at
the home. Memorial mes-
sages may be sent to the
family by visiting www.
libertymortuary.com Lib-
erty Mortuary is handling
arrangements.
Jay Logan
Veteran
James Coleman Logan,
71, of 179 Logans Run,
Duncan, passed away Sun-
day, Jan. 19, 2014.
A native of
Savannah, GA,
he was the son
of James Rich-
ard Logan of Columbia
and the late Evelyn John-
son Logan and the hus-
band of Sylvia Logan. Mr.
Logan was a member of
Dutch Fork Masonic Lodge
No. 402 and Veteran of
the US Navy. He obtained
a marketing degree from
East Tennessee State and
retired from Aetna as an
insurance adjuster.
He was one-of-a-kind and
we were honored to call
him Daddy, Dada, Papa
and Husband. He thor-
oughly enjoyed showing
his grandchildren a good
time on his farm. Once, he
even baked a Valentines
cake for us-with icing! -
and our initials! He loved
to cook for us goats, guts
and collards.
Survivors also include:
three daughters, Angela
L. Rumsey and husband
Tim of Greer, Andrea L.
Gidget Palladino and
husband Rick of Simpson-
ville, and Jaymee L. Black-
well and husband Travis
of Lyman; a brother, Roger
H. Logan and wife Kay of
Decater, Alabama; a sis-
ter, Shanna L. Grannis
and husband Larry of Co-
lumbia; and eight grand-
children, Logan Craig and
husband Elliott, Laundon
and Coleman Rumsey,
Will, Reagan, Ryan Pal-
ladino, Chastin Blackwell
and Andrew Rumsey. He is
predeceased by a brother,
Gary R. Logan.
The funeral service was
held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday
on his farm, 179 Logans
Run, Duncan.
Interment was at Wood
Memorial Park. The family
received friends following
the graveside service.
The family will be at 104
Crestwood Drive, Greer.
Robert L. Siegel
Robert Louis Siegel,
71, of Greer, died Jan.
7, 2014 at his home.
A native of Milwaukee
County, WI, son of the late
Lawrence and Martha Jutz-
ronka Siegel, he gradu-
ated from UW of Madison,
Bachelor of Science and
was a massage therapist
15 years with the Family
Practice of Greer with Dr.
DeGarmo.
Robert was a Agronomist
for 31 years with DeKalb
Seed Company, a member
of Blessed Trinity Catholic
Church, member of Brides
of the Most blessed Trin-
ity, Knights of Columbus
3rd Degree council 12274
and Knights of Columbus
4th Degree Holy Family
Council 2502.
Surviving are his wife of
49 years, Barbara Briski
Siegel of the home; two
daughters, Clare Sarbacker
of Greer and Deanna Ro-
man (Rick) of Taylors; one
brother, Lawrence Siegel,
Jr., (Debbie) of Franksville,
WI; five sisters, Carol Peck
(Ron) of Redmond, WA,
Dorothy Acker (Duane)
of Franksville, WI, Susan
Bliss (Jerry) Las Vegas, NV,
Lois Dombrowski (Ervin)
of Caledonia, WI, and Sally
Marsch (Larry) of IL; five
grandchildren, Aaron Rob-
ert Sarbacker (Tiffany) of
Madison, WI, Carl Sarback-
er (Katie Winn) of Greer,
Anna Sarbacker of Greer,
Rachel Pochardt (Ben) of
Travelers Rest and Zach-
ary Roman (Elisabeth) of
Sweden; four great-grand-
children, Annie Bernice,
Addison, Alivia and Daisy;
sister-in-law, Mary Briski
Pakulski (John) of WI and
brother-in-law, Richard
Briski (Diane) of WI.
A wake service will be
held January 24, 2014 at
the Wood Mortuary from 5
p.m. until 8 p.m. with Ro-
sary at 6 p.m.
A funeral mass will be
celebrated at 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, January 25, 2014
at Blessed Trinity Catholic
Church conducted by Fa-
ther Phillip Gillespie.
The family respect-
fully requests flowers be
omitted and memorials
be made to Blessed Trin-
ity Catholic Church for
masses said for Robert L.
Siegel.
The family is at the
home.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com.
Betty M. Suddeth
Betty McAbee Suddeth,
77, of Greer, went home
to be with the Lord Satur-
day, Jan. 18, 2014. She was
the loving wife of James
A. (Jim) Suddeth for 55
years.
Born in Greenville Coun-
ty, she was the daughter of
the late William (Brudge)
and Grace Mason McAbee.
She retired from Pied-
mont Industries after 37
years of service and she
was the caregiver for her
mother for 12 years. She
was an active member of
Camp Creek Baptist for 55
years.
In addition to her hus-
band, she is survived by
one sister and three broth-
ers: Willie Mae Williams,
Joe K. McAbee, Donald L.
(Jr.) McAbee (Evelyn), Mar-
shall O. (Bud) McAbee, Sr.,
(Sandra).
She was a loving aunt to
many nephews and nieces;
Britt McAbee (Linda), Steve
and Sabrina McAbee, Don-
nie Williams, Beckie Augh-
try (Joe), William K. McA-
bee, Mart McAbee (Debbie),
Debbra Wilson (Randy),
Chet McAbee (Rita), Chris
McAbee (Renee), Lee McA-
bee (Sharon) and Marshall
McAbee, Jr. (Deana). She
had twelve great nephews
and nieces, two special
great-great nephews, Wil-
liam (Will) McAbee and
Hunter McAbee and a sis-
ter-in-law, Hilda Dill.
She was predeceased by
her oldest brother, J.W.
McAbee.
A special thanks to In-
terim Health Care Hospice
for the special care.
Funeral services will be
held 2 p.m. Wednesday at
Wood Mortuary conducted
by Rev. John Sullivan, Dr.
David Boyter and Dr. Bill
McManus. Burial will fol-
low in Hillcrest Memory
Gardens.
Visitation will be held
12:30-1:45 p.m. Wednes-
day at Wood Mortuary.
Pallbearers will be her
nephews Britt, Mason, Lee,
Donnie, Scott and Chet.
Memorials may be made
to Camp Creek Baptist
Church, 1100 Camp Creek
Road, Taylors, S.C. 29687
or Interim Health Care
Hospice, 155 Deacon Til-
ler Court, Duncan, S.C.
29334-9967.
The families will be at
their respective homes.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com.
Betty W. Vaden
Betty Harvey Waters Va-
den, 85, of Pickens, died
January 18, 2014 at her
home.
A Greer, SC native, she
was a daughter of the late
Boyce Lee Harvey, Sr. and
Lillian Lister Harvey. Bet-
ty was predeceased by her
first husband, James Har-
old (Hodge) Waters and
her second husband, Wil-
liam L. (Bill) Vaden. She
was a retired employee of
Greenville Memorial Hos-
pital, a member of Fair-
view Baptist Church, and
she will be remembered as
the original owner of The
Fork Restaurant in Greer.
Survivors include her
four children, Cynthia W.
Barrera of Atlanta, Tony
Waters (Kay) of Greer,
Cathy W. Sanders (John)
of Pickens and Susan W.
Dillard (Franky) of Greer;
eight grandchildren and
ten great-grandchildren.
She was also prede-
ceased by a brother, Boyce
Lee Billy Harvey, Jr. and a
sister, Jean Harvey Smith.
A memorial service will
be held at The Wood Mor-
tuary Chapel in Greer on
Wednesday, January 22,
2014 at 3:30 p.m., offici-
ated by Rev. Bryan Hester,
Rev. Jim Frost and family
tributes. The family will
receive friends from 2:30-
3:30 p.m. on Wednesday
prior to the service at the
mortuary. Private burial
will follow the funeral ser-
vice.
The family is at the home
of the son, Tony Waters.
Pallbearers will be her
grandsons.
The family extends a
special thank you to In-
terim Healthcare Hospice,
Vardrey Williams and An-
gela Young for the excel-
lent care they gave during
her illness.
Memorials may be made
to Greer Community Min-
istries, P.O. Box 1373,
Greer, SC 29652-1373.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com.
OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen
A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
OBITUARIES
Can be emailed to obits@
greercitizen.com or dropped
of at 317 Trade St. Deadline:
10 a.m. Tuesday prior to day of
publication. Cost: $30; with
photo $45.
A Arrangement Florist
877-5711
The Upstates Premier Florist
1205 W. POINSETT STREET GREER OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30-6 SAT. 9-3
www.aarrangementfowers.com
Greers Freshest Flowers Master Designer Shop
VOTED BEST IN THE UPSTATE
Chilly, dry weekend
Temperatures remain cold for the rest of the week
with highs in the 30s & 40s and lows in the 20s. A
couple of cold fronts will move through the area
over the next several days bringing arctic cold air
blasts into the area. Mostly sunny skies are expected
as temperatures remain below normal as we head
into the weekend (our average high this time of year
is 53). Temperatures next week stay near 50 with
overnight lows in the 30. Expect lots of sunshine to
start next week. Have a great weekend!
Greer High Oldies Storytelling
Where: Stomping Grounds
on Trade Street
Date: Saturday, Jan. 25
7-10 p.m.

Temps: Clear and cold,
low 40s at start
53
32
3.09
2.48
+0.61
7:34 AM
5:47 PM
Jan. 23 Jan. 30 Feb. 6 Feb. 14
42/15 SUN 43/21 SUN
42/20 PS 45/25 PS
50/30 PS 50/37 PS
53/35 SUN 55/39 PS
49/26 SUN 50/30 SUN
47/24 PS 49/27 SUN
53/29 PS 55/34 PS
42/25 PS 44/30 PS
42/15 Sunny
43/21 Sunny
43/17 Sunny
44/23 Sunny
46/23 Sunny
49/27 Sunny
47/25 Sunny
50/29 Sunny
36
18
44
23
34
18
46
23
49
27
53
28
47
33
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook


FROM PAGE ONE
About 40 people have
registered and Ludwig
hopes to reach 70.
Registration for the
third annual Brrr in Grrr
Ice Bowl starts at 8:30 a.m.
and tee off is around 10:15
a.m. Feb. 1 at Century Park.
Registration costs $20 and
a five-canned good dona-
tion.
To register or get more
information, search Greer
Disc Golf on Facebook or
visit discgolfunited.com.
Those interested can also
call Ludwig at 318-243-
3932.
Online registration clos-
es at midnight Jan. 25.
A.M. Best Co. recently
affirmed the A+ finan-
cial strength rating of
BlueCross BlueShield of
South Carolinas (BSBS SC)
group of companies. The
outlook for this rating is
stable.
This rating reflects the
financial stability of our
total group of more than
40 companies, said David
Pankau, BlueCross presi-
dent and chief executive
officer. It means that our
customers can depend on
us for excellence, stability
and leadership. To achieve
this rating for 12 consecu-
tive years is a testament
to our hard work. As one
of only three insurance
carriers in the nation to
achieve this rating, we are
very proud to be in this se-
lect group.
In the latest report re-
ceived in January for 2013
performance, A.M. Best
said the uncertainties of
the effects of the Afford-
able Care Act on the com-
panys core health insur-
ance operations are offset
by the diversification into
other businesses by the
group of companies. It
said BlueCross maintains
excellent financial flexibil-
ity.
The affirmation of the
ratings of BCBS SC reflects
the continuously favor-
able operating and net
income trends on its core
health business, earnings
diversification and strong
risk-adjusted capital, the
rating agency said in a
statement.
BlueCross is the only
health insurer to compete
in all customer segments
in the state.
Founded in 1899 and
headquartered in Oldwick,
N.J., A.M. Best Company
(www.ambest.com) is the
worlds oldest and most
authoritative insurance
rating and information
source.
A.M. Best annually rates
BlueCross as a group of
companies, as well as indi-
vidually rating some of its
subsidiaries.
BlueCross in top
financial shape

BENEFIT:
40 have
registered
Activate Your
Online Account
Today
greercitizen
.com
If you already
have a print
subscription to
Jr 0rrrr 0itirn
but you dont have
access to The Greer
Citizen online,
call us today and let
us setup your online
account for free!
864-877-2076
FROM PAGE ONE
far away farm somewhere.
Its actually his backyard.
Theres all kinds of
benefits to knowing where
your food comes from, the
fact that youre raising it
in your backyard for eggs,
and that you can live more
of a sustainable lifestyle,
Rementeria continued.
In other business, coun-
cil unanimously approved
a contractual agreement
between Greer Commis-
sion of Public Works
(CPW) and Renewable Wa-
ter Resources (ReWa) for
sewer territory assignment
within areas in the City of
Greers jurisdiction. The
agreement allows ReWa
to temporarily service the
area until CPWs service
area can be expanded
through legislation.
Ann Cunningham, di-
rector of Greers parks
and recreation, and her
staff presented the de-
partments annual report.
In 2013, the Greer Parks
and Recreation Depart-
ment participated in mul-
tiple projects, including
the National Night Out
Campaign, Friends with
Lake Robinson Day of Cel-
ebration, the erection of a
sculpture in front of the
Cannon Centre and the
rehabilitation of batting
cages and tennis courts, as
well as facilitating several
youth sports and theater
programs.
In 2014, the department
will appropriate funds for
another piece of the com-
munity art and citywide
trails plan. The plan was
presented in May to be
considered as part of the
citys master plan. About
$47,000 in grants was
awarded to the depart-
ment in 2013, and through
2014, the department will
continue to utilize avail-
able grants.
Councilmember Wayne
Griffin received unani-
mous approval to serve a
second term as mayor pro
tempore. Gene Gibson,
with CPW, along with Grif-
fin, Lee Dumas and Judy
Albert were sworn in to
serve another term.
Council also approved
the first reading of ordi-
nances for annexation of
property at 3006 and 2941
Brushy Creek Road with R-
12 residential zoning.
The next Greer City
Council meeting will be
held on Jan. 28 at 6:30
p.m. at Greer City Hall.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
FROM PAGE ONE
ebrate that weve come
a mighty long way. So as
we celebrate the passing
of these difficult days, I
stopped by to tell you that
were not there yet.
He said while there are
milestones to celebrate,
there is still a lot more to
accomplish as a nation.
Were not there yet while
the poverty rate for black
families is three times that
of any other racial group.
Were not there yet, Sim-
mons said. Were not
there yet because the eco-
nomic inequality, the gap
between the rich and the
poor keeps getting wider
and wider. Were not there
yet. Were not there yet as
long as black men are not
able to get a decent pay-
ing job, while all the good
jobs go to anybody but
us. Were not there yet as
long the incarceration rate
of black people is three
times higher than that of
white people, and yet they
do the same crimes as we
do. Were not there yet,
while single mothers rais-
ing two kids working for a
minimum wage job, cant
survive off the shrinking
dollar, but the CEO gets
a bonus every year. Were
not there yet as long as
our children continue to
receive a below standard
education that systemati-
cally puts them at a disad-
vantage
Simmons high-energy
speech asked those in at-
tendance not to be com-
placent and to continue
to work toward change for
equality.
Sammy Dotson provided
musical entertainment for
the event, performing sev-
eral gospels.
Dramatic interpreta-
tions were given by LeAn-
dra Sligh, who performed
Maya Angelous Still I
Rise, Tymetrious Bolden,
who performed Maya An-
gelous Phenomenal Wom-
an, and Terrell Hampton,
who performed Dr. Kings
I have a Dream speech.
Dramatic interpreta-
tion performers were all
students from the Phyllis
Wheatley Dwight Woods
Repertory Theatre.
We want the youth to
understand the history and
understand the struggle
that you didnt get where
you are by yourself today,
youre actually (standing)
on the shoulders of the
people that came before
you and thats important
that they know the his-
tory, and that they also
understand his dream.
His dream was for all kids,
black kids, white kids, His-
panic, for every kid. And
we do live in a country
where, if you do believe in
your dreams, you can live
to be whoever you want
to be, said Wayne Griffin,
councilmember and mas-
ter of ceremonies.
Stephania Talley-Priester
and Ed Driggers were each
honored with Samaritan
Awards for their service
to the surrounding com-
munities.
Im surprised every
time. Every time its a dif-
ferent spirit. No two pro-
grams are ever the same,
Griffin said.
The Black History Pro-
gram will be held on Feb.
7 at 6:30 p.m. at the Can-
non Centre, located at 204
Cannon St., Greer.
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
TAYLORS
6007 Wade Hampton Blvd.
(Located near Fatz Cafe)
864-848-1610
STORE HOURS: 9-8 MONDAY-SATURDAY
CLOSED SUNDAY
#328 Taylors, SC
The Greer Citizen
March 31, 2008
GRIEFSHARE
FAIRVIEW BAPTIST
Fairview Baptist Church,
1300 Locust Hill Road,
Greer, will host Grief-
Share, a support group led
by Carol Allen, on the sec-
ond Sunday of each month
from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Carol Allen at 292-
6008.
CHURCH SUNDAY SCHOOL
REDEEMER LUTHERAN
Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 300 ONeal Road,
Greer, conducts Sunday
School at 9 a.m., followed
by the worship service at
10 a.m. each Sunday.
Redeemers pastor is
Scottie Burkhalter.
For more information,
call 877-5876.
TNT TUESDAY AT NEW
BEGINNINGS OUTREACH
New Beginnings Out-
reach Ministry will host a
bible study entitled TNT
Tuesday every other
Tuesday (beginning Dec.
3) at 105 Marshland Lane,
Greer.
New Beginnings Out-
reach meets on Sundays at
611 Wade Hampton Blvd.,
Greer, from 10-11:30 a.m.
in the lower level of the
strip mall across the street
from Kia Dealership.
For more Information,
call 325-2714.
OFFERING FREE FOOD
EBENEZER WELCOME
The Bread of Life Food
Pantry at Ebenezer Wel-
come Baptist Church, 4005
Highway 414, Landrum, is
open on Thursdays from
2-4 p.m.
The pantry is open to
families in need of as-
sistance. Photo ID is re-
quired.
For more information,
call 895-1461.
SINGLES BIBLE STUDY
PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST
Pelham Road Baptist
Church, 1108 Pelham
Road, Greer, hosts a Sin-
gles Bible Study each Sun-
day from 6-8:30 p.m.
SMALL GROUPS OFFERED
AT GREER FIRST BAPTIST
ENGAGE Small Groups
began this past Sunday
at Greer First Baptist
Church.
Groups offered include
Co-Ed Young Adult Sin-
gles (twenty-somethings
- 35), Newlywed Married
Couples (couples married
less than five years), Mar-
ried with Children (middle
adult ages with children
or youth) and Co-Ed Older
Adults (married or single
over 35).
Groups will meet in the
Family Life Center. Dough-
nuts and coffee will be
available beginning at 9:15
a.m. and the class begins
at 9:45 a.m.
There will be a large
group time and the last
part of the class will con-
sist of small group discus-
sion times. Class will be
lead by Pastor Rick.
GREER FIRST BEGINS NEW
SERMON SERIES
Beginning last week,
Greer First Baptist kicked
off its new series entitled,
Honest to God. The se-
ries addresses foundation-
al issues in the life of ev-
ery person: the origin and
significance of human life,
the existence and nature
of God and how God re-
veals Himself and relates
to people.
Phil Neves, a 2013 cine-
ma production graduate of
Bob Jones University, won
the first place award for
short film in the Intercol-
legiate National Religious
Broadcasters (iNRB) Stu-
dent Production awards
competition.
Neves film, No Com-
promise, is a 12-minute
social science fiction film
he completed as his cin-
ema capstone senior proj-
ect. The film included a
cast and crew of nearly 30
students and staff mem-
bers and was filmed on
the BJU campus and in the
Greenville area.
Neves will be recognized
at the iNRB Awards Cer-
emony at the Gaylord Op-
ryland Hotel in Nashville,
TN. on Feb. 24. In addition
to receiving a cash award
and a travel stipend, he
will participate in the Na-
tional Religious Broadcast-
ers Convention.
Im fascinated by the
relationship of individu-
als to institutions, said
Neves. At home, work,
school and under govern-
ment, were surrounded
by bureaucracy and au-
tomation. As institutions
grow and age, they can
become inflexible and fail
to respond to individuals
on an individual basis. No
Compromise is an explo-
ration of what it feels like
when you dont fit into the
machine, what its like to
be a loose part trapped in
the gears.
CHURCH
NEWS


