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A Different World

:
AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE
By the Social Justice Committee

Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Globalization & Trade Module
Cycle 1, Secondary Social Studies

Copyright © 2006 by Learning Materials (LEARN). All rights reserved. No part of this publication other than the Teacher Handouts, Student Handouts or Tools may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Learning Materials (LEARN). Printed in Canada, in the fourth semester of 2006 Legal Deposit Bibliothéque nationale du Québec, November 2006 National Library of Canada, November 2006 ISBN 1-897341-22-9

A Different World:
AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE
By the Social Justice Committee

DIFFERENT WORLD: AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE AA DIFFERENT WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

The production of A Different World: An Educational Tool Kit for Building Global Justice is a cooperative project between NGOs, government, educational institutions and high school teachers. The goal is to help students develop the skills, knowledge and values they need to become responsible citizens in an increasingly interdependent world. This is achieved through units that use project-based learning and interactive classroom activities, fact sheets, handouts and resources on global themes. Every effort has been made to provide accurate information and statistics; however, it is important to note the data is continually changing, and all information and statistics have been compiled from a variety of sources.

1857 de Maisonneuve West, Suite 320 Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 1J9
Tel.: (514) 933 6797 Toll free: 1 877 933 6797 email: sjc@web.ca http://www.s-j-c.net/
DIFFERENTWORLD: WORLD: TEACHERS’ AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE AA DIFFERENT GUIDE INTRODUCTION

A Different World:
By the Social Justice Committee

AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE

Written and Prepared by: Elvira Truglia Project Coordinator In collaboration with: Jerry Dunn, Eric Lamoureux, Claudie Lavallée members of the Global Economic Justice Working Group of the Social Justice Committee http://www.s-j-c.net/ And: Learning Materials (LEARN) English Montreal School Board John Paul 1 High School Mary Queen of Angels Academy Marymount High School

This Educational Tool Kit has been produced with the support of the Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

A Different World: An Educational Tool Kit for Building Global Justice is published by Learning Materials (LEARN) http://www.learnquebec.ca

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The creation of A Different World: An Educational Tool Kit for Building Global Justice would not have been possible without the assistance of the following: Kathy Sperberg of the Canadian International Development Agency Michel Lafontaine of Learning Materials (Learn) Canjita Gomes-Fernandes of the English Montreal School Board (EMSB) Eileen Kelly, Anne Ouellet, Linda Palesch and Anna Maria Vertullo of John Paul 1 High School Sister Joanne Dion, Emanuela Favaro and Amanda Jones of Mary Queen of Angels Academy John Wright and teachers of Marymount High School Sergio Greco of John F. Kennedy High School And: Derek MacCuish of the Social Justice Committee (SJC) Cover photo by the SJC

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

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A Different World:
MODULE 1

AN EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE

POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Cycle 1, Secondary Geography

Cycle 1, Secondary History & Geography

GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

MODULE 2

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

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AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

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A DIFFERENT WORLD: EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT MAP

Tool Kit Introduction

INTRODUCTION

I

Teachers’ Notes: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Overview: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Teachers’ Notes: Globalization & Trade Module Overview: Globalization & Trade Module MODULE 1

I.1 I.8

I.6

I.10 I.12

Unit 1: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Unit 3: Poverty, Health & HIV-AIDS

POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security Unit 4: Poverty, the Environmemt & Water

P1.1 P2.1 P3.1 P4.1

P

Unit 5: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Wrap-Up P5.1

Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization

GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

MODULE 2

G

Unit 2: Globalization & Multinational Corporations Unit 3: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade? Unit 4: Globalization & Trade Module Wrap-Up

G1.1 G2.1 G3.1 G4.1

Module 1: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module 2: Globalization & Trade

RESOURCES

R

R1 R9

Student Tools

FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

TOOLS

S/T

Teacher Tools

S1 T1

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

educational tool kit map
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A DIFFERENT WORLD: TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION I

Tool Kit Introduction

Teachers’ Notes: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Overview: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Teacher’s Notes: Globalization & Trade Module Overview: Globalization & Trade Module

I.2 I.6 I.10 I.12 I.8

POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS Cycle 1, Secondary Geography

MODULE 1

P

Unit 1: Introduction to Poverty & Basic Human Needs Learning Activities Guide Teacher Handout 1: What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project? Fact Sheet 1: Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs Fact Sheet 2: Child & Youth Poverty in Canada Student Handout 2: Mix & Match Game

P1.3 P1.14 P1.18 P1.21 P1.24 P1.26

Student Handout 1: What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project? Teacher Handout 2: Mix & Match Game Answer Sheet Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security

P2.3 P2.8

Student Handout: “Pre-empt silent killers like hunger,”... Unit 3: Poverty, Health & HIV/AIDS Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet 1: Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World Fact Sheet 2: Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS Student Handout 2: Sibongile’s Testimonial Student Handout 1: HIV/AIDS Before & After Quiz

P2.13

P3.3 P3.8

P3.13 P3.15 P3.16

Unit 4: Poverty, the Environment & Water Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet: Poverty, Environment & Water Student Handout 2: Water Log Worksheet

Student Handout 1: Canadian Water Consumption Chart

P4.10 P4.16 P4.17

P4.3

Unit 5: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Wrap-Up Learning Activities Guide

P5.2

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

table of contents
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P1.8

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TABLE OF CONTENTS
MODULE 2 G

Cycle 1, Secondary History & Citizenship Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet: Introduction to Globalization Teacher Handout 2: Writing for Radio

GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

G1.3 G1.11 G1.18 G1.22 G1.27 G1.28 G1.29 G1.7

Teacher Handout 1: What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project? Student Handout 1: What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project? Student Handout 2: Sample Technician Cue Sheet Student Handout 3: Sample Radio News Bulletin Student Handout 4: Sample Audio Feature

Unit 2: Globalization & Multinational Corporations Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet: Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs) Unit 3: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade? Learning Activities Guide Fact Sheet: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade?

Teacher Handout: People on the Path of a Chocolate Bar

Student Handout: Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada Unit 4: Globalization & Trade Module Wrap-Up Learning Activities Guide

G3.13 G3.15

RESOURCES Poverty & Basic Human Needs Globalization & Trade MODULE 1

R

MODULE 2

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

table of contents
G2.3 G2.7 G3.3 G3.7 G4.2 R1 R9

Student Handout 5: Globalization Bingo Card for Students

G1.32

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A DIFFERENT WORLD: TABLE OF CONTENTS
TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS STUDENT TOOLS S S/T

Learning Tree Storyboard Template

MODULE 1 PROJECT TOOLS

(A model of the entire tree with blank storyboard panels) Learning Tree Storyboard Example HIV/AIDS Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools Roots, Ground, Beaver) (An example of a Learning Tree Storyboard for HIV/AIDS) (Worksheet for each section of the Tree: Clouds, Branches/Trunk,

S2 S3 S4

News Writing

Technician Cue Sheet
CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCY TOOLS

S10 S11

Intellectual:

Compare Contrast Table Problem Solving Yes-No Questionnaire*

S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26

Brainstorm & Then Explore* Conducting an Interview* Methodological: Research Project Planner* KWL:* (What do I know, What do I want to know, What have I learned?)

Project Planner – Group Work* Researching Internet Guide* Personal & Social: Making Decisions*

Communication-Related: What’s the Message?* What’s the Medium?* General Tools: World Map*

Map of Canada*

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

table of contents
8

Radio Writing Checklist

MODULE 2 PROJECT TOOLS

S9

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TABLE OF CONTENTS
STUDENT TOOLS
EVALUATION TOOLS

continued

Taking Stock*

Cooperative Learning Group Evaluation* Mission Accomplished* Cooperative Learning Individual Evaluation* Reflecting on Using ICT* Thinking About... Information*

S27 S28 S29 S30 S31 S32 S33 S34 S35 S36 S38 S39 S40

Thinking About… Solving Problems* Thinking About… Critical Thinking* Thinking About... Being Creative* Thinking About… ICT* Thinking About… Me* Thinking About… My Work Habits*

Thinking About… Cooperating with Others* Thinking About... Communicating*
* Provided by Learning Materials (LEARN)

Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide (Units 1-5)

MODULE 1 TOOLS

TEACHER TOOLS

T

Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide (Units 1-4)

MODULE 2 TOOLS

Cross-Curricular Competency Observation Tools (CCC’s 1-9)

T14

AA DIFFERENT WORLD: AN TEACHERS’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL KIT FOR BUILDING GLOBAL JUSTICE DIFFERENT WORLD: GUIDE INTRODUCTION

table of contents
T2 T9

S37

9

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

A Different World:
INTRODUCTION
MODULE 1 MODULE 2

POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

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A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

I

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

Tool Kit Introduction (objectives, components, content, learning activites)

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

I.2

Teachers’ Notes: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Overview: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module

MODULE 1

I.6 I.8

Teachers’ Notes: Globalization & Trade Module Overview: Globalization & Trade Module

MODULE 2

I.10 I.12

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

tool kit introduction
I.1

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

Cycle 1, Secondary Studies. The objectives of this Tool Kit are to:
A DIFFERENT WORLD: GOALS 1. Encourage students to explore their roles and citizens. responsibilities as global 2. Help students develop development issues – in

The Social Justice Committee (SJC) has created a Tool Kit for teachers of
1. Encourage students to explore their roles and responsibilities as
global citizens.

2. Help students develop an understanding of global development
issues – in particular, poverty and basic human needs as well as globalization and trade – and the role that Canada plays in international cooperation.

an understanding of global particular, poverty and basic human needs as well as globalization and trade – plays in international cooperation.

The Tool Kit proposes a set of learning activities particularly suited for the new Geography and History and Citizenship Education Courses. A variety of resources and approaches to encourage and develop

and the role that Canada

students’ varied skills and interests are the cornerstone of the Tool Kit. learning.

The learning activities feature teamwork, project work, and cooperative

The two modules included in the Tool Kit are Module 1: Poverty &

Basic Human Needs; Module 2: Globalization & Trade. Each module
Question Discussion Mapping Web Quest Game Learning Tree Storyboard Magazine Radio Program Analysis

contains a series of learning units – each focused on a different topic. that encourage discussion, reflection and learning based on students’ order of activities. However, you can complete any number of the

The content is designed for teaching with interactive learning activities personal experiences. Teachers are encouraged to follow the suggested proposed activities depending on what fits best in your classroom. activities described in the modules. The in-class learning activities explore countries and themes selected for each unit. Students will apply what they have learned through the activities to their Team Projects. In this sense, the final project will be the "outcome" of the modules. The modules have been designed to allow some class time for project work. Students are also expected to work on their projects as homework.

Feel free to use your discretion in adapting or modifying any of the

Learning Activity Symbols

A DIFFERENT A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL WORLD: KITTOOL INTRODUCTION KIT INTRODUCTION

tool kit introduction
I.2

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

cross-curricular competencies – intellectual, communication-related,

The original curriculum modules relate to each of the four categories of

personal and social, and methodological competencies – encouraged by the new Quebec Education Program at the high school level. They also relate to the subject-specific competencies of understanding, interpreting and building a global conscious about geography and history and citizenship issues. It will be up to teachers to decide which competencies are observed and evaluated using the evaluation guide and observation tools provided.

teachers can use in the Social Studies curriculum, in particular for the Secondary Geography and Secondary History & Citizenship courses. provinces. The Tool Kit is available in English and French.
TOOL KIT COMPONENTS

They are also relevant to other courses in Quebec and in other Canadian

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION Module Teachers’ Notes Module Overview UNIT LEARNING ACTIVITIES GUIDE Fact Sheets TOOLS Teacher Tools Student Tools Handouts

Teachers’ Notes – A summary of the overall content and structure of a given module Module Overview – An outline of each unit in a given module and the team project

The Tool Kit for teachers contains the following components:

Learning Activities Guide – A detailed guide of learning activities, procedures and resources for each unit in the modules. Fact Sheets – Information backgrounders on the subject covered in a given unit. These are intended for teachers.

Handouts – Documents that relate to a specific learning activity in a unit (eg. a game, a quiz, etc.). May be intended for the student (a game) or the teacher (eg. a game answer sheet). Tools for Teachers – Working documents that will help teachers evaluate student learning activities and the team project based on cross-curricular and subject-specific competencies.

Tools for Students – Working documents that will help students complete their learning activities and the team project. Each tool is geared to a specific cross-curricular competency.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

tool kit introduction
I.3

The modules are designed to be a dynamic resource that Quebec

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION
Geography Content The Poverty and Basic Human Needs - Geography Module is designed to explore the themes of Nutrition, Hunger and Food Security, Health & HIV/AIDS, the Environment & Water. There are five units in this module.
THE CANADA CONNECTION The content and activities are chosen to encourage students to compare issues throughout the world and in Canada. For example, in Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security, the goals are to: 1. Introduce the issues related to the basic need of nutrition around the world and in Canada.

Using examples from various regions as well as facts and statistics, the teacher will rely on three key questions as a guide for each unit of this module: • What are the similarities and differences related to each theme, in Canada versus the rest of the world? • What is the role of Canada in development cooperation projects related to each theme being examined?

3. Build global citizenship by raising consciousness about hunger and food security. 4. Explore Canada’s role in food security-related international development projects.

History & Citizenship Content

The Globalization and Trade - History & Citizenship Module is designed to explore the themes of Globalization, Trade, and Multinational Corporations. There are four units in this module. The teacher will rely on a three key questions as a guide for this module: • What are the positive and negative aspects of the issues raised? • What are the alternatives/responses to the challenges raised? • How is Canada responding?

Learning Activities

Many of the learning activities are based on popular education exercises. Popular education is used as a tool to raise peoples’ social consciousness. Exercises are geared to relate peoples’ personal experiences to larger global social issues. Exercises are set up to:

• Begin with people’s own experiences – brainstorming, exercises that encourage individual expression ("draw map of the world", "make your own proverb"), team projects

• Move from experience to information collection – web quests, interviews, team projects • Move from information collection to analysis – testimonials, role plays, quizzes, team projects • Move from analysis to encouraging collective action for change – web quests, thinking on what can be done to help, team projects • Reflect and evaluate the process.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

tool kit introduction
I.4

2. Explore similarities and difference related to hunger and food security in Canada and the world.

• What are some development alternatives/or what can be done locally?

TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION
Each type of learning activity will help students develop different sets of competencies. Specifically, Web Searches (*CCC: methodological, intellectual) Competencies developed include — collecting and analyzing data, practicing a specific interactive skill, identifying key problems, troubleshooting. Role-play, Simulations, Interviews, Testimonials (CCC: personal and social, communication-related, methodological) Competencies developed include — empathizing with other peoples’ points of view, defending a position, identifying key problems, practicing a general or specific interactive skill (e.g. interviews), synthesizing skills in problemsolving. Games, Quizzes (CCC: methodological, intellectual)

Group Projects (CCC: intellectual, communication-related, personal and social, methodological)

Competencies developed include — finding and framing problems, collecting and analyzing data, designing/redesigning programs, applying or creating models, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views, critiquing the group process as a whole.
BUILDING KNOWLEDGE

Team Project

In the Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module, each unit contains a similar set of learning activities that use a variety of approaches. This includes activities that focus on: • student’s personal experiences (brainstorming), • information collection (quizzes, web quests), • analysis (role plays, fact sheet review) and • encouraging action for change (thinking of what can be done to help).

Each module features project-based learning. Students will be assigned a team project at the beginning of each module and will work on the project throughout each learning unit. At the teacher’s discretion, class time could be set aside for team projects during each unit. Some aspects of the projects could also be assigned as homework. The project will allow students to apply what they learn through class activities. Computer Access

These activities will help students build a body of knowledge, which they will apply when doing the Learning Tree Storyboard Projects as group work.

Certain learning activities require access to a computer (Web Quests for example). If it is not possible to arrange for computer access during class time then you will need to make alternative arrangements – find another time to schedule computer access, assign computer-related activities for computer classes (if applicable), assign computer-related activities as homework. For some learning activities, computer access is not essential so you’ll be able to print out the necessary materials in advance and hand them out in class. *CCC = Cross-Curricular Competency

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

tool kit introduction
I.5

Competencies developed include — interpreting data, identifying assumptions, judging actions, and making recommendations.

TEACHERS’ NOTES: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE
POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE 10-16 classes (75 minutes each}

Introduction

Timing/duration

An introduction to Cycle 1, Secondary Geography Module 1: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Unit 1: Introduction to Poverty & Basic Human Needs Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security (Nutrition) Unit 3: Poverty, Health & HIV/AIDS Unit 4: Poverty, the Environment & Water Unit 5: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Wrap-Up

Content outline & key themes covered

Target audience

Prerequisite skills/knowledge QEP – Cross-curricular competencies (CCC)

Secondary 1 Level Students

QEP – Subject-specific competencies

1. Intellectual competencies (eg. developed through Mix & Match game) 2. Methodological competencies (eg. developed through Poverty Quiz Internet navigation) 3. Personal and social competencies (eg. developed through Team Project) 4. Communication-related competencies (eg. developed through Brainstorm on Poverty activity)

Basic understanding of QEP (Quebec Education Program)

Module objectives/expected outcomes

1. Understand the organization of a territory (eg. developed through Internet Photo Research) 2. Interpret territorial issues (eg. developed through Read Article on Hunger activity) 3. Build a consciousness of global citizenship (eg. developed through Water Consumption activity)

Project-based learning approach: Main project

1. Explore differences and similarities in ways of living between Canadian citizens and citizens from impoverished countries. 2. Define the differences within themes related to basic human needs: food, health, education, work, housing, and environment. 3. Demonstrate that students are global citizens with connections to youth around the world who all share rights and responsibilities. 4. Engage in cooperative learning by working as a team to build a project and then to share. Produce a series of Learning Tree Storyboards to be collected in a scrapbook and presented to the class at the end of the module. Students will collectively be working to create a “forest” that could be displayed in the classroom (taken from the pages of the student Learning Tree Storyboard Scrapbooks).

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 1 teachers’ notes
I.6

Broad areas of learning

1. Health and Well Being (eg. impact of food insecurity, HIV/AIDS and their link with poverty) 2. Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights (eg. Water Scarcity and the Role of the Consumer) 3. Media Literacy (eg. Internet-based research and activities) 4. Citizenship and Community Life (eg. the role of international cooperation, the role of local and global citizens in creating social change)

TEACHERS’ NOTES: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE
POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE continued • • • • • • • • Games Quizzes Drawing Creative Writing Experiments Role-Playing Interviews Web Quests

Learning activities

Notes on the learning activities & project production

Resources included with module Teachers’ Unit Learning Activities Guide, Teacher Fact Sheets, Teacher and Student Handouts, Tools for Students and Teachers Additional teacher resources Equipment needed Comments Web site references to information, other tools, and audio-visual resources Access to computers and Internet connection with PowerPoint and MS Word already installed.

Classes could incorporate a visit to a “poor” neighbourhood into this teaching module. This would put “poverty” in context at home as well as abroad. In Montreal, teachers can contact L’Autre Montreal for a tour. Outside of Montreal, contact your municipality for a list of community resources. At the end of the module, students could extend their learning experiences by developing an on-going project such as “adopt a neighbourhood”.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 1 teachers’ notes
I.7

For the learning activities: 1. Teachers are encouraged to follow the suggested order of activities. However, you can complete any number of the proposed activities depending on what fits best in your classroom. Feel free to use your discretion in adapting or modifying any of the activities described in the modules. 2. Some web-based activities can be adapted so that information is provided to students as printed handouts rather than referred to on-line. For the module project: 1. Divide the class into teams of 4-5 students. 2. Assign teams to explore poverty and basic human needs for one selected country in either Latin America, Africa, Asia, or North America (Canada) 3. Each team will need to do research on each of the poverty and human needs learning units covered in this module (nutrition hunger and food security; health - HIV/AIDS; environment – water). 4. This is a case study approach where teams will be collecting an array of information on one specific country. They should complete one Learning Tree Storyboard for each of the above units looking at the problem, cause and solution/ideals for each theme covered. 5. In total they will complete four Learning Tree Storyboards, which will be compiled in their Scrapbooks. Eventually, pages from the Scrapbook will be displayed in the classroom as a Poverty & Basic Human Needs Forest. 6. At the end of the module, students will do five-minute presentations to the class based on the information collected in their Scrapbooks. 7. The project would be worked on during Geography class (and as homework), however aspects of the project could also be integrated into other classes.

OVERVIEW: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE Project Introduction
The goal of the Team Project is to produce a series of Learning Tree Storyboards to be collected in a scrapbook and presented to the class at the end of the module.
PROJECT GOAL: The Team Project is intended to develop all the crosscurricular competencies

The Team Project is intended to allow students to develop all the crosscurricular competencies being practiced through the learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project. The project should be worked on throughout the entire curriculum module. At the discretion of the teacher, the project could be worked on during class time and as assigned homework.

being practiced through the

learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project.

The Learning Tree Storyboard

The “Learning Tree Storyboard” is an adaptation of two ideas – the Learning Tree and the Storyboard. The Learning Tree is a common popular-education, brainstorming tool that looks at the symptoms of a problem, its causes, institutions that support the cause, solutions to the problem, and the ideal situation. The Storyboard is a tool used to develop a story and how to tell that story. For the Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module, the two ideas are combined and students will be asked to create Learning Tree Storyboards in teams.

The typical panels used in storyboards will be placed inside the Learning Tree to create a Learning Tree Storyboard. The traditional storyboard is usually presented and read in a linear way (one idea flows into the next). But in the case of the Learning Tree Storyboard, panels are placed all over the tree to create a story that can be read in many ways depending on what panel is read first or last. Each section of the Learning Tree should answer different questions about the country being studied. Students will develop storyboard panels for each of the following sections:

SOLUTION

PROBLEM

CANADA'S ROLE

Branches/Trunk - What is the problem? What are signs of the problem? Roots – What are the causes of the problem? Why are people in their actual situation? Clouds – What are the solutions to the problem (ideals)? Gound – What is the global situation for the research theme?

CAUSES

Learning Tree Storyboard Template - S2

GLOBAL SITUATION

Canadian Beaver – What is Canada’s role in the research country?

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 1 overview
I.8

Students will collectively be working to create a “forest” that could be displayed in the classroom (taken from the pages of the student Learning Tree Storyboard Scrapbooks).

OVERVIEW: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE
UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS Activity 1. World Mapping Activity 2. Brainstorm on the “First World” & “Third World”, & on the Concept of Poverty Activity 3. Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game Activity 4. Child & Youth Poverty in Canada Discussion/Math Activities Activity 5. Poverty Quizzes Activity 6. Begin Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project Activities Activities

Goals

1. Situate the “First World” and “Third World” geographically. 2. Relate territory to basic human needs. 3. Explore similarities and differences related to basic human needs in Canada and the developing world.

Goals

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY (Nutrition)

Goals

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Project Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. Explore the similarities and differences between the situation of people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa and Canada. 2. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through the interpretation of issues related to HIV/AIDS in Africa and Canada. 3. Explore Canada’s role in HIV/AIDS-related international development projects in Africa. Goals

Before & After, True or False Quiz On-Line HIV/Aids Quiz Web Case Study Web Quest Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER Activities

1. Introduce students to the issues related to the basic human need of water around the world and in Canada. 2. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through the interpretation of issues relating to poverty and access to water in Canada and the world. 3. Explore Canada’s role in water-related international development projects.

Goals

UNIT 5: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE WRAP-UP Activities

Activity 1. Photo Research: Introduction to Water Problems Activity 2. Tracking Water Consumption Activity 3. Talking about Water Option 1: Water Story Illustrations Option 2: Make Your Own Proverb Activity 4. Web Quest Activity 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project

1. Build a consciousness of global citizenship by interconnecting the issues of poverty and basic human needs such as health (HIV/AIDS), nutrition (food security), and the environment (water) covered in the previous four units.

Activity 1. Jigsaw Panel Discussion Activity 2. Show & Tell Activity 3. Presentation of Learning Tree Storyboard Team Projects Activity 4. Group Work Evaluation

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 1 overview
I.9

1. Introduce students to the issues related to nutrition around the world and in Canada. 2. Explore the similarities and differences related to hunger and food security in Canada and the world. 3. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through the interpretation of issues relating to poverty, hunger and food security in Canada and the world. 4. Explore Canada’s role in food security-related international development projects.

Activity 1. Reading Media Article: Introduction to Hunger Activity 2. Conducting a Life Interview Activity 3. A Day in the Life: Role-Playing a Script Activity 4. Web Quest Activity 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project

TEACHERS’ NOTES: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE
GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE 8-13 classes (75 minutes each}

Introduction

Timing/duration

An Introduction to Cycle 1, Secondary History & Citizenship Education Module 2: Globalization & Trade Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization Unit 2: Globalization & Multinational Corporations Unit 3: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade? Unit 4: Globalization & Trade Module Wrap-Up

Content outline & key themes covered

Broad areas of learning

Target audience

Prerequisite skills/knowledge QEP – Cross-curricular competencies (CCC)

Secondary 2 Level Students

QEP – Subject-specific competencies

1. Intellectual competencies (eg. developed through Globalization Bingo activity) 2. Methodological competencies (eg. developed through History of Globalization Mapping activity) 3. Personal and social competencies (eg. developed through Fair Trade Role-Play) 4. Communication-related competencies (eg. developed through Film Discussion activity) 5. Survey the positive and negative aspects of trade.

Basic understanding of QEP (Quebec Education Program)

Module objectives/expected outcomes

1. Define globalization and investigate its positive and negative aspects. 2. Explore how globalization impacts on international development and how Canada responds to the challenges of globalization through international cooperation. 3. Learn about the different actors in international trade and how economic exchange can create inequalities and exploitation. Students will reflect on how trade could be made more viable and equitable for the majority of people. 4. Investigate, from an historical perspective, why there is more exploitation in impoverished countries than in Europe and North America and how this is linked to the long-term world integration process. 5. Consider the role of each world citizen in making the globalization process a positive attribute for the majority of the world’s population. 6. Reflect on how globalization can increase the number of direct and indirect relations between people and the rest of the world.

1. Understanding social phenomena from a historical perspective (eg. developed through History of Globalization Mapping activity) 2. Interpreting social phenomena using the historical method (eg. developed through Consumer Analysis activity) 3. Constructing a consciousness of citizenship through the study of history (eg. developed through Producing a Chocolate Bar activity, Magazine Radio Program Team Project)

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 2 teachers’ notes
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1. Health and Well Being (eg. impact of sweatshops, cash crop farming) 2. Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights (eg. fair trade as an alternative to free trade) 3. Media Literacy (eg. radio project, film discussion activity) 4. Citizenship and Community Life (eg. role of nongovernmental organizations in constructing citizenship)

TEACHERS’ NOTES: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE
GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE continued

Project-based learning approach : Develop a 13-minute magazine format radio program to be Main Project presented to the class live at the end of the module. Learning activities • • • • • • Games Mapping Web Quests Creative Writing Media Analysis Role-Playing

Resources included with module Teachers’ Unit Learning Activities Guide, Teacher Fact Sheets, Teacher and Student Handouts, Tools for Students and Teachers Additional teacher resources Equipment needed

Web site references to information, other tools, and audio-visual resources For Project: • Access to computer lab, portable computers in the classroom, and/or home computers with Internet access and MS Word installed. • CD player • CDs (audio clips may be transferred to CD) • Cassettes (for recorded interviews or other recorded audio) Optional: Access to digital recording/editing software and microphone (to record and edit audio on the computer) Classes could incorporate a visit to a local community radio station into this teaching module.

Comments

At the end of the module, students could extend their learning experiences by developing an on-going radio program on a local community radio station.

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module 2 teachers’ notes
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Notes on the learning activities & project production

For the learning activities: Teachers are encouraged to follow the suggested order of activities. However, you can complete any number of the proposed activities depending on what fits best in your classroom. Feel free to use your discretion in adapting or modifying any of the activities described in the modules. For the module project: 1. Divide the class into teams of 4-5 students. 2. Each team will need to do research on one of the themes covered in this module (globalization, trade, multinational corporations). 3. In developing their radio programs, students will use a multidisciplinary approach by incorporating elements such as drama (eg. role-plays, songs), math (eg. statistics), new technologies (eg. recorded interviews), language arts (eg. poem), etc. 4. At the end of the module, students will do 13-minute presentations to the class. 5. The project would be worked on during History & Citizenship class (and as homework), however aspects of the project could also be integrated into other classes.

OVERVIEW: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE
Project Introduction The goal of the Team Project is develop a 13-minute magazine format radio program to be presented to the class at the end of the module. The radio program will be performed live in front of the class at the end of the module. However, there will be elements of the program that will need to be recorded in advance. Magazine Radio Program A magazine radio program is made up of different program segments with distinct content. To complete each segment of the radio program, students will have to perform different tasks relying on selected tools. Described on the page are the suggested program segments, times, associated tasks/tools and the roles and output for each segment:

PROJECT GOAL:

The Team Project is intended to develop all the crosscurricular competencies

being practiced through the learning activities and to in their own project. apply and appropriate them

© ELVIRA TRUGLIA Children participating in an outdoor broadcast by Radio Restinga, a community radio station in a neighbourhood of Porto Alegre, Brazil.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 2 overview
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OVERVIEW: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE
TIME SEGMENT DESCRIPTION TOOL/TASK ROLES OUTPUT

:30

Theme music/ Find or invent a song that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show. Include an announcement to briefly describe what your show is about.

Radio Writing Checklist

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or

Write script Record voices and music

Read live script with music background Host(s) Script

:30

Intro (line-up)

3:00 News

8:00 Feature

An in-depth focus on the theme – pick a country to illustrate your topic – include interviews/ testimonials. Key questions: What are the problems? Who is supporting the creation of the problem? What are the potential solutions (alternatives)? What is being done about it (responses)?