BJU grad wins short film award
Phil Neves
No Compromise is an exploration of what
it feels like when you dont fit into the
machine, what its like to be a loose part
trapped in the gears.
Phil Neves
BJU graduate

MLK: Talley-Priester, Driggers receive Samaritan Awards
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Recreation Supervisor Justin Miller (left) and council
member Wayne Grif n (right) presented Stephania
Talley-Priester with the Samaritan Award Monday at the
MLK event.

COUNCIL: Parks and Rec. gave report
Theres all kinds of benefits to knowing
where your food comes from...and that you
can live more of a sustainable lifestyle.
Reinaldo Rementeria
Resident
301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
ASHMORE
BROTHERS
Commercial Residential
Asphalt Paving Site Preparation
SINCE 1930
BENSON
Collision Repair Center
Ofce Hours:
7:30-6:00 Mon.-Fri.
848-5330
400 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer
Free Estimates
120 Years Combined Experience
Rental Car Competitive Rates
State of the Art Equipment & Facilities
www.bensongreer.com
989-0099
1409 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
10% DISCOUNT WITH CHURCH BULLETINS ON SUNDAYS
NEW HOMES
ADDITIONS
PAINTING
ROOFING
FLOOR
COVERINGS
CUSTOM
CABINETRY &
COUNTER TOPS
DECKS
PRIVACY
FENCING
864-578-4100
Free Estimates - 35 Years Experience
Victor United Methodist Church 1 Wilson Ave. Greer
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer 877-7724
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Brushy Creek First Assembly of God
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 879-0970
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
Its a Matter
Consignment Store
3245 B Wade Hampton Blvd.
Taylors, SC 29687
864-244-1652
of Style
Greer Gas,
Inc.
864-578-5886
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
4389 Wade
Hampton Blvd.
Taylors
864-292-1842
C
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
DILL CREEK COMMONS
1379 W. Wade Hampton, Greer
864-848-5222
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
Worship With Us
COMMERCIAL RENTALS RESIDENTIAL
www.mcculloughproperties.com
McCullough
Properties
864-879-2117
Forest Hills Funeral Home
6995 Highway 101, Woodruff
(864)576-9444
(864)288-8700
(864) 476-9898
www.foresthillsfuneralhome.net
Greer Storage
LLC
Let us handle
your storage needs!
FREE
MOVE IN TRUCK
14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer, SC 29651
864-879-2117
Greer
Q
UALITY
F
OODS
508 North Main St. 877-4043
7 am - 10 pm Mon.-Sat.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
Wanted
for role
in home
invasion
It was the Greer Police
Departments response
to a shoplifting call last
Monday that led to the ar-
rest of a Campobello man
wanted by the Spartanburg
County Sheriffs Office for
his role in a Jan. 11 Lyman
home invasion.
Ronald Lynn Harris, 42,
of 3460 Mount Lebanon
Road, Campobello, has
been charged with: mis-
representing identifica-
tion to law enforcement,
first degree burglary, as-
sault and battery of a high
and aggravated nature and
possession of a weapon
during a violent crime.
He also has warrants
pending from Greer police
for possession of drugs,
possession of drug para-
phernalia and shoplifting
property enhancement.
According to incident
reports obtained from the
Greer police, two officers
were dispatched to the
Walmart shopping center
in reference to providing
assistance to another of-
ficer, who was working a
shoplifting case at Sally
Beauty Supply.
Upon arrival, officers
learned a white female
wearing a blue dress had
just shoplifted some hair
products from the store
and her vehicle was a white
GMC suburban parked in
front of the Rent A Center.
After running the tag num-
ber of the suburban it was
determined to be linked to
the Jan. 11 home invasion
in which The Spartanburg
County Sheriffs Office is-
sued three warrants (first
degree burglary, assault
and battery of a high and
aggravated nature and
possession of a firearm
during a violent crime) on
a male suspect identified
as Ronald Lynn Harris.
While police were at-
tempting to locate Harris
and the female shoplifting
suspect (later identified
as Atkinson), a concerned
citizen approached offi-
cers and stated there was
a white male matching
Harris description walk-
ing around the parking lot
holding two fishing poles.
Officers located the man
(Harris) and asked him
for his identification. Har-
ris provided the officers
with a false identification,
and when asked about the
fishing poles, told them he
had bought them from a
man in the parking lot for
$10 a piece. When the of-
ficers realized Harris had
provided them with a false
identification, they placed
him in investigative deten-
tion and performed a terry
frisk that yielded his wal-
let, containing his iden-
tification card. The Spar-
tanburg County Sheriffs
Office was notified Harris
had been arrested.
A loss prevention offi-
cer inside Walmart, along
with video surveillance,
confirmed that Harris had
stolen the two fishing rods
that were each valued at
$49.96.
The female shoplifting
suspect, Audrey Thomp-
son Atkinson, 36, of 475
Edwards Road 7, Lyman,
was then arrested when
she returned to the sub-
urban. The stolen items
from Sally Beauty Supply
were located in the subur-
ban, along with two flash-
lights that had been stolen
from Walmart. A search of
Atkinsons purse yielded
ten oval pills identified
as hydrocodone bitartrate
and acetaminophen. Also
located inside Atkinsons
pocketbook were two fish-
ing reels and two pairs of
sunglasses that had been
shoplifted by Atkinson
from Walmart. A search
of the suburban yielded a
black bag, containing five
hypodermic needles (one
of which contained a clear
liquid that tested positive
for opiates) and a spoon
with drug residue. Harris
claimed the bag and its
contents belonged to him.
Harris was turned over to
Spartanburg County. At-
kinson was also arrested.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department or The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office or The Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice. All suspects are to be
considered innocent until
proven guilty in the court
of law.)
METH MANUFACTURE
Becky Sue Starnes, 44, of
10 21
st
St., Greer, has been
charged with manufactur-
ing methamphetamine
and possession of meth-
amphetamine.
Bruce Lee Horne, 30, of
201 Goforth Road, Lan-
drum, has been charged
with: possession of meth-
amphetamine with the
intent to distribute, traf-
ficking ephedrine/pseudo-
ephedrine, manufacturing
methamphetamine, driving
under suspension, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and faulty equipment.
Stephen Joel Horton,
34, of 102 Windemere
Drive, Greenville, has been
charged with manufactur-
ing methamphetamine
and a bench warrant for
failure to appear.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol in the area
of Memorial Drive Ext.
when he observed a green
Pontiac with two inoper-
able brake lights.
The officer activated his
blue lights to initiate a traf-
fic stop on the vehicle and,
upon doing so, he observed
the backseat passenger
and the driver moving
around inside the vehicle
in a suspicious manner.
After the vehicle stopped,
the officer approached the
driver (Horne) and asked
for his license and reg-
istration. Horne did not
have a license or a vehicle
registration. The officer
also asked for the back
seat passengers (Horton)
license.
The officer learned that
Hornes license was sus-
pended and Horton had a
failure to appear warrant.
Horne and Horton were
placed under arrest. A
third passenger (Starnes)
was ordered out of the
vehicle as well. All three
suspects were searched.
A search of Horne yielded
two bullets (.22 and .32
cal) in his front pocket. A
search of Horton yielded
a package of surefire 3-
volt lithium batteries and
a baggie containing 12 ca-
plets of Sudafed. A search
of Starnes yielded a bag-
gie of methamphetamine,
a baggie of white powder
residue and a package of
energizer lithium AA bat-
teries. A search of the ve-
hicle yielded a baggie con-
taining .4 grams of a white
powder, several small plas-
tic baggies, 288 pills, all of
which contained 30 mg of
pseudoephedrine, three
pills, which contained 120
mg of pseudoephedrine,
a digital scale, a BB gun, a
can of camp fuel and a can
of starting fluid. All three
subjects were arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
DISTURBING SCHOOL
Antonio Maurice Ken-
drick, 19, of 2 Bass Way,
Taylors, has been charged
with disturbing school.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer respond-
ed to Greer High School
in reference to a student
disturbing school.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with a faculty member
who stated Kendrick had
a verbal altercation with
his English teacher and
cursed her out in front of
class before walking out
without permission. The
officer made contact with
Kendrick, who continued
to curse loudly and re-
main belligerent with both
the school staff and the
officer.
Kendrick was placed un-
der arrest and transported
to the Greer City Jail.
POSSESSION
Lisa Marie Burnett, 37,
of 1077 Mt. Lebanon Road,
Greer, has been charged
with improper tag, posses-
sion of stolen goods and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Herbert Jackson Free-
man, 36, of the same ad-
dress, has been charged
with possession of stolen
goods.
Phillip Scott Krause Jr.,
30, of 4201 Jordan Road,
Greer, has been charged
with petit larceny, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and carrying a concealed
weapon.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ran
the tag number on a blue
Ford Taurus station wag-
on and it came back as be-
ing registered to a Toyota
Camry.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver (Burnett)
who stated she didnt
know why the tag was com-
ing back under a different
vehicle. She was unable to
provide a registration card
or proof of insurance on
the vehicle, but her driv-
ers license was valid.
Another officer arrived
on the scene and asked
the rear passenger of the
vehicle (Krause) to step
out and, after receiving
consent, he performed a
search on Krauses per-
son that yielded a blue
plastic baggie containing
white residue. Krause told
the officer the bag previ-
ously contained metham-
phetamine. Burnett then
signed a consent to search
form on the vehicle, which
yielded one capped sy-
ringe in Burnetts purse,
an expired tag on the
floorboard and a set of
brass knuckles under the
rear passenger seat.
Krause admitted to of-
ficers they had been at
Target earlier and he re-
moved the license tag off
of another vehicle and
handed it to Freeman,
who screwed the plate on
to the station wagon. All
three suspects were ar-
rested and transported to
the Greer City Jail.
SHOPLIFTING
Robert Lee Clark, 39,
of 102 Fairhaven Drive,
Greer, has been charged
with shoplifting.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to Target in
reference to shoplifting in
progress. While en route
to the location, the officer
received information that
the suspect had fled in a
silver Dodge caravan.
The officer arrived at
Target and met with the
loss prevention officer,
who stated that the sub-
ject (Clark) cut the box
containing a TV inside the
store, then removed the
security device before dis-
carding it in another sec-
tion of the store.
Clark then pushed the
cart containing the tele-
vision to the front of the
store and approached the
front door, but then be-
came aware of store se-
curity and fled the scene
without the television.
Clark was later located
and apprehended at his
residence by the Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice. A positive identifica-
tion of Clark was made as
being the suspect inside
the store.
A review of Clarks crim-
inal history revealed he
had approximately forty
prior convictions for shop-
lifting/property offenses.
DUS, POSSESSION
James Emory Mathis, 43,
of 16 Henderson Drive,
Travelers Rest, has been
charged with: driving un-
der suspension (seventh),
possession of drug para-
phernalia, window tint vi-
olation, habitual offender
and simple possession of
marijuana (third).
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
patrol when he observed
a silver Ford Taurus with
dark tinted windows trav-
eling on U.S. 29. The of-
ficer could also see the
driver was wearing head-
phones in both ears, pre-
venting his ability to hear
emergency vehicles. The
officer initiated a traffic
stop on the vehicle and its
driver Mathis.
The officer asked Mathis
for his drivers license,
registration card, and
proof of insurance. Mathis
informed the officer his
license was suspended.
Mathis then told the offi-
cer he was a habitual of-
fender and was currently
on house arrest.
The officer placed Mathis
in investigative detention
before confirming through
dispatch this would con-
stitute as Mathis seventh
DUS offense within the
last five years. Mathis in-
formed the officer he had
a dime bag of weed, along
with a scale inside his ve-
hicle. The marijuana and
the scale were located.
Mathis was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A9
Burning Feet?
Electric Shocks?
Pain & Numbness?
Pins & Needles?
Creepy Crawlies?
You might have
PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY
This condition affects 20 million Americans. It begins in the feet and
lower legs and can advance to the hands. Treatment of oral medi-
cations and injections often dont work.
Weve utilized a NEW TREATMENT that may take away most, if not
all, of your pain. Its safe and highly effective for most people, even
diabetics. Its covered by many insurance plans.
Call 864-847-6020 now to schedule
a FREE conference with one of our doctors.
Pain Relief at
Complete Healing & Wellness Center
24 E. Main St., Williamston, SC CompleteHealing.net
FDA Cleared | Safe and Effective
Dr. Robert Walker, MD Internal Medicine,
Greg Furness, PA-C, Kevin Burnham, PA-C,
Marylouise and Jack Wise, DC
NOW AVAILABLE
VIRTUALLY
ANYWHERE
IN SOUTH CAROLINA
One-time setup fee may be charged at the time of sale. Minimum 24 month service term. Equipment lease fee is $9.99 per month or if prepaid,
$199.00for 24months. Subject totaxes. Speedsareupto, arenot guaranteed, andwill vary. Serviceissubject todatatransmissionlimitsmeasured
on a monthly basis. For complete details and the Data Allowance Policy, visit www.exede.com. Service is not available in all areas. Offer may be
changed or withdrawn at any time. Exede is a registered service mark of ViaSat, Inc.
CALL (855)814-2459
or find a dealer at exede.com
1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
864-968-1133
CHECKS
CASHED
PAY BILLS HERE
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Collision sends man to hospital
Greer police and fre responded to a crash at around noon last Thursday at the intersection of SC Highway 14 and
Buncombe Road. A man was pulled from a Mercedes and was transported by ambulance to the hospital.
Shoplifting call leads to arrest of Campobello man
Ronald L. Harris
Introduces
volunteer
options
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Riverside High is bring-
ing back a long-dormant
tradition.
The schools student
council will resurrect a
service fair at 9:30 a.m.
Jan. 24 at the school.
The service fair used
to be a tradition at River-
side. We used to do it ev-
ery year, but we havent
done one for 20 years,
said Dan Freeman, the ju-
nior class vice president.
This will be kind of a first
and kind of bringing back
a tradition. Were excited
about that.
Freeman hopes the ser-
vice fair will provide stu-
dents with more volunteer
opportunities.
The service fair stands
out from any other pro-
gram that we do at Riv-
erside because its value
isnt really measure in
monetary terms, he said.
Its really the only pro-
gram whose only focus is
to build citizenship and
introduce students to new
opportunities. Were really
excited about having that
as an entirely new aspect
of what we do on student
council.
A dozen nonprofits
that have great programs
for high school students,
will visit with information,
hoping to attract volun-
teers and get students in-
volved with the organiza-
tions.
Teachers will be bring-
ing their students down to
the gym so that they can
meet the representatives
and see if there is some-
thing in their area of inter-
est, Freeman said.
He hopes to continue the
service with more organi-
zations participating next
year. Generally speaking,
its been a year of firsts for
Riverside, Freeman said.
Six years ago, our spirit
week made $7,000. This
year, in just over six years,
we made over $75,000, he
said. Theres been a lot of
changes going on recently
in our student council.
Were always looking for
new projects or ways to
expand things that we al-
ready do. That was main
reason we thought of the
service fair, that its a good
reason to bring it back.
The Academy of Arts,
The Childrens Museum
of the Upstate, The Frazee
Dream Center, the Green-
ville Zoo, Greer Relief,
Habitat for Humanity,
Hands on Greenville, the
Humane Society, the Make
a Wish Foundation, Teach-
er Cadets, Youth Base and
Youth Forward will be at
the service fair.
For more information,
contact Freeman at 404-
1475.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Riverside High will hold
service fair Friday
PARTICIPANTS |
The Academy of Arts
The Childrens Museum of the
Upstate
The Frazee Dream Center
Greenville Zoo
Greer Relief
Habitat for Humanity
Hands on Greenville
Humane Society
Make a Wish Foundation
Teacher Cadets
Youth Base
Youth Forward
A10 THE GREER CITIZEN NEWS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
Bridal
guide
2014
Jr
0rrrr
0itirn
PO Box 70, Greer, SC 29652 877-2076 877-3563 FAX
ads@greercitizen.com
Reserve your space
today!
Advertising Rates
For This Supplement:
1/4 Page 4 1/2 x 4 3/4 ............$185
1/2 Page 9 3/4 x 5 ....................$295
Full Page 9 3/4 x 9 1/2 ......... $450
Full color tabloid publication
Publication Date: Wednesday, February 12th, 2014
Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, January 29th, 2014
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
After taking a month off
for the holidays, the Give
a Shuck fundraiser is re-
turning to Great Bay Oys-
ter House.
This month, Give a
Shuck benefits Greer Re-
lief. The restaurant gives
10 percent of sales to the
nonprofit.
The events feature guest
shuckers each month
this month includes Police
Chief Dan Reynolds. Le-
land Burch, former editor
of The Greer Citizen, will
be there for storytelling,
along with some of the
Greer High Oldies.
Owner Diane Christo-
pherson started Give a
Shuck as a way to give
back to the community
that was giving to her after
her husbands death.
The event runs from 7-9
p.m. Jan. 23 at Great Bay
Oyster House, 109 E. Poin-
sett St.
Give a Shuck is usu-
ally the third Thursday
of the month. Februarys
will benefit the Greer Soup
Kitchen, followed by Greer
Community Ministries in
March.
Anyone interested in
getting involved with the
event should call Christo-
pherson at 905-6806.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
YOU KNOW, WE REALLY
OUTDID OURSELVES
THIS YEAR.
Its easy to get a little carried away
over the holidays. Well help you get
your budget back on track.
Consolidate your debts, pay off bills,
cover unexpected expenses and
lower your total payments.
Truliant.org | 800.822.0382
Truliant is federally insured by the National Credit Union
Administration and is an Equal Housing Lender. Must
meet eligibility requirements to join. All loans are subject
to credit approval.