Write news items in radio style. Do interviews Find audio clips Write script based on web research

Reporters

Script Audio clips Interviews

:30

:30

Theme music/ As at the beginning of your program jingle show, play the song or jingle that gives a sense of the mood of your show. Extro Say goodbye to the (closing credits) listeners, repeat your name, the program people have been listening to, thank today’s guests, reporters and everyone who helped put the show together.

Include the following voices: • People from the selected country • Canadians working on issue in that country • Voices from ordinary people, government and other institutions

Mixed audio clip or

Write script

Host(s)

Script

Read live script with music background

:30

Theme music/ Play the song or jingle that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show.

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or Read live script with music background

For technician: see the Technician Cue Sheet Tool - S11

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT INTRODUCTION

module 2 overview
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Include 3 news items related to the theme. of your show. Tip: Find stories that illustrate the problems you will be addressing in the show.

Introduce yourself and the Radio Writing program, announce the Checklist line-up for the program (what the listeners will hear). Write script

News Writing Tool

Reporters

Script Audio clips

Do web search to find news stories.

OVERVIEW: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE
UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Goals

1. Historically situate the process of globalization to the long-term process of world integration. 2. Survey the positive and negative aspects of globalization. 3. Reflect on how globalization can increase the number of direct and indirect relations existing between people and the rest of the world. 4. Learn about the different actors in international trade and how economic exchange can create inequalities.
Goals

Activity 1. Globalization Bingo Activity 2. History of Globalization Mapping Activity 3. Begin Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project

Activities

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

Goals

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE? Activities

1. Survey the positive and negative aspects of trade. 2. Explore how Canada and other countries respond to the challenges created by international trade and how it can be made more viable and equitable for the majority of people through fair trade.

Goals

UNIT 4: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE WRAP-UP Activities

Activity 1. Consumer Analysis: Where Does That Come From? Activity 2. CocoLoco: Producing a Chocolate Bar Activity 3. Fair Trade Role-Play Activity 4. Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project

1. Build a consciousness of global citizenship by interconnecting the issues of globalization, trade, and multinational corporations covered in the previous three units.

Activity 1. Jigsaw News Story Trading Activity 2. Presentation of Magazine Radio Program Role-Play Activity 3. Group Work Evaluation

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module 2 overview
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1. Survey the positive and negative aspects of multinational corporations (MNCs). 2. Survey the responses to the challenges presented by MNCs. 3. Survey responses to the challenges of globalization by non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Activity 1. MNC Profiling: What Does a Multinational Corporation Look Like? Activity 2. Film Discussion: The Corporation Activity 3. NGO Profiling: What Does a Non-Governmental Organization Look Like? Activity 4. Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project

Activities

MODULE 1

A Different World:
POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Unit 1: Introduction to Poverty & Basic Human Needs Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security Unit 3: Poverty, Health & HIV/AIDS P1.1 P2.1 P3.1 P4.1

MODULE 1

Unit 4: Poverty, the Environment & Water

Unit 5: Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module Wrap-Up P5.1

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

P

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

P

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

FACT SHEET P1.14 Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs FACT SHEET P1.18 Child & Youth Poverty in Canada

UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals TEAM PROJECT INTRODUCTION What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project? LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. World Mapping 2. Brainstorm on the “First World” & “Third World”, & on the Concept of Poverty P1.3 P1.4 P1.3 P1.2

3. Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game P1.5 4. Child & Youth Poverty in Canada Discussion/Math Activities 5. Poverty Quizzes 6. Begin Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Project
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

P1.6

P1.7

TEACHER HANDOUT P1.26 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game Answer Sheet

STUDENT HANDOUT P1.21 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project? STUDENT HANDOUT P1.24 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS

Unit 1 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T3

STUDENT TOOLS

Learning Tree Storyboard Template S2 Learning Tree Storyboard Example S3 Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools K-W-L S4 - S8 S17

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

Project Planner - Group Work

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
S20

P1.6

P1.1

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

a difficult time meeting basic needs such as employment, nutrition,

All around the world, including Canada, there are people who have

education, clothing and water. These people are living in poverty. This unit introduces students to this social issue affecting nearly 3 billion people or every 1 in 2 people – the majority in developing countries.

The unit also encourages students to explore the reasons why poverty exists and what can be done to reduce it around the world and at home. Students will be introduced to the Team Project that they will be completing throughout the entire module.
UNIT GOALS:

1. Situate the First and Third 2. Relate territory to basic 3. Explore the similarities and differences related to basic human needs in world. human needs. World geographically.

Canada and the developing

© SJC

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit introduction
P1.2

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
DURATION:

2-4 classes (75 minutes each)

Team Project Introduction
Process, Tools, Resources & Team Assignments
Begin the unit by introducing the Learning Tree Storyboard Project and how it will be completed:

TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

The goal of the Team Project is to produce a series of storyboards in the form of a Learning Tree to be collected in a scrapbook and presented to the class at the end of the module. The Team Project is intended to allow students to develop all the crosscurricular competencies being practised through the learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project. The project should be worked on throughout the entire curriculum module. At the discretion of the teacher, the project could be worked on during class time and as assigned homework.

Students will collectively be working to create a "forest" that could be displayed in the classroom (taken from the pages of the student Learning Tree Storyboard Scrapbooks).

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheets
FACT SHEET P1.14 Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs FACT SHEET P1.18 Child & Youth Poverty in Canada

Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit. Note that there are suggested activities that accompany the Fact Sheet on Child and Youth Poverty in Canada (see Learning Activity 4).

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. World Mapping
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, communication-related)

Students will use their creative skills to depict how they see the world.

1. Ask students to draw a picture of the world as they see it.
countries, etc.) to the class. make additions to their world map.

2. Then ask for volunteers to present their versions of the world (continents, 3. Inform students that as they move into Activity 2, they will continue to

4. Ask students to choose only one colour for their original world map and any other colour for additions (this will allow you to see the difference "before" and "after"). 5. At the end of the class, post the student drawings in the classroom to create a "World Map Mural".
P1.3

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide

Team Project Tip: Refer to the Handout for a complete description of the process, tools and resources necessary to do the project. Also introduce students to Project Tools - Learning Tree Storyboard Template, Example, and Research Tools.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Activity 2. Brainstorm on the "First World" & "Third World", & on the Concept of Poverty
(CCC: intellectual, communication-related) Students will be introduced to the concepts of the First and Third World as well as to the concept of poverty. The activity will also help students start to reflect on what poverty means in Canada versus in the developing world.

1. Based on the World Mapping activity, ask a series of questions to probe
how much students know about world geography: • Is Africa in your world?

2. Move to a discussion that will define developed and developing countries
from the students’ perspective. • Have you heard of the term "First World"? • Where is the First World on your map? • What about the term "Third World"? • Where is the Third World on your drawing?

• Can you think of another way of describing these countries without using the words "First World" or "Third World"? the subject:

3. If students don't bring up the issue of poverty on their own, lead them into
• Did you know that one of the reasons that some people consider countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe as part of the Third World is because these countries are poorer than countries in North America and Western Europe. These "richer" continents are considered to be part of the "First World". If these continents are not already on your map, draw them now. Note that "Third World" countries are sometimes called "underdeveloped". Many people don’t like these terms because they see them as negative. They think these terms suggest that these countries are backwards or not as good as richer countries. Some people prefer using more positive terms like "developing countries", "majority world", and countries of the "Global South". All of these terms are subjective – even "developed" and "developing". • Which terms would you use?

4. Move to a discussion on poverty:
• Does Canada have poverty? Relate to their personal experiences: • Where have you seen poverty? • Do you know anyone who is poor? • Where could poor people get clothing?

• What about if someone's parents had to move to another province to find a job - would they be poor? • Where could someone who is poor get food? Etc.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P1.4

• Where is Canada on your map? If they're not already on your map, put them on now.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Mark on your map where you think the highest rate of poverty exists in Canada. Note: Verify the Canadian Council on Social Development Web site www.ccsd.ca/factsheets/index.htm - for the latest statistics on economic security in Canada.

TEACHER HANDOUT P1.26 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game Answer Sheet

5. Now extend the discussion on a global level:
• Would being poor in a country in the developing world be the same as being poor in Canada?

Activity 3. Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal and social) Students will start to reflect on the fact that people around the world may have the same basic needs but that we all live in different circumstances. Students will also learn about the unequal distribution of wealth in the world.

1. Pre-Activity As a warm-up to the Mix & Match game, lead a discussion on poverty and basic human needs.
Suggested questions include: • What could you not live without?

• Are there some things that are more important than others (do you really need them)?

• Does everyone need the same things or do some people need more, or less?
STUDENT HANDOUT P1.24 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game

• What if you lived in the U.S., would you need the same things as you do here? • What if you lived in Mexico, would you need the same things as you do here? (Put these countries on your world map if they are not there already.) • Is it easy to get the things you need? • Is it the same for people in developing countries?

2. Mix & Match Game Divide students into teams and ask them to match the given descriptions to the correct income (higher-, middle-, lower-income) and basic human needs category. See Handout. 3. Post-Game Discussion/Brainstorm Lead a post-game discussion based on the game students have just played. Suggested questions include: • How does income group affect quality of life? • Where in the world do you think people from each income group live?

Make sure to bring home the point that Canada has poverty too and there are people in Canada who live in each income group. However, also bring out the different circumstances between living in a certain income group in Canada versus a country in the developing world.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Activity 4. Child & Youth Poverty in Canada Discussion/Math Activities
Students will reflect on what living in poverty means in Canada versus in developing countries through discussion and working out concrete math problems. Procedure: After going over the information on child and youth poverty in Canada with your students, lead a class discussion on the subject using the questions below as a guide. You can also assign the math activities listed below.

1. What other activities are children living in poverty left out of - in Canada, 2. What else can be done to help?
compared to children living in poverty in developing countries. Canada.

3. Discuss the differences faced by children living in poverty in Canada

4. In teams, come up with a household budget for a family of four living in 5. If a family's income was $40,000 per year and its living expenses were
$10,000 per year, would this family be living above or below the poverty line? (Hint - calculate percentage of expenses related to family income) have to earn to be living above the poverty line? (Hint: Remember what percentage of expenses should be spent on living expenses)
STUDENT TOOL S17 K-W-L What do I know? What do I want to know? What have I learned?

6. If a family spent $15,000 per year on living expenses, how much would it

Note: Although there is no official poverty line in Canada, agencies like Campaign 2000 use a statistical indicator defined by how much is spent on basic needs (food, clothing, shelter). Families who spend 20% or more of their income on basic needs compared to the general public are considered to be living in very difficult financial situations.

Activity 5. Poverty Quizzes
(CCC: intellectual, ICT integration)

Students will apply what they have already so far in an interactive activity.

1. Choose among the following Canadian quizzes for your students to do
on-line individually: Canadian Poverty Quiz (True or False) http://www.campaign2000.ca/quiz2/index.html

NAPO (National Anti-Poverty Organization) Poverty Quiz (multiple choice) http://www.napo-onap.ca/docs/quiz.php?ln=en

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P1.6

around the world?

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Extension: Construct International Poverty Quiz (CCC: intellectual, methodological, communication-related, personal and social) Students will develop their own international poverty quiz based on the information they have learned so far and the quizzes they have already completed.

2. Divide class into teams and ask teams to come up with 3-4 questions
each.

4. The teacher will collect the flip charts and post them on the blackboard or wall for the entire class to see. 5. Proceed to do the quiz as a class.

Activity 6. Begin Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project
STUDENT TOOL S20 Project Planner - Group Work

Now that the project has been introduced, ask students to meet in their teams and begin by assigning different roles to team members.

Integrated Subjects
Language Arts Sample activity: Write an essay on one of the following: • What activities are children living in poverty left out of? • What can you do to help reduce poverty?

• Discuss the differences faced by children living in poverty in Canada to children living in poverty in developing countries. Math Sample activities:

Based on the Fact Sheets, construct pie charts to illustrate the various statistics on poverty around the world. See Activity 4 for other math problems.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P1.7

3. Each team writes its questions on a flip chart.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?
Introduction
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

The goal of the Team Project is to produce a series of Learning Tree Storyboards to be collected in a scrapbook and presented to the class at the end of the module. The Team Project is intended to allow students to develop all the crosscurricular competencies being practised through the learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project. The project should be worked on throughout the entire curriculum module. At the discretion of the teacher, the project could be worked on during class time and as assigned homework. Students will collectively be working to create a "forest" that could be displayed in the classroom (taken from the pages of the student Learning Tree Storyboard Scrapbooks).

Process:

1. Divide the class into teams of 4-5 students.

2. Assign teams to explore poverty and basic human needs for one selected country in Latin America, Africa, Asia, or North America (Canada). 3. Each team will need to do research on each of the poverty and basic
human needs learning units covered in this module (nutrition - hunger and food security; health - HIV/AIDS; environment - water).

4. This is a case study approach where teams will be collecting an array of information on one specific country. They should complete one Learning Tree Storyboard for each of the above units looking at the problem, cause and solution/ideals for each theme covered. 5. In total they will complete four Learning Tree Storyboards, which will be
compiled in their scrapbooks. Eventually, pages from the Scrapbook will be displayed in the classroom as a Poverty & Basic Human Needs Forest.

6. At the end of the module, students will give five-minute presentations to
the class based on the information collected in their scrapbooks. Their presentation should do the following: • Present all elements (problem, cause, solution/ideals) of one of their Learning Tree Storyboards or

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
• Present selected elements of each of their Learning Tree Storyboards or • A variation they choose and • Accommodate different learning styles by incorporating elements such as games (e.g. quizzes), drama (e.g. role-plays, songs), math (e.g. statistical graphs), art (e.g. drawings), new technologies (e.g. PowerPoint presentation, recorded interviews), language arts (e.g. poem), maps, etc. • Include something learned about a different country from a different team (they will have the opportunity to learn about different countries during the jigsaw activity they will do before the end of the module).

Use the Learning Tree Storyboard Template & Example to see what the finished "Tree" might look like. Use the Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools for Clouds, Branches/Trunk, Roots, Ground, Beaver

Team Project Tip:

7. Tools or worksheets will be used to complete the project. At least one team
should keep copies of the Learning Tree Storyboard Worksheets used as their rough drafts. Final copies will be transferred to the scrapbook.

The Learning Tree Storyboard

SOLUTION

PROBLEM

CANADA'S ROLE

The "Learning Tree Storyboard" is an adaptation of two ideas - the Learning Tree and the Storyboard. The Learning Tree is a common, popular education brainstorming tool that looks at the symptoms of a problem, its causes, institutions that support the cause, solutions to the problem, and the ideal situation. The Storyboard is a tool used to develop a story and how to tell that story. For the Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module, the two ideas are combined and students will be asked to create Learning Tree Storyboards in teams.

CAUSES

Learning Tree Storyboard Template - S2

GLOBAL SITUATION

The typical panels used in storyboards will be placed inside the Learning Tree to create a Learning Tree Storyboard. The traditional storyboard is usually presented and read in a linear way (one idea flows into the next). But in the case of the Learning Tree Storyboard, panels are placed all over the tree to create a story that can be read in many ways depending on what panel is read first or last.

Because of the different layers involved in this project, different elements could be easily integrated into other subjects such as Math, Drama, Language Arts, and Art Class.

Each section of the Learning Tree should answer different questions about the country being studied. Students will develop storyboard panels for each of the following sections:

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
P1.9

8. The Teacher will store the scrapbooks.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Branches/Trunk - the problem/symptoms What is the problem? What are signs of the problem? Possible things to include: • Statistics on how people are affected by the situation in the research country. • Stories that illustrate the lack of basic human needs - from the perspective of people in the country being researched (e.g. a news story, testimonial or interview students have heard or read). • Descriptions of the living and working conditions for people in the country being researched (e.g. Are people eating enough food to be healthy? Do people have access to medical treatment, to clean water, to work to make a living?) Roots - causes of the problem Why are people in their actual situation?
ROOTS

CLOUDS

GROUND

• Why there is hunger, people dying of HIV/AIDS, a shortage of clean water (students will need to pay attention to the facts learned in class). • The role of the national government. • The role of big business. • The role of the international community. Clouds - solutions to the problem (ideals) Possible things to include: • Things that need to change nationally, internationally. • Examples of international development projects.

Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools - S4

• What the ideal situation would look like if the problem wasn't there.

• Ideas on how students can help on a local, national or international level. Gound - What is the global situation for the research theme? Possible things to include:

• The global situation for the theme and country being researched (include information from facts learned in class). Canadian Beaver - What is Canada's role in the research country? Possible things to include: • The role Canada plays internationally on the theme being researched. • Examples of Canadian international development projects in the country being researched (or in the region the country belongs to).

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
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BRANCHES/TRUNK

BEAVER

Possible things to include:

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Project Roles
Everyone on a team will have a different role to play. There will be a: • Project Coordinator: Keeps team on track, makes sure project checklist is completed, coordinates team meetings to discuss progress and problems • Technical Coordinator: Coordinates the audio-visual elements and acts as the resource person for computer application software (if applicable) • Research Coordinator: Finds information for different aspects of research project - Branches/Trunk; Roots; Clouds • Materials Coordinator/Archivist: Keeps all of the Tools/Worksheets being used to develop the Learning Tree Storyboards and coordinates the materials to be transferred in the Scrapbook.

Tools

Tools that are particularly useful for the project include (for complete list, see page 8 of the Table of Contents): • Learning Tree Storyboard Template - p. S2 (a model of the entire tree with blank storyboard panels) • Learning Tree Storyboard Example - p. S3 (an example of a Learning Tree Storyboard for HIV/AIDS)

• Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool - p. S4 - S8 (a worksheet to be used to help complete each section of the Learning Tree Storyboard: Clouds, Branches/Trunk, Roots, Ground, Beaver) • Project Planner - p. S19 (use to answer questions for each part of the Learning Tree: What do I know, What do I need to know, Where do I need to look, How will I present it?) • Project Planner - Group Work - p. S20 (use to choose different roles for team members) • Research Internet Guide - p. S21 (use to do Internet research) • Making Decisions - p S22

• Taking Stock - p. S27 (use to make sure project is on track and to decide on any revisions that may be needed) • Cooperative Learning Individual Evaluation - p. S30 (use to evaluate the experience of group work) • Reflecting on Using ICT - p. S31 (use to evaluate the experience of using ICT) • What's the Medium? - p. S24 (use to decide on what medium is needed to communicate a message) • What's the Message? - p. S23 (use to help determine what needs to be communicated and to whom)
A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
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A number of tools have been made available to help students complete the learning activities as well as the project.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Materials List
Access to computer lab, portable computers in the classroom, and/or home computers with Internet access and Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Word installed. • Storyboard paper • Scrapbook • Markers • Pens • Pencils • Paper • Atlas of the World/maps

General Resources for Students

Students will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for Team Projects: Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation." This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/ World Atlas of Maps, Flags, Geography Facts http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm Blank Maps of Canada - the Provinces and Territories http://www.canadainfolink.ca/blankmap.htm

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
P1.12

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Canadian Geographic/Canadian International Development Agency Poverty & Hunger Web site Provides summaries on population, poverty and hunger, health, HIV/AIDS, education, the environment, Canadians making a difference in the world. Also gives a series of links for students (Youth Zone), teachers, and resources. http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/worldmap/cida/poverty.asp Canadians Making a Difference in the World Descriptions of people from across Canada who are working on international development projects around the world. Click on "Canadians making a difference in the world" in the Features section of this Web site: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/

The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/

For a description of the First, Second and Third World, go to this Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World Millennium Development Goals - Youth Web site A site dedicated to explaining the goals to reduce poverty set by the international community at a UN Summit in 2000. http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/mdgs/index.html

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 1
P1.13

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

FACT SHEET P1.14 Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs

Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs
What Is Development?
Material wealth has commonly defined whether or not a country is considered "developed" or "developing". Those with the most wealth are said to be "developed" and part of the "First World" and those with the least are said to be "developing" or part of the "Third World". Since the end of the Cold War in 1991, the subjective terms "First World" and "Third World" have described countries with more or less economic wealth respectively. Many consider these terms to be outdated and to have negative connotations. So is it possible to describe "development" in a way that goes beyond referring to material wealth? Some have suggested using "majority world" and countries of the "Global South" instead of "Third World". Some have suggested using "Two-ThirdsWorld" instead of "First World" to connote that these countries use two-thirds of the world’s resources. (For a more detailed historical discussion of these terms, visit the Wikipedia Encyclopedia at www.wikipedia.org and search for "First World".) The United Nations describes Human Development like this:

three billion people - lives on less than two dollars a day.

"Human development is about much more than the rise or fall of national incomes. It is about creating an environment in which people can develop their full potential and lead productive, creative lives in accord with their needs and interests. Development is thus about expanding the choices people have to lead lives that they value." (UNDP Development Report 2005)
Half the world - nearly

Successful development can therefore imply many things such as: • A stable political, social and economic environment

• Being able to participate in a democratic environment with an ability to have a say in one's own future

• An improvement in living standards and access to all basic needs so that a person has enough food, water, shelter, clothing, health, education, etc.

Global Poverty: An Introduction
People live in poverty when they are not able to achieve the standard of living that is usual for their society. Standards of living may change from one country to another but the effects of poverty remain the same throughout the world: hunger, homelessness, lack of education, and resources to fulfill basic human needs. Poverty is not only having no money. For those in developing countries, it is also not having the materials and resources to fulfill their basic needs. People can be poor when they don't have access to employment and basic healthcare, education and essentials like food, clothing and water.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 1
P1.14

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Facts & Figures on Poverty
People living in poverty are hungry, malnourished, without access to safe drinking water and sanitation, not going to school, dying from preventable causes, and spending too much money to repay debts.
A quarter of the world's

population, 1.3 billion

people, lives on less than considered to be living in severe poverty.

What's more… • Nearly 800 million people do not get enough food, and about 500 million people are chronically malnourished. More than a third of children are malnourished. • Of the world's 38 million people living with HIV/AIDS, more than 93% live in developing countries. • More than 840 million adults are illiterate - 538 million of them are women. • Around 2 million children died as a result of armed conflict in the last decade. • 11 million children under the age of five die each year from preventable causes. • 1.2 billion or close to one out of four people live without access to safe drinking water. • Some 2.4 billion people (close to 50% of people in the world) lack access to basic sanitation. • 110 million landmines lie undetonated in 68 countries.

one dollar a day. They are

• The developing world spends $13 on debt repayment for every $1 it receives in grants.

• In sub-Saharan Africa, the poverty rate has remained at about 48% over the last ten years but the number of people living in poverty has increased from 220 million in 1990 to 300 million in 1998. Inequality also Exists in Industrialized Countries

• In industrial countries, more than 100 million people live below the poverty line, more than 5 million people are homeless and 37 million are jobless. • Contrary to popular belief, nations with the smallest economic gap between the rich and the poor are those with the healthiest people and not countries with the most wealth. The Wealthy & the Poor: A Redistribution of Resources Would Eradicate Poverty • The net wealth of the 10 richest billionaires is $133 billion, more than 1.5 times the total national income of the least developed countries. • The cost of eradicating poverty is 1% of global income.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 1
P1.15

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
• Effective debt relief to the 20 poorest countries would cost $5.5 billion - the same as it cost to build Euro Disney. • Providing universal access to basic social services and transfers to alleviate income poverty would cost $80 billion, less than the net worth of the seven richest men in the world. • In fact, 51% of the world's hundred wealthiest bodies are corporations. • Six countries can spend $700 million in nine days on dog and cat food. • Today's world spends $92 billion on junk food, $66 billion on cosmetics and nearly $800 billion in 1995 for defence expenditure.

What Can Be Done? Governments: Millennium Development Goals…
At the Millennium Summit in September 2000, some 190 nations adopted the Millennium Declaration, which sets out to eliminate poverty by 2015. These countries promised to:

1. Reduce by half the proportion of people living on less than a dollar a day. 3. Reduce by half the proportion of people without access to safe and affordable drinking water. 4. Ensure that all boys and girls complete primary school. 5. Achieve gender equality in access to education. 6. Reduce by 75% the number of mothers who die from giving birth. 7. Reduce by two thirds the number of children under five who die. 8. Stop and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS, malaria and other major diseases.

9. Achieve improvement in the lives of at least 100 million people living in slums, by 2020. Individuals
the Millennium Development Goals.

1. Write to the Canadian P.M. to uphold Canada's financial contribution towards meeting 2. Organize a campaign in schools to raise awareness about Global Poverty. 3. Join the Make Poverty History Campaign http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/. 4. See www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/PovertyAroundTheWorld to find out more
about the causes of poverty around the world and spread the word. Read about: • Inequality • The Wealthy and the Poor • Poverty in Industrialized Countries • Corruption • Poverty and the Internet

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 1
P1.16

2. Reduce by half the proportion of people who suffer from hunger.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Sources
UN Cyberschoolbus Poverty Curriculum http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/intro.asp Facts About Poverty and the Millennium Development Goals http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/media_info/factsheets.html Facts & Figures on Poverty http://www.teamstoendpoverty.org/script/pnud.webquick.Surf/fr/visages/chiff res?langue=en Poverty Facts & Statistics http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Facts.asp

Other Resources for Teachers
"A Developing World" - A map created by CIDA and Canadian Geographic This site has information on issues related to population, poverty and hunger, health, HIV/AIDS, education and the environment. You can also request your own copy of the map from this site (a plug-in is needed to see the on-line interactive version of the map). http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/worldmap/cida/poverty.asp?language=EN OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers - Mapping Our World Resource This site has a series of activities using world maps. The maps "project" the world from different perspectives. http://oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/mappingourworld/

“It’s so sad that people live in cardboard houses. It’s so sad that children die without a solution and lack of medicine.” (The Friends of “Hope” Organization)

© SJC

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 1
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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

FACT SHEET P1.18 Child & Youth Poverty in Canada

Child & Youth Poverty in Canada
n 1989, the House of Commons resolved unanimously to end child poverty I among Canadians by the year 2000. The following information from the Campaign 2000 Fact Sheet on Child & Youth Poverty in Canada reveals how far Canada still remains from reaching its goal. According to Campaign 2000, today… • More than one million Canadian children or one out of every six children still live in poverty. • Twice as many people use food banks today than in 1989, suggesting that more families are having trouble feeding their children. • Children living in poverty go to school hungry and have a difficult time paying attention in class.

• Canada has the adequate resources to fight poverty but the gap between the rich and poor continues to grow.

Who Lives in Poverty?

• Women usually earn less than men and are more likely to be in part-time work. Single mothers are especially susceptible to poverty. • There are more children from Aboriginal, visible minority and immigrant families, as well as children with a disability living in poverty.

• Visible minority children under 14 years old are almost twice as likely to be living in poverty compared to all children in the same age group. Poverty Rate Among Aboriginal, Visible Minority and Immigrant Children (0-14 years): 2001 40.4% 40% 33.6% 18.4% All immigrants Aboriginal minority Visible minority All children

Source: Statistics Canada Census 2001

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 2
P1.18

• Canada is 15th out of 19 rich countries that have a high proportion of children living in poverty.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

What Is Poverty?
Although there is no official poverty line in Canada, agencies like Campaign 2000 use the Statistics Canada's Low Income Cut-Off (LICO) as a relative measure of poverty. • LICO is defined by how much is spent on basic needs (food, clothing, shelter). • Families who spend 20% or more of their income on basic needs compared to the general public are considered to be living in very difficult financial situations. Children from families who cannot afford to meet basic needs have less access to social and recreational activities that most children/youth enjoy, such as: • Going to the movies • Going on school trips • Going to summer camps • Going on vacation, etc.

What Are the Factors Contributing to Child/Youth Poverty?
Poor Jobs with Poor Wages • Almost 2 million Canadian adults are in jobs earning less than $10/hour. • Many parents work two or more jobs but still can't make ends meet.

Lack of Affordable Housing • Four out ten renters paid more than 30% of their annual income on shelter, and two out ten paid more than 50% of their annual income on housing. This leaves very little money to pay for other basic needs such as food, clothing, childcare, transportation, medicine, phone and hydro, and school supplies. Insufficient Social Services • Government cuts to social services have meant that there is not enough funding to provide adequate support to low-income families. • Government changes in Employment Insurance have left many families without financial assistance during unemployment. • Cuts to social assistance rates leaves families living far below the poverty line.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 2
P1.19

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
High Cost of Daycare Services & Postsecondary Education • The lack of a national childcare system, which would guarantee a regulated, national standard of quality, means many families cannot afford daycare in their area. Parents in these families cannot pursue education, training and employment. • 88% of Canadian children aged 0-12 don't have access to regulated childcare space due to a shortage of regulated daycare spaces. • Increased tuition fees and reduced government funding make it hard for lowand middle-income families to send their children to college or university.

What Can Individuals Do to Help? 1. Learn more about the issues and share this knowledge with family,
friends and neighbours to build awareness.

2. Get involved (e.g. letter writing, petitions, public forums). 3. Join the "Make Poverty History" campaign
http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/

Sources
Fact Sheet on Child and Youth Poverty in Canada www.campaign2000.ca; www.pueblito.org

Other Resources for Teachers
Campaign 2000 http://www.campaign2000.ca/ Pueblito Canada www.pueblito.org National Anti-Poverty Organization http://www.napo-onap.ca/ Quebec Anti-Poverty Organization http://pauvrete.qc.ca/sommaire.php3 Report - Women, Poverty & Homelessness in Canada http://www.napo-onap.ca/en/resources.php

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 2
P1.20

4. Organize an "End Child Poverty Event" at school.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?
Introduction
STUDENT HANDOUT P1.21 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

The goal of the Team Project is to produce a series of Learning Tree Storyboards to be collected in a scrapbook and presented to the class at the end of the module. In class and as homework, you will be working on the project throughout the whole Poverty & Basic Human Needs Module. With all your Learning Tree Storyboards put together, you and your classmates will be creating a "Building Global Justice Forest" that may be displayed in the classroom (taken from pages of your Learning Tree Storyboard Scrapbooks).

The Learning Tree Storyboard
SOLUTION

The typical storyboard is a tool used to develop a story and how to tell that story. Your Learning Tree Storyboards will look like trees with many storyboard panels inside the tree outline.
CANADA'S ROLE

PROBLEM

CAUSES

Each section of the Learning Tree Storyboard should answer different questions about the country you are researching on poverty and basic human needs. You will develop storyboard panels for each of these sections:

GLOBAL SITUATION

Use the Learning Tree Storyboard Template & Example to see what the finished "Tree" might look like. Use the Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools for Clouds, Branches/Trunk, Roots, Ground, Beaver

Team Project Tip:

Branches/Trunk - The problem/symptoms. What is the problem? What are signs of the problem? Roots - Causes of the problem. Why are people in their actual situation? Clouds - Solutions to the problem (ideals). Ground - What is the global situation for your research theme? Canadian Beaver - What's Canada's role in your research country?

CLOUDS

BRANCHES/TRUNK ROOTS

GROUND

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
BEAVER

P1.21

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Project Roles
Everyone on a team will have a different role to play. You might be the: • Project Coordinator: keeps team on track, makes sure project checklist is completed, coordinates team meetings to discuss progress and problems. • Technical Coordinator: coordinates the audio-visual elements and acts as the resource person for computer application software (if applicable). • Research Coordinator: finds information for different aspects of research project - Branches/Trunk; Roots; Clouds. • Materials Coordinator/Archivist: keeps all of the Tools/Worksheets being used to develop the Learning Tree Storyboards and coordinates the materials to be transferred in the Scrapbook.

Where you will find the information you need? You will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for your Team Projects: Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation." This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from "Resources" of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site menu. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/ New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/ World Atlas of Maps, Flags, Geography Facts http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm Blank Maps of Canada - the Provinces and Territories http://www.canadainfolink.ca/blankmap.htm

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
P1.22

General Resources for Students

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Canadian Geographic/Canadian International Development Agency Poverty & Hunger Web site Provides summaries on population, poverty & hunger, health, HIV/AIDS, education, the environment, Canadians making a difference in the world. Also gives a series of links for students (Youth Zone), teachers, and resources. http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/worldmap/cida/poverty.asp Canadians Making a Difference in the World Descriptions of people from across Canada who are working on international development projects around the world. Click on "Canadians making a difference in the world" in the Features section of this Web site: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/

The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/

For a description of the First, Second and Third World, go to this Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_world Millennium Development Goals - Youth Web site A site dedicated to explaining the goals to reduce poverty set by the international community at a UN Summit in 2000. http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/mdgs/index.html

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
P1.23

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game
STUDENT HANDOUT P1.24 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game

Everyone around the world may have the same basic needs but we all live in different circumstances. As you do the activity below, think about the unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Instructions: Read the descriptions on the left-hand side and match them to the correct category of Basic Human Needs and Income Group. Write the letter "L" for "low," "M" for "medium" or "H" for "high" to make your match.

This group represents the majority of the world's population - roughly 55%. The average income is $725 a year - about $2 a day - although many families earn much less. This group represents roughly 30% of the world's population. Parents in this group earn between $725 and $8,900 a year. Healthcare is out of the question, so for most families death is all too familiar, with families expecting to lose two to three of their children before they turn five.

HEALTH & NUTRITION

This income group is able to afford a nutritious daily diet and has access to the best medical care. Levels of access to good nutrition and medical care vary greatly in this group. People are always living on the edge. Children may go to school - for a few years anyway - especially if they are boys. Children are born destined to go to school; the only uncertainty is how many yearsthey will study after high school.

BASIC EDUCATION

School is a luxury few children will ever experience. Most girls don't even bother to dream about school.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 2
P1.24

INCOME GROUP

This group represents 15% of the world's population with an income of $8,900 or more per person

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

FINANCIAL SECURITY

MIX & MATCH GAME continued

It would take losing only one harvest to drought, or a serious illness, to throw a family in this group into poverty. But if the family is lucky, parents can find a way to join a community credit group to get access to a small loan. As part of this income group, families have access to credit and money that most others do not. It's a good life because families have access to everything they need and security to enjoy it.

HOUSING

Many families in this group are homeless or living in structures so flimsy that a hard rain or strong wind becomes life threatening.

Families in this group live in comfortable and secure housing. Parents own at least one car, and probably have two televisions. A family in this group probably owns no land and lives in overcrowded housing with poor plumbing. The village or town this family lives in offers electricity, but it must ration its use. Parents in this group may work as day labourers, domestic help, or perhaps as migrant workers. If parents could get better skills training, they might have a chance at a higher-paying job.

WORK

When a family in this group takes its annual two-week vacation, parents don't worry about their jobs disappearing.

If parents do work, they are probably tenant farmers or landless day workers. They receive few benefits from the crops they work on; they would prefer to grow their own food for their kids.
Source: Adapted from the UN Cyberschoolbus Poverty Introduction Activity http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/intro.asp

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 2
P1.25

Every day is a struggle for families in this group to meet their basic needs. Finding food, water, and shelter can consume the whole day. For many mothers, it would not be uncommon to walk 8 to 16 kilometres to find clean water; spend several more hours working in the fields and of course taking care of the children.

UNIT 1: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game Answer Sheet
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.26 Poverty & Basic Human Needs Mix & Match Game Answer Sheet

Instructions:
Read the descriptions on the left-hand side and match them to the correct category of Basic Human Needs and Income Group. Write the letter "L" for "low," "M" for "medium" or "H" for "high" to make your match.

INCOME GROUP

This group represents 15% of the world's population with an income of $8,900 or more per person. This group represents the majority of the world's population - roughly 55%. The average income is $725 a year - about $2 a day - although many families earn much less. This group represents roughly 30% of the world's population. Parents in this group earn between $725 and $8,900 a year.

H

HEALTH & Healthcare is out of the question, so for most families death is all too familiar, NUTRITION with families expecting to lose two to three of their children before they turn five.

This income group is able to afford a nutritious daily diet and has access to the best medical care.

BASIC Children may go to school - for a few years anyway - especially if they are boys. EDUCATION

Levels of access to good nutrition and medical care vary greatly in this group. People are always living on the edge. Children are born destined to go to school; the only uncertainty is how many years they will study after high school.

FINANCIAL SECURITY

School is a luxury few children will ever experience. Most girls don't even bother to dream about school.

It would take losing only one harvest to drought, or a serious illness, to throw a family in this group into poverty. But if the family is lucky, parents can find a way to join a community credit group to get access to a small loan.

As part of this income group, families have access to credit and money that most others do not. It's a good life because families have access to everything they need and security to enjoy it.

HOUSING

Every day is a struggle for families in this group to meet their basic needs. Finding food, water, and shelter can consume the whole day. For many mothers, it would not be uncommon to walk 8 to 16 kilometres to find clean water; spend several more hours working in the fields and of course taking care of the children. Many families in this group are homeless or living in structures so flimsy that a hard rain or strong wind becomes life threatening. Families in this group live in comfortable and secure housing. Parents own at least one car, and probably have two televisions.

WORK

A family in this group probably owns no land and lives in overcrowded housing with poor plumbing. The village or town this family lives in offers electricity, but it must ration its use.

Parents in this group may work as day labourers, domestic help, or perhaps as migrant workers. If parents could get better skills training, they might have a chance at a higherpaying job. When a family in this group takes its annual two-week vacation, parents don't worry about their jobs disappearing. If parents do work, they are probably tenant farmers or landless day workers. They receive few benefits from the crops they work on; they would prefer to grow their own food fortheir kids.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

Source: Adapted from the UN Cyberschoolbus Poverty Introduction Activity http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/intro.as

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout 2
M M L H L H H L M H L M L M L
P1.26

M

L

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

FACT SHEET P2.8 Poverty, Hunger & Food Security

UNIT 2 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Reading Media Article: Introduction to Hunger “Pre-empt silent killers like hunger,”... 2. Conducting a Life Interview 3. A Day in the Life: Role-Playing a Script 4. Web Quest 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project P2.3 P2.3 P2.4 P2.5 P2.6 P2.2

STUDENT HANDOUT P2.13 ”Pre-empt sillent killers like hunger,” says World Food Programme

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS

Unit 2 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T4

STUDENT TOOL Research S18

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
P2.1

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

The world produces enough food to feed everyone. And yet, there are
countries, regions, villages, households and individuals that are not able to meet their food needs. According to World Vision Canada, "food security is when everyone has enough nutritious food to focus upon other needs. Food security exists when individuals are no longer enslaved to hunger - when people are free to enjoy a healthy and
UNIT GOALS:

active life."

1. Introduce students to the issues related to the basic human need of nutrition around the world and in Canada.

But how and why do people go hungry? What needs to change to improve this situation? These are the questions this unit tackles.

2. Explore the similarities and differences related to hunger and food security in Canada and the world.

3. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through the interpretation of issues relating to poverty, hunger and the world. and food security in Canada 4. Explore Canada's role in food security-related projects. international development

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit introduction
© SJC

P2.2

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

DURATION:

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet
Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)
FACT SHEET P2.8 Poverty, Hunger & Food Security

Learning Activities & Procedure
When facilitating discussions, relate the context of poverty, hunger and food security in Canada and the world to the impact on quality of life and development issues.

Activity 1. Reading Media Article: Introduction to Hunger
(CCC: personal & social, communication-related)
STUDENT HANDOUT P2.13 ”Pre-empt sillent killers like hunger,” says World Food Programme

Students will be introduced to the extent of hunger in the world in relation to other "natural disasters" that receive more media attention.

1. Ask students to read the Student Handout individually.
hunger,".... Possible discussion questions include: • What are the "silent killers"?

2. Lead a class discussion based on the reading, "Pre-empt silent killers like

• What affects more lives - hunger or natural disasters like the Asian tsunami in December 2004? • How many people affected by the tsunami received emergency food aid? • In what region of the world did the disaster take place? • What countries were affected? Place them on your world map done in Unit 1.

Activity 2. Conducting a Life Interview
(CCC: personal & social, communication-related, methodological)

Students will have the chance to empathize with another generation and imagine what life would have been like living with very different means. (This activity is intended for a culturally diverse classroom.) like for them growing up. Sample questions: • Where were you born? • When did you arrive in Canada? • What do you typically eat as a child in your home country? • How does that compare to your diet in Canada?

1. Ask students to interview their parents or grandparents on what life was

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UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY
• What was life like in your home country?

2. Students should submit a written summary of their interview in a questionand-answer format. Extension:

3. Ask students to present the interviews as a role-play by taking on the role
of the parent interviewed (can bring in pictures for illustration).

Students will have the chance to empathize with people from other countries and imagine what life is like for people living with very different means than most people in Canada.

1. Visit the Farm Radio Network Web site:

Go to the Farm Radio Network Web site. Click on "Publications" and then click on "Scripts for Radio" to see a list of dozens of scripts. http://www.farmradio.org/ available by clicking on the right-hand menu: • Biodiversity: 56.4 Grow many different crops and crop varieties: Radio Spots 56.1 Diversification on the farm

2. Choose among the pre-selected scripts in one of the following categories

• Community Development: 69.4 Children have a right to play and to learn 57.11 Women working together can make a difference in their community • Crop Production: 65.9 Nutrition and health: story ideas for the radio 46.10 A mother helps to start a school garden • Health & Nutrition: 65.6 Families benefit when girls go to school Or, choose your own scripts among these and many other subjects.

3. Proceed to divide the class in teams and ask them to practise reading the
script. Direct them to imagine presenting the script to the class as though they were in a radio studio and presenting to a live audience. Extension:

4. Ask students to present a summary of the problem, cause, and solution to
the class after the role-play.

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Activity 3. A Day in the Life: Role-Playing a Script

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

Activity 4. Web Quest
(CCC: personal & social, communication-related, methodological, intellectual) Students will learn about what is being done to help solve the problem of hunger and food security around the world. They will read about three kinds of initiatives: • Trade (agricultural policy - Food First) • Media - Information (Farm Radio Network) • Community Projects (community gardens)

STUDENT TOOL T18 Research What do I want to find out? Where did I get my Information (Web sites)?

Note: To help students navigate the Internet, take the time to familiarize yourself with the information in the following Web sites.

1. In teams, students review examples of international cooperation projects
and Canadian examples from the Web sites below (See #3).

2. List three examples and answer the following questions for each:
• What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community?

Team Project Tip: This activity is useful for deciding what to place in the "Canadian Beaver" section of each Learning Tree Storyboard.

3. Choose from the following Web sites:
Trade Food First Read "Food First: Program Areas". http://www.foodfirst.org/programs

Media Projects Simbani Africa News Agency After selecting your language choice (English or French) from the home page, click on "Food Security." http://simbani.amarc.org/ Developing Farm Radio Network (Canada) Select your language choice (English or French) to enter the Web site. http://www.farmradio.org

FAO - TeleFood This is the Web site for "Telefood" - a solidarity campaign by the UN FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) to help fight hunger. http://www.fao.org/food/english/index.html

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Community Projects USC (University Service of Canada) From the home page, click on "What We Do," then on "Seeds of Survival," for the USC Food Security Program description. http://www.usc-canada.org Canadian Action for Food Security and Community Gardening Find links to projects in different Canadian cities on this Web site: http://web.idrc.ca/es/ev-32829-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html General

Food Security Bureau (Canada) This page includes a description of food security issues and the Canadian response. http://www.agr.gc.ca/misb/fsb/

Activity 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What Is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project? Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools - a research tool for each of the storyboard panels to be included on the Learning Tree. Team Project Tip:

(CCC: communication-related, personal & social, methodological, intellectual) Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/trunk = symptoms of problem; roots = causes; clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation]; ground = global situation; beaver = role of Canada).

Other Resources
For Students

Refer to as needed: Learning Tree Template, Learning Tree Example & the Teacher Handout

Project Planner - Use this tool for each section (roots, etc.) of the tree being explored.

Kids Corner This page by the CIDA Forestry Advisors Network (CFAN) has information about tropical forests, why they are important to food security and what can be done to help save them. Read the "Tropical Forests" section here: http://www.rcfa-cfan.org/english/ekids.htm FAO Photofile See images of the people of Eritrea, Ghana, Honduras and their forests on this Web site: http://www.fao.org/NEWS/FOTOFILE/PH9707-e.htm

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UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY
For Teachers Food First - 12 Myths About Hunger Click on "Background," scroll down to 1998 and select the document "12 Myths about Hunger". http://www.foodfirst.org/pubs/ World Vision Teacher Resources for Hunger Visit this Web site for links to videos and more teacher materials on global hunger. http://www.worldvision.ca/home/education-and-justice/teacher-resources/#7

World Food Day Audio Stories On this Web site, you can select among a number of audio stories related to the 2004 World Food Day. You will need RealAudio player to listen. http://www.fao.org/wfd/audio_2004_en.asp

Integrated Subjects
Language Arts Possible essay questions:

• If there is enough production of food in the world to feed every woman, man and child, why are there so many hungry people in the world? • What population groups are most vulnerable to hunger and why? Math Sample activity:

• Based on the Fact Sheets, construct pie charts to illustrate the various statistics on poverty and food security. Drama • Do at least one of the interactive activities described in Activity 3.

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Knowledge and information for food security in Africa: From traditional media to the Internet http://www.fao.org/sd/CDdirect/CDan0017.htm

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

FACT SHEET P2.8 Poverty, Hunger & Food Security

Poverty, Hunger & Food Security
Hunger & Poverty
Food may be a basic necessity but according to the United Nations, more than 840 million people around the world go hungry every day. And one in twelve people worldwide are malnourished, including 160 million children under the age of 5. They do not get enough vitamins and minerals from the food that they eat to stay healthy. Hunger also kills: Every day 34,000 children under age five die from hunger and related causes.

children under age five die from hunger and related causes. (UN)

Every day, 34,000

World hunger is a glaring symptom of world poverty. Globally, 1.3 billion people (or 1 in four people) live in conditions of extreme poverty. Most live in developing countries, and more than three-quarters live in rural areas. They lack both the basic resources necessary to live sustainably, such as food, shelter and health care, and the power needed to make decisions about their own futures. One of the major myths about hunger is that there is not enough food to feed the world. The fact is that enough food is produced to feed every child, woman and man around the world. The question remains… Why Are So Many People Still Going Hungry?

SOME CAUSES OF HUNGER:

1. Poverty 3. War

2. Environmental problems

One of the main causes of hunger is poverty. Most of the people who are hungry do not have enough money to purchase the food they need. According to the United Nations, the poorest and most food-insecure people live in Africa, while the largest number of continually undernourished people live in the Asia-Pacific region. Hunger is especially serious in South Asia, where growing poverty, debt, economic decline, unfair trade practices, fast population growth, poor weather, war, and government collapse have contributed to the continent's food problems. People in Canada and the United States also face hunger more than before, although hunger is less prominent and less severe in wealthy nations compared to developing countries. Hunger is also an environmental problem as fresh water, land, forests and fisheries continue being used at or beyond capacity. As people compete for resources, those without economic and political clout – poor and hungry people – have become even more marginalized. This is true especially in countries where land holdings are not even or fair, and poor families are forced to move onto fragile land and to overcrowded cities.

War is also a cause for hunger. War slows or stops food production and marketing. Food supplies are often taken and used as instruments of war, crop cycles are interrupted, seeds and breeding livestock are consumed in desperation, and children suffer lasting damage as a result of insufficient food. Regardless of fighting, heavy military spending takes resources away from food production, education, and health care.

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fact sheet
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UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

Hunger Facts
Social & Economic Inequalities There is enough world production of wheat, corn, rice and other grains to meet the minimum nutritional requirements for every child, woman and man in the world. Nevertheless, hunger continues to affect over 840 million people around the world, including 30 million in the United States (World Watch Institute) and 2.4 million Canadians (The Canadian Association of Food Banks). • One in every five people in the developing world is chronically undernourished, a total of 777 million individuals. (World Food Summit) • Poor people often lack access to land to grow food or have inadequate income to buy food. Nearly one in four people, 1.3 billion - a majority of humanity - live on less than $1 per day, while the world's 358 billionaires have assets exceeding the combined annual incomes of countries with 45% of the world's people. (UNICEF) There are dramatic inequalities in consumption. Globally, the 20% of the world's people in the highest-income countries account for 86% of total private consumption expenditures-the poorest 20% account for only 1.3%. More specifically, "the" richest fifth: • Consume 45% of all meat and fish, the poorest fifth 5%. • Consume 58% of total energy, the poorest fifth less than 4%. • Have 74% of all telephone lines, the poorest fifth 1.5%. • Consume 84% of all paper, the poorest fifth 1.1%.

world’s richest countries total consumption.

• Own 87% of the world's vehicle fleet, the poorest fifth less than 1%. (UNDP 1998 Human Development Report)

The Most Vulnerable People
• Around the world the most vulnerable to hunger are: children, pregnant and nursing women, single mothers, the elderly, the homeless, the unemployed, ethnic and racial minorities, and the working poor. (United Nations World Food Program) • 70% of the world's poor are female. (UNICEF) • It is estimated that 3,100,000 people die each year from diarrhea and most of the victims are children. (United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization) • 55% of the 12 million child deaths each year are related to malnutrition. (World Food Summit) • 100 million people are homeless and 2.5 billion people have no access to proper sanitation. (UNICEF)

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account for 86% of global

20% of people in the

UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY
• 800 million people lack access to basic health care, and 1.2 billion lack access to safe drinking water. (UNICEF) • The Indian subcontinent has nearly half the world's hungry people. Africa and the rest of Asia together have approximately 40%, and the remaining hungry people are found in Latin America and other parts of the world. (Hunger in Global Economy)

What Can Be Done to Break the Cycle of Hunger & Poverty
Often it takes just a few simple resources for impoverished people to be able to become self-sufficient. These resources include quality seeds, appropriate tools, and access to water. Small improvements in farming techniques and food storage are also helpful. (OXFAM) • Many hunger experts believe that ultimately the best way to reduce hunger is through education. Educated people are best able to break out of the cycle of poverty that causes hunger. (UNICEF) • To reach the World Food Summit goal of reducing hunger by half by 2015, the number of hungry people needs to fall by 22 million a year. Currently it is falling by only 6 million a year. (World Food Summit)

About Food Security

people do not have

enough to eat in a world that produces enough woman and child. food to feed every man,

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. (World Food Summit 1996)
More than 800 million

Key components of food security:

• Food security requires the production or availability of nutritionally adequate and safe food at all times. • Individuals and households must have access or the capacity to acquire sufficient, safe and nutritious food both in quantity and in quality to meet their daily dietary requirements for a healthy and productive life. • The world does produce enough food to feed everyone. However, there are countries, regions, villages, households and individuals that are not able to meet their food needs. Over 800 million human beings do not have enough to eat.

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UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

The Canadian Context
Canadians living in poverty are faced with food insecurity. Similar to the rest of the world, poverty is the main reason that Canadians face food insecurity. Canada may have large supplies of healthy food yet Canadians living in poverty don't have enough access to food and nutritional well-being. According to the Food Security Bureau of Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, "food security" broadly includes access, availability and utilization of food. Food security has become an issue of increasing public concern as vulnerable Canadians are unable to meet their food needs without compromising other basic needs. With the recession of the 1980s, a massive charitable food assistance system emerged to respond to the huge rise in the demand for food assistance. The first food bank in Canada was established in 1981 in Edmonton, Alberta. There has been a continual rise in the number of food banks, collective kitchens, school-based breakfast or community-based feeding programs ever since. Results from the HungerCount: A Surplus of Hunger survey (2000) indicated that 726,902 people received emergency groceries from a food bank. Some 40% of those relying on food banks were under 18 years of age. The Food Security Bureau of Agriculture and AgriFood Canada also outlines the following facts:

• There is strong evidence of food-related health and nutritional problems in Canada. Vulnerable groups are the most affected. These include: single-parent women, children, elderly people, aboriginals, homeless persons, unemployed people, refugees and new immigrants. • For aboriginals, contaminants in water and traditional food supplies are a significant concern.

• There is increasing consumer awareness of and concern about food quality and safety including biotechnology, genetic engineering, chemical fertilizers and pesticides. The Canadian Response Food security is a complex issue that can only be addressed through the active cooperation of all actors including federal and provincial departments and civil society groups. The Canadian government points to a number of initiatives to improve the situation: • On a federal level, social safety net programs helping vulnerable persons purchase food include: Federal Employment Insurance, Old Age Security, Child Tax Benefit and the Canada Health and Social Transfer Program.

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• Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and local administration, with support from federal and provincial governments, help provide access to food and other supports needed by vulnerable persons. • In 1996, Canada joined 186 other nations in committing to eliminate hunger and to reduce the number of undernourished people by half by 2015. The pledge was made at the November 1996 World Food Summit, hosted in Rome by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. • In response to the World Food Summit, Canada developed an Action Plan to improve food security both domestically and internationally. • Canada's Action Plan on Food Security was launched on October 16, 1998. • A Food Security Bureau was established in February 1999.

Sources
UN Cyberschoolbus http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/food.asp UNICEF http://www.kidscanmakeadifference.org/hunfa.htm Canadian Food Security Bureau http://www.agr.gc.ca/misb/fsb/fsb-bsa_e.php?page=index Global Issues www.globalissues.org

Other Resources for Teachers
Causes of Hunger are related to Poverty www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Poverty/Hunger/Causes

For more information on how the following issues affect food security: • Land rights and ownership • Diversion of land use to non-productive use • Increasing emphasis on export-oriented agriculture • Inefficient agricultural practices • War • Famine • Drought • Over-fishing • Poor crop yield • Lack of democracy and rights

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STUDENT HANDOUT P2.13 ”Pre-empt sillent killers like hunger,” says World Food Programme

“Pre-empt silent killers like hunger," says World Food Programme
unger causes far greater suffering and death on a daily basis across H the world than the worst natural disasters, says the United Nations (UN) World Food Programme. Daily killers like hunger and related diseases cause as many deaths each week as the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami. Most of those who die are children. Yet these deaths receive very little media coverage and not enough global attention, the United Nations food aid agency told participants at a UN meeting on global disasters. The meeting focused mostly on the setting up of a global system to warn people about natural hazards. But the World Food Programme (WFP) says hunger and related diseases cause nine times as many deaths as war or natural disaster. The agency wanted to bring attention to these silent killers whose terrible burden can be greatly reduced by preparing for emergencies. "These people die quietly in communities devastated by poverty, without drawing international media coverage," the agency said. At the meeting in Kobe, Japan, attended by 4,000 participants from 150 countries, James T. Morris of the WFP said: "Let me give one word of warning, the constant hunger and malnutrition that affects 300 million children worldwide does not create the dramatic media coverage of a tsunami, but it causes far greater suffering. We cannot afford to ignore that fact. This too is an emergency." Morris stressed that the WFP has made reducing the risk of disaster and preparing for emergencies two of its priorities. It also played an important role in developing a new tool to warn people early about emergencies.

"The Asian tsunami crisis provided us with a very graphic illustration of the importance of preparing for emergencies and early warning," said Morris. He also pointed out that the number of natural disasters is rising. One-third of the 100 million people worldwide who benefit from the World Food Programme are now affected by natural hazards. "The Asian tsunami shocked the world and massive relief efforts are being organized for the survivors. We now face the challenge to keep up the momentum for millions of other people around the globe whose lives are also haunted by hunger and poverty, but whose faces are rarely in the spotlight," he added.
Source: This is a revised version of the original article by the WFP published on: www.un.org/news, January 20, 2005. http://www.infochangeindia.org/AgricultureItop.jsp?section_idv=10#3684
©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout
P2.13

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

P2.14

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

FACT SHEET P3.8 Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World FACT SHEET P3.13 Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS

UNIT 3 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. HIV/AIDS Before & After, True or False Quiz 2. On-line HIV/AIDS Quiz 3. Web Case Study 4. Web Quest P3.3 P3.3 P3.4 P3.5 P3.2

STUDENT HANDOUT P3.15 HIV/AIDS Before & After Quiz STUDENT HANDOUT P3.16 Sibongile’s Testimonial

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS

Unit 3 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T5

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

STUDENT TOOLS Compare Contrast Table K-W-L Research

S12 S17 S18

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
P3.1

5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project P3.6

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

More than two thirds of the 38 million people with HIV/AIDS in

the world live in Africa. It is a global epidemic that is devastating one continent more than any other - not just by sometimes killing entire families but by affecting the livelihoods of entire communities. This makes it even more difficult for Africa to get out of extreme poverty. Education is the key to preventing HIV infection.

UNIT GOALS:

1. Explore the similarities situation of people living Canada.

This unit focuses on HIV/AIDS education and aims to dispel the myths about HIV/AIDS and what can be done to help stop its spread worldwide.

and differences between the with HIV/AIDS in Africa and

2. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through the interpretation of social in Africa and Canada. in HIV/AIDS-related projects in Africa.

issues related to HIV/AIDS 3. Explore Canada's role international development

© MARTIN BEAULIEU/GLOBALAWARE "Rita, victim of AIDS in Mozambique, comes every month to purchase her antiretroviral treatment at an NGO's hospital. Despite everything, only 1% of the patients in Africa profit from the treatment which can save their life; the latter represent 95 % of the patients of the AIDS in the world." (GlobalAware)

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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

DURATION:

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet
Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)
FACT SHEET P3.8 Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World FACT SHEET P3.13 Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS

Learning Activities & Procedure

When facilitating discussions, relate the context of HIV/AIDS in Canada and the world to the impact on quality of life and development issues.

Activity 1. HIV/AIDS Before & After, True or False Quiz
(CCC: communication-related, intellectual)
STUDENT HANDOUT P3.15 HIV/AIDS Before & After Quiz STUDENT HANDOUT P3.16 Sibongile’s Testimonial

Students will learn about some of the most common myths and facts about HIV/AIDS.

1. Ask students to complete the "HIV/AIDS Before & After, True or False Quiz" individually (see Handout P3.15). 2. Then ask a volunteer to read Sibongile's testimonial (see Handout P3.16),
which reveals the myths and facts about AIDS.

3. Based on the testimonial just heard, redo the True or False Quiz as a class.
Extension:

4. Lead a class discussion on HIV/AIDS.
STUDENT TOOL S17 KWL What do I know? What do I want to know? What have I learned?

Suggested discussion questions include: • What is HIV? • What is AIDS? • How do people get HIV and who gets HIV? • Is HIV/AIDS a problem in Canada?

• In what part of the world is HIV/AIDS the biggest problem and why?

Activity 2. On-Line HIV/AIDS Quiz
(CCC: intellectual, ICT integration)

Students will apply what they have already learned so far in an interactive activity.