Give a Shuck returns
to Great Bay Thursday
WANT TO GO? |
What: Give a Shuck
When: Thursday, Jan. 23,
7-9 p.m.
(Then the third Thursday of
every month.)
Guest shuckers: Police Chief
Dan Reynolds, Leland Burch
To Beneft: Greer Relief (Each
night benefts a diferent
agency.)
Leland Burch
Dan Reynolds


FROM PAGE ONE
1107 Poplar Dr. Ext. on 6.8
acres of land. There will
be two phases to the con-
struction, the first being
the temple and the second
being a residential home.
Genes Dairy Bar on
Wade Hampton and Bella
Michele will be demolished
and replaced by a two-
space retail facility. The
tenants for the facility are
unknown, but construc-
tion is expected to begin
by mid-March or April.
A Dollar Tree may be
built at 14001 E. Wade
Hampton Blvd. off Patter-
son Road and Wade Hamp-
ton Blvd. near Walmart in
a 10,000 square foot facil-
ity. Demolition and con-
struction is expected to
begin within five months.
Typically, Dollar Trees
are not standalone stores
and they usually measure
about 5,000 square feet.
About two years ago, the
company began an initia-
tive to create larger stand-
alone stores that measure
about 10,000 square feet.
Presently, about 40 of the
planned 500 have already
been constructed.
The next regularly
scheduled Planning Advi-
sory meeting will be held
on Feb. 20.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
PLANNING: Genes Dairy demolished


Embracing
rivalry
A
s a sports writer/fan,
its easy to lose your
passion for the game.
You know, that thing
that made you stay out
until it was dark as a kid.
That thing that helped
you get closer to your
dad or meet the girl you
ended up marrying.
That thing that offers a
simple escape when you
just need a few hours to
play.
I know, I know. I need
to stop getting so gushy
about sports, but I
couldnt help but be re-
minded of why I love the
game of basketball during
Thursday nights double-
header between Greer and
Blue Ridge.
The place was electric.
Thats what you would
expect during a rivalry
game. I had heard stories
of the Blue Ridge/Greer
rivalry, but Id never expe-
rienced it first hand.
It didnt take long
though. While sitting
about a foot away from
the Blue Ridge bench dur-
ing the boys game and I
overheard a conversation
that made me smile. A
heckling Greer student
(sitting directly behind
a Blue Ridge player)
leaned over to express his
disapproval of the Tigers
performance during the
first quarter (I say this as
child-friendly as possible).
Blue Ridge is a team
that has already lost its
fair share of games this
season, but that didnt
stop the player from
returning fire.
Didnt you guys take
the L in football, he
said.
Oh, snap! I thought to
myself. The sports fan in
me loved it. The basket-
ball fan in me loved it. It
was rivalry at its finest.
These guys are just kids
and they loved sports just
as much as I did.
You really couldnt hear
either the boys game or
the girls game. The crowd
was so intense the entire
night.
After watching the
Greer and Blue Ridge
girls trade three-point-
ers in the first half of
their game, I had to stop
myself from letting out
a cheer. I wasnt pulling
for a team. I was pulling
for the sport. These girls
played some pretty flaw-
less basketball, hitting big
shot after big shot.
The same was true for
the boys game. Ive got-
ten to know both teams
pretty well during my first
couple of months on the
job, and it was fun seeing
their competitive spirits
come alive.
When the Blue Ridge
men hit several crucial
buckets to secure the
go-ahead points late in
the fourth quarter against
Greer, not a single person
in the arena was jumping
higher than head coach
Ray Riley.
It was a great night
of basketball. Just ask
Greer girls coach Carlton
Greene.
This is the best of bas-
ketball right here, Greene
said. I wish we could play
like this every night. This
not only makes the play-
ers excited to play, but it
makes the fans excited
to come to the game and
it makes the sport one of
the most exciting sports
in the country.
He gets it.
During games like we
saw Thursday night, its
a shame anybody has to
lose. Sure, both teams
want wins over their
rival schools, but for us
sports fans in the crowd
who simply want to be
reminded of why we love
the game, it couldnt have
lasted long enough.
SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA
B
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Eastside put together
one of its best team per-
formances of the season
over the weekend, defeat-
ing Hillcrest 260-254 for
the Greenville County
wrestling championship.
Eagle coach Jack Kos-
micki said his team showed
some major improvements
during the outing.
Theyve kind of been
under our expectations so
far, but a lot of that has
to do with injuries. Weve
been far from our full
starting lineup, Kosmicki
said. Our focus going into
county was to work on
individual improvement
and let the team score fall
where it may fall. The next
thing I know, were coming
out of semifinals with the
lead.
Eastside now sits at 12-4
on the year with a 3-0 re-
cord in the region.
Were starting to feel
like the wrinkles are start-
ing to get ironed out, Kos-
micki said. Their perfor-
mance and having other
guys come back into the
lineup this week is start-
ing to make me feel like
were rolling in the right
direction.
Kosmicki said several of
his guys showed promise.
I was pleasantly sur-
prised, Kosmicki said.
We were able to fight Hill-
crest off during the final
round. They wrestled the
way I expected them to
wrestle. We just needed to
focus on several things we
do in terms of our tech-
nique. We just got back to
what weve always done.
We were fundamental and
solid. It really paid off.
Freshman Sam Blumer,
113, gave the team a lift
during the county tour-
nament and surprised his
coach along the way.
Sam has filled in for
us all year and has been
steadily improving, Kos-
micki said. He made it
to the finals and that was
a lot of points that we
havent been getting from
him. He stepped up and
had a great tournament.
He was big for us.
Taylor Chemell, 182,
named most outstanding
wrestler of the tourna-
ment, also had a stellar
showing for Eastside, win-
ning his weight class.
Weve always expected
that level of wrestling
from Taylor and he fi-
nally came out with it,
Kosmicki said. He stayed
solid in his technique and
was very aggressive and
SEE EAGLES | B4
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Courtney Robinson net-
ted her 1,000th career
point at Blue Ridge on
Thursday, a milestone
most high school athletes
have to wait until their
senior season to accom-
plish.
Not Robinson. The ju-
nior guard has seen a great
deal of success during her
first three years and joins
teammates Ross Mathis
and Eden Holombo in the
Tigers 1,000-point club.
I didnt feel the ex-
citement that I wanted
to because I didnt know
anything about it. To me,
it was a surprise, Robin-
son said. It was a big ex-
perience for me. I never
thought I would get the
points and never really
thought about it.
Blue Ridge coach Byron
Hardy said Robinsons
success can be attributed
to hard work.
I am truly a blessed
coach, Hardy said after
the teams win over Greer.
Ive got three 1,000-
point scorers on my team
at one time. Not many
coaches have that. Its a
blessing and I know that
its the product of other
peoples hard work. They
work hard on their own.
They are classic gym rats.
Theyre always in the gym
and I get to see the results
of all that hard work. Its
awesome.
Reaching the 1,000-
point mark is not enough
for third-year standout,
however.
I want to accomplish
more, Robinson said. I
just be an all-around play-
er. I want to leave some-
thing here at Blue Ridge.
Robinson said her team-
mates have helped her lift
her game to the next level.
Ive played with these
girls all my life, Robinson
said. I love playing with
them. Even though were
a small team, we can ac-
complish more than any-
body in this region. I just
love these girls so much.
SEE ROBINSON | B4
Jacob Simms has been
named the head coach of
North Greenvilles track
and field program and
Cameron Stober will take
over coaching duties for
the cross country team.
Simms, who ran col-
legiately at University of
Tennessee Chattanooga
and North Greenville,
graduated as a Crusader
in the Spring of 2013.
In addition to running
for the Crusaders, Simms
has worked for both the
cross country and track
and field teams for three
seasons.
Simms is married to
Whitney Simms and the
couple has one son, Coo-
per.
Stober takes over a cross
country program that had
one of its most successful
seasons in 2013.
I am blessed to have
this opportunity. I look
forward to working along
side Coach Simms to im-
prove both the cross coun-
try and track and field pro-
grams, Stober said. God
has truly blessed me and
I am grateful to be part of
such a wonderful school
and athletic department.
Both the mens and
womens teams finished
the season with two first-
place postings, while also
placing in the top five
four times. Stober is a
former North Greenville
cross country runner, who
graduated with a degree in
sport management in May
of 2012.
While working in the
athletic department at
North Greenville, Stober
also assisted former head
coach Michael Bayne with
track and field, coaching
the Crusaders in several
field events.
Eagles secure county title
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Ian Rodgers, right, helped Eastside defeat Berea on Monday night. The Eagles are looking to win their 22nd region title
in a row this season.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Michael Fernandez, blue, won his weight class at the Greenville County tournament over
the weekend.
Blue Ridges Robinson
joins 1,000-point club

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Courtney Robinson scored her 1,000th career point during
The Lady Tigers game against Greer.
Theyve got to get
better and theyve
got to get consistent.
There is always
something to work
on. There is always
something that is
sloppy that we need
to tighten up.
Jack Kosmicki
Eastside wrestling coach
Jacob Simms Cameron Stober
Stober, Simms
accept NGU
coaching roles


B2 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
BLUE RIDGE
After a 1-9 start to the
season, Blue Ridge was
desperate for a win.
Thursday night, that win
came over rival Greer in a
hard-fought 66-57 contest
at home. Tiger coach Ray
Riley said he hopes his
team will be able to turn
the page on a rough start.
I washed the back-
boards and put up new
nets. We talked about this
being a new season. It was
a good win for us, Riley
said.
Blue Ridge was forced to
battle back early on. The
Yellow Jackets opened the
game on an 8-0 run in the
first quarter, but the Ti-
gers would not stay down
for long.
Blue Ridge knotted the
game at 13 late in the first
before heading into the
half down 35-27.
It was tough, Riley
said. I thought we may
have shown some signs of
defeat, but we came back
and played a really great
second half. We had three
good days of practice and
weve worked extremely
hard. Its the kids. I was
feeding on them as much
as they were feeding on
me.
Things would begin to
shift in the third quarter,
as the Tigers took advan-
tage of a Greer offensive
slump.
We were finally able to
hit some free throws and
some shots and played
pretty good defense, Riley
said. I thought we played
tough. Greer is a very good
basketball team. Its a
great win for our program
against a great coach.
Key free throws down
the stretch sealed the nine-
point win for Blue Ridge.
Jeff (Neely) and I go way
back, and its always good
to win against a quality
program, Riley said.
Riley said it was a per-
fect rivalry atmosphere
for his team.
Our fans were great,
Riley said. Thank God
for our fans. When youre
1-9 like we were and they
come out and support you,
its just super.
After letting his team
enjoy the win with fellow
students and family mem-
bers Thursday night, Riley
said it is time for the Ti-
gers to refocus.
You have to credit the
kids. The kids did every-
thing, Riley said. Were
going to come back and
try to get a win against
Pickens.
RIVERSIDE
It was not an easy week
for the Warriors.
Riverside picked up two
more losses, falling to 7-10
on the year. Warrior coach
Greg Miller said the team
gave up some key buckets
to one of the states best
players during its 79-47
loss to Gaffney.
L.J. is a special player,
Miller said. He ended up
having 31, but I though
we actually did a good job
against him. The rest of
the team hurt us.
Riverside followed up
the Gaffney loss with a 68-
56 defeat against Mauldin.
In the Mauldin game,
it came down to rebound-
ing and turnovers, Miller
said. They put a really
good run on us in the first
quarter, and we were able
to pull it back to within
one in the third quarter. In
the fourth quarter, offen-
sive rebounds really hurt
us and cost us the game.
Despite the recent strug-
gles, Miller said his team
continues to work hard
and prepare for success
each week.
We really just try to pre-
pare for these games like
theyre any other team,
Miller said. We dont want
to under play them or over
play them. We just have to
execute our game plan and
do what we do well. That
will put us in a position to
win.
The team faces games
against Byrnes and Spar-
tanburg this week.
Every game in this re-
gion is important, Miller
said. Were just at the
point in the year where, if
we can clean up what we
do on the defensive glass
and make a few better de-
cisions with the ball in our
hands, I think we can be
in pretty good shape to be
in a position to win those
two games (against Byrnes
and Spartanburg).
Miller said this is the
toughest Rebel team he
has seen in a while.
Byrnes is very big and
physical, Miller said.
This might be one of the
best Byrnes teams Ive
seen in the past seven or
eight years. Its a team
thats very dangerous. We
have to keep them off the
glass. Thats the key.
Results for the Byrnes
game were not available at
press time.
The head coach said his
team will be up for another
test on Friday as they take
on Spartanburg.
Its going to be a diffi-
cult game at their place,
Miller said. Weve had a
rough five-game stretch,
but the kids have come
back every day ready to
work. Were just trying to
prove our point that weve
made some mistakes, but
were going to bounce
back.
EASTSIDE
The Eagles remain un-
defeated in region play,
earning a 64-52 win over
Greenville last week.
Eastside coach Tom Ch-
amness said his team is
heading in an encouraging
direction.
Greenville was ranked
in the top 10 in the state
and our kids responded to
the challenge, Chamness
said. I felt pretty good
about it.
Nigel Owens led the ef-
fort for the Eagles with 21
points while Wesley John-
son followed closely be-
hind with 13 of his own.
Eastside led 31-15 at the
half before mustering a
few runs to finish the job
in the final 16 minutes of
play.
In what was an uncon-
ventional week for his
team, Chamness said his
team responded well.
We were thrown off
our routine a little bit,
Chamness said. The kids
had exams that day and
it wasnt like a regularly
scheduled day. We cut
back our practice time
because we wanted the
kids to have more time to
study. You always go into
something like that think-
ing how are your kids go-
ing to respond? I thought
they responded well.
The Eagles battled Trav-
elers Rest for first place in
the region on Tuesday. Re-
sults were not available at
press time.
Its for control of the
region, Chamness said.
Theyre 6-0, were 6-0 and
I think the next team has
three losses. Its a huge
game for us and its a huge
game for them.
Chamness said Eastside
has gotten better, and
hopes the team will con-
tinue to improve.
I think they feel like
weve gotten better, and I
feel that way too, Cham-
ness said. I think weve
taken some steps forward
and were getting more
confident in our game
plans and what were do-
ing.
With just a few games
left in the home stretch
of the season, the Eagles
want to finish strong.
Were certainly not
overconfident, he said.
Youve got to go into ev-
ery game against every
opponent and understand
you have to fight for your
life, but I think were start-
ing to handle things bet-
ter.
GREER
Jeff Neelys team saw a
lead slip away during its
66-57 loss to rival Blue
Ridge Friday night.
Greer stumbled against
a struggling Tiger team
that has lost nine games
this season, falling behind
in the fourth quarter.
We didnt have a great
night offensively, Neely
said. We missed a lot of
shots and couldnt get into
a flow. Blue Ridge played
outstanding. It was one
of the best games theyve
played from what Ive
heard.
Greer led for most of the
first half, securing a 35-27
halftime lead. Blue Ridge
would bounce back in the
third, however, taking a
42-41 lead with a minute
remaining in the quarter.
A three by Greers Mat-
thew Moore knotted the
score at 44 heading into
the fourth.
Blue Ridge pulled away
in the final eight minutes,
securing the nine-point
win on several made free
throws and converted
turnovers and second
chance opportunities.
Moore led the Yellow Jack-
ets with 21 points.
They played great, we
didnt and they converted
down the line, Neely said.
We just have to go from
there and get better.
Neely said, despite Blue
Ridges record, his guys
knew it would be a tough
matchup heading into the
game.
Our guys have played
there before and they
know what its like play-
ing Blue Ridge, Neely
said. They werent caught
off guard, but we tried to
prepare them for the fact
that Blue Ridge was go-
ing to play their very best
against us.
Neely said there is no
room to have a bad show-
ing in region play.
You see it everywhere,
Neely said. Duke came
into Clemson and got
ambushed by Clemson.
Things like that happen.
We have to be totally fo-
cused and ready. Anybody
can beat anybody in this
game. I dont care who it is,
if you dont show up and
play your best, bad things
happen. Thats what hap-
pened to us.
For Greer, its back to
the drawing board.
We just have to get
back to work, Neely said.
Weve had a few good
days of practice. Were re-
focusing on some things
that are important to us
to be successful. We didnt
feel like we were doing the
things, offensively, that
we should do. Were work-
ing hard.
The head coach said
there is no point in look-
ing back at what you can-
not change.
You dont look back.
You keep going, Neely
said. You take the next
game and try to get bet-
ter.
Greer will take on Green-
ville, a team the Yellow
Jackets beat earlier in the
season, this Friday.
Greenville is playing re-
ally well and Southside has
won their last two, Neely
said. Theyre dangerous.
You just cant take a night
off.
BYRNES
Dormans buzzer-beat-
er sent the Rebels home
with a sour taste in their
mouths, but Byrnes would
bounce back to pound
Boiling Springs on Friday
night.
Dormans Carlos Dotson
hit a shot with less than
two seconds remaining to
seal Byrnes 50-48 loss.
A couple of buckets by
Byrnes Syverio Jones tied
the score with less than
two minutes remaining
in the fourth. The Rebels,
however, were unable to
top a Dorman squad that
remains undefeated in the
region.
Despite the loss, Byrnes
rebounded to pound Boil-
ing Springs during a 72-47
win Friday evening.
Jones led the 9-7 Reb-
els with 16 points on the
night. With the win, Byrnes
improved to 3-3 in the re-
gion.
The Rebels faced games
against Riverside and
Wade Hampton this week.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Blue Ridge ends losing skid, defeats Greer
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greers short win streak was snapped last week against Blue Ridge. The Yellow Jackets take on Greenville on Thursday.
PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Blue Ridge got its frst win of 2014 on Thursday night against rival Greer. The Tigers im-
proved to 2-9 on the season.
I dont care who it
is, if you dont show
up and play your
best, bad things
happen.
Jef Neely
Greer Boys Coach
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B3
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
BLUE RIDGE
The Lady Tigers capi-
talized on a last-minute
comeback Thursday night,
sealing a 81-77 win over
rival Greer in the final sec-
onds of the game.
After sitting out most of
the game with foul trouble,
Blue Ridge guard Court-
ney Robinson hit four last
minute free throws that
ultimately gave her team
the win.
Tiger coach Byron Hardy
said his team had to fight
hard to stay in the con-
test.
They battled all night,
Hardy said. There are no
easy games in our region
and Greer shot the ball
extremely well. We knew
they could shoot, but we
just kept battling back. We
got in the passing lanes
and we didnt give up.
Senior Ross Mathis led
Blue Ridge with 36 points,
nine assists and seven
steals on the evening. Ju-
nior Robinson added 21
points to the effort, while
senior Eden Holombo con-
tributed 18.
We have some smart
players on our team and
we took advantage of it,
Hardy said. We started
out with some foul trou-
ble, but we came back re-
ally strong. Thats the type
of game you want to be in.
It makes your blood pres-
sure go up, but you want
to be in those games.
Hardy said his team
showed the will to win
down the stretch.
We saw some maturity,
Hardy said. We got a little
rushed at times, trying to
get back all eight or nine
points at one time and
that doesnt work. But, we
have the players that give
us the opportunity to be in
games by the way we play.
Going forward, we have to
build on that. No deficit is
too difficult to come back
from.
Hardy was impressed
with Robinson, who scored
her 1,000th career point in
the game.
She came out with
three fouls in the first half
and picked up her fourth
early in the third quarter,
Hardy said. Down the
stretch, we knew it was
do or die and she played
smart through the rest
of the game. When it got
down to the point where
she got into a rhythm, it
was very exciting.
Mathis 11 made field
goals kept the game with-
in striking distance for the
Lady Tigers, who trailed
for most of the second
half.
Ross kept us in the
game. She kept us within
striking distance, Hardy
said. When youre staying
competitive and staying
in the game, youve got a
chance to win. Thats what
were looking for.
That was a heck of a
game to watch and very
entertaining. My hearts
pumping a little bit, but
Im okay, he said.
Hardy said Blue Ridge
will be looking at some
even tougher battles
ahead.
Weve got teams gun-
ning for us every time,
Hardy said. It doesnt get
any easier from here so
weve got to go back to the
drawing board and get af-
ter it.
GREER
Greer was less than a
minute away from stealing
a rivalry win the over one
of the regions top teams
Thursday night, but came
up just shy in a 81-77 loss
to Blue Ridge
The thing about a game
like this is that nobody got
ahead, Greer coach Carl-
ton Greene said. It was
a pressure-packed game.
Every possession counted,
but each team kept com-
ing back and making big
plays. Thats what made
it such a good game. The
shame of a game like that
is that somebody has to
lose. Both teams ought to
come out winners when
the play like that.
Greer led most of
the fourth quarter, but
Greenes Yellow Jackets
were unable to come away
with the win.
Weve got a great op-
ponent in Blue Ridge and
they found out theyve got
a great opponent in us,
Greene said. Thats what
makes a rivalry so good.
Despite the loss, Greene
said he got some huge per-
formances from his team.
Weve been talking all
year about playing as a
team and playing togeth-
er, Greene said. (Against
Greer), it paid off. At dif-
ferent phases of the game,
different people stepped
up and made plays that we
had to have. Some made
shots, some got rebounds
and others took care of
the basketball against the
trap. They did all of those
things when we needed
them to do it. It was a won-
derful team effort.
Greene said his team
had its hands full dealing
with Blue Ridges Mathis
and Robinson.
Theyre two great play-
ers and we knew we had to
shut them down, Greene
said. We rotated some
players on them and tried
to take them out of what
they liked to do and, for
the most part, we thought
we were successful, but
good players find a way to
score. Good players find
a way to make the game
what its supposed to be.
We made them play ex-
tremely hard.
In such a competitive re-
gion, the head coach said
there is no room to take a
night off.
We have to come every
night to play and, if you
dont, you can bet your
opponent will, Greene
said. Its very difficult to
win on the road. I thought,
playing as well as we did,
this was a great mark of
maturity on our part.
When asked if he learned
anything about his team
against Greer, Greene re-
sponded with a sure an-
swer.
I learned they can play,
he said.
EASTSIDE
The Lady Eagles have
struggled in games against
the top teams in the region
this season, and last week
was no different.
Eastside fell during a
heartbreaking 60-57 loss
to Greenville Thursday
night, and coach Cindy De-
Hart said her team simply
let the Red Raiders get to
the line too often.
We started out slow in
the first quarter and dug
ourselves in a hole, De-
Hart said. The rest of the
game was fairy even. We
actually outscored them
in the fourth quarter,
but they went to the free
throw line 39 times and
scored 22 points. That was
the major difference in the
ball game.
Despite the loss, DeHart
said she was pleased with
her teams effort.
We played them hard,
DeHart said. We were
in the ball game. It went
down to the wire. We had
a number of opportunities
to win the ball game in the
fourth quarter and just
couldnt do it. The effort
was there.
Taylor Thompson led
the team with 13 points,
and her sister, Destiny
Thompson, added 10.
Were playing young
people and they have to
learn and grow from their
experiences, DeHart said.
We just have to learn how
to finish. Weve improved
so much in a years time.
Weve come a long way
and now weve got to learn
to finish.
The Lady Eagles have
now dropped close games
to Blue Ridge, Southside
and Greenville.
We played pretty good
defense, we just have to
learn how to finish, De-
Hart said. Weve played
the top three teams (in our
region) and weve lost by a
total of eight points.
DeHart said the competi-
tion will not get any easier
going forward.
Its just tough compe-
tition, DeHart said. We
lost by two to Blue Ridge
at their place, we lost by
three to Southside in over-
time and we lost to Green-
ville by three. We know
were competitive and
we will learn with experi-
ence.
Eastside faces a rematch
with Blue Ridge this Friday
at 6 p.m.
You have to learn and
you have to grow, DeHart
said. Blue Ridge comes
to us Friday and well face
the other (top two) teams
on the road, but you can
never overlook anybody
else. Every night is a battle
for us and weve got to get
ready.
BYRNES
The Lady Rebels strug-
gled against Dorman be-
fore punishing Boiling
Springs last week.
Byrnes coach Stacey Par-
ris said foul trouble caught
up with the team during
its 81-54 loss to Dorman.
I was very pleased with
how we played against
Dorman, Parris said. We
were down 11 at halftime
against the number one
team in the region and the
number one team in the
state. I thought our girls
just played hard. It was a
very hard fought game un-
til the third quarter when
we got into foul trouble
and their bench started to
have its way on us.
The team was looking for
redemption after a rough
outing Tuesday night,
beating Boiling Springs by
more than 50 points.
After playing Dorman
as well as we did, we had
our best practice of the
season on Wednesday. We
just came back and were
able to bounce back re-
ally hard, Parris said. We
were just ready to play
against Boiling Springs
and we shot the ball the
best we have all season.
The Rebels face games
against Riverside and
Wade Hampton this week.
This is our biggest week
of the season, Parris said.
Wade Hampton is ranked
fourth, I would think were
fourth and Riverside is
sixth. Its the teams that
are right there with us in
region rankings and we re-
ally need to sneak up on
somebody.
Parris said two wins
this week would go a long
way.
If we can win Tuesday
and Friday and get on a
three game winning streak,
it would be amazing, Par-
ris said. It would certainly
go a long way in securing
us a playoff spot. This
week is crucial for us.
Tuesday was Pink
Night for the Lady Reb-
els as they kicked off the
start of Relay for Life
with Hoops for Cancer
against Riverside. Results
were not available at press
time.
We need to take care
of business at home so
we can secure a place in
the playoffs, Parris said.
That is our focus going
into this week.
RIVERSIDE
The Lady Warriors had
another tough week, drop-
ping games to Gaffney and
Mauldin.
Head coach Jenny Taylor
said she saw some posi-
tive things from her team
against Gaffney, which
outscored Riverside in the
final quarter of play.
We did okay against
Gaffney, Taylor said. It
was a seven-to-10 point
game most of the time
and they built a 12-point
lead at one point. During
the last few minutes of the
game, we cut it to about
seven or eight, but we just
dont have quite enough to
get where we need to be in
those games.
We didnt play bad, we
just didnt have enough,
she said.
The Lady Warriors were
unable to bounce back
against Mauldin, dropping
to 4-12 on the year.
I was pleased with our
effort against Mauldin. I
thought they played ex-
tremely hard, Taylor said.
I thought we did some
things well and made
some strong moves. We
lost, but there were some
bright spots also. They
played about as hard as
you can play.
This has been a chal-
lenging year for Riverside,
which has seen a tremen-
dous amount of success in
the past.
Weve had extremely
strong teams in the past
at Riverside, Taylor said.
At one point, we won four
region championships in
five years. This is just a lit-
tle bit different team. The
experience isnt there and
were not as athletic as
some of those teams in the
past. Its just a little dif-
ferent. You have to coach
them differently, but you
have to coach every team
differently.
Taylor said this has been
a fun team to coach, de-
spite the losing record.
I love being around
them and I love coaching
them, Taylor said. Its
just going to be a process
and its going to take time.
Weve got the majority of
our team coming back next
year and sometimes, when
you have kids that work as
hard as they do, you end
up being better than some
teams that are extremely
talented. Weve got some
good things going on and
its going to continue to
get better.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Lady Tigers steal win over Yellow Jackets
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greers Julia Sudduth and company were not able to fnish the job on Thursday, losing to Blue Ridge in the fnal minute
of the rivalry game.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Riverside dropped two more games last week, losing to Gafney and Mauldin. The Lady
Warriors are now 4-12 on the year.
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Ross Mathis has had no
trouble scoring the bas-
ketball this season.
The senior has led Blue
Ridge in scoring in a
number of game, and her
most recent 36-point per-
formance against Greer
earned her The Greer Citi-
zen and Clock/Clock Ex-
press Player of the Week
award.
Mathis added nine as-
sists and seven rebounds
in the contest.
Playing Greer is always
intense anyway. Theyre
our rival, Mathis said.
Theyve actually gotten a
lot better in the last cou-
ple years. This year they
are really tough.
The Lady Tigers, who
trailed for a majority of
the second half, battled
back all game.
I felt like everyone
wanted it, Mathis said.
We were intense, but we
were under control. I was
just trying to stay relaxed
and mentally into the
game the entire time and
it made it a little bit easier.
Everyone just played men-
tally tough.
The team crawled back
into the game behind a
big shooting night from
Mathis.
During practice I work
a lot on my shot, Mathis
said. During game situ-
ations, I think that really
helps.
Another Lady Tigers
standout, Courtney Robin-
son, sat on the bench for
the extended period, but
Mathis said other team-
mates stepped up.
Courtney sitting on the
bench (with foul trouble)
for a while was definitely
tough, Mathis said. Ev-
eryone else really had to
step up. We had to make
sure we were really play-
ing good defense and
whenever Courtney was in
the game, we had to make
sure we were playing a lot
of help defense.
Everyone really stepped
up, she said.
Mathis has seen her role
develop during her four
years at Blue Ridge.
I think my role is being
a leader, Mathis said. (My
job is) being that encour-
aging leader and getting
everyone settled down and
into the game.
The guard said the play
of her teammates makes
the game easier.
They make me bet-
ter, Mathis said. Play-
ing with them, I definelty
learn some things from
everyone on the team.
Ive played with Courtney
and Eden forever and Ive
learned a lot from them.
They make me want to be
a better player and prac-
tice harder.
Blue Ridge will still need
big performances from
Mathis down the stretch,
as it hopes to make a push
for a region champion-
ship.
We want to make it to
the playoffs, obviously,
but right now our region
is really tough, Mathis
said. We cant look ahead
too far. Its nice to have
goals, but we have to fo-
cus on whats in front of
us now.
The Lady Tigers face
Eastside on Friday, a team
Blue Ridge narrowly es-
caped earlier this season.
Theyre very aggressive
and super intense, Mathis
said of Eastside, Were
going to have to settle
down and do our game
plan and what we want to
do. Its going to be a tough
game and its going to be
intense, but I think we can
pull it out.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
R
O
S
S