1. Direct students to choose among the following quizzes to do on-line individually (or feel free to make up your own based on the Fact Sheets provided):

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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS
UNICEF AIDS Youth Quiz From the "Explore" menu, click on the "HIV/AIDS" sub-menu and then click on "Quizzes". http://www.unicef.org/voy/ HIV/AIDS Positive Stories Youth Quiz Click on "Quiz" (print versions are also available on this Web site): http://www.hivaids.webcentral.com.au/

Youth On-Line Quiz Click on "Kids Issues" on the left-hand menu, then click on "HIV/AIDS". http://www.youthonline.ca/

Activity 3. Web Case Study

(CCC: methodological, communication-related, personal & social, ICT integration) Students will learn about the similarities and differences of living with HIV/AIDS in Canada compared to youth in various African countries.
Note: Materials for this Web Quest may be printed as handouts if there is no computer lab availability. STUDENT TOOL T12 Compare Contrast Table

1. Ask students to read real life stories of the following youth/children living or affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa:
• Nelao (Namibia) • Kennedy (Kenya) • Shoebox story (Kenya) • Yetarik (Ethiopia) • Ouisseina (Niger) The stories are available on the:

UNICEF AIDS Youth Site From the "Explore" menu, click on the "HIV/AIDS" sub-menu and then click on "Quizzes". http://www.unicef.org/voy/

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AVERT Quiz http://www.avert.org/hivquiz.htm

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

2. Also ask students to read real life stories about people living or affected by
HIV/AIDS in Canada from the following Web sites: HIV, Youth, Women - Planned Parenthood Federation of Canada http://www.ppfc.ca/ppfc/HIV/e/stories/stories_e.html HIV/AIDS Positive Stories Click on "Stories" on this Web site: http://www.hivaids.webcentral.com.au/
Note: To help students navigate the Internet, take the time to familiarize yourself with the information in the listed Web sites. Team Project Tip:

3. In teams, choose two life stories from Africa and Canada.

• How did they get HIV? • What is their life situation? • How did getting HIV affect their lives? • Did they tell anyone about their condition? • Are they getting treatment? • What did they do to help themselves?

This activity is useful for deciding what to place in the "Canadian Beaver" section of each Learning Tree Storyboard.

5. Each team will submit a written report on the similarities and differences.
Extension: Ask students to present their case study to the class.

Activity 4. Web Quest

(CCC: methodological, communication-related, personal & social, ICT integration) Students will learn about what is being done to help solve the problem of HIV/AIDS around the world.
STUDENT TOOL S18 Research What do I want to find out? Where did I get my information (Web sites)?

1. In teams, review examples of international cooperation projects and
Canadian examples from the Web sites listed on P3.6.

2. List three examples and answer the following questions for each:
• What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community?

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4. Discuss what are the similarities and differences in these life situations:

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

3. Choose from the following Web sites:
HIV/AIDS Projects in Africa Click on "HIV/AIDS" from the "Global Issues" menu of the Web site below and then click on "HIV/AIDS". From the left-hand menu, click on "Projects" and then on "Canadian Partners' Initiatives". Here you can read short descriptions of projects being carried out in various African countries. http://www.cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm Canadian Society for International Health This page provides a list of 18 organizations that have received money from CIDA to do HIV/AIDS projects around the world. You can read descriptions of their projects on this page and you can also click on the Web site of an organization that interests you. http://www.csih.org/what/HIVorgs.html Note: Some projects focus on prevention and education (e.g. NGO projects), others on access to treatment (Canada's role in supporting access to generic retroviral drugs), still others on building networks of cooperation (UN AIDS). Some are very local projects, while others involve many nations or partners working together.
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

Based on the different nature of projects, you may choose to assign teams to different kinds of international cooperation projects.

You may also choose to find your own examples of international cooperation projects.

Activity 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Project
Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools - a research tool for each of the storyboard panels to be included on the Learning Tree. Team Project Tip:

(CCC: communication-related, personal & social, methodological, intellectual) Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/trunk = symptoms of problem; roots = causes; clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation]; ground = global situation; beaver = role of Canada).

Refer to as needed: Learning Tree Template, Learning Tree Example & the Teacher Handout

Project Planner - Use this tool for each section (roots, etc.) of the tree being explored.

For Students

UNICEF Discussion Forum Once you enter the Web site below, click on "Speak Out" from the top menu. You can then click on "Discussion Forum" and choose the "HIV/AIDS" forum. Here, you will read the opinions of youth from around the world on the subject of HIV/AIDS: http://www.unicef.org/voy/

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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Other Resources
CARE - Zambia story http://www.cbc.ca/sunday/AIDS/diary.html BBC News Photo Journal - Juliet's Story Read Juliet's Story about living With HIV in Zambia: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/picture_gallery/04/health_juliet0s_ story/html/7.stm BBC News - Aids: A South African Success Story http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/4056223.stm BBC News - A Big Fall in African Life Expectancy http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/3894733.stm

BBC News - Africa Section At the bottom of the Web page (middle column) listed below, see "Country Profiles - A Guide to Africa" and select a country or territory. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/default.stm

Integrated Subjects

Language Arts Sample activity: Using examples and information from Activity 4 and 5, write an essay on living with HIV/AIDS in Canada & Africa and what needs to be done to help stop the spread of HIV/AIDS in the world. Math Sample activity: Based on the Fact Sheet, construct pie charts to illustrate the various statistics on HIV/AIDS.

Drama Sample activity: Based on the real life stories in Activity 4, develop alternative scenarios for selected people: • How could they have prevented getting HIV? • Can you think of a different outcome for the person you select?, etc. Science and/or Sex Education Go over the Infection and Prevention of HIV/AIDS Fact Sheet in class and do some of the quizzes in Activity 3.

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P3.7

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

FACT SHEET P3.8 Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World

Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World
I try '2' say all 'dat I feel 'nd portray it all beautifully I also try as much as possible '2' b real 'nd live life fully - HIV free it is simply a matter of free will - if we but only decide '2' salvage HUMANITY from every physical 'nd social ill showing love 'nd care to those who are HIV infected already as we help one another stay HIV free we would then truly ADVANCE HUMANITY spread 'dis message -in comemoration of December 1st, 'd World HIV/AIDS Day
Source: http://www.unicef.org/voy/speakout/speakout_949.html

HIV/AIDS: A Global Epidemic

world's poorest countries of HIV/AIDS and helping live longer.

means stopping the spread those already infected to

More than 38 million people are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. The most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS are the poorest people in the poorest countries. Reasons include lack of education, poor nutrition and inadequate health care, which are all linked with extreme poverty.
Fighting poverty in the

Families, communities and countries are torn apart by HIV/AIDS with parents, workers and leaders dying by the thousands every year. Children replace parents as the bread-winners and can no longer go to school. There are no crops for food or to put money on the table because people are too sick to work the fields. Economies suffer and communities fall apart as businesses and basic services are disrupted. HIV/AIDS is making it overwhelming for people to rise out of poverty, improve their basic living conditions, and escape their vulnerability to disease. Fighting poverty in the world's poorest countries means stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS and helping those already infected to live longer.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet 1
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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Key Facts
• More than 38 million people are living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. • More than 25 million (two thirds) of them are in sub-Saharan Africa. • 10 million of them are young people aged 15 to 24. • Some 15 million children have already been orphaned by HIV/AIDS. • Women are twice as likely as men to become infected by having sex. • The global HIV/AIDS epidemic killed more than three million people in 2004. • East Asia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia show the sharpest rises in HIV cases.

Africa
More than 38 million people around the world are living with HIV. Starting in the late 1970s and early 1980s, HIV spread in a line from West Africa across to the Indian Ocean, before moving to the southern countries where it is now the most prevalent.

nearly half of all infected adults worldwide.

Women now account for

HIV has hit sub-Saharan Africa hardest. More than 25 million people or nearly two-thirds of people with HIV live in sub-Saharan Africa, where there is a dramatic rise in the cases among women in particular. Women now account for nearly half of all infected adults worldwide. In 2005, South Africa had the most cases in the world, with more than five million. Botswana (37%), Lesotho (29%) and Swaziland (39%) had the highest percentage of people who are HIV positive. In these countries, out of every ten people, 3-4 people are living with HIV.

Young People & HIV/AIDS

According to UNICEF, young people are at the centre of the HIV and AIDS crisis. • It is estimated that 11.8 million young people (aged 15-24) are living with HIV today. Each day, nearly 6,000 more are infected, as well as 2,000 infants who contract the virus from their mothers during pregnancy or birth, or through breastfeeding. And 14 million children worldwide have lost one or both parents to AIDS.

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fact sheet 1
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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Who Is the Most Vulnerable?
Cultural, political and economic factors make some young people more vulnerable to infection than others: • Girls are at higher risk in some parts of the world. This is partly because girls are more likely to be pressured into having sex and less likely to be able to control with whom, when and how they have sex. Also, social attitudes to sex and sex education may make it more difficult for girls to get the information they need to protect themselves from the virus. • Young people who inject illegal drugs are likely to be infected with HIV because they may be sharing unsterilized needles. • The poor or homeless are more at risk because they are more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, for example by being forced to have sex for money. • Children orphaned by AIDS are themselves particularly vulnerable to infection because they often have no one to care for or protect them, or any means of earning a living.

What Can Be Done? Prevention/Education…

Young people are not only among the most vulnerable, but they are also crucial to a lasting solution to the HIV/AIDS crisis. UNICEF says that in areas where HIV infection rates are levelling off or actually declining, it's mainly because young men and women are changing their behaviour. And young people are also taking a lead in passing on the vital information that promotes such change. However, we all have a part to play in fighting the HIV and AIDS crisis: • Most importantly, everyone must have the accurate information about how the virus is spread and how they can protect themselves. • Making sure everyone can develop the skills and self-confidence to keep safe in difficult situations is also critical. • So is having access to services, such as counselling, treatment and HIV testing. • And all adults must do everything they can to make sure communities are safe and young people are supported.

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fact sheet 1
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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Canada
According to Health Canada, the first case of AIDS in Canada was reported in 1982. Despite improved drug and therapy programs, the number of persons living with HIV in Canada is rising, from an estimated 40,000 in 1996 to 56,000 in 2002. The virus itself changes quickly, mutating, creating new strains, which present challenges in detection, prevention and treatment. No cure or vaccine exists. New treatments are very costly and it is too soon to measure their full effect.

Who is the Most Vulnerable to Contracting AIDS? Aboriginal People • Injecting drug use continues to be a key mode of transmission. • Aboriginal peoples make up a growing percentage of positive HIV test reports and reported AIDS cases.

• HIV/AIDS has a significant impact on Aboriginal women.

• Aboriginal peoples are being infected with HIV at a younger age than nonAboriginal peoples. Women

• In Canada, a total of 1,555 AIDS cases and 7,256 HIV cases have been reported in adult women up to June 30, 2003.

• Women represent a rising proportion of those with positive HIV test reports in Canada and in 2002 accounted for 25% of all positive HIV test reports. • Heterosexual contact and injecting drug use are the two major risk factors for HIV infection in women. Youth

• 20.9% of people who tested positive for HIV in 2004 were 15-29 years old. • Risky behaviour increases the potential for HIV transmission among young Canadians. Street-involved youth, those who inject drugs and young men who have sex with men are particularly vulnerable to HIV.

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fact sheet 1
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• In 2002, Aboriginal peoples made up 12.9% of the total reported AIDS cases for which ethnicity was known.

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Sources
UN AIDS http://www.unaids.org/ Canadian International Development Agency - HIV/AIDS http://www.cida.gc.ca/aids.htm BBC Special Report - the Global Spread of HIV http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/africa/03/aids_debate/html/africas_epi demic.stm UNICEF - Voices of Youth http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/aids/explore_187.html

Other Resources for Teachers
UNICEF - Voices of Youth See section on "Testing and Treatment". http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/aids/explore_187.html World Vision - HIV-AIDS Educational Tool Kit for Teachers http://www.worldvision.ca/home/education-and-justice/teacherresources/aids-educational-toolkit/

UN World Summit on Sustainable Development - Fact Sheet on Africa Click on "Media Info" from the following Web site. Then click on "Fact Sheets" and finally click "Facts About Africa". http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/

Canadian Aids Society - HIV/AIDS Backgrounders Once you enter the home page of the CAS Web site, click on "CAS Resources" from the left-hand menu, then click on "Backgrounders/Fact Sheets," and then click on "Youth and HIV/AIDS" or "Children and HIV/AIDS". http://www.cdnaids.ca/

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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

FACT SHEET P3.13 Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS

Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS
1. AIDS is caused by HIV. AIDS is caused by HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, which damages the body's defence system. People who have AIDS become weaker because their bodies lose the ability to fight all illnesses. They eventually die. There is no cure for HIV. 2. The onset of AIDS can take up to ten years. The onset of AIDS can take up to ten years from the time of infection with the HIV virus. Therefore a person infected with HIV may look and feel healthy for many years, but he or she can still transmit the virus to someone else. New medicines can help a person stay healthier for longer periods of time, but the person will still have HIV and be able to transmit HIV. 3. HIV is transmitted through HIV-infected bodily fluids. HIV is transmitted through the exchange of any HIV-infected bodily fluids. Transfer may occur during all stages of the infection/disease. The HIV virus is found in the following fluids: blood, semen (and pre-ejaculated fluid), vaginal secretions, and breast milk.

4. HIV is most frequently transmitted sexually. HIV is most frequently transmitted sexually. That is because fluids mix and the virus can be exchanged, especially where there are tears in vaginal or anal tissue, wounds or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Girls are especially vulnerable to HIV infection because their vaginal membranes are thinner and more susceptible to infection than those of mature women.

5. People who have Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are at greater risk of being infected with HIV. People who have STIs are at greater risk of being infected with HIV and of transmitting their infection to others. People with STIs should seek prompt treatment and avoid sexual intercourse or practise safer sex (non-penetrative sex or sex using a condom), and inform their partners.

6. The risk of sexual transmission of HIV can be reduced. The risk of sexual transmission of HIV can be reduced if people do not have sex, if uninfected partners have sex only with each other or if people have safer sex - sex without penetration or sex using a condom. The only way to be completely sure to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV is by abstaining from all sexual contact.

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fact sheet 2
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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS
7. People who inject themselves with drugs are at high risk of becoming infected with HIV. HIV can also be transmitted when the skin is cut or pierced using an unsterilized needle, syringe, razorblade, knife or any other tool. People who inject themselves with drugs or have sex with drug users are at high risk of becoming infected with HIV. Moreover, drug use alters people's judgment and can lead to risky sexual behaviour, such as not using condoms. 8. Contact a health worker or an HIV/AIDS centre to receive counselling and testing. Anyone who suspects that he or she might have been infected with HIV should contact a health worker or an HIV/AIDS centre in order to receive confidential counselling and testing. It is your right. (Article 24 of the Convention on the rights of the child). 9. HIV is not transmitted by everyday contact. HIV is not transmitted by: hugging, shaking hands; casual, everyday contact; using swimming pools, toilet seats; sharing bed linens, eating utensils, food; mosquito and other insect bites; coughing, sneezing.

10. Everyone deserves compassion and support. Discriminating against people who are infected with HIV or anyone thought to be at risk of infection violates individual human rights and endangers public health. Everyone infected with and affected by HIV and AIDS deserves compassion and support. (Article 2 of the Convention on the rights of the child). Source: This information has been reprinted with the permission of UNICEF: http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/aids/explore_186.html

Other Resources for Teachers

HIV/AIDS Web Central - Frequently Asked Questions About HIV/AIDS http://www.hivaids.webcentral.com.au/text/faq.html#Q1 AVERT - HIV & AIDS Statistics http://www.avert.org/statindx.htm

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UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

STUDENT HANDOUT P3.15 HIV/AIDS Before & After Quiz

HIV/AIDS Before & After, True or False Quiz
Please answer True or False to each of the following questions to test your HIV/AIDS awareness. Complete the quiz before and after hearing or reading Sibongile’s Testimonial - P3.16.

QUESTION

BEFORE

TRUE OR FALSE TRUE OR FALSE AFTER

1. HIV can be spread by shaking hands. 2. AIDS can be passed on to another person during sex.

4. Pregnant women can pass the AIDS virus on to their unborn child. 5. A person can get AIDS by donating blood. 6. It is possible to get AIDS from a toilet seat. 7. The virus causing AIDS is HIV - human immunodeficiency virus. 8. AIDS is spread by kissing. 9. At this time, there is no cure for AIDS. 10. HIV is carried in the blood. 11. Drug users can pass on HIV to other users if they share needles. 12. Only men can become infected by HIV. 13. You should avoid touching a person with AIDS. 14. It is risky to use the same water fountain as a person with AIDS. 15. If you are strong and healthy you can't get AIDS. 16. AIDS means Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. 17. You can tell by looking at someone if they have HIV. 18. More people are dying from AIDS in Canada than elsewhere. 19. More than 38 million people live with HIV/AIDS worldwide.
Source: Adapted from the "AIDS Education & Awareness Program" Canadian Public Health Association Quiz ©
LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
P3.15

3. Two-thirds of people living with AIDS live in Africa.

UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

STUDENT HANDOUT P3.16 Sibongile’s Testimonial

Sibongile's Testimonial
My name is Sibongile. I live in South Africa. I would like to go to school but I have to work to help my mother.

My father died from AIDS and my mother does not make enough money for the family. Mother says Father is one of the ebony angels, one of the millions of people in Africa dying from AIDS. She is worried about me because she thinks I might have HIV. She says it might be in Mother's tummy when Father died. I know she has HIV but she keeps my blood. She is also worried about my baby brother. He was in

it a secret. She got the virus when she was making a baby with Father.

Other kids know how my father died. Now they don't want to come near me. They think that I will make them sick if they touch me.

But it's not true. My Father was very strong so I didn't understand how he could die. But Mother says there is no cure for AIDS even if you are strong.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 2
P3.16

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

FACT SHEET P4.10 Poverty, the Environment & Water

UNIT 4 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Photo Research: Introduction to Water Problems 2. Tracking Water Consumption 3. Talking About Water 4. Web Quest 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Team Project P4.3 P4.4 P4.5 P4.6 P4.7 P4.2

STUDENT HANDOUT P4.16 Canadian Water Consumption Chart STUDENT HANDOUT P4.17 Water Log Worksheet

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS
STUDENT TOOLS Research Project Planner S18 S19

Unit 4 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T6

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
P4.1

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

More than 50 countries will be threatened by water shortages by
2050. The problem of water scarcity is linked mainly to the uncontrolled consumption of water. In this unit, students will learn about the overconsumption of water, its causes, consequences and what needs to be done to reverse the trend globally.
UNIT GOALS:

1. Introduce students to the issues related to the basic the world and in Canada. human need of water around

The unit also encourages students to think about how they might reduce the waste of water in their own homes and communities.

global citizenship through relating to poverty and and the world.

the interpretation of issues access to water in Canada 3. Explore Canada's role in water-related international development projects.

© SJC

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unit introduction
P4.2

2. Build a consciousness of

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

DURATION:

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet
(CCC: intellectual) Go over information in the Fact Sheet in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)
FACT SHEET P4.10 Poverty, the Environment & Water

Learning Activities & Procedure

Activity 1. Photo Research: Introduction to Water Problems
Students will learn about the different issues related to water around the world and that action needs to be taken to preserve this limited resource.

(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)
STUDENT TOOL T18 Research What do I want to find out? Where did I get my information (Web sites)?

1. Divide class in teams.
team (see list of photos on page P4.4). illustrated in its photo and prepare a short report on the following: • What is the general problem? • What specific example(s) illustrate(s) the problem? • What is the proposed solution, if any?

2. Go to the UNESCO Photo Exhibit Web site and assign a photo to each 3. Each team will review the brief description of the water problem(s)

4. Teams will present their reports to the class.

5. As teams are presenting their reports, the teacher can draw out information
contained in the Fact Sheet that complements the problem being raised by the students. Alternative:
Team Project Tip: Encourage students to use general or country-specific facts learned during this activity in their Learning Tree Storyboard Project.

6. If there is no computer lab access during class time, the teacher can print
out each of the photo assignments and hand out the hard copies during the class. International Year of Fresh Water Web site Go to the International Year of Fresh Water Web site listed below. Click on "Photo Library on Water" and then click on "Water Photo Exhibition" in the bottom right-hand corner: http://www.wateryear2003.org/en

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learning activities guide
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When facilitating discussions, relate the context of poverty, the environment and water in Canada and the world to the impact on quality of life and development issues.

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
List of photos from the UNESCO Photo Exhibit: • Brazil from Above (dying ecosystems) • Industry: Tanning in Morocco (industry represents 22% consumption of freshwater) • Alternative Energy: Making a Difference (alternatives to hydroelectric energy needed to meet demands) • Rice Fields and Agriculture (agriculture consumes 70% of freshwater withdrawals)

• Salt of Life in Bolivia (evaporation of freshwater and the process of desalination of sea water to increase freshwater supply in certain countries) • Market Time in El Salvador (the expected results of increasing population growth and water consumption on the world's water supply)

• Our Cultural Heritage Threatened (the effects of the construction of hydroelectric dams) • Water for our Future (global water trends and places most affected by scarcity)

Tip: the teacher might want to explain terms like "per capita" and "scarcity" before giving the reading assignments.

Activity 2. Tracking Water Consumption
STUDENT HANDOUT P4.16 Canadian Water Consumption Chart STUDENT HANDOUT P4.17 Water Log Worksheet

(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Students will discover the uses of water in their daily lives. They will also identify the activities that use the most water, and start thinking about how to reduce water waste. They will also think about how access to water in Canada is different than access in developing countries. In teams, they may also track their use of water over a one-week period, and compare and graph their results.

1. Brainstorm on the daily uses of water and make a list on the board/overhead/flipchart.

2. Discuss activities that use the most amount of water. 3. Compare the list brainstormed in class to the one in the Water

Consumption Chart as well as other facts and notes included in the Student Handout and the Fact Sheet. Are there any items the students thought of that are not included in the chart or vice versa?

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• A Women's Work (women are underestimated in development projects but are those who work to ensure family needs are met)

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

4. Now inform students that the average daily consumption of water for
Canadians is about 343 litres/day. For someone in the Third World, the amount is about 58 litres/day.

5. Ask students to imagine that they could only use 58 litres of water per day.
How would their water usage have to change in order to be able to reduce their consumption (what activities could they cut out, if any; how could they consume less for each activity, etc.)?

6. In teams, ask students to fill out a Water Log Sheet estimating how much

Extension:

7. Divide class into teams, and ask all team members to track their water

usage for one week. Use the Water Log Sheet to track consumption. Remember to add any items from the brainstorm session not already listed in the Water Log Sheet. Estimate usage of any added items. graph of its water consumption by type of activity.

8. Each team should total its personal and team totals and then create a team 9. Teams will submit their graphs to the teacher who will lead a class

discussion comparing consumption between teams - which team consumed the most water, which team consumed the least, what could teams learn from each other, how do totals compare to Canadian average consumption?

Activity 3. Talking about Water
(CCC: personal & social, communication-related)

Students will discover the importance of water in peoples' lives and use creative expression to communicate what they've learned.

Option 1: Water Story Illustrations International Year of Fresh Water Web Site.

1. Assign students to read one of the stories listed below taken from the 2003 2. Ask students to draw a picture to illustrate an aspect of the story related to water. The text of the original story should accompany their illustration.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
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they would have to use by activity in order to keep their consumption to 58 litres/day.

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

3. If possible, create a display in the classroom of all the student illustrations.
To see the following stories from around the world on-line, visit the following Web site, go to the "Water Talks" section of the left-hand menu and click on "Myths and Stories": http://www.wateryear2003.org/ Alternative: As an alternative, you can print out each of these stories and hand out the hard copies during the class. • Sinnan and the Shannon

• The Bride of the Water God
Team Project Tip: Encourage students to think about incorporating an illustration or proverb in their Learning Tree Storyboard Project.

• The Great Flood • The House of Moon and Sun • The Old Man and the Termites - They Know • The Origin of the Amazon • The Teachings of the Rain God • Well Women Transform Lives

Option 2: Make Your Own Proverb

1. Ask students to go to the "Water Talks" section of the left-hand menu of the
Web site and click on "Proverbs". Here students will read many proverbs about water that originate from many countries around the world: http://www.wateryear2003.org/ water based on what they have learned in class. and then change these sayings into something about water.

2. In their project teams, ask students to come up with their own proverb on 3. They can also think about sayings that their parents or grandparents use, 4. Ask teams to present and explain their proverbs to the class.

Activity 4. Web Quest

(CCC: personal & social, communication-related, methodological, intellectual) Students will learn about what is being done to help solve the problem of water scarcity around the world. They will read about projects by Canadian non-governmental organizations (NGOs), others that are funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and others run by American public interest organizations.

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• The Boat of the Dead

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
STUDENT TOOL S18 Research What do I want to find out? Where did I get my information (Web sites)? Tip: To help students navigate the Internet, take the time to familiarize yourself with the information in the following Web sites. Team Project Tip:

1. In teams, students review examples of international cooperation projects
and Canadian examples from the Web sites below. Note that each of the campaigns or projects is related to the main water issues covered in the Fact Sheet.

2. List three examples and answer the following questions for each:
• What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community?

Development & Peace Campaign: "Water: Life Before Profit" The site includes a series of action sheets, backgrounders and resources on the Canadian NGO's campaign against the privatization of water. http://www.devp.org/testA/current.htm

WaterCan - A Canadian NGO dedicated to "water issues" in developing countries. From the Water Can Web site, go to "International Projects" from the left-hand menu and click on "Field Reports" to read about the international projects that WaterCan supports in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. http://www.watercan.com/ Public Citizen - An American consumer advocacy organization Visit the Web site of the "Water for All" International Campaign with examples of water struggles in various countries around the world. http://www.citizen.org/cmep/Water/cmep_Water/ Council of Canadians From the left-hand menu, click on "Water" or the "Blue Planet Project" to read about water privatization in Canada and what is being done to protect water as a public resource. www.canadians.org/index.htm

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This activity is useful for deciding what to place in the "Canadian Beaver" section of each Learning Tree Storyboard.

3. Choose from the following Web sites:

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

Activity 5. Work on Learning Tree Storyboard Project
(CCC: communication-related, personal & social, methodological, intellectual)
TEACHER HANDOUT P1.8 What is the Learning Tree Storyboard Project?

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/trunk = symptoms of problem; roots = causes; clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation]; ground = global situation; beaver = role of Canada).

2003 International Year of Fresh Water Make sure to visit the Photo Library! http://www.wateryear2003.org/
Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tools - a research tool for each of the storyboard panels to be included on the Learning Tree. Team Project Tip:

Quizzes

UN Water Quiz http://www0.un.org/cyberschoolbus/waterquiz/waterquiz4/index.asp WaterCan Kids Page See WaterCan Kids' Quiz & Slide Show (Microsoft PowerPoint). http://www.watercan.com/kids/index.shtml

Refer to as needed: Learning Tree Template Learning Tree Example & the Teacher Handout Project Planner - Use this tool for each section (roots, etc.) of the tree being explored.

For Students

CIDA Youth Zone - Water Click on "Youth and Teachers" from the main menu at the top of the page, then click on "Youth Zone". From the "Youth Zone" page, click on "Development Topics" from the left-hand menu and then select "Water". http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm WaterCan Kids Page http://www.watercan.com/kids/index.shtml

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Resources

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

For Teachers
WaterCan Teacher Resource H2Oh http://www.watercan.com/h2oh/ Children's Water Education Council http://www.cwec.ca/eng/educators/teachers.asp OXFAM Water for All OXFAM's on-line learning resource on water and change. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/water/

Other Resources
UNESCO Water Portal http://www.unesco.org/water/

CBC - Water for Profit: How multinational corporations are taking control of a public resource This site features a series of national and international stories on water privatization. http://www.cbc.ca/news/features/water/

Integrated Subjects
Language Arts See Activity 3 - Make Your Own Proverb Math See Activity 2 - Tracking Water Consumption - graphing activity Art See Activity 2 - Water Story Illustrations

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P4.9

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

FACT SHEET P4.10 Poverty, the Environment & Water

Poverty, the Environment & Water
"Thanks to the replenishing cycle of rain and evaporation, the amount of water on Earth has remained the same over the past four billion years. Only in this generation has there been concern that we may be ruining our water supply." (Selling Canada's Water, CBC)

Globally...
The Problem While access to fresh, clean water is taken for granted in some countries, it is a scarce resource in others. In fact, water is not equally distributed between continents. The situation is the worst in Asia, Africa and Latin America. More than 50 countries are threatened by water shortages between now and 2050. • Some 1.1 billion people or 18% of the world's population lack access to safe drinking water.

• Every year, more than 2.2 million people, mostly children under five, die from problems associated with the lack of safe water and sanitation. • More than 6,000 children die every day from diseases related to lack of access to safe drinking water, poor sanitation and poor hygiene.

• In developing countries, about 80% of illnesses are linked to poor water and sanitation conditions. Some Causes
TWO REASONS FOR WATER SCARCITY ARE:

population.

1. The growth in the world's 2. The widespread use of

water for agriculture and industrialization.

The problem of water scarcity is linked to the uncontrolled consumption of water. People use seven times more water today than in the 19th century. There are two main reasons for this: the growth in the world's population, and the widespread use of water for agriculture and industrialization. Below are some specific issues:

Hydroelectric dams (cause displacement) Millions of gallons of water are used to generate electricity around the world everyday. Overhead cables take the electricity to power factories and light up homes hundreds of miles away. This may sound like a good thing, however building a massive dam means building a massive reservoir behind it. This floods the land where the reservoir is built and often causes thousands of people to leave their homes.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
P4.10

• Some 2.4 billion people do not have access to sanitation.

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
Example: The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China is the largest hydroelectric dam in the world and caused the displacement of some 1.9 million people.

are usually the ones who fetch and carry the water that will be used at home.

Women and children

Health & hygiene (access to safe drinking water, nearby) When people (and animals) have to use the same stream or pond for washing and drinking, germs can get into the water and cause illness. Not only that, but the water used for drinking is often located several kilometres from where people live. Women and children (mostly girls) are usually the ones who have to fetch and carry the water they will use at home. This is very heavy work (filled buckets or pots can weigh up to 20 kilograms) that takes up too much time each day. And even though the water is boiled to kill germs, there is always a risk of getting an illness such as cholera. Many people die from cholera. Not only should people have access to drinking water nearby, but it should also be safe. Example: Twenty-year old Lidie spends a quarter of her day fetching water for her family in rural India. Her studies have suffered as a result. This will limit the kind of job she can get. Large-scale irrigation Millions of gallons of water are used to irrigate crops around the world everyday. Irrigation on large farms sometimes uses so much water that land in a community is dried out and many trees are lost. When it does rain, the water rushes away and takes soil with it. Ordinary people are left struggling to find enough water. Over the years, the water level underground becomes lower and lower. Wells can go as deep as 20 metres - making water extremely difficult to pull every time a family needs to get water to drink, cook, wash or water their crops.