M
A
T
H
I
S
#
25
Position: Guard
Age: 17
Class: Senior
Parents: J.J. and Kristi Mathis
Of the court: Likes to hang out with family
Favorite athlete: Candice Parker
Favorite movie: The Proposal
Favorite hobby: Listening to music
Pregame ritual: Praying
Movie star who would play you: Reese Witherspoon
Favorite musician: Carrie Underwood
The Greer Citizen
PLAYER OF THE WEEK
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
Wrestling ..........................................................Greer @ Southside, 6 p.m.
Travelers Rest @ Eastside, 6 p.m.
Blue Ridge @ Pickens, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
Basketball................................................... Greer @ Greenville, 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 24
Basketball ...................................................Blue Ridge @ Eastside, 6 p.m.
Riverside @ Spartanburg, 6 p.m.
Byrnes @ Wade Hampton, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 25
College Basketball...........North Greenville @ Belmont Abbey, 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN. 28
Basketball..................................................Travelers Rest @ Greer, 6 p.m.
Eastside @ Pickens, 6 p.m.
Berea @ Blue Ridge, 6 p.m.
Byrnes @ Spartanburg, 6 p.m.
CALENDAR |
REGISTER FOR BASEBALL,
SOCCER AND SOFTBALL
Greer Baseball Club,
Foothills Soccer Club of
Greer, and Girls Softball
sign-ups for the spring of
2014 begin Monday, Jan. 6
and conclude Friday, Feb.
7.
Parents may choose to
sign up in the office, lo-
cated at 446 Pennsylvania
Ave., Greer, Monday - Fri-
day from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Registration is also avail-
able online at cityofgreer.
org/departments/youth_
sports.php.
The 2014 seasonal fee
for the Greer Baseball
Club and Girls Softball is
$75 for an in-city resident
and $85 for out-of-city
residents.
The seasonal fee for
the Foothills Soccer Club
of Greer is $70 for in-city
residents and $80 for out-
of-city residents.
The clubs are accepting
registrations for all kids
ages 3 - 14. There are a
limited number of spots in
certain divisions. Registra-
tion will occur on a first
come first serve basis.
Practices and games are
held at Greer Parks and
Recreation facilities.
Opening day for Greer
Baseball Club is sched-
uled for April 5 at Century
Park. Opening day for
Foothills Soccer Club is
March 17 at Suber Park.
MIDDLE TYGER INDOOR
SOCCER REGISTRATION
Registration is now open
until Feb. 5 for Middle
Tyger youth indoor soc-
cer.
Ages range from 3 - 12
with the cost being $15 for
members and $65 for non-
members.
Matches are held Tues-
days and Thursdays from
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
For more information,
please visit spartanbur-
gymca.org or call Adam
Beasley, sports director, at
433-9623.
GCM GOLF TOURNAMENT
REGISTRATION OPEN
The Dick Brooks Honda
Meals on Wheels Invita-
tional golf tournament has
opened registration for the
May 9 event at Greer Coun-
try Club. The 17th annual
tournament benefits Greer
Community Ministries.
Golfers and sponsors
should register online at
DickBrooksHondaMOW-
golf.com. There is a limit
of 48 teams of four and
the deadline to sign up is
March 31. Each golfer will
receive a gift bag, grilled
lunch and snacks.
Cost is $160 per indi-
vidual and $640 per team.
Teams will be split into
morning and afternoon
sessions with a shotgun
start.
Winning teams will re-
ceive cash prizes. Compe-
titions this year include
Closest to the Pin, Hole in
One, Closest to the Line
and a putting contest.
There are many levels of
sponsorship support avail-
able: partner, $5,000; plat-
inum, $2,500; gold $1,500;
contest sponsor, $500 and
hole sponsors, $125. Sign
up to be a sponsor at the
website by March 14 to be
included in event public-
ity.
The Meals on Wheels
Golf Tournament provides
funds needed to continue
serving over 300 home-
bound senior adults in the
Greater Greer area with a
hot meal Monday through
Friday. The meals are pre-
pared on site in the Greer
Community Ministries
kitchen and volunteer
drivers deliver them.
For more information
contact Hannah Rainwater,
GCM events coordinator,
877-1937 or hrainwater@
gcminc.org.
GOODWILL MUD RUN
REGISTRATION CONTINUES
Registration is now open
for the Goodwill Mud Run,
presented by St. Francis
Sports Medicine.
The event will be held
Saturday, April 12, at 7
a.m. and Sunday, April 13,
at 4 p.m.
The run will be 3.5 miles
with 35 obstacles. Teams
will compete against each
other and will be officially
timed.
The cost to enter for a
two-person team (Satur-
day only) is $100. A four-
person team is $140 and
a JROTC team (this is for
JROTC high school teams
only) is $90.
For more information,
visit GoodwillMudRun.org.
Mathis drops 36 in win over Yellow Jackets
BILLY CANNADA | THE GREER CITIZEN
Ross Mathis was named Player of the Week for her 36-point
performance. She is pictured with coach Byron Hardy.

PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Finishing on top
Bob Jones basketball players Rebecca Teruel, left, and Matt
Quantrille were named to the all-tournament team after a
second place fnish at the Tabernacle Christian School New
Years Classic Tournament over the weekend.
SPORTS
ROUNDUP
Boston Red Sox General
Manager Ben Cherington
will be in attendance dur-
ing the Greenville Drives
annual Hot Stove Event,
slated for Monday, Jan.
27.
Cherington, who was
named Major League Base-
balls executive of the year
in 2013, is entering his
third season with the Red
Sox.
This is the first time
that a Red Sox General
Manager has attended the
Drives Hot Stove Event,
and we couldnt be more
excited, Drive Team Pres-
ident Craig Brown said.
Ben Cherington was the
architect behind Bostons
remarkable 2013 season
that concluded with a
World Series champion-
ship, and we are thrilled
that he has taken time out
of his busy schedule to
visit Greenville.
The Red Sox received
contributions from a wide
variety of players this
season, storming to a 97-
65 record, an American
League East division title
and a World Series cham-
pionship.
Seven former Drive play-
ers were featured on the
postseason roster, includ-
ing pitchers Clay Buch-
holz, Felix Doubront, Jon
Lester, Franklin Morales
and Brandon Workman,
and infielders Xander Bo-
gaerts and Will Middle-
brooks.
The Hot Stove Event will
be held at ZEN, located in
Downtown Greenville near
the Main Street gates at
Fluor Field, from 5:30-8
p.m. The event is compli-
mentary to the public and
includes food and bever-
age.
Im sure that Ben will
discuss the principles he
used to build the Red Sox
into a championship club
in 2013 and how he sees
the teams prospects for
2014. He will also be able
to talk about former Drive
players and how they will
impact the big league club
in the near future.
The 2014 Hot Stove
Event will be a one-of-a-
kind experience for our
fans, said Drive General
Manager Eric Jarinko. Our
fans will have the chance
to interact with Ben Cher-
ington, a prominent face
of the Red Sox organiza-
tion, and Darren Fenster,
who will be the face of the
Greenville Drive all season
long. Well also be giving
our fans a sneak peek of
whats in store at Fluor
Field in 2014, including
this years theme.
FROM B1
patient. He had a phenom-
enal day.
Eastsides Raj Al-Mashri,
160, also won his weight
class.
Hes kind of been our
big gun in our back pocket
that nobody really knows
about, Kosmicki said. If
you see him wrestle one
time, hes not a secret any-
more. Hes wrestling with
tons of confidence.
Eastside has won more
than 20 region champion-
ships in a row, and Kos-
micki does not want to
stop now.
I think the last time we
didnt win was in 1992,
Kosmicki said. (Having
the streak is) not fun at all.
I cant tell you how much I
hate that thing. Youve got
to keep it going. Nobody
wants to be the team that
loses it, but it is always
refreshing to know, if all
goes well and we do win it,
that it is past us.
We really like to get
that thing in the rearview
mirror, he said.
Eastside will need to im-
prove if the team hopes to
have success at the state
tournament.
We have to get better,
Kosmicki said. We lost to
Dorman the other night
and that team that wres-
tled Dorman wasnt good
enough to win a state title.
Theyve got to get bet-
ter and theyve got to get
consistent. There is always
something to work on.
There is always something
that is sloppy that we need
to tighten up.
A few key region match-
ups still stand between the
Eagles and the playoffs.
Right now were still
focused on winning our
region, Kosmicki said.
Once we get that monkey
off our back, we can focus
on other things.
Riverside finished third
in the tournament with
128.5 points as a team.
Blue Ridge also placed in
the top ten, scoring 101
points.
Eastsides Michael Fer-
nandez, 194, Clay Walker,
138, and Charlton Clark,
120, also won their weight
classes.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
FROM B1
They push me every single
day.
She has seen her fair
share of close games.
Stepping to the line in the
closing seconds of Blue
Ridges game against the
Yellow Jackets, the pres-
sure was on Robinson to
make four free throws to
seal a late comeback win.
I just wanted to make
them, she said. Im not
a good free throw shooter,
but I knew I needed to
make the shots.
She would make the
shots, guaranteeing her
team the win over its ri-
val.
Beating Greer is a great
experience, Robinson
said. I love winning over
our rival team. Thats the
game that really pumps
me up. Greer is one of our
toughest (opponents) and
I love playing them.
Looking ahead, Blue
Ridge has hopes of com-
peting for a state title.
We can go all the way,
Robinson said. I have faith
in my team. I know for a
fact that, if we keep doing
what we do, we can make
it all the way to state.
ROBINSON: Has faith
her team can make state





EAGLES: Team has won
more than 20 region titles


Right nowwere
still focused on
winning our region.
Once we get that
monkey off our
back, we can focus
on other things.
Jack Kosmicki
Eastside High wrestling coach
Red Sox GM will
headline Greenville
Drive Hot Stove
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is
Subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, national origin
or an intention to make such
preference, limitation or dis-
crimination. This newspaper
will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of
the law. Our readers hereby
informed that all dwelling
advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal op-
portunity basis.
1-1,8,15,22,29-TFN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION.
Notice is hereby given that
THE SOUTHERN GROWL,
LLC. intends to apply to the
South Carolina Department
of Revenue for a license/per-
mit that will allow the sale and
on premises consumption of
BEER/WINE at 1301 WEST
WADE HAMPTON BOULE-
VARD,, SUITE B GREER,
SC 29651. To object to the
issuance of this permit/li-
cense, written protest must
be received by the S.C. De-
partment of Revenue no later
than February 7, 2014.
For a protest to be valid,
it must be in writing, and
should include the following
information:
(1) the name, address and
telephone number of the per-
son ling the protest;
(2) the specic reasons why
the application should be
denied;
(3) that the person protesting
is willing to attend a hearing
(if one is requested by the
applicant);
(4) that the person protesting
resides in the same county
where the proposed place of
business is located or within
ve miles of the business;
and
(5) the name of the applicant
and the address of the prem-
ises to be licensed.
Protests must be mailed to:
S.C. Department of Rev-
enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box
125, Columbia, SC 29214; or
faxed to: (803) 896-0110.
1-22,29, 2-5
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACA-
TION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more
than 2.6 million South Caro-
lina newspaper readers. Your
25-word classied ad will ap-
pear in 105 S.C. newspapers
for only $375. Call Jimmie
Haynes at the South Caro-
lina Newspaper Network, 1-
888-727-7377.
AUCTIONS
AUCTION EVERY THURS-
DAY 11am in old ABC Build-
ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit
auctionzip.com
1-1,8,15,22,29-TFN
Advance Auction Notice!
27th Annual Clarendon Hall
Academy Auction 3/1/2014
- 9AM Farm-Construction-
Truck & Miscellaneous Con-
signments accepted Auction
conducted by J G Blocker
843.908.3833/Buddy Lewis
843.983.5040
Absolute Online Only Auc-
tion- 21.63 +/- Acres on I-40
at Exit 154, Mebane, NC,
Alamance Co., 2/4 at 8am
to 2/10 at 3pm, Bid Center
at Mebane Arts & Commu-
nity Center. Iron Horse Auc-
tion Co., Inc. 800-997-2248.
NCAL3936. www.ironhor-
seauction.com
ADVERTISE YOUR AUC-
TION in 105 S.C. newspapers
for only $375. Your 25-word
classied ad will reach more
than 2.6 million readers. Call
Jimmie Haynes at the S.C.
Newspaper Network, 1-888-
727-7377.
Drivers: $ign-on Bonus-
TRAINEES & OTR DRIV-
ERS! PAID
Orientation.
Wiley Sanders Truck
LINES, INC. RECRUITING:
855-777-9785
1-8,15,22,29
Drivers: DEDICATED. Re-
gional & OTR. Start up to
$.44/mi + Excellent Benets.
401K + Bonuses. Excellent
Hometime! CDL-A 6mos.
exp. 877-704-3773
1-22,29
12 Pro Drivers needed Full
Benets + Top 1% Pay Re-
cent Grads Welcome CDL A
Req - 877-258-8782 www.
ad-drivers.com

Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
Qualied drivers. Home most
weekends. Call: 843-266-
3731 / www.bulldoghiway.
com EOE
$1500 Spring Bonus. Hiring
3/4 or One ton Diesel Pickup
Trucks. Special Georgia Ori-
entation scheduled. Apply
today at www.foremosttrans-
port.com or 866-764-1601

Train to be a PROFESSION-
AL TRUCK DRIVER through
Primes Student Driver Pro-
gram. Obtain your Commer-
cial Drivers License, then
get paid while training! 1-
800-277-0212 driveforprime.
com
New Pay-For-Experience
program pays up to $0.41/
mile. Class A Professional
Drivers Call 866-501-0946
for more details or visit Su-
perServiceLLC.com
OWNER OPERATORS Av-
erage $3K/week! Be out up
to 14 days, enjoy GUARAN-
TEED home time! Weekly
settlements. Cardinal Great-
wide pays loaded/unloaded.
Class-A CDL & 1yr driving ex-
perience. Fleet Owners Wel-
come. Operate under your
own authority or ours! Call
Matt 888-220-6032. Drive-
ForCardinal.com
GUARANTEED PAY! CLASS-
A -CDL FLATBED DRIVERS
NEEDED! Local, regional,
OTR. Great pay package/
benets/401k match. 1yr exp.
required. Call JGR 864-488-
9030 Ext. 319, Greenville and
Gaffney SC locations. www.
jgr-inc.com
WE NEED DRIVERS!! Im-
mediate openings. OTR
drivers, minimum 1yr. OTR
experience. Late model con-
ventional tractors/48 atbed
trailers. Top pay, insurance.
Home most weekends. Senn
Freight 1-800-477-0792
ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER
JOBS in 105 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classied ad will reach
more than 2.6 million readers.
Call Jimmie Haynes at the
S.C. Newspaper Network, 1-
888-727-7377.
SUPERIOR TRANSPORTA-
TION Start the year with a
new Career!! OTR Drivers
Class A CDL 2 yrs. Exp. Flat-
bed Guaranteed Salary! Call
Craig 800-736-9486 Ext 266
Drivers: Run FB with WTI. Be
home on weekends. Start up
to 28% plus fuel bonus. New
equipment. BCBS. Experi-
ence needed. LP available.
Call 877-693-1305
FOR SALE
WASHER / DRYER HEAVY
DUTY, extra large capac-
ity, white, excellent working
order and condition. $175
each. Family moving. 864-
483-5265. Will sell sepa-
rately. Possible delivery.
DirecTV - Over 140 channels
only $29.99 a month. Call
Now! Triple savings! $636.00
in Savings, Free upgrade to
Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday
ticket free!! Start saving to-
day! 1-800-908-5974
DISH TV Retailer - Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation!
CALL Now! 1-800-635-0278
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a whole-home
Satellite system installed at
NO COST and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to new
callers, SO CALL NOW 1-
866-981-7319
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Tuesday, January 28, 2014 is
the last day to redeem win-
ning tickets in the following
South Carolina Education
Lottery Instant Game: (591)
WINNING STREAK
COMPUTERS/ELECTRONICS
My Computer Works. Com-
puter problems? Viruses, spy-
ware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections
- FIX IT NOW! Professional,
U.S.-based technicians. $25
off service. Call for immedi-
ate help. 1-888-269-7891

SERVICES
DIVORCE WITH OR WITH-
OUT children $125.00. In-
cludes name change and
property settlement agree-
ment. SAVE hundreds. Fast
and easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7

MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Get trained as FAA
certied Aviation Technician.
Housing and Financial aid for
qualied students. Job place-
ment assistance. Call Avia-
tion Institute of Maintenance
866-367-2513
YARD SALES
YARD GIVEAWAY!!
ALL ITEMS ARE FREE!!
CLOTHES, CAN GOODS,
BEDDING, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, ETC.
WHEN: SATURDAY,
JANUARY 25, 2014 ,
11:00 AM - 1:30 PM
WHERE: AGAPE HOUSE
900 GAP CREEK RD
GREER,SC 29651
(INTERSECTION OF GAP
CREEK RD AND WADE
HAMPTON BLVD, NEXT TO
TUCK AND HOWELL)
1-22
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS THE GREER CITIZEN B5
Last weeks answers
EMERYS
TREE
SERVICE
Fertilization
Thinning
Removals
Stump Grinding
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
895-1852
HELP WANTED
327 Suber Road
1 & 2 Bedroom
879-2015
NOW LEASING!
JORDAN
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
-
8
-
t
f
n
c
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 864-877-2076
RATES
20 words or less: $13.50 frst insertion
Discount for additional insertions
DEADLINE
5pm Monday
for insertion Wednesday
TERMS
Cash in advance. We accept Visa,
MasterCard and Discovery Card

COMPUTERS
PUBLIC NOTICE
A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BY THE
TOWN OF LYMAN PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION IN THE COURT ROOM OF
LYMAN TOWN HALL, 81 GROCE ROAD,
SOUTH CAROLINA ON THURSDAY, JANUARY
30TH, 2014 AT 5:30 PM TO CONSIDER THE
FOLLOWING ITEM:
PROPERTY LOCATED AT HOLLY SPRINGS
ROAD AND POWELL LAKE ROAD FROM
GBD-1 TO PH

CONTACT DENNIS P. DROZDAK, CLERK/
TREASURER, 81 GROCE ROAD, LYMAN, SC
29365 OR (864) 439-3453 FOR A COPY OF THE
PROPOSED DISTRICT.
South Carolina
Newspaper Network
Assembly, Refrigeration, Brazers,
CNC Operators, and Break Press Operators
HTI Employment Solutions is hiring for immediate openings
at Frigoglass. Candidates must be able to work frst or second
shift. Pay range is $10-12/hr with competitive benefts package
that includes medical, dental, vision, and 401k.
Apply online at www.htijobs.com
or at our Spartanburg ofce:
1400 John B. White Sr. Blvd, Spartanburg, SC 29301
JOBS! JOBS! JOBS!
Frigoglass and HTI are Equal Opportunity Employers
NEW LOCATION
HTI Employment Solutions has moved to
the Westgate Crossing Shopping Center
next to Westgate Mall!
We currently have immediate openings for
Material Handlers, Assemblers,
Forklift Operators, etc.
Pay range is from $10-14/hr.
Apply online at www.htijobs.com
660 Spartan Blvd. Ste. 150,
Spartanburg, SC 29306
Next to Kirklands
HTI is an Equal Opportunity Employer
LIFE
INSURANCE
MADE EASY!
AFFORDABLE
RATES, SIMPLE
APPLICATION
FLEXIBLE PLANS
AND FEATURES
MAKE BUYING
INSURANCE
QUICK & SIMPLE
CALL: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
ARE YOU
RETIRING AND
GOING ON
MEDICARE?
GET THE FACTS
ABOUT YOUR
HEALTH
CHOICES.
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
Your Local, Independent Agent
FREE
YOURSELF
FROM THE
HIGH COST OF
HEALTHCARE
COMPARE OUR
MEDICARE
SUPPLEMENT
RATES.
CALL: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
PROTECT
YOUR HOME
AND FAMILY
WITH LIFE
INSURANCE
THAT GIVES
YOU PEACE
OF MIND.
CUSTOMIZED
TO FIT
YOUR NEEDS!
CALL: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
LIFE INSURANCE
SHOULD FIT YOUR
FINANCIAL
GOALS.
THATS WHY
WE GIVE YOU
FLEXIBLE
OPTIONS TO MEET
YOUR NEEDS.
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
Your Local, Independent Agent
ARE YOU
HAPPY
WITH YOUR
MEDICARE
SUPPLEMENT
PREMIUM?
YOU
COULD BE!
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
Your Local, Independent Agent
FINAL EXPENSE
INSURANCE
LEAVE A
LEGACY TO
THOSE YOU
LOVE.
FAST - SIMPLE
- EASY.
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
Your Local, Independent Agent
YOU WOULD
PROBABLY LIKE
HAVING FUN
RATHER THAN BE
CONFUSED ABOUT
MEDICARE
INSURANCE
COVERAGE.
GET THE FACTS
AND ENJOY LIFE
KNOWING YOUR
CHOICES.
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
LEARN ABOUT
YOUR HEALTH
CARE
COVERAGE
OPTIONS WITH
MEDICARE
AND CLEAR
UP ANY
CONFUSION.
Call: TONY
SHERRILL
INSURANCE
Taylors, SC
864-268-7465
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
LEGAL NOTICE
AUCTIONS
VACATION
RENTALS
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CALL FOR SERVICES
MISCELLANEOUS
YARD
SALES
LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Three groups of two
writers will write all night;
the directors and actors
will arrive the following
morning. After 24 hours,
the audience will fill the
theater to watch a perfor-
mance that didnt exist the
previous day.
The 24 Hour Play Festival
returns to the Greenville
Little Theatre (GLT) for its
fifth year this weekend.
Its a production of Studio
444, an arm of GLT.
Its a very fun event,
said Katie King, GLT as-
sociate director. Its my
favorite event of the whole
season because its so fast-
paced.
A poll is on the GLT web-
site, greenvillelittletheatre.
org, on what to include in
the play situations, occu-
pations, dialog and props
are all included. The poll
runs through Jan. 24.
The groups of writers
come in and they find out
what won the polls and
what they have to include
in their plays and then
they start writing. And
they write all night, King
said. They have, basically,
from seven oclock at night
until seven oclock the
next morning. Last year, I
think the first group got
done about 2 or 2:30 in the
morning. The last group
got done around seven in
the morning.
Everyone comes with
their A games, she said.
Its just really cool to
see how much work and
effort everyone puts in
and how exciting it is for
everybody, King said.
The cast and crew are
made up of the six writ-
ers, three directors, three
stage managers and 15
actors. The performances
are typically family-friend-
ly, she said, describing it
as PG-13.
Its nothing that would
be offensive, I dont think,
King said.
The Greenville Little
Theatre is the only theater
in town that does some-
thing like this.
I just love how fast-
paced it is and how we can
put everything together so
quickly and still come up
with three really great pro-
ductions, she said. Weve
never had one thats gone
terribly wrong. Its really
awesome to see how much
dedication people put into
it.
The production also fea-
tures the Laughing Stock
Improv group.
The fifth annual 24
Hour Play Festival produc-
tion starts at 8 p.m. Jan.
25 at the Greenville Little
Theatre, 444 College St.
in downtown Greenville.
Tickets are $10 and are
available through green-
villelittletheatre.org or by
calling 236-6238.
24 Hour Play Festival returns to GLT
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The play, set to debut this weekend, is a production of Studio 444. Those interested can
go online and participate in a poll that asks what should be inculded in the play.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The Greenville Little Theatre is getting set to conduct its 24 Hour Play Festival, an event that requires writers, directors and actors to put together a
perfomance in a single day.
Sitting
will
kill us
F
or Christmas, I
received two really
amazing gifts: a mas-
sage at Urban Nirvana and
a Fitbit, a small pedom-
eter/fitness tracker.
Both gifts were wildly
appropriate for me. The
massage, because Im an
uptight worrier; the Fitbit,
because Im a nerd who
likes to make lists and
keep track of all kinds of
data.
I was unprepared for
both gifts to open my
eyes the way they have.
I redeemed the mas-
sage this past weekend.
The massage therapist
guessed that I spent a
lot of time at a desk,
because apparently I roll
my shoulders forward
and most of my tension
was in the upper neck and
shoulder area.
He suggested being
mindful of slouching and
Ive caught myself several
times since Saturday. Its
hard to change 20-plus
years of habits. He also
suggested using an exer-
cise/yoga ball instead of
a chair.
(Are you reading this,
Billy and Steve? I need
an exercise ball and a Y
membership...for work.)
The Fitbit measures
my steps taken, calories
burned and lets me know
how much time I spent
being active. One of the
early goals is to hit 10,000
steps.
The first time I hit
10,000 steps, my day
included a half-hour gym
visit, walking in down-
town Greenville and some
normal weekend errands
and chores (cleaning my
apartment, grocery shop-
ping, all that fun stuff).
It wasnt difficult, but it
blows my mind how little
I walk during the week
when I spend hours at a
desk compared with the
weekend.
Just doing every day
things like cleaning, shop-
ping, going for a walk, all
add up quickly.
Writing, unfortunately,
is mostly a sedentary
profession. As of early af-
ternoon Tuesday, I hadnt
hit 700 steps.
Im not tied to my desk
the way some profes-
sions are. I get out into
the community, attend-
ing Tarzan rehearsals,
Greater Greer Education
Foundation functions at
the Chamber or whatever
else Im working on in a
given week.
Im not a doctor or a
scientist, but sitting all
the time is basically a
death sentence. OK, so
that is not backed up with
any data.
But Google sitting
and health. Youll get
481,000,000 results. And
theyre not good news.
The Washington Post
published an infographic
titled The health hazards
of sitting this week. Its
terrifying problems
with organs, legs, bones
and muscles can all come
from sitting too much.
According to the Mayo
Clinic, sitting can be
linked with cardiovascular
disease and cancer.
Like my new pal the
massage therapist told
me just be mindful of
your habits. If you sit at
a desk for work, dont
immediately park yourself
in front of the TV or flop
on the couch (I myself am
guilty of this).
Go for a walk on your
lunch break. Dance. Par-
ticipate in the Wii Olym-
pics. Life is short dont
spend it sitting. Stand
(and walk, run and dance)
while you can.