Example: Agha Khan, one of the richest men in the world, owns a large sugar plantation in Burkina Faso. Pipes carry water from the River Komoe to a human-made lake. From there it is pumped to 500 metre-long spraying machines, which are used to water huge fields of sugar cane. After heavy rain, waterfalls start running from the River Komoe. But later in the year, these waterfalls become narrow streams since much of the water has gone to irrigate the sugar plantation. The result is land drying out, the loss of trees, and little water left for ordinary people.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
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UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
Privatization of a public resource Most people would consider water to be a basic human need - something one needs to survive. However, the selling of water to make a profit is a growing trend around the world. This public resource is usually managed by local or municipal governments, which supply water to households. If a government decides to sell water to a corporation, then the latter becomes the manager of the water supply. What used to be a generally affordable public resource then becomes a private resource that people must pay for. In the past ten years, three giant global corporations (Bechtel, Vivendi and Suez) have taken control over the water supplied to almost 300 million people in every continent of the world. Another sign of increased privatization is the bottled water industry. Growing by 20% per year, it is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. As a result, bottled water companies are constantly searching for new water supplies. Example: The private company, Aguas del Tunari took over the water system in Cochabamba, Bolivia in February 2000. In February and March 2000, thousands of people took to the streets to protest the huge rise in the price of water. Many people saw their bills triple or even quadruple just weeks after the company owned by a London-based multinational took over. For thousands of families, the rise in price meant that half of their monthly income went to paying for water. People were unable to survive under these conditions and demanded that the city break the water contract with the private company. After a huge struggle between the citizens of Cochabamba, the police and the military, the city finally listened to the people and ended the water contract with Aguas del Tunari. See case study on this story: http://www.cbc.ca/news/features/water/bolivia.html 70% of the world's water is used for farming (food production), 90% is used for this purpose in the dry tropics. The use of water for irrigation has increased by over 60% since 1960. 22% of the world's water is used for business and industry 8% of the world's water is used by individuals

generally affordable public resource becomes a private resource that people must pay for.

What used to be a

Key Statistics • Although three-quarters of the world's surface is covered by water, 97.5% of this is saltwater and only 2.5% is freshwater, most of which is frozen in ice caps. Less than 1% of the world's freshwater resources are available for human use.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
P4.12

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
• About 2 billion people depend on groundwater worldwide (about one-third of the world's population). Countries around the world face rapidly depleting groundwater resources, including parts of India, China, West Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the former Soviet Union and the western United States.
Four out of ten people in

the world experienced water shortages by the mid1990s.

• About 80 countries around the world had experienced serious water shortages by the mid 1990s. This makes up about 40% of the world's population. • One-third of the global population lives in countries with moderate-to-high water stress. Water stress occurs when water consumption is more than 10% of renewable freshwater resources. West Asia faces the biggest threat. More than 90% of the population in the region lives under severe water stress. • Two-thirds of the global population is expected to be living in waterstressed conditions in less than 25 years. • Universal access to safe drinking water is not expected before 2050 in Africa, 2025 in Asia and 2040 in Latin America and the Caribbean. • A 40% increase in global water use is expected by 2020.

• By 2015, the international community has set a goal to reduce by half the proportion of people who don't have access to safe drinking water.

• To go along with this goal, the international community will seek to reduce by half the number of people without access to sanitation. • It is expected to cost around $30 billion per year to meet these goals, almost double what is now being spent.

• Improved public awareness about the consequences and alternatives to hydroelectric dams, large-scale irrigation and the privatization of water.

In Canada...

Canada has 20%, the biggest portion, of the world's fresh water, but only 9% of the world's "renewable" fresh water supply. This compares with 18% for Brazil, 9% for China and 8% for the U.S.

A Water-Rich Country? • Canada has more lake area than any other country in the world: Canada's rivers and lakes have enough water to flood the entire country by two metres! • The Great Lakes have 18% of the world's fresh surface water, making them one of the largest systems of freshwater reserves on earth. • Between 1972 and 1991, Canada's use of freshwater resources increased by 80% per year. In the same period, Canada's population only increased by 3%.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
P4.13

What Needs to Be Done?

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

largest consumers of water in the world.

Canadians & Water Consumption

Canadians the second

A typical Canadian uses around 350 litres of water a day for household and gardening purposes. This makes Canadians the second largest consumers of water in the world. Americans are the biggest consumers using some 400 litres of water per day. For individuals in the Third World, their average daily consumption is some 58 litres/day. So how do Canadians consume so much water?
Average Canadian Water Consumption for Typical Daily Activities Area inside or outside the home Bathroom Flushing toilet Showers Baths

100 litres 150 litres 20 litres 20 litres 8 litres 10 litres

20 litres

Brushing teeth (with tap running) Shaving Kitchen Hand washing (with tap running) Cooking Washing dishes by hand Using dishwasher Utility Room Outdoors Using garbage disposal Doing laundry (1 load) Washing car Watering the lawn

35 litres

225 litres 35 L/min

400 litres

home use occurs in bathrooms.

The breakdown of water usage in the average Canadian household is as follows:
About 65% of indoor

• Toilet - 30% • Bathing and showering - 35% • Laundry - 20% • Drinking and cooking - 10% • Cleaning - 5%

Notes about water use in and around Canadian homes: • Only 10% of home water supply is used in the kitchen for drinking, cooking and washing dishes. • About 65% of indoor home use occurs in the bathrooms. • Toilets use 40% more water than needed. • The greatest water use occurs in the summer when about half to three quarters of treated water is used for gardening.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
P4.14

20 litres

40 litres

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
Water & Canada's Economy Most water resources are used in industry and agriculture: • Canadians consumed some 703 million litres of bottled water in 1998 • Canada's hydroelectric dams meet two-thirds of the country's electricity needs • 324 litres of water are needed to produce one kilogram of paper • 94 litres of water are need to produce one kilogram of steel • 1,000 litres of water are needed to grow one kilogram of potatoes • 10 litres of water are needed to manufacture one litre of gasoline • One litre of oil can contaminate up to 2 million litres of water • There have been serious talks during the past few years on whether Canada should take advantage of its supply of water by selling it for profit - like gas, oil and timber. • This wouldn't just affect the way water is supplied to Canadian households some entrepreneurs also want to export water from Canada's lakes. See: Water as a Commodity: http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/water/

Sources
Development & Peace Campaign: - "Water: Life Before Profit" http://www.devp.org/testA/current.htm WaterCan Teacher Resource H2Oh http://www.watercan.com/h2oh/ Public Citizen Case Study about the privatization of water in Bolivia. http://www.citizen.org/documents/Bolivia_(PDF).PDF OXFAM Water for All OXFAM's on-line learning resource on water and change. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/water/

2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development Water Fact Sheet http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/media_info/factsheets.html CBC News Online - "By the numbers" http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/water/bynumbers.html Environment Canada - "Water conservation - every drop counts!" http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/info/pubs/lntwfg/e_chap6.htm

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
P4.15

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

STUDENT HANDOUT P4.16 Canadian Water Consumption Chart

Canadian Water Consumption Chart

Average Canadian Water Consumption for Typical Daily Activities Area inside or outside the home Average use BATHROOM Flushing toilet Showers Baths Shaving KITCHEN 150 litres 20 litres 8 litres 10 litres 100 litres 20 litres

Brushing teeth (with tap running) Hand washing (with tap running) Cooking Washing dishes by hand Using dishwasher UTILITY ROOM OUTDOORS Washing car Using garbage disposal Doing laundry (1 load) Watering the lawn

40 litres 20 litres

400 litres 35 L/min

225 litres

Did you know that the average Canadian home uses water like this… ? • Toilet - 30% • Bathing and showering - 35% • Laundry - 20% • Drinking and cooking - 10% • Cleaning - 5% In fact, did you also know that… ?

• Only 10% of home water supply is used in the kitchen for drinking, cooking and washing dishes. • About 65% of indoor home use occurs in the bathrooms. • Toilets use 40% more water than needed.

• The greatest water use occurs in the summer when about half to three quarters of treated water is used for gardening.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
P4.16

20 litres

35 litres

UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

STUDENT HANDOUT P4.17 Water Log Worksheet

Water Log Worksheet
How much water do you use in a typical week? Find out by keeping track and maybe you will find areas where you can really save water. Make sure to also keep track of the water you use away from home - that adds up too! If you are working in teams, all team members should keep track of their individual use separately. At the end of the week, get together to add totals.

Average Canadian Water Consumption for Typical Daily Activities
How many times do you do these activities? Average Total Your Total

BATHROOM Flushing toilet Showers Baths

20 litres

100 litres 10 litres 2 litres 8 litres 1 litre

Brushing teeth (with tap running) Brushing teeth (with tap off) Shaving

150 litres

Hand washing (with tap running) Hand washing (with tap off) KITCHEN Cooking

20 litres

Washing dishes by hand Using dishwasher Using garbage disposal UTILITY ROOM OUTDOORS Washing car Other Doing laundry (1 load)

20 litres 40 litres

35 litres

20 litres

225 litres 400 litres 35 L/min

Watering the lawn

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 2
P4.17

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri.

Sat.

Sun.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

P4.18

UNIT 5: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE WRAP-UP

UNIT 5 GOALS Unit Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Jigsaw Panel Discussion 2. Show & Tell 3. Presentation of Learning Tree Storyboard Team Projects 4. Group Work Evaluation P5.2 P5.3 P5.3 P5.3 P5.2

TOOLS
TEACHER TOOLS STUDENT TOOLS Evaluation Tools S27 - S40

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
P5.1

UNIT 5: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE WRAP-UP

UNIT GOALS:

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. Jigsaw Panel Discussion
(CCC: intellectual, personal & social, communication-related) Students will share with classmates their knowledge about the country they have been studying throughout the module.

1. Build a consciousness of global citizenship through interconnecting the issues of poverty & basic human needs such as health

(HIV/AIDS), nutrition (food in the previous four units.
DURATION:

1. Each team will select one aspect of its Learning Tree Storyboard Project to
present to the class. This could mean presenting all aspects of one Learning Tree Storyboard (HIV/AIDS, Hunger & Food Security, Water & the Environment), or one particular aspect of all of their Learning Trees, or another combination students choose.

security), and water covered

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)

2. One member from each team will be part of a discussion panel.

3. The teacher will moderate the panel discussion and invite teams to take
note of some aspect of another team's project that they can incorporate in their Learning Tree Storyboard(s).

4. Each student will be given 5 minutes to present on the panel.
with the class. Possible questions include: • What surprised you the most about the presentations? • What were some of the similarities you saw between countries? • What are some of the differences?

5. At the end of the panel presentations, the teacher will open a discussion

• Do you think Canada should be involved in helping developing countries?

• What about the problems we have at home, who should be helping Canadians? • How can you help? Extension:

6. Brainstorm with the class on an activity it can do to help and that the

class can take on as a project at the end of the module. For example, a project in the school (e.g. create an awareness poster, fundraising activity), a project involving the local community (invite speakers from a community or non-governmental organization to the school), a project to connect with other communities in Canada or around the world (join discussion forums or create a discussion forum, twin with a school/organization in another country), plan an event to raise awareness about poverty and basic human needs or about one of the themes covered in the module (for example, organize an event to commemorate World AIDS Day on December 1st), etc.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P5.2

UNIT 5: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE WRAP-UP

Activity 2. Show & Tell
(CCC: personal & social, communication-related) Post in the classroom the World Maps (Unit 1), Water Illustrations (Unit 4) and Proverbs (Unit 4) that the students have produced in previous units. Give students a chance to mingle, view the artwork and discuss their work with their classmates.

Activity 3. Presentation of Learning Tree Storyboard Team Projects
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)

1. All teams will give 5-minute presentations about their country-specific

Learning Tree Storyboard Project. They will decide how to present their projects – whether they will give a general overview of all the Learning Trees or focus on a specific tree and theme. dynamic, each presentation should either include an interactive component (like a class quiz), an artistic component (like a proverb or an illustration) or a multimedia component (PowerPoint slides, audio interview, etc.).

2. To accommodate different learning styles and make the presentations more

3. Sheets from student scrapbooks can be posted in the classroom to create
a "Building Global Justice: Poverty & Human Needs Forest".

4. All teams will hand in the Learning Tree Project Scrapbooks to the teacher.

Activity 4. Group Work Evaluation

STUDENT TOOLS Evaluation Tools S27 - S40

After class presentations, hand out the cooperative learning group evaluation and the individual evaluation tools you feel are most appropriate for your students (see the "Evaluation" section of the "Student Tools" in the Table of Contents, page 9). These can be completed in class and as homework at the teacher's discretion.

Integrated Subject
Art The Show & Tell activity could also be done in Art Class.

A DIFFERENT POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
P5.3

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

MODULE 2

A Different World:

MODULE 2 GLOBALIZATION & TRADE
G1.1 G2.1 G3.1 G4.1

Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization

Unit 2: Globalization & Multinational Corporations Unit 3: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade? Unit 4: Globalization & Trade Module Wrap-Up

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

G

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

G

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

FACT SHEET G1.7 Introduction to Globalization

UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals G1.2

TEAM PROJECT INTRODUCTION Magazine Radio Program LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Globalization Bingo 2. History of Globalization Mapping 3. Begin Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project G1.3 G1.4 G1.6 G1.3

STUDENT HANDOUT G1.22 What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project? TEACHER HANDOUT G1.11 What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project? TEACHER HANDOUT G1.18 Writing for Radio STUDENT HANDOUT G1.27 Sample Technician Cue Sheet STUDENT HANDOUT G1.28 Sample News Bulletin STUDENT HANDOUT G1.29 Sample Audio Feature STUDENT HANDOUT G1.32 Globalization Bingo Card

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS

Unit 1 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide

STUDENT TOOLS News Writing

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

T10

Radio Writing Checklist Technician Cue Sheet

Conducting an Interview World Map

Project Planner - Group Work

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
S10 S11 S16 S25 S20 S9

G1.1

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

For some, globalization is a positive force that brings us closer
that creates more inequality between the rich and the poor.
UNIT GOALS

together – creating a network of interconnectedness of exchange, customs, laws and politics. For others, globalization is a negative force – one that draws us farther apart, by encouraging an economic system

1. Historically situate the

process of globalization to the long-term process of world integration.

This unit explores the historical process of world integration and encourages students to reflect on its positive and negative aspects.

2. Survey the positive globalization.

and negative aspects of

3. Reflect on how globalization can increase the number of direct and indirect relations existing between people and the rest of the world.

4. Learn about the different actors in international trade can create inequalities. and how economic exchange

Protesters march during the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) Summit in Quebec City in 2001. (GlobalAware)

© JOHN DONOGHUE/GLOBALAWARE

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit introduction
G1.2

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

DURATION:

Team Project Introduction
Process, Tools, Resources & Team Assignments
Begin the unit by introducing the Magazine Radio Program Team Project and how it will be completed: The goal of the Team Project is to develop a magazine-format radio program to be presented to the class at the end of the module. The Team Project is intended to allow students to develop all the crosscurricular competencies being practised through the learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project.

2-4 classes (75 minutes each)

The radio program will be performed live in front of the class at the end of the module. However, there are elements of the program that will need to be recorded in advance.

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet

FACT SHEET G1.7 Introduction to Globalization

Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. Globalization Bingo
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social)

In this version of bingo, students will reflect on how globalization can increase the connections between people and the rest of the world and the role they can play in influencing these connections.
STUDENT HANDOUT G1.32 Globalization Bingo Card

Procedure: be playing a kind of bingo game. on the bingo card. signature more than once.

1. Pass out copies of the bingo cards and explain to students that they will 2. Their goal is to get signatures from students who can answer questions

3. They cannot sign their own paper and they cannot get another student's 4. Let students know that this is an activity for them to share what they already
know and to start a discussion about the issues being raised in the unit.

5. Students are winners if they complete two lines in any direction.
G1.3

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide

Team Project Tip: Refer to the Magazine Radio Program Project Handout (G1.11) for a complete description of the process, tools and resources necessary to do the project. Also use the Writing for Radio Handout (G1.18) as a guide. Introduce students to the Project Tools - Radio Writing Checklist, Technician Cue Sheet, News Writing Tool as well as the Sample Scripts.

The project should be worked on throughout the entire curriculum module. At the discretion of the teacher, the project could be worked on during class time and as assigned homework.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Activity 2. History of Globalization Mapping
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Students will be introduced to important benchmarks in the history of globalization - helping them to later make connections between early forms of economic globalization and the present-day situation. Procedure: Draw a large outline of the map of the world on the blackboard or on a transparency. This will be used for the mapping part of the activity. Have on hand different coloured chalk or markers. Divide class into teams. Assign each team to one of the following stories related to the Fact Sheet. Each story will require students to do specific Web Quest and world-mapping activities as described below.

STUDENT TOOL S25 World Map

1. Ancient Empires

There were signs of early forms of economic globalization even many centuries ago. Ancient empires such as the Egyptian (2850-715 BC), Greek (900-200 BC), Roman Empires (500 BC - 300 AD) would take goods and raw materials from the country of conquest and bring them back to the home "province". Conquerors would take some items for their own personal use (to decorate their palaces for example). Other items such as wine, olives, and spices would be sold in local markets. For this purpose, trade routes were established with the countries being conquered. Web Quest • Find a typical trade route for Ancient Greece or • Find a typical trade route for the Ancient Roman Empire World Mapping

• Once in the larger group, ask teams to trace the route on the world map.

2. European Expansion

During the period of European Expansion (14th Century - 19th Century), the empires of Spain, Portugal, Britain, France, Germany and others set up colonies in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania. This made economic globalization more obvious. The wealth taken from the colonies caused industry to grow in these empires. Industry produced many goods, which required the creation of new markets within and outside the empires. This meant the need for more trade.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G1.4

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
Web Quest • What kinds of products were manufactured in the Spanish, Portuguese, British, French or German Empires during the period of European Expansion? • What raw materials were taken from the Americas, Africa, Asia or Oceania to manufacture these products? World Mapping • Once in the larger group, ask teams to write the name of the empire they have chosen to research on the world map based on the "home base" of that empire. For example, the name of the Roman Empire should be written on the outline of Italy. • Under the name of the empire, ask students to write the name of the product(s) produced by that empire.

• Then ask students to write the name of the country or countries of the Americas, Africa or Asia where the raw material for the manufactured products came from on the world map.

• Under the name, students should indicate the raw materials taken from that country or countries.

3. Revolutions

Economic globalization increased as countries moved through stages of transition or "revolutions." There are two major revolutions that were historically very important for economic globalization: the agricultural revolution (17501900) and the industrial revolution (1750-1830). Together, they created the framework for the "modern globalized world" - private property, technology, trade, communications and factories were the outcomes of these revolutions. Web Quest • In what country did the Industrial Revolution begin and why? or

• What were the most important changes that came out of the agricultural revolution? World Mapping

• Ask students to write "Industrial Revolution" on the country where it began or • Ask students to write "Agricultural Revolution" on a country where they think it had a major impact.

4. International Financial Institutions
At the end of World War Two, a new set of rules were created for the global economy. Some say the rules were intended to prevent other financial crises such as the Great Depression of the 1930s that hurt the world economy.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G1.5

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
In 1944, world leaders met in Bretton Woods, New England to discuss how to create a stable and cooperative global economy. Three institutions came out of the meeting: the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Web Quest • Find the Web site for the IMF, World Bank, GATT or the WTO. Where is their headquarters located? World Mapping

Alternative:

• Ask students to present the world-mapping activity using multimedia. For example, doing a PowerPoint presentation, including interactive maps, etc.

Activity 3. Begin Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project
STUDENT TOOL S20 Project Planner - Group Work

(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)

Now that the Project has been introduced, ask students to meet in their teams and begin by assigning different roles to team members.

Resources

"Globalization: For and Against" - A BBC News Article (September 25, 2000) http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/941031.stm "What is globalization?" - A section on the about.com Web site Includes a collection of articles on globalization from different viewpoints. http://globalization.about.com/od/whatisit/

Integrated Subjects

Language Arts Sample activity: Ask students to design their own bingo cards based on the information they have learned in the unit. Geography Activity 2 can be integrated into Geography class.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G1.6

• Ask students to write "IMF," "World Bank," "GATT" or "WTO" on the corresponding city and country.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

FACT SHEET G1.7 Introduction to Globalization

Introduction to Globalization
What Is Globalization?
Almost everyone has heard the term "globalization", but far from everyone agrees on what it means exactly. On the one hand, it is described as a positive force that brings us closer together - we are becoming more and more connected through customs, laws and politics. On the other hand, it is also described as a negative force - one that draws us farther apart by an economic system that creates more inequality between the rich and the poor. The term globalization has been used to describe a range of trends and phenomena. It most broadly describes the increased exchange of goods, people, ideas and cultures between nations. This could mean getting access to the worldwide web, the opening of another Gap store or the signing of a free trade agreement. In a more narrow sense, globalization is about economics and an increased international flow of goods and services. This Module will focus mainly on the economic aspects of globalization.

History of Globalization

revolution and the

industrial revolution were for economic

Society has changed over time - from sedentary to hunter-gatherer (nomadic) through agricultural improvements to the development of villages and cities in each region of the world.
The agricultural

historically very important globalization.

There were signs of early forms of economic globalization even many centuries ago. Ancient empires such as the Egyptian (2850-715 BC), Greek (900-200 BC) and Roman Empires (500 BC - 300 AD) would take goods and raw materials from the country of conquest and bring them back to the home "province." Conquerors would take some items for their own personal use (to decorate their palaces for example). Other items such as spices would be sold in local markets. For this purpose, trade routes were established with the countries being conquered.

As of around 1450, regional geographic trading blocs such as Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, India, China and Africa already existed. Changes took place only within these blocs, either within a country or an economic or geographic region, rather than on an international level. Economic exchanges increased over time. Some reasons include well-established sea routes (transport); increased population leading to more trade; the rise of political systems that followed the Reformation and Renaissance; more technological and manufacturing skills and the "discovery" of the Americas. In fact, economic globalization increased as countries moved through stages of transition or "revolutions." There are two major revolutions that were historically very important for economic globalization: the agricultural revolution (1750-1900) and the industrial revolution (1750-1830). Together, they created
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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
the framework for the "modern globalized world" - private property, technology, trade, communications and factories were the outcomes of these revolutions. Beginning in the 18th Century, the agricultural revolution transformed human society by the invention of the plough. Before this, small-scale farmers were only able to produce enough for their own survival. With the new technology, it was now possible to produce on a large-scale and have extra agricultural resources, more than those just necessary for survival. These extra or surplus resources were sold for profit. A small group of nobles gained control of these surplus resources and armed themselves to protect their power. This concentration of power and resources eventually led to the development of the state. The rich and powerful developed the state institution to further strengthen their position. The Industrial Revolution began in Britain around 1750 brought the use of new materials, technologies and ways of producing goods. Materials like iron and steel, fuels, and steam power started to get used. There was now electricity, the invention of new machines and the factory system (which meant the increased division of labour). There were also inventions in transportation such as the automobile, airplane, and in communications such as the telegraph and radio.

The Development of a World Trading System

During the middle of the second millennium, there were increasing links between countries but there was no one global world system. This was because of great distances and lack of transport between Africa, the Americas, Oceania and China. The trade that existed during this period was mainly in luxury goods such as silk rather than the mass flow of goods. Two events changed this situation. First, the age of European Expansion which began towards the end of the 14th century. Second, technological improvements in maritime navigation. Both events were a result of powerful nations competing with each other for even more power and territory. For example, Christopher Columbus and other explorers wanted to reach the East for spices, trade and power, and for Christianity to become more dominant than Islam. England was a major trading nation during the 17th Century, especially through its imperialist network based on its Caribbean territories, the Americas and later expansion into India and Canada. During this period, the Dutch were the key European nation promoting trade and beginning the model of European globalization. Trading companies, public banks and the stock exchange were all started by the Dutch.
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During the period of European Expansion (14th Century to 19th Century), the Empires of Spain, Portugal, Britain, France, Germany and others set up colonies in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania. This made economic globalization more obvious. The wealth taken from the colonies caused industry to grow in these Empires. Industry produced many goods, which required the creation of new markets within and outside the Empires. This meant the need for more trade.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

International Financial Institutions
At the end of World War Two, a new set of rules was created for the global economy. Some say the rules were intended to prevent other financial crises such as the Great Depression of the 1930s that hurt the world economy. In 1944, world leaders met in Bretton Woods, New England to discuss how to create a stable and cooperative global economy. Three institutions came out of the meeting: the International Monetary Fund created to lend money to countries that are in financial trouble, the World Bank created to lend money to help countries grow and develop, and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) created to encourage international trade. More specifically,

1. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was established to promote
international cooperation on finance, encourage stable exchange rates and an organized way of exchanging money between countries. It was also given the role of providing emergency loans to countries that ran into problems paying.

2. The World Bank (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development)

3. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/World Trade

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Organization (WTO) - GATT was established at Bretton Woods as a set of rules to control international trade and stop the policies that some say damaged the world economy in the 1930s. These were policies that favoured national economies (also known as protectionist policies). In 1995, the WTO replaced GATT, expanding its role to cover the trade in services not just goods. There are now trade rules for areas like telecommunications, banking, clothing and food. There is another difference between GATT and the WTO. GATT was an agreement not an institution and so it was harder to enforce its rules. The WTO is an institution and can legally fine nations that refuse to follow the trade regulations.

SAPs Create a Gap
With the establishment of these three institutions, a new economic order began to unfold. With a restored confidence in the economy, trade expanded and the World Bank started giving massive loans to the Third World for development. Eventually, growth in the Western economy started to slow down as prices rose dramatically. As a result, there was an increase in interest rates and unemployment, which meant that the west had less money to loan to Third World countries. These countries now faced growing debt because of increased interest rates. During this period, the IMF began offering loans with strings attached to countries in debt. The IMF would provide loans on the condition that the borrowing country adopt a structural adjustment policy (SAP) with the following measures:

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was founded as a means of reviving European economies damaged by the World Wars. Its role was later extended to developing countries. The idea is to lend money to developing countries in order to help them grow.

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• Privatizing public institutions. Or, selling government corporations that provide services such as the phone, hydro and water to private companies. • Reducing government spending on social services such as hospitals, schools, and welfare programs. • Liberalizing trade (free trade). In other words, getting rid of rules and limits to make it easier for companies to set up shop in the indebted country. • Increasing exports or the sale of products to other countries. Although SAPs were set up to help reduce the debt these countries faced, it had the opposite effect: • Due to increased interest rates, Third World countries have had to spend more on paying interest. • Increased exports have resulted in oversupplying the market of most primary commodities (such as coffee, cocoa), which has driven down the cost of these goods.

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were to create worldwide

economic globalization

The original goals of

• The reduction in social services has created an increase in the death of children and higher levels of malnutrition.

has been an increase in inequality and poverty.

prosperity... Instead, there

The original goals of economic globalization were to create worldwide prosperity and improvements in quality of life. Instead, there has been an increase in inequality and poverty as national governments lose their ability to control their development strategies and policies. But is it possible to respond to the challenges of economic globalization in order to indeed improve quality of life worldwide? This is one of today's most pressing concerns by all sectors of society.

Sources

"History of Globalization" An article by Matthew J. Rippon on the "A world connected" Web site. www.aworldconnected.org/article.php?id=611print=1 Slaves to Trade A public educational tool by the Social Justice Committee. http://www.s-j-c.net/ Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm

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• Third World countries have had to export more to keep their export revenues stable.

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What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project?
Introduction
TEACHER HANDOUT G1.11 What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project?

The goal of the Team Project is to develop a 13-minute magazine format radio program to be presented to the class at the end of the module. The Team Project is intended to allow students to develop all the crosscurricular competencies being practised through the learning activities and to apply and appropriate them in their own project. The project should be worked on throughout the entire curriculum module. At the discretion of the teacher, the Project could be worked on during class time and as assigned homework. The radio program will be performed live in front of the class at the end of the module. However, there are elements of the program that will need to be recorded in advance.

Process:

1. Divide the class into teams of 4-5 students.
module (globalization, trade, multinational corporations).

2. Each team will need to do research on one of the themes covered in this 3. In developing their radio programs, students will use a multidisciplinary
approach by incorporating elements such as drama (e.g. role-plays, songs), math (e.g. statistics), new technologies (e.g. recorded interviews), language arts (e.g. poem), etc.

4. At the end of the module, students will give 13-minute presentations to the
class.

5. The Radio Writing Checklist and scripts will be used to complete the

Project. At least one team should keep copies of the scripts used as their rough drafts.

6. Final copies of the script (program transcript) will be given to the teacher. Magazine Radio Program
A magazine radio program is made up of different program segments with distinct content. To complete each segment of the radio program, students will have to perform different tasks relying on selected tools. Described below are the suggested program segments, times, associated tasks/tools and the roles and output for each segment:

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TIME SEGMENT DESCRIPTION TOOL/TASK ROLES OUTPUT

:30

Theme music/ Find or invent a song that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show. Include an announcement to briefly describe what your show is about.

Radio Writing Checklist

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or

Write script Record voices and music

Read live script with music background Host(s) Script

:30

Intro (line-up)

3:00 News

8:00 Feature

An in-depth focus on the theme – pick a country to illustrate your topic – include interviews/ testimonials. Key questions: What are the problems? Who is supporting the creation of the problem? What are the potential solutions (alternatives)? What is being done about it (responses)?