Benefits
GCM
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Family and friends gath-
ered Jan. 18 to share food
and fond memories at the
fifth Annual Mark Wiburn
Memorial Oyster Roast.
Michael Wright, one of
Marks lifelong friends,
helps organize the event.
Before he died, Mark men-
tioned wanting to host an
oyster roast.
When he passed, we all
just kind of thought it be
something to remember
him by and its evolved
since then, he said. Five
years ago, it was just to
get everybody together
to remember MarkNow
its become we remember
Mark and its fellowship,
too.
When Mark died at 27-
years-old, his friends
streamed into his parents
house and havent stopped
checking in on the family
since, his mother Susan
Winburn said.
When God scooped
up Mark, we did not
know that morning that
he was not going to, at
some point, start to im-
prove enough to get into
a regular room, she said.
In the moment of every-
thing, Marks friends just
streamed in our house and
have not stopped touching
base with us and checking
in on us.
The event raises money
for Greer Community Min-
istries. Since the first oys-
ter roast, the group has
donated thousands of dol-
lars to the nonprofit.
Winburn was generous,
his mother said.
Our son Mark was a
giver of himself, she said.
Otherwise these friends
wouldnt have been so
touched by him and asked
John and I if it would be
agreeable to honor Marks
memory near his birth-
day.
Rachael Angel and her
husband were friends of
Marks from college. He
was in their wedding and
the Angels have kept in
touch with the Winburn
family. This was the first
year they missed the oys-
ter roast.
Weve enjoyed going
the past several years,
Angel said. Its just a
great way to honor him
and remember him and
get everybody together at
one time and celebrate his
life. He touched each of us
in a special way.
He would have loved the
oyster roast, she said.
Oh, he would love it,
Angel said. I know its a
day he smiles down on all
of us. He always enjoyed a
good party and always en-
joyed being around friends
and family.
Mark Winburns legacy
will continue to live on.
Angel and husband are
expecting a son in March,
whom they are planning to
name Elijah Mark.
He was a great guy. He
was always the life of the
party, she said. His smile
just made you smileYou
always had a good time
when you were around
him. You felt special being
his friend.
Oyster roast
celebrates
Winburn
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Susan Winburn, Theresa Harvey and John Winburn (left to right) celebrate the ffth annual
Mark Winburn Oyster Roast.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
There were plenty of oysters to shuck on Saturday
evening.
WASHINGTON CENTER
STUDENTS GO BOWLING
Nardia Lloyds middle
school class at Washing-
ton Center enjoyed their
curriculum-based instruc-
tion trips to the bowling
alley.
Through bowling trips,
students are able to work
on gross motor skills,
turn-taking skills, sports-
manship and practicing
appropriate behavior.
Communication is also a
huge skill that is practiced
on bowling trips. Students
are able to communicate
their snack choices and
needs through tactile pic-
ture symbols and voice
output devices.
These experiences give
the students a chance to
practice classroom skills
in a real-life setting.
RMS PLANS EIGHTH GRADE
GRADUATION CONFERENCES
Eighth Grade Individual
Graduation Plan (IGP) Con-
ferences will begin on Jan.
21-Feb. 14.
Students were sent
home with a bright orange
letter Jan. 6 that will give
parents the appointment
date and time for their
childs conference at the
bottom of the letter.
For more information,
you can go to the Guidance
Departments Website or
contact Brooke Howard at
355-7987 or kbhoward@
greenville.k12.sc.us.
RIVERSIDE LOOKING
FOR CAREER EXPERTS
RMS is seeking parents
and people in the com-
munity that may be inter-
ested in coming to speak
to students about their
career to expose students
to a variety of career op-
portunities and/or would
like to host a student for a
job shadowing experience
for a day.
Contact Brooke Howard
at 355-7987 or kbhow-
ard@greenville.k12.sc.us
ENROLLMENT OPEN AT
GREER MIDDLE COLLEGE
Open Enrollment for
Greer Middle College Char-
ter High runs through Feb.
3. Interested applicants
can submit the application
located on the website.
Greer Middle College
will hold a lottery to deter-
mine enrollment at 3:30
p.m. Feb. 11 in the school
cafeteria.
For more information,
visit greermiddlecollege.
org. Greer Middle College
is a public, charter school
located on the Greer cam-
pus of Greenville Techni-
cal College.
LANGSTON SCHOOL HELPS
WITH TOYS FOR TOTS
Langston Charter Middle
School students and fac-
ulty assisted members of
the United States Marine
Corps as they collected
donations for Toys for
Tots during the school car
line.
The school collected
more 450 toys, 12 books,
and 35 stocking stuffers
to be given out by Marines
to needy children in the
community.
LANGSTON YEARBOOKS
ARE AVAILABLE FEB. 2
Langston Charger Mid-
dle School yearbooks are
on sale for $48 until Feb. 2
and $50 from Feb. 3May
1. Order online at jostens-
yearbooks.com.
Contact yearbook advi-
sor, Rachel Hamilton, at
rhamilton@langstonchar-
ter.org with any questions.
LANGSTON WILL HOST
BOOK FAIR FEB. 37
The Scholastic Fiesta
Spring Book Fair is Feb.
3-7 at Langston Charter
Middle School.
Family Night will be held
on Tuesday, Feb. 4. Parent
volunteer opportunities
are available and may be
scheduled be contacting
June Deas 286-9700.
BJA FORENSICS TEAM
WINS AWARDS
The Bob Jones Acad-
emy Forensics team par-
ticipated in two forensics
tournaments during their
Christmas break.
The Laird Lewis Invi-
tational, held Jan. 3-4 at
Myers Park High School in
Charlotte, N.C., featured
teams from seventeen
states.
The following BJA stu-
dents won individual
awards:
Micah Samuels of Pied-
mont First Place, Extem-
poraneous Team Debate
Jonathan Savoy of Greer
Semi-finalist in Novice
Lincoln-Douglas Debate
Elliot Lovegrove of
Greenville Semi-finalist
in Extemporaneous Speak-
ing
Marina Shew of Green-
ville Double Octafinalist
in Varsity Lincoln-Douglas
Debate
Julianne Doney of Green-
ville Quarterfinalists in
Original Oratory
Jacquelynne Perry
Quarterfinalist in Im-
promptu Speaking
BJA also participated in
the Hillcrest High School
Invitational on Jan. 11
with teams from South
Carolina, North Carolina,
Georgia and Tennessee.
The team won the third
place sweepstakes trophy
at the HHS Invitational.
The following BJA stu-
dents won individual
awards:
Michael Leung of Simp-
sonville First Place, Chil-
drens Literature
Marina Shew of Green-
ville First Place, Lincoln-
Douglas Varsity Debate
Jonathan Savoy of Greer
Second Place, Lincoln-
Douglas Novice Debate
Micah Samuels of Pied-
mont and Elliott Kelley of
Easley Third Place, Public
Forum Debate
Jacquelynne Perry of
Greenville Third Place,
Impromptu speaking
Anne Nguyen of Taylors
Third Place, Novice Read-
ing
Haley Brammer of Green-
ville Fourth Place, Prose
Lauren Jacquette of Tay-
lors Fifth Place, Declama-
tion
The BJA Forensics team
is coached by Chuck and
Gail Nicholas.
CHANDLER CREEK
TO HOLD SCIENCE FAIR
Chandler Creek Elemen-
tarys annual science fair
is Feb. 7. Third through
fifth grade students are
encouraged to enter. They
should see their teacher
for the guidelines.
Participating students
need to turn in projects
Feb. 6. The school will be
selling display boards in
the front office for those
who need to purchase
one.
LANGSTON COLLECTING
BOXTOPS, POP TOPS
Langston Charter Middle
School is collecting Box-
tops and pop tops (the
tabs on soda cans) to raise
money for the school.
Donations can be
dropped off in the school
lobby.
ANNE FRANK EXHIBIT
TO VISIT RMS
Anne Frank, A History
for Today, the traveling
exhibit from the Anne
Frank museum, will be at
Riverside Middle School
Feb. 18-March 28.
The exhibit will be open
to schools for field trips
March 11-28 and to the
public March 15-27 during
select hours.
Visit greenville.k12.
sc.us/rms/ for more infor-
mation and times. Contact
Mary Higgins at 355-7902
to schedule a field trip. A
$1 donation per person is
requested.
LANGSTON EXTENDS
COMPUTER LAB HOURS
Langston Charter Mid-
dles computer lab will
be open on Wednesday
mornings at 7:45 a.m. for
students to work on any
school related projects or
homework.
Students must enter
at the drop off door
and then come around
through the lunch area to
enter the lab.
GREER STUDENT NAMED TO
SAMFORD DEANS LIST
Caroline S. Reid of Greer
has been named to the
Deans List for the fall se-
mester at Samford Univer-
sity in Alabama.
Samford University re-
leases deans lists after
the close of the fall and
spring semesters each aca-
demic year. To qualify for
the deans list, a student
must have earned a mini-
mum 3.5 grade point aver-
age out of a possible 4.0
while attempting at least
12 credit hours of course-
work.
Deans List is the high-
est academic recognition
given by the school at the
end of each semester.
PRINZ GRADUATES FROM
AUBURN UNIVERSITY
Christopher Prinz of
Greer graduated from Au-
burn University at Mont-
gomery on Dec. 14 with
a Bachelor of Science de-
gree.
Prinz was one of more
than 300 students to re-
ceive a degree at the uni-
versitys fall commence-
ment ceremony.
The nationally accredit-
ed university offers more
than 90 degree programs
to more than 5,000 un-
dergraduate and graduate
students. Learn more at
aum.edu.
SHOESTRING PLAYERS SEEK
DIDGERIDOO PLAYER
A didgeridoo player is
needed for the upcom-
ing production of Our
Countrys Good by the
Shoestring Players at the
University of South Caro-
lina Upstate.
The play is about the
colonization of Australia
in the late 1700s. Perfor-
mance dates are Feb. 20-
23.
For details, contact Jimm
Cox at 503-5697 or jcox@
uscupstate.edu.
USC UPSTATE HOLDS
RETIREMENT WORKSHOP
The University of South
Carolina Upstate Continu-
ing Education Division is
offering an educational
course to help retirees
Rejuvenate Your Retire-
ment.
The course is designed
to help retirees, or those
getting ready to retire, to
plan and protect invest-
ments, while making it
possible to enjoy retire-
ment without worrying
about money.
The course will be of-
fered in the John M.
Rampey Center on the USC
Upstate Campus during
four different sessions: 1
3 p.m. Thursdays, Jan.
23 and 30; 9:30 11:30
a.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 28 and
Feb. 4.
The course is $19 per
person in advance or $29
per couple. A $21 materi-
als fee is payable to Larry
Stringer, instructor, at the
first class meeting.
Register by calling Dr.
Faruk Tanyel at (864) 503-
5587 or email ftanyel@us-
cupstate.edu.
FURMAN RECEIVES
$1 MILLION GRANT
The Duke Endowment of
Charlotte, N.C., has award-
ed Furman University a $1
million grant to support
the work of the Riley In-
stitute at Furman, a highly
respected public policy
organization devoted to
driving significant social
and economic progress in
South Carolina.
The $1 million grant will
go toward establishing a
permanent endowment for
the Riley Institute, whose
wide array of public policy
programs benefits not only
Furman students and fac-
ulty but also people across
the state and region.
The Institute is named
for former South Carolina
Governor and U.S. Secre-
tary of Education Richard
W. Riley, a 1954 Furman
graduate.
For more information,
visit the Riley Institute
website, or call 294-3546
or e-mail jacki.martin@
furman.edu.
CLARENCE B. JONES WILL
SPEAK AT FURMAN
Clarence B. Jones, who
served as political advisor,
counsel and draft speech-
writer for Martin Luther
King, Jr., will speak at 7
p.m. Jan. 27 on the Fur-
man University campus in
Shaw Hall of Younts Con-
ference Center.
His talk, Kings Legacy:
Challenge for the 21st
Century, is free and open
to the public. Jones will
also sign books following
the lecture.
In addition to coordi-
nating the legal defense
of King and other leaders
of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference
during the Civil Rights
era, Jones assisted King
in drafting his celebrated
I Have a Dream speech.
He also helped negotiate,
at the request of Governor
Nelson A. Rockefeller, an
end to the historic Attica
prison inmate rebellion in
1971.
Jones was the first Af-
rican-American to serve
as partner in a Wall Street
investment banking firm,
and was twice recognized
as Fortunes Business Man
of the Month. He is co-au-
thor of the books, What
Would Martin Say? and
Behind the DreamThe
Making of the Speech That
Transformed a Nation. He
also writes a regular col-
umn for the Huffington
Post.
He currently serves as
the Diversity Visiting Pro-
fessor at the University
of San Francisco, and as
Scholar Writer-in-Resi-
dence at the Martin Luther
King, Jr. Research & Educa-
tion Institute at Stanford
University.
Jones visit to Furman
is part of the universitys
MLK celebration. Furman
is also sponsoring these
MLK events:
9 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 1,
Burgiss Theater and Wat-
kins Room, Trone Student
Center Martin Luther
King Youth Program and
Rudolph Gordon College
Fair
10 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 15,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Burgiss
Theater, Trone Student
Center Joseph Vaughn
Oratorical Contest
For more information,
contact Chandra Dillard at
chandra.dillard@furman.
edu or 294-2503, or visit
the Furman website.
BJU GRAD WINS STUDENT
PRODUCTION AWARD
Phil Neves, a 2013 Cin-
ema Production graduate
of Bob Jones University
and resident of Sunbury,
Pa., won the first place
award for short film in the
Intercollegiate National
Religious Broadcasters
(iNRB) Student Production
Awards competition.
Neves film, No Com-
promise, is a 12- minute
social science fiction film
he completed as his cin-
ema capstone senior proj-
ect. The film included a
cast and crew of nearly 30
students and staff mem-
bers and was filmed on
the BJU campus and in the
Greenville area.
Neves will be recognized
at the iNRB Awards Cer-
emony at the Gaylord Op-
ryland Hotel in Nashville,
Tenn. on Feb. 24.
In addition to receiving
a cash award and a travel
stipend, he will participate
in the National Religious
Broadcasters Convention.
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
ELEMENTARY
Thursday Sweet and sour
chicken over brown rice,
stufed shells with garlic
bread stick for all, vegetation
station, broccoli and cheddar
soup, fresh vegetables with
dip, choice of fruit, milk.
Friday Pizza, chicken fajita
with lettuce and tomato,
vegetation station, corn
chowder, pinto beans, choice
of fruit, milk.
Monday Baked fsh sand-
wich, pizza, vegetation sta-
tion, southwest chicken and
brown rice, soup, vegetable
medley, choice of fruit, milk.
Tuesday Chicken gumbo
over brown rice, toasted
cheese sandwich, vegetation
station, tomato basil soup,
corn, choice of fruit, milk.
Wednesday roasted chick-
en, pasta marinara, garlic
bread stick for all, vegetation
station, chicken noodle soup,
carrots, choice of fruit, milk.
MIDDLE
Thursday Beef burrito,
cheese quesadilla, grilled
chicken salad with whole
grain roll, pinto beans, gar-
den salad, assorted fruit, milk.
Friday Hot dog with chili,
meatball sub, chef salad with
whole grain roll, Cole slaw,
sweet potato bites, assorted
fruit, milk.
Monday Roasted chicken
with brown rice and whole
grain roll, barbeque sand-
wich, mandarin chicken salad
with whole grain roll, corn,
carrots, assorted fruit, milk.
Tuesday Spaghetti and
meatballs with garlic bread
stick, spicy chicken wrap,
southwest chicken salad with
whole grain roll, vegetable
medley, green beans, as-
sorted fruit, milk.
Wednesday Fish nuggets
with macaroni and cheese,
deli sandwich, chicken Caesar
salad with whole grain roll,
fresh vegetable with dip, lima
beans, assorted fruit, milk.
HIGH
Thursday Beef burrito,
cheese quesadilla, grilled
chicken salad with whole
grain roll, pinto beans, gar-
den salad, assorted fruit, milk.
Friday Hot dog with chili,
meatball sub, chef salad with
whole grain roll, Cole slaw
sweet potato bites, assorted
fruit, milk.
Monday Roasted chicken
with brown rice and whole
grain roll, barbeque sand-
wich, mandarin chicken salad
with whole grain roll, corn,
carrots, assorted fruit, milk.
Tuesday Spaghetti and
meatballs with garlic bread
stick, spicy chicken wrap,
southwest chicken salad with
whole grain roll, vegetable
medley, green beans, as-
sorted fruit, milk.
Wednesday Fish nuggets
with macaroni and cheese,
deli sandwich, chicken Caesar
salad with whole grain roll,
fresh vegetable with dip, lima
beans, assorted fruit, milk.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Seven Riverside Middle School Students have been selected to attend the 2014 SC All
State Orchestra on Feb. 21-23 at Furman University. Students will work with nationally
acclaimed conductors throughout the weekend and perform a concert at 2 p.m. on Feb.
23 at Furman Universitys McAlister Auditorium.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The BJA Forensics team won the third place sweepstakes trophy at the HIllcrest High
School Invitational.
SCHOOL
NEWS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
HIGHER EDUCATION |
LUNCH
MENUS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B7
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
A Washington Center middle school class took a
curriculum- based trip to the bowling alley.


LAUGH FOR A CHILD SET
AT CHAPMAN CENTER
Healthy Smiles of Spar-
tanburg will host the
eighth annual Laugh for
a Child event on Jan. 30
at the Chapman Cultural
Center in downtown Spar-
tanburg.
Tickets are sale for $75
per person, which in-
cludes entertainment by
the legendary comedian,
Dave Coulier, also known
as Uncle Joey from the sit-
com, Full House, as well
as heavy hors doeuvres
and cocktails.
To order tickets to
Laugh for a Child, contact
the Healthy Smiles office
at 592-4696 or email Kitta
Cates at healthysmiles@
sccsc.edu.
The pre-party will start
at 6 p.m. Jan. 30 in the
Jennifer Evins Lobby fol-
lowed by Dave Couliers
performance at 8 p.m. in
the David Reid Theatre.
See silent auction items at
healthysmilesonline.org.
ONEACT OPERAS ON STAGE
AT DANIEL RECITAL HALL
From crime family rival-
ry in a 1920s Speakeasy
to the hilarious antics of
over-the-top opera audi-
tionee Wanda Wannabe,
all sung in English, Con-
verse Opera Theatre puts
a modern-day twist on
classic operas by Purcell
and Mozart for its upcom-
ing production.
The double-bill of one-
act operas are specially
designed for those who
might typically shy away
from opera, featuring
modern-day twists on the
tragic Dido and Aeneas
and comedic The Impre-
sario.
The production runs Jan.
24-26 in Blackman Music
Buildings Daniel Recital
Hall at Converse College.
Show times are 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 24 and 25 and 3 p.m.
on Jan. 26.
Tickets are $15 for gen-
eral admission, $13 for se-
niors and free for students
with ID and children.
They are available for
advance purchase through
the Twichell Auditorium
Box Office at 596-9725 or
at the door prior to perfor-
mances.
SPARTANBURG YOUTH
THEATRE LISTS CLASSES
The Spartanburg Youth
Theatre will begin the
spring semester of its
2014 Theatre Education
Program for grades 4K-12
starting the week of Feb.
10.
Among the new offer-
ings is a series of classes
for younger actors en-
titled Storybook Ad-
ventures: From Page to
Stage, in which students
will have the opportu-
nity to turn their favorite
childrens books, such as
the Frindle, Alexander
and the Terrible, Horrible,
No Good, Very Bad Day,
Judy Moody was in a
Mood, and for our young-
est actors, Cloudy with a
Chance of Meatballs, into
live performances. Other
classes include a Stage
Combat class for interme-
diate acting students and
a class for more advanced
actors called The Actors
Lab.
Students will also have
the opportunity to devel-
op their musical theatre
talents by enrolling in
Broadway Basics or Broad-
way Boot Camp, featuring
selections from the hit
Broadway musicals Shrek!
The Musical and Legally
Blonde. All classes will
culminate in an end of
the semester performance
showcase for family and
friends.
SYT has also added an
additional Daytime Drama
Class, giving home school
students an opportunity
to take Stage Makeup and
The Art of Acting.
The Spartanburg Youth
Theatre offers scholarship
opportunities available for
those who require finan-
cial assistance. Call The
Spartanburg Youth The-
atre at 585-8278 to enroll
or for more information.
STOMPING GROUNDS
COFFEE & WINE BAR EVENTS
7:30-10:30 p.m. Jan. 24
Northern Border Blue-
grass Band
5-7 p.m. Jan. 25 Craig
Owens
5-7 p.m. Jan. 25 Italian
Dinner for $9.95
7-10 p.m. Jan. 25 Greer
Oldies Storytelling night
Jan. 27 - $10 pencil
drawing class with Robert
Decker
7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Jan.
31 Leather and Lace
CHAPMAN CULTURAL
ANNOUNCES EVENTS
Spartanburg Soaring!:
Through Apr. 30. A four-
month long celebration
of the communitys pro-
gressive and playful spirit,
symbolized by the kite.
Look for cool things to do,
like see kite-themed mov-
ies and write poems about
kites.
Creative Ladies: Though
Feb. 15. On exhibit at the
Spartanburg Art Museum
(SAM). The exhibition fea-
tures a variety of art and
craft created by 20 artists,
all seniors who meet week-
ly to learn new art tech-
niques and practices at
the City of Spartanburgs
C.C. Woodson Community
Center. Free and open to
the public.
Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday-Saturday, and 1-5
p.m. Sunday. Call 582-7616
for more information.
Artists Guild: Jess Stone:
Through Jan. 28. Jess
Stones exhibit will be a re-
flection on her life, espe-
cially how she views turn-
ing 30 years old. It will be
free for public viewing 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Satur-
day, and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.
Call 542-ARTS for details.
Sundays Unplugged: Jan.
19, 26. Chapman Cultural
Center is open 1-5 p.m.
every Sunday afternoon
and presents a local mu-
sician for the publics ca-
sual listening enjoyment.
The musicians are part of
Chapmans Singer-Song-
writer Concerts series,
where they perform free
mini-concerts 2-4 p.m. For
January, the line-up is Jan.
19, Daniel Z; and Jan. 26,
Travis Smith. Call 542-
ARTS for details.
Ballroom Dance Classes:
Jan. 27. Ballet Spartanburg
offers ongoing ballroom
and popular dance classes
at 7:30 p.m. every Monday.
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter. The disco dance The
Hustle will be featured on
Jan. 27, and Feb. 3. Call
583-0339 for details.
Abstract Invitational Ex-
hibition: Through Mar. 29.
Eight artists from the pied-
mont of North and South
Carolina exhibit abstract
works on paper, canvas
and ceramics. It is free
and open to the public, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Satur-
day, 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Call
582-7616.
Lunch and Learn: His-
tory: Jan. 24. Spartanburg
Regional History Museum
will host its monthly Lunch
& Learn at 12:30 p.m. Jan.
24 at Chapman Cultural
Center. Each month, a
guest speaker presents on
a topic related to local his-
tory. $5 at the door. Call
596-3501 for details.
Fiber Arts Workshop
with artist Gloria D. Ward:
Jan. 25. Spartanburg Art
Museum will host a free fi-
ber art workshop by Gloria
Ward 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Ward
will demonstrates the tra-
ditional craft of felting and
leads participants through
the process of creating a
fiber pin similar to those
on exhibit at Spartanburg
Art Museum in the We Are
the Creative Ladies of C.C.
Woodson exhibition. This
workshop is appropriate
for students 10 and older,
and families are encour-
aged to come and learn
together.
Millennium Brass: Jan.
25. Spartanburg Philhar-
monic Orchestra will spon-
sor a chamber concert by
Millennium Brass quintet
at 8 p.m. in the Chapman
Cultural Center Theater.
These five internationally
known musicians perform
jazz, pops and classical
styles, and collectively
have performed as solo
and section members with
many of Americas leading
orchestras and pops stars.
Tickets are $38 for adults
and $15 for students. Call
948-9020 for details.
Winter Jazz Series: Jan.
31. Daniel Z and his Jazz
Ensemble will kickoff
Chapman Cultural Centers
Winter Jazz Series at 7
p.m. Daniel has performed
throughout the western
world with his wide range
of talent on drums, piano,
and voice. Listeners can ex-
pect swinging jazz, bossa
nova, and modern jazz.
On Thursday, Feb. 20, Tish
Oney will be in concert
with tunes by Peggy Lee,
and on Thursday, Feb. 27,
the series ends with Jazz
Singers and the Spartan-
burg Jazz Ensemble. $10
each. Call 542-ARTS for
details.
ROCK N ROLL GOLD BEGINS
JAN. 23 AT CENTRE STAGE
Music of the 50s, 60s
and 70s will come to life
with this concert that runs
Thursday-Sunday Jan. 23
- Feb. 15. Shows are at 8
p.m. Thursday-Saturday
and 3 p.m. on Sunday.
Tickets are $35, $30 and
$25.
Student rush tickets
available 30 minutes prior
to show time for $20
with school ID (day of,
based on availability), one
ticket per ID. The box of-
fice can be reached at 233-
6733 2 - 6 p.m. Tuesday-
Friday two hours before
performances.
Tickets and additional
information are avail-
able online at centrestage.
org.
DAVID WILSON ON DISPLAY
AT THOMPSON GALLERY
An exhibition by Univer-
sity of Tennessee art pro-
fessor David Wilson will
be on display Jan. 6 31 in
Thompson Gallery of the
Roe Art Building at Fur-
man University campus.
Thompson Gallery hours
are 9 a.m. 5 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday.
A reception and gallery
talk is scheduled for 6:30
- 8:30 p.m. Jan. 30 in the
Roe Art Building. Wilsons
exhibition, Wander, is
free and open to the pub-
lic.
For more information,
contact Furmans Depart-
ment of Art at 294-2074.
GREER OPRY HOLDS
SATURDAY DANCE
The Greer Opry House at
107 Cannon St. presents
Classic Country Band with
Ed Burrell on Saturdays at
8 p.m.
Admission is $9 per
person. Free line dancing
from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. No
alcohol, smoking or out-
side food and drink. Fam-
ily entertainment.
Visit greeropryhouse.5u.
com.
ARTWALK CELEBRATES
SPARTANBURGS CULTURE
Celebrate Spartanburgs
culture with ArtWalk, the
self-guided tour of down-
towns artistic commu-
nity, 5-9 p.m. on the third
Thursday of each month.
Many venues are open
late to show patrons all
the new and exciting ex-
hibits.
Wine-and-cheese type
refreshments are available
and art talks are often on
tap.
Call 542-ARTS for more
information.
SEND US YOUR UPCOMING
CONCERTS, PLAYS, EVENTS
Send all of your enter-
tainment news to Katie
Jones at kjones@greerciti-
zen.com or to The Greer
Citizen, Attn: Things To
Do, P.O. Box 70, Greer, S.C.
29652.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