Write news items in radio style. Do interviews Find audio clips Write script based on web research

Reporters

Script Audio clips Interviews

:30

:30

Theme music/ As at the beginning of your program jingle show, play the song or jingle that gives a sense of the mood of your show. Extro Say goodbye to the (closing credits) listeners, repeat your name, the program people have been listening to, thank today’s guests, reporters and everyone who helped put the show together.

Include the following voices: • People from the selected country • Canadians working on issue in that country • Voices from ordinary people, government and other institutions

Mixed audio clip or

Write script

Host(s)

Script

Read live script with music background

:30

Theme music/ Play the song or jingle that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show.

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or Read live script with music background

For technician: see the Technician Cue Sheet Tool - S11

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Include 3 news items related to the theme. of your show. Tip: Find stories that illustrate the problems you will be addressing in the show.

Introduce yourself and the Radio Writing program, announce the Checklist line-up for the program (what the listeners will hear). Write script

News Writing Tool

Reporters

Script Audio clips

Do web search to find news stories.

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Because of the different layers involved in this project, different elements could be easily integrated into other subjects such as Drama, Language Arts, Computer Science, and Art Class.

Project Roles
Everyone on the production team will have a role to play. To produce the program, there should be: • A Producer: coordinates show lineup, assigns stories, responsible for overall program • Reporters: research and write scripts for stories • A Technician: gathers, records and edits sound

• Host(s)/Announcer(s): presents show segment(s)

Tools

A number of tools have been made available to help students complete the learning activities as well as the project. Tools that are particularly useful for the project include (for complete list, see page 8 of the Table of Contents): • Radio Writing Checklist - p. S9 • Technician Cue Sheet - p. S11 • News Writing - p. S10

• Project Planner - p. S19 (use to answer questions for each program segment: What do I know, What do I need to know, Where do I need to look, How will I present it?) • Project Planner - Group Work - p. S20 (use to choose different roles for team members) • Researching Internet Guide - p. S21 (use to do Internet research) • Conducting an Interview - p. S16

• What's the Medium? - p. S24 (use to decide on what medium is needed to communicate a message) • What's the Message? - p. S23 (use to help determine what needs to be communicated and to whom) • Making Decisions - p. S22

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Everyone should be part of the live role-play of the radio program: Reporters present their own pieces live; Technicians play all of the taped audio; and the Producer might become the live host or announcer:

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• Taking Stock - p. S27 (use to make sure project is on track and to decide on any revisions that may be needed) • Cooperative Learning Individual Evaluation - p. S30 (use to evaluate the experience of group work) • Reflecting on Using ICT - p. S31 (use to evaluate the experience of using ICT) • World Map - p. S25

Materials List • Access to computer lab, portable computers in the classroom, and/or home computers with Internet access and Microsoft Word® installed. • Access to digital recording/editing software, microphone and speakers (to record and edit audio on the computer) • Pens • Pencils • Paper • Roundtable - for guests • Two tables - one for hosts, the other for technician • Host microphone(s), guest microphone • CD player • CDs (audio clips may be transferred to CD) • Cassettes (for recorded interviews or other recorded audio)

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General Resources for Students
Students will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for Team Projects:

Theme & Country Resources
Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation." This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/ CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/

The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/

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UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

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Audio Resources
Audio Archives InterWorld Radio A global network for radio stations and journalists. Includes news and programs about world issues and local contexts. http://www.interworldradio.org/# OneWorld Radio A global radio community sharing programs and ideas on development. http://radio.oneworld.net/ UNICEF Audio Features Radio interviews and packages, with transcripts, on latest current events affecting children worldwide. http://www.unicef.org/media/media_18185.html

Simbani - AMARC Africa News Agency Audio reports by community radio journalists on the following themes: HIV/AIDS, the environment, food security, gender, human rights & democracy. http://simbani.amarc.org/ Radio for All A selection of audio files for sharing produced by grassroots media activists. http://www.radio4all.net/ Learning Resources ITrain On-line A series of free resources on producing multimedia. http://www.itrainonline.org/ Plug-Ins

To listen or download audio from the Internet, you need to make sure that you have the appropriate computer plug-in (software) installed. For Apple Quick Time MP3 Player http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html For PC RealPlayer for RealAudio http://www.real.com/playerplus/index.html?lang=en Audiograbber To extract audio from CDs http://www.audiograbber.com-us.net/

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News Sources
Canadian Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Canada's national news agency Web site with links to CBC Radio, CBC Television and local CBC sites. http://cbc.ca Rabble.ca News stories, in-depth features, interviews and commentaries by writers who promote social change. http://rabble.ca/ International

International Press Service An independent news agency from the Global South covering stories on development and globalization. http://www.ips.org/ British Broadcasting Corporation World news published by Britain's national news agency, the BBC. http://news.bbc.co.uk/

Common Ground News Centre A mix of politics, issues and news by writers who promote social change. Published by a U.S.-based non-profit organization. http://www.commondreams.org/ New Internationalist Magazine On-line Reports on issues of world poverty and inequality. http://www.newint.org/

Multinational Monitor Magazine The on-line version of the magazine that tracks corporate activity, especially in the Third World. http://multinationalmonitor.org/monitor.html

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UN News Service News published by the United Nations News Centre. http://www.un.org/News/

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TEACHER HANDOUT G1.18 Writing for Radio

Writing for Radio
Key Questions
There are four questions to think about when writing for radio:

1. Who is your audience? Who are you addressing: friends, school staff, the
general public?

2. What do you want to say? As you research your theme, think about what
strikes you the most about what you find out, what are the most important points. These are the things you'll want to highlight in your radio show.

3. How much time do you have to say it? Tailor what you write based on
how much time you have to say it.

4. How are you going to say it - what program genre and format are you

Magazine Programs

Magazine programs cover one topic or several topics in some depth. They include a range of items that are defined by content or the target audience (for example, women's programs, health programs). Magazine programs may mix a number of formats such as talk, music, and interviews, and are usually prepared by a team. Program Components (segments) Program components are the basic elements of radio programs. The following are the radio formats that you will be exploring on your program:

Jingles A jingle is a catchy tune or rhyme to attract the listener's attention and reinforce a message. Jingles are often recognized immediately because they are repeated often and are linked with specific themes, people, events, products, etc. For example, students will be creating a jingle to help identify their radio programs. It will be repeated at least three times during the show and should include: • Name of the radio program (should indicate the theme being addressed) • The key message being conveyed (this could also be a slogan) • Recorded music that reflects the mood desired (could be hummed or sung)
STUDENT TOOL S10 News Writing

News Bulletins A news bulletin presents information about local, national, and international news and current affairs in order of importance or interest. News items should answer the questions: Who? What? Where? When? and Why? The first sentence of a news item is called the "lead". This sentence sets the context for the news item. It should be short, catchy and current.

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going to use? You will be exploring a variety of radio formats on your magazine program: jingles, news, reports, interviews. Each should be approached in a different way (see program components below).

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Features The feature provides an in-depth perspective on an issue or story. Features: • Need a clearly defined topic and angle or focus. • Are scripted. • Often contain music, sound effects, interviews, vox-pops or testimonials. • Need thorough content research, for example by conducting Internet research, and reviewing written documentation. • Are usually part of a news bulletin or magazine program.
STUDENT TOOL S16 Conducting an Interview

Interviews An interview is a method of talking to one or more guest speakers to ask questions and get information.

• Discuss the questions with the interviewee before the interview. • Be clear about the key messages (2-3) you both want to convey. • Summarize these main points at the end of the interview. • Be sensitive in how you conduct your interview.

• For your magazine program, your teammates may role-play a special guest (for example, a member of a Fair Trade organization). Vox-Pops, Testimonials, Audio Clips

• Vox-pops - Short 1-2 question interviews with people in the street (could also be your classmates, family members or other people you know), designed to reflect the feelings of ordinary people on an issue or topic. • Testimonials - Peoples' opinion on a subject based on their experience.

• Audio Clips - You can find testimonials, vox-pops, and interviews on the theme you are researching by searching Web sites with audio archives (recorded audio). You will need to know how to download this audio in order to use it for your magazine program. Music

Music is a key element in many radio programs, and is often used as a way to link different elements of a program. There are many styles of music such as jazz, classical, pop, country and western, vocal, and instrumental. • Choose music to suit your type of show or program content. • Music research is an important component of programming. Unless the broadcast is done live directly by the performer, music has to be bought or received as a promotional gift, and is usually subject to copyright.

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• Choose your interviewees carefully - they need to know about the subject, or be individuals directly involved in the event.

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Basic Principles of Radio Writing
The radio journalist has to write so that listeners can understand the story the first time it is read. Below are some basic principles on writing for radio.

1. Write as you speak, in simple sentences. Radio announcing uses a
conversational style. Avoid specialized terms, unless they are explained.

2. Test your script as you write. Don't just run your eyes over it, or murmur
under your breath. Read it out loud. If you trip over a word or phrase, it needs to be changed.

3. Use precise, clear language. The text should be easy to follow by ear. If
you are not sure about a sentence or paragraph, read it out to others and see whether they understand.

5. Write news thoughtfully. News or documentary material should be

delivered slowly, and in small chunks. News contains a lot of information and is more difficult to digest. Give your listeners time to reflect.

6. Think for the listener. Assess your script from the listener's point of view. 7. Show, don't tell. Be concrete and talk in pictures and images. It may
sound strange, but radio can be a very visual medium. You have to give listeners something to "look" at with their imagination instead of their eyes.

8. Don't overload your text with too much information. 9. Simplify numbers. Say "nearly 16 thousand" instead of "15 870". 10. Avoid repetitions, overused words and tongue twisters.

11. Avoid abbreviations unless you know that they are well known. If this

isn't possible, mention the name in full at the start and keep reminding the listener. You can't rewind a radio show to catch a missing detail.

12. Avoid using pronouns such as he, her, they. Who is being referred to
may not be so clear to the listener. It is better to repeat than assume.

13. Avoid lists. You may end up losing the listener's interest. 14. Punctuate to suit your own reading style. 15. Titles go before names. For example, "Prime Minister, Mrs. X."
Script Layout Here are some tips on how your script (copy) should look like: • Write hard-to-pronounce words phonetically • Write names or numbers in full • Use an easy-to-read font in a large size

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4. Write for one listener. Write and deliver your words as though you are speaking to one person, not a crowd.

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• Double space all copy for easy reading • Type on one side of the page only • Use one-inch margins • Use large spaces to indicate where the paragraph begins • Mark your copy so that it is easy to read and follow. For example, if you want a word emphasized, underline it. Also, put slash marks after the sentences where a pause is needed. Writing Cues The magazine radio program can contain a range of radio formats so it can become pretty complex. To make it easier to follow, especially when doing a live show as you will be doing, you will need to write cues in your script to let you know when to move from one program element to another, or when to bring "in" (start) or fade "out" (stop) each element: • Clip: segment of audio, any length, played as a unit, meant to serve as a quote. • Segment: an edited interview or narrated story with clips. • Narration: the story told by a host, announcer or presenter.

• Ambience: a background sound usually recorded at the scene of an event. Helps place the listener at the event as a participant or observer. The final script of your piece can also be the transcript of your show, or a detailed record of your program in writing.

Source: The "Basic Principles of Radio Writing" were originally published in the ITrainOnline "Multimedia Training Kit: Radio Scripting Handout"

Technical

Downloading audio from the Internet See the section on plug-ins on the list of General Resources for Students Copying audio onto CD from your computer See the section on plug-ins on the list of General Resources for Students Digital audio production See training unit on "Digital Audio Production" http://www.itrainonline.org/itrainonline/mmtk/audio.shtml

Presenting your radio program See training unit on "Presentation" in the "Producing Content for Radio" section http://www.itrainonline.org/itrainonline/mmtk/radiocontent.shtml

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What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project?
Magazine Radio Program
STUDENT HANDOUT G1.22 What Is the Magazine Radio Program Project?

A magazine radio program is made up of different program segments with distinct content. To complete each segment of the radio program, you will have to complete different tasks using selected tools. On the next page are the suggested program segments, times, associated tasks/tools, the roles and output for each segment. Each team member will have an important role to play as part of the production team. Project Roles To produce the radio program, there should be: • A Producer: coordinates show lineup, assigns stories, responsible for overall program • Reporters: research and write scripts for stories • A Technician: gathers, records and edits sound

Everyone should be part of the live role-play of the radio program: Reporters present their own pieces live; Technicians play all of the taped audio; and the Producer might become the live host or announcer: • Host(s)/Announcer(s): presents show segment(s)

© ELVIRA TRUGLIA Children participating in an outdoor broadcast by Radio Restinga, a community radio station in a neighbourhood of Porto Alegre, Brazil.
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UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
TIME SEGMENT DESCRIPTION TOOL/TASK ROLES OUTPUT

:30

Theme music/ Find or invent a song that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show. Include an announcement to briefly describe what your show is about.

Radio Writing Checklist

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or

Write script Record voices and music

Read live script with music background Host(s) Script

:30

Intro (line-up)

3:00 News

8:00 Feature

An in-depth focus on the theme – pick a country to illustrate your topic – include interviews/ testimonials. Key questions: What are the problems? Who is supporting the creation of the problem? What are the potential solutions (alternatives)? What is being done about it (responses)?

Do interviews

Reporters

Script Audio clips Interviews

Find audio clips Write script based on web research Include the following voices: • People from the selected country • Canadians working on issue in that country • Voices from ordinary people, government and other institutions

:30

:30

Theme music/ As at the beginning of your program jingle show, play the song or jingle that gives a sense of the mood of your show. Extro Say goodbye to the (closing credits) listeners, repeat your name, the program people have been listening to, thank today’s guests, reporters and everyone who helped put the show together.

Mixed audio clip or

Write script

Host(s)

Script

Read live script with music background

:30

Theme music/ Play the song or jingle that program jingle gives a sense of the mood of your show.

Announcer

Mixed audio clip or Read live script with music background

For technician: see the Technician Cue Sheet Tool - S11

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
G1.23

Include 3 news items related to the theme. of your show. Tip: Find stories that illustrate the problems you will be addressing in the show.

Introduce yourself and the Radio Writing program, announce the Checklist line-up for the program (what the listeners will hear). Write script

News Writing Tool

Reporters

Script Audio clips

Do web search to find news stories. Write news items in radio style.

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

General Resources for Students
For Team Project & Activities
Students will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for Team Projects:

Theme & Country Resources
Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation." This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/ UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/ CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/

The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
G1.24

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Audio Resources
Audio Archives InterWorld Radio A global network for radio stations and journalists. Includes news and programs about world issues and local contexts. http://www.interworldradio.org/# OneWorld Radio A global radio community sharing programs and ideas on development. http://radio.oneworld.net/ UNICEF Audio Features Radio interviews and packages, with transcripts, on latest current events affecting children worldwide. http://www.unicef.org/media/media_18185.html

Simbani - AMARC Africa News Agency Audio reports by community radio journalists on the following themes: HIV/AIDS, the environment, food security, gender, human rights & democracy. http://simbani.amarc.org/ Radio for All A selection of audio files for sharing produced by grassroots media activists. http://www.radio4all.net/ Learning Resources ITrain On-line A series of free resources on producing multimedia. http://www.itrainonline.org/ Plug-Ins

To listen or download audio from the Internet, you need to make sure that you have the appropriate computer plug-in (software) installed. For Apple Quick Time MP3 Player http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html For PC RealPlayer for RealAudio http://www.real.com/playerplus/index.html?lang=en Audiograbber To extract audio from CDs http://www.audiograbber.com-us.net/

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
G1.25

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

News Sources
Canadian Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Canada's national news agency Web site with links to CBC Radio, CBC Television and local CBC sites. http://cbc.ca Rabble.ca News stories, in-depth features, interviews and commentaries by writers who promote social change. http://rabble.ca/ International

International Press Service An independent news agency from the Global South covering stories on development and globalization. http://www.ips.org/ British Broadcasting Corporation World news published by Britain's national news agency, the BBC. http://news.bbc.co.uk/

Common Ground News Centre A mix of politics, issues and news by writers who promote social change. Published by a U.S.-based non-profit organization. http://www.commondreams.org/ New Internationalist Magazine On-line Reports on issues of world poverty and inequality. http://www.newint.org/ Multinational Monitor Magazine The on-line version of the magazine that tracks corporate activity, especially in the Third World. http://multinationalmonitor.org/monitor.html

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 1
G1.26

UN News Service News published by the United Nations News Centre. http://www.un.org/News/

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Sample Technician Cue Sheet

STUDENT HANDOUT G1.27 Sample Technician Cue Sheet

SEQ. 1.

TIME :30

SEGMENT

Theme music/ program jingle

SOURCE

Narration: Announcer Audio clip .

MEDIA

Live read CD Live read

CUES

In: "Latin America, Africa, Asia… "

3.

3:00

News

Narration: Reporters Narration: Reporters Audio clips

Live read CD

Out: "… so stay tuned." In: "Oxfam reports… " Out: "… for fair trade not free trade." In: "Coffee farmers in Guatemala… "

4.

8:00

Feature

Live read CD CD CD Live read CD Live read

Audio Clips Interviews 5. :30 Theme music/ program jingle Narration: Announcer Audio clip 6. :30 Extro (closing credits) Narration: Host Ambience

Out: "building a social movement."

In: "Latin America, Africa, Asia… " Out: "… humanize globalization, globalize solidarity." In: That’s it for today’s show on... ” Out: "Until next time, this is Peggy Lawrence." In: "Latin America, Africa, Asia… "

7.

:30

Theme music/ program jingle

Narration: Announcer Audio clip

Live read CD

13:30

Out: "humanize globalization, globalize solidarity."

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 2
G1.27

2.

:30

Intro (lineup)

Narration: Host

Out: "… humanize globalization, globalize solidarity." In: "Welcome to free trade or fair trade… "

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Sample Radio News Bulletin
Interworld Radio News Bulletin: 23/05/2005
STUDENT HANDOUT G1.28 Sample Radio News Bulletin

India's capital, Delhi is in a state of high alert after a third bomb went off last night. On Sunday one person died and 49 people were injured as two bombs went off in cinemas showing a film considered offensive by some Sikhs. The film, Jo Bole So Nihal, banned in the largely Sikh region of Punjab was shown for the first time in Delhi on the weekend. Some Sikh groups say the film denigrates their religion by using a Sikh religious chant, which is used in battle or in prayer. No group has claimed responsibility for the bombings. China has urged calm after ordering three million doses of bird flu vaccine to be sent to a western province. The move comes after wild geese found dead in Qinghai province were confirmed as having been infected by the H5N1 strain of the virus. Last week, World Health Organization officials renewed fears that bird flu could mutate and spread between humans. All human cases have been linked to contact with infected poultry. The virus has killed 53 people in Asia since 2003. The UN refugee agency says hundreds of people are still fleeing Togo following their disputed election. Violent protests were sparked by the election of Faure Gnassingbe, the son of its late ruler at the end of April. Opposition leaders claimed the election was rigged. A total of 32,000 people have now fled to Benin and Ghana since the unrest began. Many said they were fleeing a crackdown by Togolese security forces. The UNHCR has been unable to verify the reports.

UN envoy James Morris will visit Southern Africa to assess the threat of food shortages and HIV across the region. Mr. Morris will visit four countries, Zambia and Botswana where HIV infection rates are among the highest in the world, and Malawi and Zimbabwe that have been hit by drought. Critics of the Zimbabwean Government have blamed the drop in their food production on President Robert Mugabe's land reforms while the President blames western sanctions. The diamond firm De Beers has come under fire from the South African government over its commitment to black empowerment. In Parliament last week, South Africa's Deputy Minister of minerals Lulu Xingwana criticized the world's largest diamond mining firm for appointing another white, male chief executive. Firms in South Africa are being urged by the government to promote and hire more black employees to redress the damage done by the apartheid regime. De Beers did not comment on the remarks that were contained within a BBC report. Source: InterWorld Radio http://www.interworldradio.org/#
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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 3
G1.28

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Sample Audio Feature: India's Karate Girls
State of the World's Children, 2004: Audio Package for Radio Broadcasters
• Suggested narrator script, interview transcripts and sound actuality in MP3 format. • Total running time, including introduction, narration and all sound elements: around 5 minutes, 30 seconds. • All material recorded and scripted by UNICEF. Material is for broadcast use, free of charge.

STUDENT HANDOUT G1.29 Sample Audio Feature

Bihar is one of the poorest states in India, home to 86 million people. Most are subsistence farmers and fishermen living in remote, flood-prone areas, far from the nearest school. Historically, very few girls have gone to school in Bihar - but in recent years the picture has been changing with enrolment rates for girls rising from just 24% in 1992 to 34% today. With the support of UNICEF girls now have the chance to go to "jagjagis" or "wake up" centres as well as special boarding schools. Bihar's Education Project reaches over 2000 villages, and four out of five girls go on from the boarding schools to secondary education. Without support, most of them would never have seen a pen or pencil. 18-year-old Lalita Kumari is one of the girls who have beaten the odds. Not only is she continuing her education, she has landed herself an unusual teaching job…

Audio of karate class

Narrator: Teenage girls stand in rows, feet astride, thrusting first one arm then the other straight out in front of them - it's a karate lesson and the teacher is 18-yearold Lalita Kumari. Lalita is such a natural at the martial art that she's become a blue belt-and she's now been asked to teach physical education in four local schools. Lalita: (in Hindi) "By learning karate, I now feel more confident about tackling anybody trying to harm me. I can now protect myself against an enemy attack and get out of any problem unscathed."

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 4
G1.29

Introduction

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
Narrator: After going to a jagjagi, Lalita went on to the Mahila Shiksan Kendra - a boarding school for semi-literate students aged 15 to 35. Part of the Bihar Education project, the school provides a basic education in maths, painting, language skills and vocational training over eight months. Lalita now returns to her old school to teach karate… Lalita: (in Hindi) "Before I started studying and going to school, I never had the confidence to speak to any adult, or go out and meet anybody. I hadn't even seen another village or district or town." Narrator: Getting a start at school was no easy task - Lalita had to persuade her parents to let her go to a jagjagi at the age of twelve. Her mother recalls her first reaction when Lalita approached her about going to school: Lalita's mother: (in Hindi) "What's the need to let a girl study? What is the use? She can study as much as she likes, but in the end she'll only have to cook, which she'd be doing anyway if she didn't study." Narrator: As a child Lalita became used to hearing opposition from all sides.

Lalita: (in Hindi) "Everyone used to call me a boy since I wanted to go to school. Do girls study? No way. Boys study and girls don't. They don't go. They do the household work. If you're a girl and you go to school, then people will laugh at us."

Audio of school gong and girls in class.

Narrator: As another school day starts at the Mahila Shiksan Kendra, the headteacher Ms Sangeeta says the lessons are about much more than physical fitness…

Ms Sangeeta: (in Hindi) "Lalita attended our school. Empowerment is one of our major objectives, and for that reason, we impart some kind of training to these girls: cycling, knitting, painting, karate, sewing and art. We give training in karate so that the girls can develop a sense of self-confidence. Usually, these girls come from a background, which is very backward, so they're very withdrawn, scared, introverted and shy. So much so that they hesitate to a great extent to express themselves. But karate training helps them open up."

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 4
G1.30

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
Narrator: Today, Lalita's parents are fully behind her education - Lalita's father is quite sure they made the right decision… Lalita's father: (in Hindi) "Today everyone realizes the advantages of sending their children to study. It has become a huge success. Everyone is happy to let their daughters study. Now, if they call 30 girls to study, 50 show up for lessons. It's really become a huge hit over here." Narrator: Education has paid off for Lalita and her community. She's taught hundreds of young women how to defend themselves and has also earned money for herself and her family. Lalita's mother says she's proud of her daughter. Lalita's mother: (in Hindi) "Now people are saying 'look how well a girl from our community has developed.' It's very nice to hear."

Audio of second karate class

Narrator: As the sun goes down, another karate lesson is under way - and out in front of the class is Lalita, a young woman determined that other girls will follow her lead…

Source: UNICEF Audio Features http://www.unicef.org/media/media18185.html

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 4
G1.31

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Globalization Bingo Card for Students
Instructions
STUDENT HANDOUT G1.32 Globalization Bingo Card

To win, you need to fill in two rows in any direction. You cannot sign your own paper. Each person can only sign the paper once.

Who…
B
Can speak more than two languages

I
Can name an ancient empire

N
Knows what HBC stands for

G
Knows someone who owes money

O

Knows what MNC stands for

Is wearing something made in another country Knows where coffee comes from

Has heard of free trade

Knows someone who would work for $5 a day Can name a country in Latin America

Knows what continent established many empires Has travelled to another country

Eats at McDonald’s

FREE

Knows what chocolate is made of

Doesn’t have a cell phone

Has ever traded something valuable for something else

Has heard of fair trade

Has been to a farm

Was born in a country other than Canada

Knows what a colony is

Knows someone who works in a factory

Is wearing something made in Canada

Watches the news

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout 5
G1.32

Can name a country in Africa

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

FACT SHEET G2.7 Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)

UNIT 2 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. MNC Profiling: What Does a Multinational Corporation Look Like? G2.3 G2.4 G2.5 G2.6 G2.2

2. Film Discussion: The Corporation 3. NGO Profiling: What Does a NonGovernmental Organization Look Like? Team Project

TEACHER TOOLS

TOOLS

Unit 2 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T11

STUDENT TOOL Project Planner

S19

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
G2.1

4. Work on Magazine Radio Program

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

When European explorers began their search for new wealth five
from native populations and then sold them back to the colonies as

centuries ago, they took raw materials from their colonies using labour finished goods. Today, it works much the same way: Western countries import raw materials from Third World countries and export finished products to these countries. What's different are the players. International trade is now dominated by Multinational Corporations

UNIT GOALS:

1. Survey the positive and negative aspects of multinational corporations. the challenges presented by MNCs.

(MNCs), entities that are based in one country but have operations in many other countries around the world.

2. Survey the responses to

This unit will explore the implications of this phenomenon.

3. Survey responses to the challenges of globalization by non-governmental organizations.

© SJC

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit introduction
G2.2

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

DURATION:

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet
Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)
FACT SHEET G2.7 Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. MNC Profiling: What Does a Multinational Corporation Look Like?
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)

Procedure: In groups, students will research an MNC and evaluate its record as a global corporation. One group should evaluate the presence of the MNC in Canada.

1. Divide the class into groups. 2. Assign groups one of the following corporations to research:
• Wal-Mart • Nestlé • General Motors • Monsanto • Dow Chemical • The Gap • Nike • McDonald's

3. Ask groups to create profiles of the assigned corporation.
Profiles should include: • Date of establishment • Location of headquarters • Countries in which it operates • Number of people it employs • Type of products it offers • Who does the company try to sell its products to? • Total sales

• What do organizations that criticize multinationals say about the MNC (labour rights, human rights, environmental impact)? • What claims does the MNC make about the benefits it brings to communities?

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G2.3

Students will do research and weigh information in order to assess whether multinational corporations (MNCs) foster international development or deepen global inequalities.

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

Activity 2. Film Discussion: The Corporation
(CCC: intellectual, communication-related) Students will see and reflect on this media portrayal about the rise of The Corporation, the role and influence it has in today's society, the challenges raised by its omnipresence and possible responses to these challenges. Procedure:

1. As a class, view The Corporation, a film by Mark Achbar, Jennifer Abbott, Joel Bakan (145 minutes)
themes:

• The responsibility of corporations to people (corporate social responsibility) • The joint economic and social reliance between individuals, corporations and nations • Impacts of commercial activity on individuals, communities and the environment • Impacts of globalization Key questions:

• How does the film talk about the theme - through interviews, images, etc.? • What do they think about the theme - do they agree with the film, do they have other opinions on the theme that were not presented in the film? Alternative

Divide class into teams. Each team is assigned a theme. After discussing the theme in their team, they should prepare a short written report on: • How does the film talk about the theme - interviews, images, etc.?

• What do they think about the theme - do they agree with the film, do they have other opinions that are not presented in the film? Film Synopsis

The Corporation explores the nature and spectacular rise of the dominant institution of our time. Footage from pop culture, advertising, TV news, and corporate propaganda, illuminates the corporation's grip on our lives. Taking its legal status as a "person" to its logical conclusion, the film puts the corporation on the psychiatrist's couch to ask, "What kind of person is it?" Provoking, witty, sweepingly informative, The Corporation includes forty interviews with corporate insiders and critics - including Milton Friedman, Noam Chomsky, Naomi Klein, and Michael Moore - plus true confessions, case studies and strategies for change. Source: http://www.thecorporation.com/

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G2.4

2. Hold a class discussion after viewing the film on the following possible

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS
Availability This film can be rented in Montreal from repertory video clubs such as La Boîte Noire or Vidéo Beaubien. Outside Montreal, check your local video clubs for availability. There is also an educational edition of this film that teachers can buy (see "Buy the Film" section on the Web site).

Activity 3. NGO Profiling: What Does a Non-Governmental Organization Look Like?
While multinationals exist to create global markets, non-governmental organizations exist to create global citizens. Their overall goals are to investigate, campaign and take action in order to convince governments, corporations and the general public to make the world a better place for everyone. In this activity, students will do research and weigh information in order to assess how non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are responding to the challenges of globalization and multinational corporations. Procedure:

1. Divide the class into groups.

2. Assign groups one of the following non-governmental organizations to
Team Project Tip: One of your news stories might come from one of these organizations.

research: • Friends of the Earth Canada • Greenpeace Canada • Équiterre • Corporate Watch • International Forum on Globalization • Third World Network • OXFAM Canada •Social Justice Committee

3. Ask groups to create profiles of the assigned NGO. Profiles should include:
• Date of establishment • Location of headquarters • Countries in which it has other offices • Type of organization: environmentalist, anti-corporate-led globalization, social justice, international cooperation • What the organization is trying to change or achieve (and how). • Number of members that support it • Who are these members - other organizations? Individuals?
A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G2.5

(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

Activity 4. Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards creating their Magazine Radio Program.