THINGS
TO DO
By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF FEB. 3
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Dallas Buyers
Club (R) -- Matthew Mc-
Conaughey delivers a ca-
reer-altering performance
as a hard-partying cow-
boy who became a hero to
many people only after he
was told he had 30 days
to live. Ron Woodroof
(McConaughey) was di-
agnosed with HIV in the
early 1980s, when little
was known about the virus
and many promising treat-
ments were not available
in the U.S. Ron sets about
smuggling medicine into
Texas for the benefit of
himself and the HIV-posi-
tive population.
As Rons character de-
velops, there is a raw and
believable change as he
sympathizes with people
he used to shun. The film
also carries a strong con-
tender for best supporting
actor with Jared Leto as
Rayon, a transsexual and
fellow HIV patient who
becomes Rons friend and
business partner.
About Time (R) -- Tim
(Domhnall Gleeson) is a
decent, fumbling, charm-
ing and awkward young
Brit who learns on his 21st
birthday that the men in
his family can time travel
-- only into the past and
only into moments from
his own life. Tims power
allows him to erase and
re-do his most uncomfort-
able mistakes and missed
opportunities. He spends
the rest of his (screen)
time keeping his girl and
staving off lifes tragedies.
Written and directed by
Richard Curtis (veteran
of a thousand English ro-
mantic comedies, includ-
ing Love, Actually and
Four Weddings and a
Funeral), the movie devi-
ates just a little while still
showing the Curtis stamp.
Its painfully cute, full to
the brim with sentiments
and a little clumsy while
advancing the plot. Its an
easy watch, and sure to
have a few laughs for even
the most cynical viewers.
Free Birds (PG) -- This
is the big, animated, star-
studded, 3D Thanksgiving
movie about turkeys us-
ing a time machine to go
to the first Thanksgiving
and prevent turkey from
ever being part of the tra-
dition. Though its stuffed
with sight gags and goofy
sidekicks, its just never
very funny. The way facto-
ry farms and turkey hunts
are depicted can be pretty
scary for the young ones.
If you want your child to
be a vegetarian, there must
be a kinder way than mak-
ing him or her sit through
this.
DOG OF THE WEEK
Baggage Claim (PG-13)
-- There are romantic com-
edies that are cloying and
gushy, or too serious and
heavy. And all romantic
comedies are pretty pre-
dictable -- it just runs in
the genre. However, some
romantic comedies are so
atrocious that they may
actually intend to harm
us with bizarre messages
about love. In Baggage
Claim, a flight attendant
needs a man in 30 days
(just because), so she ar-
ranges to be on a plane
whenever one of her exes
travels (shes apparently
involved with TSA and
NSA on this one) in the
vain hope of rekindling a
romance.
Matthew McConaughey in
The Dallas Buyers Club
Rating: 7 out of 10
Run time: 121 minutes
Rated: R for language and
graphic violence
T
hat Lone Survivor
raked in over $70
million in its first ten
days shows how much
our country loves real
heroes. Based on the
autobiographical book
by former Navy Seal
Marcus Luttrell, the film
is a visceral and moving
tribute to military bravery
and sacrifice. Its another
showcase for the under-
rated Mark Wahlberg, and
a return-to-form for direc-
tor Peter Berg, who gave
us Friday Night Lights a
decade ago.
Set in 2005, the story
follows a team of four
Navy Seals into the moun-
tains of Afghanistan,
where theyve been or-
dered to locate and kill a
Taliban leader. All goes as
planned until a group of
goat herders come along,
alerting enemy soldiers
and leaving the Americans
badly outnumbered by at-
tacking Taliban forces.
Like all good war
movies, its a fierce and
difficult viewing experi-
ence. From the opening
training montage to the
real-life photos that close
the show, Bergs emo-
tional investment in the
project is evident. The
handheld cinematogra-
phy and piercing sound
effects put us right into
the action, emphasizing
Afghanistans unforgiving
terrain and the horrifying
intensity of the firefight.
If not for the first and last
half hour, Lone Survivor
would still be a rock-solid
action movie, but Bergs
quieter moments with
both the Americans and
Afghanis give the film a
stronger, more human
resonance.
Character development
is the films glaring weak-
ness a shame given the
talent and chemistry of
a cast that includes Eric
Bana (Munich) and Emile
Hirsh (Into the Wild).
Berg deserves credit
though, for avoiding
political angles and high-
lighting the blurry ethics
of wartime dilemmas.
As for Wahlberg, its his
best performance since
2010s The Fighter. And,
judging by the physical
and emotional strain of
the role, theres no doubt
he cared as much about
this tribute to our brave
soldiers as his director
did.
wbuchheit@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Lone Survivor a visceral, moving film
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Lone Survivor thrusts movie-goers right into the action, providing a moving portrayal
of the dif culties of war.
MOVIE
REVIEW
WILLIAM
BUCHHEIT

BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Quinn threatened Char-
lie into keeping her secret
about the jewelry heist.
Ridge comforted Katie
after her argument with
Brooke. Liam frantically
tried to reach Hope before
she went on her camping
trip with Wyatt. Mean-
while, Quinn urged Wy-
att to leave sooner rather
than later. Caroline hinted
to Liam that it might be
time to let Hope go. Quinn
had an ulterior motive
when she asked Pam to
lunch. Rick and Brooke
disagreed on Hopes re-
bound relationship with
Wyatt. Believing that Pam
could be trusted, Quinn
told her about Wyatts role
in the heist. Katie received
a dinner invitation from a
handsome man. Hope and
Wyatt go on their camping
trip along the Pacific coast.
Wait to See: Bill recruits
Justin to dig up some dirt.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Julie shared her suspi-
cions with Abigail that
something happened to
Nick. Brady was guilt-rid-
den when he realized the
consequences of his ac-
tions. JJ convinced Bev to
help him neutralize There-
sa. A very angry dad read
Hope the riot act about her
daughter. Abigail demand-
ed to know if EJ killed
Nick. Eric was faced with
a difficult decision. The-
resa used Bradys drunken
state to her advantage.
Family and friends gath-
ered to celebrate Arian-
nas christening, which
concluded with a shocking
turn of events. Gabi grew
worried as Julie made it
clear that she wanted to
question her about Nicks
disappearance. Abigail
struggled with a moral
dilemma. Sami made a
decision about her rela-
tionship with EJ. Wait to
See: Kate finds herself in a
sticky situation.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Luke was flabbergasted
by what he found at the
boathouse. A new chief of
staff at the hospital was an-
nounced. Felix apologized
to Sabrina. Kiki confronted
Franco about the knife and
bloody fingerprints that
were found. Another op-
portunity presented itself
for Carly to be saved. Lulu
and Dante shared a bitter-
sweet moment. The other
candidates were stunned
by who was named the
new chief of staff. Nathan
was running on borrowed
time regarding Silass
case. Brad was asked out
on a date. Dukes mysteri-
ous whereabouts piqued
Annas interest. Wait to
See: Duke is cornered by
an armed Julian.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Summer was rushed to
the hospital after she took
too many energy pills. Jack
demanded to know why
Sharon called Nick instead
of Jack. Billy asked Kelly
not to come to his house
anymore. Noah caught
Courtney buying drugs.
Chelsea announced that
she was moving to Paris
with Adam. Jabot was be-
ing investigated by the
labor board for selling ille-
gal diet pills online. Abby
was locked inside the loft
by the mysterious woman
who was following her
and Tyler around. Michael
and Christine argued over
Fens legal defense. Dylan
and Avery were hot on
Ians tail until someone
warned the cult leader
that people were looking
for him. Gloria welcomed
wedding planner David
Tutera to Genoa City. Wait
to See: Chelseas world is
turned upside down.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE:
I am 71 years old and
have been diagnosed with
chronic heart failure. In
October of last year, I had
triple bypass surgery, but
now Im in good health.
Some things I have read
about chronic heart failure
are unnerving. Will you
give me your take on what
lies ahead for me? -- S.T.
ANSWER: Heart failure,
chronic heart failure and
congestive heart failure
are the same condition. Its
one of the most common
reasons why older people
are hospitalized. The basic
problem is that the heart
has become so weak that
it circulates blood poorly.
Such poor circulation per-
mits fluid to ooze out of
blood vessels and con-
gest tissues in the feet,
ankles and lower legs. The
lungs fill with fluid, which
brings on heart failures
cardinal feature -- gasping
for breath on even slight
exertion.
Other signs of heart
failure are breathlessness
when lying in bed, heart
enlargement, seen on X-
rays, and the doctors dis-
covery of lung sounds that
indicate the lungs have
fluid in them.
Numerous conditions
lead to heart failure. At the
top of the list is coronary
artery disease, the block-
age of heart arteries that
often brings on a heart
attack. This must be why
your heart failed. You did
have surgery to correct
blocked heart arteries, but
they did their damage well
before surgery took place.
Heart valve problems,
high blood pressure and
atrial fibrillation are other
causes of heart failure.
Medicines usually can
get the heart beating with
greater vigor and can less-
en or abolish most symp-
toms. Anything that af-
fects heart function must
be treated. High blood
pressure, for example, has
to be lowered.
You might think that
inactivity is best for your
heart -- it isnt. Your doc-
tor will outline a program
that keeps you active to the
level that your heart can
tolerate. Walking is one
example, but more strenu-
ous exercise is encouraged
when your heart becomes
stronger. You should be
on a low-salt diet.
You ought not to be
discouraged about your
outlook. The life span of
people with congestive
heart failure has increased
by 15 percent in men and
by 5 percent in women in
just the past decade. The
increment in womens life
span is smaller because
women live longer, on av-
erage, than men.
Readers can order the
booklet on congestive
heart failure by writing:
Dr. Donohue -- No. 103W,
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Canada with the recipi-
ents printed name and
address. Please allow four
weeks for delivery.
***
DEAR DR. DONOHUE:
My EKG report, sent to me,
says left axis deviation.
Is that a big deal? -- M.Y.
ANSWER: It means that
that electric signal origi-
nating in the upper heart
chamber and responsible
for each heartbeat takes
a different route to reach
the lower heart chambers,
the pumping chambers.
In the absence of symp-
toms, its not a dangerous
thing. You dont have to
dwell on it. I take it you
have a doctor who ordered
the EKG. That doctor will
follow up to see if you have
any hidden heart trouble.
The condition is not an
emergency situation.
Dr. Donohue regrets that
he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his
column whenever possible.
Readers may write him or
request an order form of
available health newslet-
ters at P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
PAUL G.
DONOHUE
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 FUN AND GAMES THE GREER CITIZEN B9
Heart failure
is quite treatable
Ian Buchanan stars as Duke
on General Hospital
NEW YORK STRIPS
(SLICED FREE)
B10 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014
NO LIMITS NO GIMMICKS NO SALES TO DEALERS
NO BEER OR WINE SOLD CLOSED ON SUNDAYS
508 North Main Street
www.shopqual i tyfoods.com
877-4043
Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Q
F
#
1
SERVICE
QUALITY
and
PRICE
IN
W
a
d
e

H
a
m
p
-
t
o
n

B
l
v
d
.
U
.
S
.

2
9
W
a
lg
r
e
e
n
s
G
r
e
e
r

S
t
a
t
e

B
a
n
k
B
e
r
r
y

S
t
.
Main St.
Hwy. 14
D
o
w
n
t
o
w
n
G
r
e
e
r
N
QUALITY
FOODS

Old Greer
High
School
Greer
FRESH NEVER FROZEN
WE HONOR FOOD
STAMPS, WIC, AND
VENDOR COUPONS
Week Ending 1-25-14
BONELESS
CHICKEN TENDERS
MIXED PORK
LOIN CHOPS
BLACK ANGUS WHOLE
BEEF CUBED
STEAK
BLACK ANGUS FAMILY PACK
LB.
1 LB. GREAT AMERICAN
$
2
49
CENTER CUT
PORK LOIN CHOPS
SHREDDED
OR CHUNK
CHEESE
2 LB. GREAT AMERICAN
6-8 OZ. MORNING FRESH FARMS
5 OZ. CAN
STARKIST
$
3
69
BLACK ANGUS FAMILY PACK
BONELESS BOTTOM
ROUND STEAK
LB.
LB.
POTATO
CHIPS
LB.
$
1
89
SALMON
FILLETS
FAMILY PACK BONE IN
FAMILY PACK BONE IN
TUNA
FAMILY PACK SLICED
HALF BONE IN
PORK LOIN
SALTINES
10.5 OZ. HY TOP
$
1
79
WHOLE BONE IN
PORK LOIN
(SLICED FREE)
LB.
FAMILY PACK BONE IN
COUNTRY STYLE
PORK RIBS
67

12 OZ. HORMEL
FRYER CHICKEN
DRUMSTICKS
BONUS
BUY
FRESH NEVER FROZEN
5 LB. MULBERRY
2/
$
3 5/
$
5
LIL
SIZZLERS
EXTRA LARGE FRESH SLICING
TOMATOES
45 OZ. SWAGGERTY
SAUSAGE
PATTIES
12 OZ. FRESH EXPRESS
GARDEN
SALAD MIX
OR 1 LB. OLD FASHION
SLAW MIX
16 OZ.
HY TOP
1 LB. GREAT AMERICAN
EASY PEEL
SHRIMP
$
3
79
BLACK ANGUS BONELESS
BEEF EYE OF
ROUND ROAST
LB.
99

$
5
99
77

99

FULL COOKED
TAIL ON SHRIMP
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
ALL BEEF
PATTIES
BONUS
BUY
$
3
69
BLACK ANGUS BONELESS
BEEF
RUMP ROAST
LB. LB.
LB.
2/
$
4
JUMBO SWEET
ONIONS
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
CREAM OR CELERY,
CREAM OF CHICKEN,
OR CREAM
OF MUSHROOM SOUP
10.5 OZ. HY TOP
2/
$
3
EXTRA LARGE
CANTALOUPES
BUFFALO
CHICKEN TENDERS
LB.
BONELESS NEW YORK
STRIP STEAK
$
2
29 $
6
99
FULLY COOKED BLACK ANGUS BONELESS
BEEF BOTTOM
ROUND ROAST
$
3
49
BLACK ANGUS FAMILY PACK
LB.
FRYER
CHICKEN THIGHS
99

LB.
FRESH NEVER FROZEN
16 OZ. BETTER VALU
SQUEEZE MUSTARD
57

64 OZ. BETTER VALU


APPLE JUICE COCKTAIL
97

15.5-16 OZ. JIF


PEANUT BUTTER
$
1
97
59 OZ. DONALD DUCK
ORANGE JUICE
2/
$
4
6 PK. CANS
YOOHOO DRINK
2/
$
5
16 OZ. NABISCO
PREMIUM SALTINES
2/
$
4
12 CT. PET BROWN MULE
ICE CREAM BAR
10 CT. MORNING FRESH FARMS
BISCUITS
67

15 PK. BOTTLES
PEPSI COLA PRODUCTS
$
5
99
12 OZ. BORDEN AMERICAN
CHEESE SINGLES
2/
$
4
Check out our website at www.shopqualityfoods.com
$
5
99
79

$
7
49
BONUS
BUY
4/
$
5
$
15
99
BONUS
BUY
$
15
99
BONUS
BUY
LB.
$
2
99
BABYBACK
PORK RIBS
BONE IN
BONUS
BUY
$
1
99
BONUS
BUY
OODS
LB.
BONUS
BUY
4/
$
5
BONUS
BUY
BONUS
BUY
UALITY
LB.
$
1
89
BONUS
BUY
LB.
$
7
59
BONUS
BUY
FAMILY PACK
SWEET POTATOES
BONUS
BUY
69

$
1
99
12 OZ. BAR-S ALL MEAT
HOT DOGS
OR BOLOGNA
99

BONUS
BUY
$
1
99
LB.
LB.
BONUS
BUY
$
3
69
LB.
LB.