STUDENT TOOL S19 Project Planner

Resources

Multinational Monitor Magazine The on-line version of the magazine that tracks corporate activity, especially in the Third World. http://multinationalmonitor.org/monitor.html "The New and Revised Map of the Corporate World" An educational tool published by the Polaris Institute, a Canadian NGO. http://www.polarisinstitute.org/edu_tools/corp_map.pdf

"Wal-Mart 'Duped' Locals to Build on Holy Site" An article by Elizabeth Mistry on the Common Dreams Web site (January 2005). http://www.commondreams.org/headlines05/0116-01.htm For Teachers

Teacher Resources - The Corporation A section with resources for teachers on the Canadian documentary film, The Corporation. http://www.tvo.org/thecorporation/teachers.html

Integrated Subjects

Language Arts Sample Activity: Turn the profiles in Activity 1 and 3 into an essay assignment. Media Arts Sample Activity: View the film, The Corporation. Select scenes for media analysis: What are the main messages of the scenes? What techniques are used to convey these messages (e.g. psychology metaphor, humour, etc.)?

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G2.6

The Upstream Journal A free publication on global economic, social, and cultural rights. Published by the Social Justice Committee, a Canadian NGO. http://www.upstreamjournal.org/

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

FACT SHEET G2.7 Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)

Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)
he process of expanding trade began five centuries ago when European T explorers began searching for new wealth. The European nations took raw materials from their colonies using labour from native populations and then dumped their surplus goods on these colonial nations. It works in a very similar way today. Western countries import raw materials from Third World countries and export finished products to these countries. After the Second World War, the United States was the main economic power. As we move into the 60s and 70s, West Germany and Japan began to assert its economic muscle. However, a new player was also introduced onto the scene during this time - Multinational Corporations (MNCs). These are large corporations based in one country but with operations in many other countries. They are also known as Transnational Corporations (TNCs). Global trade is now dominated by MNCs. According to the Washingtonbased Institute for Policy Studies, global corporations such as General Motors, Wal-Mart and Ford Motor are more powerful than most nation-states. Today, 51% of the 100 largest economies in the world are run by multinational corporations and not by countries. MNCs now control 70% of the world's trade but they operate virtually uncontrolled. They generally move in and out of countries as they wish, taking advantage of lower wages, weak environmental regulations and tax breaks. They also help influence government policies at the national and international level. The presence and power of MNCs is a controversial issue. These powerful entities have many supporters as well as many critics. Here are some of the arguments for and against multinationals.

100 largest economies in the world are run by multi-national corporations.

Today, 51% of the

of the world's trade but they operate virtually uncontrolled.

MNCs now control 70%

For Multinationals
• Offers employment to local workers • Promotes peace internationally • Creates sense of community across international borders • Allows entire world to improve standard of living • Gives access to quality products regardless of location • Promotes economic stability • Raises standard of living for regions involved in production • Gives local economies new economic opportunities • Fact of life which needs to be accepted • Reflects global economy

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G2.7

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

Against Multinationals
• Ruins local economies • Depletes local work forces by drawing people to urban centres • Stifles cultural growth and expansion on local level • Provides little help with problems which are local in nature • Creates cultural homogenization • Too big, little interest in the individual • Gives political power to outside interests • Creates economic instability by being subject to the whims of the global economy • Replaces traditional values with materialistic values • Makes local economies subject to mass layoffs

Facts at a Glance
• There are some 63,000 multinational corporations worldwide. • Of the world's 100 largest economies, 51 are corporations. • Seventy-five per cent of all MNCs are based in North America, Western Europe and Japan. • The Top 200 corporations' combined sales are bigger than the combined economies of all countries minus the biggest 10. • While the sales of the Top 200 are equal to 27.5% of world economic activity, they employ only 0.78 % of the world's workforce. • The combined sales of the Top 200 are 18 times bigger than the combined annual income of the 24% of the total world population living in ''severe'' poverty. • Two thirds of international trade is accounted for by just 500 corporations. • Global retailers like Coca Cola, Kellogg, PepsiCo, Nestlé, KFC and McDonald's spend billions of dollars on advertising and promotion every year to convince people to buy their products. • Some schools in Canada partner with some of these corporations and directly promote their products.
Source: The Top 200 Economies, Washington: Institute for Policy Studies http://www.corpwatch.org/downloads/top200.pdf

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G2.8

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS
WHO CONTROLS THE WORLD ECONOMY? Based on the Top 100 World Economies in 1999 Rank Country or Corporation Gross Domestic Product (GDP) or Total Sales ($US millions) 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 GM Denmark 176,558 174,363 166,809 163,881 162,558 154,146 140,964 159,985

Wal-Mart

Exxon Mobil Ford Motor Poland DaimlerChrysler Norway

Indonesia

145,449 131,127 128.892

South Africa Finland

Saudi Arabia Greece Mitsui

Mitsubishi

Toyota Motor

Source: The Top 100 Economies, Washington: Institute for Policy Studies http://www.corpwatch.org/downloads/top200.pdf

General Electric

115,670 111,630

117,765

Trade Blocs

Supporters of multinationals and increasing economic globalization want to increasingly open new doors to trade opportunities. In addition to efforts through the WTO to regulate trade across all regions, there are many efforts to create regional trade blocs. These include: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), the Mercosur block in South America, the European Union (E.U.), and the Association of East Asian Nations (ASEAN). One of the latest attempts at regionalism is the effort to create the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), which would encompass all 34 states of the Americas, except for Cuba, and would serve to eventually eliminate barriers to trade and investment. Supporters and promoters of free trade agreements (such as the U.S.) say that eliminating trade barriers is an absolute benefit leading to increased trade, investment and "development for all."

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G2.9

Thailand

123,934 118,555

126,130 123,887

UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS
Critics say that these agreements have many associated costs such as governments losing the ability to make their own decisions. For example, the FTAA would give corporations the right to sue governments who don't follow the rules in the agreement. These agreements also promote huge industrial development projects that displace rural and indigenous peoples, negatively impact the environment, promote sweatshop-style industry, lack transparency and democracy, and serve to fill the pockets of the elite while emptying the pockets of those who are already poor.

Labor brought tens of

©

TIM RUSSO/GLOBALAWARE

thousands of union members to demonstrate against the proposed hemispheric free Summit in Miami in 2003. (GlobalAware) trade deal during the FTAA

The Alternative to Runaway Trade
Groups around the world are working to fight these problems and advocate for a new economic system. The New Internationalist's "No-Nonsense Guide to Globalisation" (2000) summarizes some of these efforts in five steps:

1. Increase citizen participation

2. Establish a global financial authority

The world needs a new international regulatory agency to reduce volatility and inefficiency in global financial markets.

3. Honour the earth

Global environmental standards must be set based on sustainability, equity and justice and should be imbedded in all international trade and investment agreements.

4. Stop speculation by supporting a tax on international financial transactions
A tax on financial speculation could help stabilize global markets and capture much-needed funds for global development.

5. Control capital for the public good
An alternative investment code is needed for democratic control of capital and to stimulate investment that benefits local communities. This would replace the WTO rules that favour wealthy investors.

Other Sources
Slaves to Trade A public educational tool by the Social Justice Committee. http://www.s-j-c.net/ Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G2.10

The institutions that determine global trade and investment policy have an obligation to incorporate the opinions and insights of civil society into their decision-making.

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

FACT SHEET G3.7 Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade?

UNIT 3 INTRODUCTION Unit Introduction & Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Consumer Analysis: Where Does That Come From? 2. CocoLoco: Producing a Chocolate Bar 3. Fair Trade Role-Play 4. Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project G3.3 G3.3 G3.5 G3.5 G3.2

TEACHER HANDOUT G3.13 People on the Path of a Chocolate Bar

STUDENT HANDOUT G3.15 Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada

TOOLS
TEACHER TOOLS Unit 3 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T12 STUDENT TOOL Project Planner S19

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
G3.1

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Most people are aware that the products they buy and use come
from another country. They may also notice that most are from "developing" or "Third World" countries. However, not everyone is aware of the inequitable relationships associated with the production and distribution of products that end up in Canada and around the world.

Through interactive learning activities, this unit focuses on presentUNIT GOALS:

day globalization and explores the differences between free and fair trade.

1. Survey the positive and 2. Explore how Canada and other countries respond to the challenges created by negative aspects of trade.

international trade and how it can be made more viable and equitable for the fair trade. majority of people through

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A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit introduction
G3.2

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

DURATION:

Teacher Reference: Fact Sheet
Go over information in the Fact Sheets in a discussion format, prompting students with leading questions, group reading, etc. You may want to bring out different elements in the Fact Sheet while doing various learning activities in the unit.

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)
FACT SHEET G3.7 Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade?

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. Consumer Analysis: Where Does That Come From?
Students will become sensitized to the extent to which products sold in Canada come from another country (especially developing countries). And, based on their experiences, will reflect on the considerations related to the production and distribution of these products. Procedure:

Ask students to rummage through their house and look for products or things that may have come from another country. Ask them to make a list of the objects and their country of origin (the teacher can do the same). When they come to class, ask them to review their list. Then brainstorm, identifying each product as you go. Some things to discuss include: • What is known about the country of origin.

• How that product is made (who makes it, who controls the production and distribution). • How it reached their house. Who was involved in that process. • How the price was set and who gets what share.

Alternative

Select a range of items from various countries of origin to bring into the classroom rather than giving students the home assignment. This will allow more "control" over what is discussed in class.

Activity 2. CocoLoco: Producing a Chocolate Bar
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)
TEACHER HANDOUT G3.13 People on the Path of a Chocolate Bar

Students will build on what they have learned in Activity 1 and apply their knowledge to the example of chocolate, one of many products that come from developing countries. They will learn about the issues related to the production and distribution of chocolate.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G3.3

(CCC: intellectual, communication-related)

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?
Procedure:

1. Divide class into groups. Hand out one chocolate bar (with squares) on a
plate to each group. Tell students that chocolate bars are one example of a product exported by Third World countries. This example is being used to learn about who earns what in the process of getting the chocolate bar to us.

2. Discuss with students:
• What are the steps involved in the production and distribution of chocolate? Use the Teacher Handout (G3.13) to explain to students the main categories in the production and distribution chain: plantation workers, landowners, exporter, importer, chocolate manufacturer, retailer, and consumer. Brainstorm with students on the type of work done by each of these groups. List peoples' suggestions on the flip chart. Refer to the Teacher Handout as a discussion guide.

3. Ask all groups to cut up the chocolate bar according to the share that they
think each group listed above should receive, based on its costs and the amount of work it does. (E.g. If every chocolate bar costs a dollar, how many cents should your local store receive, how much should the wholesaler, shipper, exporter, and worker receive?) Tell the groups that they should be ready to explain their rationale.

4. Come back to the larger group. Ask each group to present its breakdown.
Then share with students the actual breakdown of who receives what.
STUDENT HANDOUT G3.15 Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada

5. According to the European Fair Trade Association, out of every dollar, the
grower/worker earns 5 cents; the trading and manufacturing industry earns 70 cents; the retailer (store) earns 25 cents.

Ask the group why it thinks the chocolate bar ends up being cut up the way it is. • Why do the small farmers or plantation workers get so little? • Who has the power to set prices? • What can be done to change the situation so that workers and farmers receive a fairer share? Explain to the class that the chocolate bars they received are actually fair trade. Brainstorm on what a fair trade breakdown would look like. • How much do workers who produce fair trade chocolate receive compared to chocolate traded on the commodity market? Refer to the following Web site: The Cocoa Chain: The Facts See the bar breakdown of fairly traded chocolate. http://www.newint.org/issue304/facts.html

6. Remind the group that chocolate is only one example of the many
products that come from the Third World. Many other agricultural products, such as sugar, bananas and coffee, have a similar breakdown.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G3.4

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Activity 3. Fair Trade Role-Play
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Based on what they have learned in previous activities, students will take on different points of view and practise developing arguments in support of or against a fair trade alternative. Scenario A fair trade organization wants to convince a store or coffee shop to carry fair trade products. Procedure:

1. Divide class into teams of four.
and which two people will be the coffee shop or store managers.

2. Each team will decide which two people will be the fair trade representatives 3. Each team will role-play a conversation between the fair trade

representatives and the coffee shop or store managers. For each side, ask students to think about the arguments for and against.

4. In the larger group, teams will report whether the fair trade representatives

were able to convince the store or coffee shop managers to carry their goods? And, why or why not? Extension:

In a jigsaw, teams will role-play their conversations to other teams in the class. Alternative Scenario

Students want to convince their school to carry fair trade products such as chocolate bars.

Activity 4. Work on Magazine Radio Program Team Project
STUDENT TOOL S19 Project Planner

(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards creating their Magazine Radio Program.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G3.5

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UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Resources
"Fair trade" A description from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_trade La Siembra Co-op Links and resources on fair trade published by this Canadian fair trade cooperative. http://www.lasiembra.com/links.htm World Cocoa Foundation An American foundation that encourages sustainable and responsible cocoa growing. http://www.worldcocoafoundation.org/ "The Cocoa Chain - The Facts" An article in the New Internationalist Magazine (August 1998 issue). http://www.newint.org/issue304/facts.html For complete issue on the cocoa trade, go to: http://www.newint.org/issue304/contents.html

OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers - The Coffee Chain Game See section with interviews/testimonials from coffee farmers and their families. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/teachers/coffee/index.htm

For Students
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child http://www.savethechildren.ca/resources/pdf/crc.pdf

For Teachers

"Chocolate" A Unit on Fair Trade and Human Rights by the Global Education Network. http://www.global-ed.org/cu-chocolate.pdf OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers Resources on Trade and Fair Trade. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/teachers/fairtrade_resources/ #freeolplanet/teachers/fairtrade_resources/#free

Integrated Subjects

Geography Do Activity 1 and map the country of origin of each product onto a World Map. Math Do chocolate bar production cost analysis in Activity 2 in Math class. Drama Do Activity 3 in Drama class.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G3.6

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

FACT SHEET G3.7 Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade?

Globalization: Free Trade or Fair Trade?
ree trade zones are industrial areas set up to attract foreign investment. F They offer incentives to attract investment like tax breaks, weak labour and environmental laws, and cheap labour. These zones are also called Export Processing Zones (EPZs) and are known to attract industry that requires only basic technology and large but low-skilled labour forces. Examples include the clothing, footwear and electronic component assembly industries. There are more than 41 million people who work in some 3000 EPZs worldwide, especially in Latin America and Asia. The factories located in these regions are often called sweatshops. The term sweatshop was first used in the 19th century (during the Industrial Revolution). It describes a situation where factory owners make a profit by employing people to work long days under unsafe conditions for low wages. Some large corporations have gone back to these sweatshop practices that offer poor working conditions and don't pay enough for people to provide for their families. This is called exploitation. Women are the most affected by this situation. The World Development Report estimates that women make up 70-90% of workers in export processing zones (EPZs) worldwide.

The Clothing Industry
Some large corporations

use sweatshop practices that offer poor working

conditions and don't pay enough for people to provide for their families.

The clothing industry is famous for sweatshop practices. Very few of the fashion giants actually produce their own products anymore. It is much cheaper for companies to contract out the production to the lowest bidder. Companies that offer the lowest costs are usually located in free trade zones known for their poor labour conditions and low taxes.

Together, the garment and textile industries are the largest industrial employer in the world. The garment industry makes up half the global industry. There are more than 23.6 million people employed in the garment industry worldwide. Seventy-five per cent of these workers are women.

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A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G3.7

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

The Most Commonly Traded Goods
Jeans Jean made completely from cotton was used for its durability during the slave labour trade of the 18th century. The colour Indigo came from plants in the Americas and India. It became the standard colour for jeans, which became popular thanks to Hollywood movies about cowboys. After trade liberalization in the late 1970s, jeans started to be produced in the South in sweatshop conditions allowing companies to profit from cheap labour (usually female). Coffee The coffee bean arrived in Europe with 17th century Italian traders. The most profitable part of the coffee trade began to concentrate in the shipping, processing and retailing sector. Small-scale producers were left with growing and processing the bean, which is the least profitable part of the business. Prices of coffee have gone down in recent decades because of too much supply. Countries that rely on coffee production have increased production in order to pay for their rising international debt.

Cocoa The cocoa bean was first used in Mexico to make a spicy drink during the Mayan Empire. The chocolate industry was born after the invention of the cocoa press in the late 19th century. This led to the development of companies like Cadbury and Rowntree of England and Hershey's and Mars in the U.S. World production of cocoa later moved to West Africa. Ghana became the largest producer from 1910 to 1979. Other countries were soon encouraged to set up cocoa plantations but the increase in cocoa supply drove down prices substantially.

Why Are the Farmers in the Cocoa-Producing Countries Poor?
For every ton of cocoa produced the farmer receives just 5%. So if the current market price is €1045 per ton, a farmer will receive just €52.25. Any fall in global cocoa prices has a huge impact on the farmer. Cocoa prices have been cut in half over the last ten years. As a result, cocoa farmers have been unable to meet their own needs or pay their workers adequately. World prices are governed by supply and demand. Farmers cannot afford to limit production in order to push up the prices. They are in a weak bargaining position as West African economies are critically dependant on cocoa. The chocolate market is worth about €60 billion each year. (Amnesty International Trading)

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G3.8

Fruit: the Banana In 1870, Captain Lorenzo Dow Baker landed the schooner Telegraph in Jamaica and saw that bananas were popular on local markets. He bought 160 bunches for one shilling per stalk on Port Antonio docks. Eleven days later, he sold the bananas in New Jersey for two dollars a bunch and made a huge profit. This was the beginning of the banana trade. Bananas were shipped to Boston and New Orleans from Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica. By 1898, the U.S. was importing more than 16 million bunches.

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

How Does Canada Fare?
Garments According to the Status of Women Canada, as protections for the Canadian garment industry were eliminated through free trade agreements, many Canadian manufacturers became unable to compete and simply closed down. Now, just over half of the clothing sold by the Canadian garment industry is made in Canada. Garment production in Canada is increasingly moving to unregulated small contracting shops and home-based sewing facilities. There are some 40 000 home-workers in Canada who typically work for less than minimum wage with no enforcement of labour standards. Coffee According the Coffee Association of Canada, in 2003, 63% of Canadians drank coffee everyday, and the average coffee drinker has three cups a day. Cocoa The average Canadian eats roughly 6.7 kg of chocolate annually. Eating chocolate has become less sweet since 2000 as numerous reports have linked cocoa production to slave labour. Save the Children Canada says that 15,000 children between the ages of 9 and 12 have been sold into forced labour on cocoa farms on the Ivory Coast, West Africa, in the last few years. Children are often trafficked from Mali, Burkina Faso, Togo and Benin and then brought into the Ivory Coast and other countries in West Africa. Fruit Fruit is one of the fastest growing imported food "commodities" in Canada. Imports of fruit have doubled since 1985. According to Statistics Canada, in 1995 Canada bought 60% of its fruit from the U.S., and the remaining 40% from Southern countries mainly in Latin America. The average Canadian eats more than 13 kilograms of bananas every year. In 1995, Canadians imported $247 million worth of bananas and banana products. In 1996, almost a billion dollars worth of fruit and fruit products was imported into Canada from the South. This represented 41% of fruit imports from all sources.

of the clothing sold by the Canadian garment industry is made in Canada.

Now, just over 50%

60% of its fruit from the

U.S. and some 40% from America.

Canada buys some

countries mainly in Latin

The Impact of Cash Cropping (large-scale production)
There are serious environmental and human impacts resulting from commercial fruit growing. Large-scale fruit production creates: • loss of biodiversity • too much use of highly toxic pesticides that are very harmful to the local environment and to farm workers (see banana example) • soil erosion • poor working conditions including low wages and denial of the right to organize (form unions) • reduced self-reliance of small growers and their displacement by large foreign-owned enterprises

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G3.9

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

The Alternative: Fair Trade
Fair trade is an alternative approach to conventional international trade. Rather than setting prices through the commodity market which tends to fluctuate extremely, fair trade is a partnership between producers, traders or buyers and consumers. The result is a more equitable and sustainable exchange of goods. This exchange recognizes the true cost of labour and production to the producer. According to Chantal Havard of TransFair, "Fair trade was born some 50 years ago in Europe as an alternative and a response to the international trade system's incapacity to address the needs of poor people in developing countries. It is both a citizen and consumer's movement, as it enables people from the North to make a difference in lives of people from the South, by choosing to buy products that have been fairly traded."

Goals of Fair Trade
Many fair trade retailers, wholesalers and producers are members of the International Federation of Alternative Trade (IFAT). IFAT is a global network of fair trade organizations that works to improve the livelihoods of disadvantaged people through trade. IFAT members adhere to the following goals of fair trade: • To pay fair prices to producers which recognize the cost of labour and production. • To buy directly from producers and pay an advance of up to 50% to allow producers to buy seeds, tools and materials. • To raise awareness among consumers of the negative impact of traditional trade on small producers.

• To protect human rights by promoting social justice, sound environmental practices and economic security. • To work with democratically run organizations like cooperatives and selfhelp groups.

• To promote development opportunities for women and indigenous people, and to protect children from exploitation in the production process. Source: The International Federation of Alternative Trade www.ifat.org

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A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
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G3.10

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

a fair trade product in Canada if it carries the TransFair label.

Fair Trade Market in Canada
You can recognize

All fair trade labelling in Canada is organized through TransFair Canada (TFC), a non-for-profit company that licenses the TransFair label. A product must have been produced under the principles of fair trade in order to be certified and carry the TransFair label. Fair trade labelling began in Canada in 1996. Coffee was the first product made available and is still the most widespread.

What Are the Benefits for the Industry?
Supplying fair trade products ensures that farmers can earn enough for their crops to continue producing quality. Farm workers who receive adequate wages and benefits are considered more productive. Direct relationships with growers allow companies to benefit from consistent access to quality products on a long-term basis. As consumer demand for socially responsible goods continues to rise, a business that carries fair trade certified products is tapping into a growing market.

What Are the Benefits for the Consumer?

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A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G3.11

Choosing to buy fair trade certified products such as bananas, coffee, tea, chocolate, sugar and sports equipment means getting quality products. It also means buying products that have been cultivated in good working conditions, with respect for farmers, workers and for the environment. For Chantal Havard, "It is about realizing that Canadian consumers have the power to change things and make the world a better place for all."

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Fair Trade in Action: The Banana Example
Benefits for Plantation Workers Fair trade standards ensure that plantation owners provide fair wages to their workers, and that management respects the rights of workers to be part of unions. Benefits for Worker Health & the Environment Fair trade certification requires that producers use sustainable agricultural practices, which protect workers and the environment. On most non-fair trade and non-organic banana plantations, dangerous pesticides are used throughout the growing and harvesting process. International standards for pesticide use are often ignored by plantation owners and are unknown to workers. Banana farmers and workers face many neurological disorders such as muscle pains, nausea, and dizziness; organ damage to eyes, liver, and lungs; and even sterility in males because of exposure to these chemicals. Fair trade ensures that farmers follow all national and international legislation regarding the use and handling of chemicals, and that the most dangerous ones aren't used at all. Although not formally required, most fair trade certified bananas and mangos are also certified organic.

Sources

Global Citizens for Change A Canadian NGO dedicated to global education issues and volunteering in developing countries. http://www.citizens4change.org/

"Let's Trade Fair" An article by Chantal Havard, Common Ground on-line Magazine (April 2005). http://www.commonground.ca/iss/0504165/cg165_FairTrade.shtml "Ethical Chic" An article by Natalie Karneef, The Montreal Gazette (May 2, 2005). http://www.lululemon.com/about/media/press/138 Fair Trade Toronto A working group affiliated with Oxfam Canada in Toronto. www.fairtradetoronto.com

Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm Behind the Brand Names: Working Conditions and Labour Rights in Export Processing Zones International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) (December 2004). http://www.icftu.org/www/PDF/EPZreportE.pdf

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

fact sheet
G3.12

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

People on the Path of a Chocolate Bar

TEACHER HANDOUT G3.13 People on the Path of a Chocolate Bar

Consumers

• Buy from the retailers (store).

• Want the best taste at the best price.

• If they are aware, they want fair practices.

Retailers

RETAILERS/DISTRIBUTORS

• Buy from the supplier (wholesaler).

• Want to buy at the cheapest price so they can sell at the highest price to the consumer and make the biggest possible profit.

Chocolate manufacturer

TRADING/MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

• Buy the raw material (cocoa) from the importer.

• Want the cheapest production practices so that profit increases.

• The two largest chocolate manufacturers in North America are Hershey's and Mars.

Importer

• Buys from the exporter. the manufacturer.

• Wants to the buy at the lowest possible price to sell at the highest possible price to

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout
G3.13

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Exporter

• Buys cocoa from the plantation owners or small-scale farmers.

• Wants to buy at the lowest possible price to sell at the highest possible price to the importer.

• The Ivory Coast is the largest cocoa producer in the world, holding 43% of the world market, while Ghana, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria, Malaya and Cameroon account for 48% of the market. • Many of these countries are dependant on the cocoa crop. For example, cocoa revenues account for more than 33% of Ghana's total export earnings and 40% of those of the Ivory Coast.

Source: Amnesty International Trading

Plantation workers/Cocoa farmers

• It is estimated that 14 million people are involved in cocoa production worldwide. However, 90% of the world's cocoa is grown on small family farms of 12 acres or less. • Many of the workers on cocoa farms have been sold into forced labour. • The U.S. State Department's year 2000 Human Rights Report acknowledged that some 15,000 children between the ages of 9 and 12 have been sold into forced labour on cotton, coffee and cocoa plantations in northern Ivory Coast in recent years. A 1998 report from UNICEF stated that some Ivory Coast farmers use child slaves, many from poor neighbouring countries such as Mali, Burkina Faso, Benin and Togo.

Source: Amnesty International Trading

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Retailers
(stores)

WHO GETS WHAT FOR EVERY $1 CONSUMER SPENDS ON CHOCOLATE?
(importer, exporter, manufacturer)

Trading/Manufacturing Industry receives 70 cents

Producers

receive 25 cents

(plantation workers,cocoa farmers)

receive 5 cents

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

teacher handout
G3.14

PRODUCERS

UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

STUDENT HANDOUT G3.15 Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada

Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada
Maquila Solidarity Network The Maquila Solidarity Network (MSN) is a Canadian network promoting solidarity with groups in Mexico, Central America, and Asia. It works to improve conditions for workers in maquiladora (sweatshop) factories and export processing zones. http://www.maquilasolidarity.org/ OXFAM Canada Founded in 1963, OXFAM Canada is a non-profit international development organization that supports community programs in food security, health, nutrition and democratic development. It emphasizes working with women and is a member-based organization. www.oxfam.ca

a fair trade product in Canada if it carries the TransFair label.

You can recognize

Dix Milles Villages Ten Thousand Villages is a non-profit organization that provides fair income to Third World people by promoting their hand-made crafts in North America. It works with artisans in about 30 countries, 70% are women who would otherwise be unemployed or underemployed http://www.villages.ca/

TransFair Canada TransFair Canada is a national non-profit organization that does public education and Fair Trade certification. It works to improve the livelihood of developing world farmers and workers. http://www.transfair.ca/

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

student handout
G3.15

Équiterre Équiterre (from the French words for equity and earth) is a Canadian not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting environmental and socially just choices. Its programs focus on action, education and research based on social justice, economic solidarity and the defence of the environment. www.equiterre.qc.ca

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

G3.16

UNIT 4: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE WRAP-UP

UNIT 4 GOALS Unit Goals LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. Jigsaw News Story Trading 2. Presentation of Magazine Radio Program Role-Play 3. Group Work Evaluation G4.2 G4.2 G4.3 G2.2

TOOLS
TEACHER TOOLS Unit 4 Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide T13 STUDENT TOOLS Evaluation Tools S27 - S40

Cross-Curricular Competencies Observation Tools T14 - T16

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

unit map
G4.1

UNIT 4: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE WRAP-UP
UNIT GOALS:

1. Build a consciousness of global citizenship by interconnecting the issues multinational corporations covered in the previous three units.

Learning Activities & Procedure
Activity 1. Jigsaw News Story Trading
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related) Students will share with classmates their knowledge about the theme they have been researching throughout the module.

of globalization, trade, and

1. Each radio team will select one news story to "trade" with another team. 2. The teacher will assign students to a team that is covering a different theme to exchange news stories with.
stories and exchange news story scripts. Radio Program.

4. Each team will incorporate the exchanged news story into their Magazine

Activity 2. Presentation of Magazine Radio Program Role-Play
(CCC: intellectual, methodological, personal & social, communication-related)

1. Technical coordinators from each team will set up the presentation area placing the tables, chairs, microphones, and other equipment facing the "live studio audience." 2. Before presenting, each team should adjust the presentation area to
accommodate its particular Radio Program. to the class.

3. Each team will present its 13-minute Magazine Radio Program Role-Play

4. To accommodate different learning styles and make the presentations more
dynamic, each team is expected to demonstrate a multidisciplinary approach by incorporating elements such as drama (e.g. role-plays, songs), math (e.g. statistics), new technologies (e.g. recorded interviews), language arts (e.g. poem), etc.

5. Each team will hand in a copy of its final script to the teacher.

A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G4.2

DURATION:

2-3 classes (75 minutes each)

3. Give students a chance to mingle with the other team, discuss their news

UNIT 4: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE WRAP-UP

Activity 3. Group Work Evaluation
After class presentations, hand out the cooperative learning group evaluation and the individual evaluation tools you feel are most appropriate for your students (see "Tools for Students" in the Table of Contents, page 9). These can be completed in class and as homework at the teacher's discretion.

STUDENT TOOLS Evaluation Tools S27 - S40

Integrated Subjects
Language Arts Activity 1 could also be integrated into Language Arts class.

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A DIFFERENT GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE A DIFFERENT WORLD:WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

learning activities guide
G4.3

Drama Activity 2 could also be integrated into Drama class.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TEACHERS’ GUIDE INTRODUCTION

RESOURCES

A Different World:
RESOURCES
MODULE 1 POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS Unit 1: Introduction to Poverty & Basic Human Needs Unit 2: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security Unit 3: Poverty, Health & HIV/AIDS R1 R4 R5 R7

Unit 4: Poverty, the Environment & Water MODULE 2

Unit 1: Introduction to Globalization

GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

Unit 2: Globalization & Multinational Corporations Unit 3: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade

R13 R14

R9

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT RESOURCES

R

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOL KIT RESOURCES

R

RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

General Resources for Students
For Team Project & Activities
Students will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for Team Projects: Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation." This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/ UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

World Atlas of Maps, Flags, Geography Facts http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm Blank Maps of Canada - the Provinces and Territories http://www.canadainfolink.ca/blankmap.htm

Canadian Geographic/Canadian International Development Agency Poverty & Hunger Web site Provides summaries on population, poverty & hunger, health, HIV/AIDS, education, the environment, Canadians making a difference in the world. Also gives a series of links for students (Youth Zone), teachers, and resources. http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/worldmap/cida/poverty.asp

Canadians Making a Difference in the World Descriptions of people from across Canada who are working on international development projects around the world. Click on "Canadians making a difference in the world" in the Features section of this Web site: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm

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New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/

RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/ The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/ For a description of the First, Second and Third World, go to this Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World Millennium Development Goals - Youth Web site A site dedicated to explaining the goals to reduce poverty set by the international community at a UN Summit in 2000. http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/mdgs/index.html
FACT SHEET P1.14 Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs

Unit 1 Fact Sheet: Poverty, Development & Basic Human Needs
Sources
UN Cyberschoolbus Poverty Curriculum http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/intro.asp

Facts About Poverty and the Millennium Development Goals http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/media_info/factsheets.html Facts & Figures on Poverty http://www.teamstoendpoverty.org/script/pnud.webquick.Surf/fr/visages/chiff res?langue=en Poverty Facts & Statistics http://www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Facts.asp

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RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS

Other Resources for Teachers
"A Developing World" - A map created by CIDA and Canadian Geographic This site has information on issues related to population, poverty and hunger, health, HIV/AIDS, education and the environment. You can also request your own copy of the map from this site (a plug-in is needed to see the on-line interactive version of the map). http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/worldmap/cida/poverty.asp?language=EN OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers - Mapping Our World Resource This site has a series of activities using world maps. The maps "project" the world from different perspectives. http://oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/mappingourworld/

FACT SHEET P1.18 Child & Youth Poverty in Canada

Unit 1 Fact Sheet: Child & Youth Poverty in Canada
Sources
Fact Sheet on Child and Youth Poverty in Canada www.campaign2000.ca; www.pueblito.org

Other Resources for Teachers
Campaign 2000 http://www.campaign2000.ca/ Pueblito Canada www.pueblito.org National Anti-Poverty Organization http://www.napo-onap.ca/ Quebec Anti-Poverty Organization http://pauvrete.qc.ca/sommaire.php3 Report - Women, Poverty & Homelessness in Canada http://www.napo-onap.ca/en/resources.php

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RESOURCES UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY

FACT SHEET P2.8 Poverty, Hunger & Food Security

Unit 2 Fact Sheet: Poverty, Hunger & Food Security
Sources
UN Cyberschoolbus http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/poverty2000/food.asp UNICEF http://www.kidscanmakeadifference.org/hunfa.htm Canadian Food Security Bureau http://www.agr.gc.ca/misb/fsb/fsb-bsa_e.php?page=index Global Issues www.globalissues.org

Other Resources for Teachers
Causes of Hunger Are Related to Poverty www.globalissues.org/TradeRelated/Poverty/Hunger/Causes

• Land rights and ownership • Diversion of land use to non-productive use • Increasing emphasis on export-oriented agriculture • Inefficient agricultural practices • War • Famine • Drought • Over-fishing • Poor crop yield • Lack of democracy and rights

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For more information on how the following issues affect food security:

RESOURCES UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Unit 3 Activity Guide Resources
For Students
UNICEF Discussion Forum From the UNICEF Web site, click on "Speak Out" from the top menu. You can then click on "Discussion Forum" and choose the "HIV/AIDS" forum. Here, you will read the opinions of youth from around the world on the subject of HIV/AIDS. http://www.unicef.org/voy/

Other Resources
CARE - Zambia story http://www.cbc.ca/sunday/AIDS/diary.html BBC News Photo Journal - Juliet's Story Living With HIV in Zambia. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/picture_gallery/04/health_juliet0s_ story/html/7.stm

BBC News - A Big Fall in African Life Expectancy http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_depth/3894733.stm

BBC News - Africa Section At the bottom of the page (middle column), see "Country Profiles - A Guide to Africa" and select a country or territory. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/default.stm

FACT SHEET P3.8 Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World

Unit 3 Fact Sheet: Poverty & HIV/AIDS in Africa, Canada & the World
Sources
UN AIDS http://www.unaids.org/ Canadian International Development Agency - HIV/AIDS http://www.cida.gc.ca/aids.htm

BBC Special Report - the Global Spread of HIV http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/africa/03/aids_debate/html/africas_epi demic.stm UNICEF - Voices of Youth http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/aids/explore_187.html

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BBC News - Aids: A South African Success Story http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/4056223.stm

RESOURCES UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS

Other Resources for Teachers
UNICEF - Voices of Youth See section on "Testing and Treatment". http://www.unicef.org/voy/explore/aids/explore_187.html World Vision - HIV-AIDS Educational Tool Kit for Teachers http://www.worldvision.ca/home/education-and-justice/teacherresources/aids-educational-toolkit/ UN World Summit on Sustainable Development - Fact Sheet on Africa Click on "Media Info" from the following Web site. Then click on "Fact Sheets" and finally click on "Facts About Africa". http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/ Canadian Aids Society - HIV/AIDS Backgrounders Once you enter the home page of the CAS Web site, click on "CAS Resources" from the left-hand menu, then click on "Backgrounders/Fact Sheets," and then click on "Youth and HIV/AIDS" or "Children and HIV/AIDS". http://www.cdnaids.ca/

FACT SHEET P3.13 Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS

Unit 3 Fact Sheet: Infection & Prevention of HIV/AIDS
Other Resources for Teachers

HIV/AIDS Web Central - Frequently Asked Questions About HIV/AIDS http://www.hivaids.webcentral.com.au/text/faq.html#Q1 AVERT - HIV & AIDS Statistics http://www.avert.org/statindx.htm

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RESOURCES UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER

Unit 4 Activity Guide Resources
2003 International Year of Fresh Water Make sure to visit the Photo Library! http://www.wateryear2003.org/

Quizzes
UN Water Quiz http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/waterquiz/waterquiz4/index.asp WaterCan Kids Page See WaterCan Kids' Quiz & Slide Show (Microsoft PowerPoint). http://www.watercan.com/kids/index.shtml

For Students
CIDA Youth Zone - Water Click on "Youth and Teachers" from the main menu at the top of the page, then click on "Youth Zone". From the "Youth Zone" page, click on "Development Topics" from the left-hand menu and then select "Water". http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/index-e.htm WaterCan Kids Page http://www.watercan.com/kids/index.shtml

For Teachers
WaterCan Teacher Resource H2Oh http://www.watercan.com/h2oh/ Children's Water Education Council http://www.cwec.ca/eng/educators/teachers.asp OXFAM Water for All OXFAM's on-line learning resource on water and change. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/water/

Other Resources for Teachers
UNESCO Water Portal http://www.unesco.org/water/ CBC - Water for Profit - How multinational corporations are taking control of a public resource This site features a series of national and international stories on water privatization. http://www.cbc.ca/news/features/water/

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RESOURCES UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
BBC - World Water Crisis Read about how the world's supply of fresh water is running out, the reasons why and possible solutions. http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/static/in_depth/world/2000/world_water_ crisis/default.stm

FACT SHEET P4.10 Poverty, the Environment & Water

Unit 4 Fact Sheet: Poverty, Environment & Water
Sources
Development & Peace Campaign - "Water: Life Before Profit" http://www.devp.org/testA/current.htm WaterCan Teacher Resource H2Oh http://www.watercan.com/h2oh/ OXFAM Water for All OXFAM's on-line learning resource on water and change. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/water/

CBC News Online - "By the numbers" http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/water/bynumbers.html Environment Canada - "Water conservation - every drop counts!" http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/info/pubs/lntwfg/e_chap6.htm

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2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development Water Fact Sheet http://www.johannesburgsummit.org/html/media_info/factsheets.html

RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

General Resources for Students
For Team Project & Activities
Students will find out about a number of resources through the learning activities. However, here are some general resources that will be especially useful for Team Projects:

Theme & Country Resources
Infonation - View and Compare Statistical Country Data From the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site, click on "Infonation". This page allows students to view and compare statistical information about any selected country. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/ UN Cyberschoolbus - Country at a Glance Click on "Country at a Glance" from the "Resources" menu of the UN Cyberschoolbus Web site. This page allows students to click on any country chosen and read an overview about that country including a profile of its news, economy, environment, health and technology. http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/

New Internationalist - Country Profiles Click on "Country Profiles" from the left-hand menu of the New Internationalist Web site to read the profiles of hundreds of countries around the world. http://www.newint.org/ CIDA and International Development The role of CIDA in international development. Click on "What We Do" from the main menu of: http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/

The World Fact Book Reference maps, flags of the world and country profiles of the geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military and transnational issues of the country you select. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/ United Nations Development Program - Human Development Reports Features statistics from the Human Development Report including data by country and development indicator (income, employment, fertility, etc.). http://hdr.undp.org/statistics/ Wikipedia - A Free Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/

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RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Audio Resources
Audio Archives InterWorld Radio A global network for radio stations and journalists. Includes news and programs about world issues and local contexts. http://www.interworldradio.org/# OneWorld Radio A global radio community sharing programs and ideas on development. http://radio.oneworld.net/ UNICEF Audio Features Radio interviews and packages, with transcripts, on latest current events affecting children worldwide. http://www.unicef.org/media/media_18185.html Simbani - AMARC Africa News Agency Audio reports by community radio journalists on the following themes: HIV/AIDS, the environment, food security, gender, human rights & democracy. http://simbani.amarc.org/ Radio for All A selection of audio files for sharing produced by grassroots media activists. http://www.radio4all.net/ Learning Resources ITrain On-line A series of free resources on producing multimedia. http://www.itrainonline.org/ Plug-Ins To listen or download audio from the Internet, you need to make sure that you have the appropriate computer plug-in (software) installed. For Apple Quick Time MP3 Player http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/win.html For PC RealPlayer for RealAudio http://www.real.com/playerplus/index.html?lang=en Audiograbber To extract audio from CDs. http://www.audiograbber.com-us.net/

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RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

News Sources
Canadian Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Canada's national news agency Web site with links to CBC Radio, CBC Television and local CBC sites. http://cbc.ca Rabble.ca News stories, in-depth features, interviews and commentaries by writers who promote social change. http://rabble.ca/ International UN News Service News published by the United Nations News Centre. http://www.un.org/News/

British Broadcasting Corporation World news published by Britain's national news agency, the BBC. http://news.bbc.co.uk/

Common Ground News Centre A mix of politics, issues and news by writers who promote social change. Published by a U.S.-based non-profit organization. http://www.commondreams.org/ New Internationalist Magazine On-line Reports on issues of world poverty and inequality. http://www.newint.org/

Multinational Monitor Magazine The on-line version of the magazine that tracks corporate activity, especially in the Third World. http://multinationalmonitor.org/monitor.html

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International Press Service An independent news agency from the Global South covering stories on development and globalization. http://www.ips.org/

RESOURCES UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

Technical Resources for Teachers
For Team Project
Downloading audio from the Internet See the section on plug-ins on the list of General Resources for Students. Copying audio onto CD from your computer See the section on plug-ins on the list of General Resources for Students. Digital audio production See training unit on "Digital Audio Production". http://www.itrainonline.org/itrainonline/mmtk/audio.shtml Presenting your radio program See training unit on "Presentation" in the "Producing Content for Radio" section. http://www.itrainonline.org/itrainonline/mmtk/radiocontent.shtml

Unit 1 Activity Guide Resources

"What is globalization?" A section on the about.com Web site. Includes a collection of articles on globalization from different viewpoints. http://globalization.about.com/od/whatisit/

FACT SHEET G1.7 Introduction to Globalizaton

Unit 1 Fact Sheet: Introduction to Globalization
Sources
"History of Globalization" An article by Matthew J. Rippon on the "A world connected" Web site. www.aworldconnected.org/article.php?id=611print=1 Slaves to Trade A public educational tool by the Social Justice Committee. http://www.s-j-c.net/ Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm

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"Globalization: For and Against" A BBC News article (September 25, 2000). http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/941031.stm

RESOURCES UNIIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS

Unit 2 Activity Guide Resources
The Upstream Journal A free publication on global economic, social, and cultural rights. Published by the Social Justice Committee, a Canadian NGO. http://www.upstreamjournal.org/ Multinational Monitor Magazine The on-line version of the magazine that tracks corporate activity, especially in the Third World. http://multinationalmonitor.org/monitor.html "The New and Revised Map of the Corporate World" An educational tool published by the Polaris Institute, a Canadian NGO. http://www.polarisinstitute.org/edu_tools/corp_map.pdf "Wal-Mart 'Duped' Locals to Build on Holy Site" An article by Elizabeth Mistry on the Common Dreams Web site (January 2005). http://www.commondreams.org/headlines05/0116-01.htm

Teacher Resources - The Corporation A section with resources for teachers on the Canadian documentary film, The Corporation. http://www.tvo.org/thecorporation/teachers.html

FACT SHEET G2.7 Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)

Unit 2 Fact Sheet: Globalization & Multinational Corporations (MNCs)
Sources
Slaves to Trade A public educational tool by the Social Justice Committee. http://www.s-j-c.net/

Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm

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For Teachers

RESOURCES UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Unit 3 Activity Guide Resources
"Fair trade" A description from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_trade La Siembra Co-op Links and resources on fair trade published by this Canadian fair trade cooperative. http://www.lasiembra.com/links.htm World Cocoa Foundation An American foundation that encourages sustainable and responsible cocoa growing. http://www.worldcocoafoundation.org/ "The Cocoa Chain - The Facts" An article in the New Internationalist Magazine (August 1998 issue). http://www.newint.org/issue304/facts.html For complete issue on the cocoa trade, go to: http://www.newint.org/issue304/contents.html

For Students
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child http://www.savethechildren.ca/resources/pdf/crc.pdf

For Teachers

"Chocolate" A Unit on Fair Trade and Human Rights by the Global Education Network http://www.global-ed.org/cu-chocolate.pdf OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers Resources on Trade and Fair Trade. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/teachers/fairtrade_resources/#free

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OXFAM Cool Planet for Teachers - The Coffee Chain Game See section with interviews/testimonials from coffee farmers and their families. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/teachers/coffee/index.htm

RESOURCES UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

FACT SHEET G3.7 Globalization: Free Trade or Fair Trade?

Unit 3 Fact Sheet: Globalization, Free Trade or Fair Trade?
Sources
Global Citizens for Change A Canadian NGO dedicated to global education issues and volunteering in developing countries. http://www.citizens4change.org/ "Let's Trade Fair" An article by Chantal Havard, Common Ground on-line Magazine (April 2005). http://www.commonground.ca/iss/0504165/cg165_FairTrade.shtml "Ethical Chic" An article by Natalie Karneef, The Montreal Gazette (May 2, 2005). http://www.lululemon.com/about/media/press/138 Fair Trade Toronto A working group affiliated with OXFAM Canada in Toronto. www.fairtradetoronto.com

Behind the Brand Names: Working Conditions and Labour Rights in Export Processing Zones International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) (December 2004). http://www.icftu.org/www/PDF/EPZreportE.pdf

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Geomatics for High School Curriculum A Web site with educational tools that explore international-cooperation issues. http://www.woodroffehs.ocdsb.ca/worldissues/en/main.htm

RESOURCES UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?

Unit 3 Student Handout: Fair Trade Organizations & Resources in Canada
For Students
Maquila Solidarity Network The Maquila Solidarity Network (MSN) is a Canadian network promoting solidarity with groups in Mexico, Central America, and Asia. It works to improve conditions for workers in maquiladora (sweatshop) factories and export processing zones. http://www.maquilasolidarity.org/ OXFAM Canada Founded in 1963, OXFAM Canada is a non-profit international development organization that supports community programs in food security, health, nutrition and democratic development. It emphasizes working with women and is a member-based organization. www.oxfam.ca Équiterre Équiterre (from the French words for equity and earth) is a Canadian not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting environmental and socially just choices. Its programs focus on action, education and research based on social justice, economic solidarity and the defence of the environment. www.equiterre.qc.ca

Dix Milles Villages Ten Thousand Villages is a non-profit organization that provides fair income to Third World people by promoting their hand-made crafts in North America. It works with artisans in about 30 countries, 70% are women who would otherwise be unemployed or underemployed. http://www.villages.ca/ TransFair Canada TransFair Canada is a national non-profit organization that does public education and Fair Trade certification. It works to improve the livelihood of developing world farmers and workers. http://www.transfair.ca/

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TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS
POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE 1

A Different World:

Student Tools

Teacher Tools

S2 T2

Student Tools

GLOBALIZATION & TRADE

MODULE 2

Teacher Tools

S9 T9

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

S/T

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

S/T

STUDENT TOOLS

STUDENT TOOLS MAP

STUDENT TOOLS
Learning Tree Storyboard Project Tools MODULE 2 MODULE 1 S2

Magazine Radio Program Project Tools

S9

Intellectual Methodological Personal & Social Communication-Related General Tools Evaluation Tools

CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCY TOOLS

S12 S18 S22 S23 S25 S27

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

educational tools map
S1

Learning Tree Storyboard Template

SOLUTION

PROBLEM

CANADA'S ROLE CAUSES

GLOBAL SITUATION

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LEARNING MATERIALS

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Learning Tree Storyboard Example HIV/AIDS

SOLUTION

POOR PEOPLE ARE MORE AT RISK

PROBLEM

SOUTH AFRICA HAS THE MOST CASES IN THE WORLD

KIDS ARE ORPHANED AND MUST WORK

GIRLS ARE MORE AT RISK

CANADA'S ROLE CAUSES

RESEARCH

LACK OF EDUCATION

POOR NUTRITION

POOR HEALTH CARE

GLOBAL SITUATION

38 MILLION PEOPLE ARE DYING OF HIV/AIDS

10 MILLION YOUTH (AGE 15-24) DIE

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HEALTHY PEOPLE

ACCESS TO MEDICATION

EFFECTIVE PREVENTION

Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool: Clouds
Clouds = solutions to the problem/ideals
Research with your team on possible things to include in the "cloud" panels.

• Examples of Canadian international development projects. • What the ideal situation would look like if the problem wasn’t there. • Ideas on how you can show solidarity on this issue on a local, national or international level.

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Possible things to include: • Things that need to change nationally, internationally.

Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool: Branches/Trunk
Branches/Trunk = What is the problem? What are signs of the problem?
Research with your team on possible things to include in the "trunk/branches" panels. Possible things to include: • Statistics on how people are affected by the situation in the research country. • Excerpts or summaries of stories that illustrate the lack of basic human needs (eg. a news story, testimonial or interview heard or read.) • Examples of the living and working conditions for people in the country you are researching.

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Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool: Roots
Roots = causes of the problem
Research with your team on possible things to include in the "roots" panels. Possible things to include: • Why there is hunger, people dying of HIV/AIDS, a shortage of clean water, (pay attention to the facts you’ll learn in class). • The role of the national government. • The role of big business. • The role of the international community.

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Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool: Ground
Ground = the global situation for research theme
Research with your team on possible things to include in the "ground" panels. Possible things to include: • The global situation for the theme and country you are researching (including information from facts learned in class).

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Learning Tree Storyboard Research Tool: Beaver
Beaver = Canada’s role
Possible things to include: Research with your team on possible things to include in the "beaver" panels. • The role Canada plays internationally on the theme you are researching. • Examples of Canadian international development projects in the region your country (of research) belongs to.

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NAME: DATE:

Radio Writing Checklist
Script Writing
Write as you speak, in simple sentences. Radio announcing uses a conversational style. Avoid specialized terms, unless they are explained.

Write for one listener. Write and deliver your words as though you are speaking to one person, not a crowd.

Write news thoughtfully. News or documentary material should be delivered slowly, and in small chunks. News contains a lot of information and is more difficult to digest. Give your listeners time to reflect. . Think for the listener. Assess your script from the listener's point of view.

Show, don't tell. Be concrete and talk in pictures and images. It may sound strange, but radio can be a very visual medium. You have to give listeners something to "look" at with their imagination instead of their eyes. Don’t overload your text with too much information.

Simplify numbers. Say "nearly 16 thousand" instead of "15 870". Avoid repetitions, overused words and tongue twisters.

Avoid abbreviations unless you know that they are well known. If this isn't possible, mention the name in full at the start and keep reminding the listener. You can't rewind a radio show to catch a missing detail. Avoid using pronouns such as he, her, they. Who is being referred to may not be so clear to the listener. It is better to repeat than assume. Avoid lists. You may end up losing the listener's interest. Punctuate to suit your own reading style. Titles go before names. For example, "Prime Minister, Mrs. X."

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Use precise, clear language. The text should be easy to follow by ear. If you are not sure about a sentence or paragraph, read it out to others and see whether they understand.

Test your script as you write. Don't just run your eyes over it, or murmur under your breath. Read it out loud. If you trip over a word or phrase, it needs to be changed.

NAME: DATE:

News Writing

TOPIC:

News items should answer the questions: Who? What? Where? When? and Why? The first sentence of a news item is called the lead. This sentence sets the context for the news item. It should be short, catchy and of immediate interest.

Who?

What?

Where?

When?

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Lead sentence:

NAME: DATE:

Technician Cue Sheet
Seq. # Time Segment Source Media

TOPIC:

Cues

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S11

NAME: DATE:

Compare Contrast Table
WHAT AM I COMPARING?
1.

TOPIC:

WHAT IS SIMILAR?

WHAT IS DIFFERENT?

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S12

NAME: DATE: TOPIC:

Problem Solving
What is the problem?

What is the cause?

What is the solution?

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S13

NAME: DATE:

Yes-No Questionnaire

1.

YES

NO

2.

3.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

TOTAL:

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S14

4.

NAME:

Brainstorm & Then Explore
• Brainstorm your list here. • Then select one item from your list that you would like to explore in greater detail. • Write the number of the item in the circle below and add to your ideas on the lines.

¿

DATE:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S15

NAME: DATE:

Conducting an Interview
Interview Topic:
INTERVIEWER: INTERVIEWEE: DATE: RELATIONSHIP TO INTERVIEWER:

What do I want to find out?

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S16

Make a list of information that you would like to know on the lines below:

¿

How can I ask it as a question?

Turn each item on your list into a question that you could ask during the interview.

NAME: DATE:

K-W-L

KNOW

K

WANT TO KNOW

W

LEARNED

L

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

intellectual tool
S17

NAME: DATE:

Research
What do I want to find out?

TOPIC:

What did I find out?

Where did I get my information (Web sites, etc.)?

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

methodological tool
S18

NAME: DATE:

Project Planner
Project Title:

STEP 1

What do we do first?

¿

STEP 2

What is next?

What do we need?

What do we need?

What is next?

What do we need?

WE’RE DONE
©
LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

¿

STEP 4

STEP 3

What is next?

What do we need?

methodological tool
S19

¿

NAMES:

Project Planner

Group work as easy as 1-2-3

DATE:

1. With your group, brainstorm each person’s strengths that would be helpful for this project. 2. In the centre of the puzzle, list all the jobs that will have to take place in order for the project to be completed. 3. Then, taking turns, each group member can select the job that he/she would be good at completing.
MEMBER 1 MEMBER 2

TO DO

MEMBER 3

MEMBER 4

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

methodological tool
S20

NAME: DATE:

Researching Internet Guide
SEARCH ENGINE SELECTED: Internet URL address http://www. Pictures that I may need for my presentation: KEYWORDS USED IN SEARCH:

Key information found on this site:

Internet URL address http://www.

Pictures that I may need for my presentation:

Key information found on this site:

:

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

methodological tool
S21

NAMES:

Making Decisions What’s the problem?
DATE:

What are we making a decision about?

What are the criteria?

Making a list of the things that are important to keep in mind when making the decision:

What choices do we have?

Make a list of all the possible solutions that you can imagine:

After you have fitted in the choices and criteria, place an X or write in the appropriate cell.
(Insert one choice per cell.)

Our Criteria

Our Possible Choices

What’s our decision? Based on the information in the table, explain why this choice was made:

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

personal & social tool
S22

NAME: DATE:

What’s the Message? What’s the big idea?
What are we trying to communicate?

TOPIC:

Who will be the audience for my message?
With whom will we be communicating?
Our peer(s) Our teacher(s)

Our students in the school Our family members Other

Students in another school People in our community

Cycle 1

Cycle 2

Cycle 3

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

communication-related tool
S23

NAME: DATE:

What’s the Medium?

TOPIC:

Reminder: Before selecting a mode of communication, be sure that you can answer the following questions:

What is the purpose of the message? Who is the audience?
Brainstorm some of the ways that you could communicate your message to others:
ORALLY using your voice VISUALLY using pictures or objects

WRITTEN using words to write
: :

MUSICALLY using music or sounds

SYMBOLICALLY using signs and symbols

PHYSICALLY using movement, gestures or signs

MEDIA-RELATED using video, slide shows, etc
:

FINAL SELECTION(S)

Reasons for making this decision:

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

communication-related tool
S24

NAME: DATE:

World Map

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

general tool
S25

NAME: DATE:

Map of Canada

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

general tool
S26

NAME: DATE:

Taking Stock Progress
Where are we in terms of our project, what have we accomplished so far? (Use point form)

• • • •

Revising the Plan
Are we on track with our plan? Does it need to be revised? What do we need to do next to accomplish our goal? (Use point form)

• • • •

Reflection

How is it going? What can we change right now to make the process better for ourselves?

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S27

NAMES:

Cooperative Learning
Group Evaluation
DATE:

What did we like best about working together? What did we learn about working as a group?

How did we solve our group problems?

How did we think that our project turned out? How happy are we with the results?

The next time we do a project like this, here are some of our goals for improvement:

GROUP SIGNATURES:

Teacher’s Comments

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S28

NAME: DATE: TOPIC:

Mission Accomplished! Before: Setting criteria
How will we know if we communicated successfully?

After: Reflection
How do we think it worked?

What kind of feedback did we get from others?

What will we do next?

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S29

NAME: DATE:

Cooperative Learning
Individual Evaluation Project title:

TOPIC:

What was your role in helping your group complete this project?

Things that made you think... If I had to do this project again I would...

If my team members were to evaluate me they would say that...

Teacher’s Observations

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S30

NAME: DATE:

Reflecting on Using ICT
My task was...

TOPIC:

How did I choose what technological resources to use for this task?

How did the technology(ies) I selected help me complete my task?

Teacher Feedback

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S31

In the future, how can I use technology in new ways?

I would like to improve...

NAME:

Thinking about... Information
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Gathering information from a variety of sources

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Reading through the information I have gathered

Highlighting key information with a highlighter or underlining it Selecting the right information to use to answer my questions Comparing information from different sources Making sure I cite my sources

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Brainstormed keywords Searched the Internet Went to the library Asked people Found useful information Used my referencing sheet

When I...

Succeeded in what I set out to do
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S32

NAME:

Thinking about... Solving Problems
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Clarifying the problem/situation

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Making links with other problems I have solved

Brainstorming solutions in a group or by myself Testing out possible solutions

Choosing a solution and following through Trying again if the solution doesn’t work

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Understood the problem

When I...

Was able to tell others about the problem in my own words Was able to suggest possible solutions Was able to carry through a solution Wasn’t afraid of trying again Identified strategies that worked
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S33

NAME:

Thinking about... Critical Thinking
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Understanding the issue/situation

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Having an opinion about it that is mine Backing up my opinion with facts or feelings Communicating my opinion to others, discussing my opinion with them

Comparing my opinion with that of others

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Was able to form an opinion

When I...

Was able to discuss my opinion with others without conflict Was able to give reasons for my opinion

Considered different points of view before making up my mind Changed my mind about something

Realized what my bias is on a given issue
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S34

Recognizing my bias

NAME:

Thinking about... Being Creative
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...
Imagining possibilities

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Not being limited to what I am already comfortable with

Finding new ways to express my ideas and thoughts Participating actively in the process

Trying again if I am not pleased with the way things are turning out

Being open to new ideas and possibilities

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...

When I...

Tried doing something which was new to me Was pleased with my first try, so I... Identified how I was going to make things better the next time round
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S35

Accepting the unknown

NAME:

Thinking about... My Work Habits
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...
Being organized Making good use of time Breaking down my project into manageable sections Actively participating in the work

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Taking pride in the presentation of my work Listening carefully Reading carefully

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Filled out my planner Used a time planning sheet

When I...

Contributed my ideas to the group Took an active role in the process Kept my work neat Paid attention Followed instructions

Next time
I think I will work on...

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S36

NAME:

Thinking about... ICT
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Learning to use software that is new to me for a specific task Learning new features of a software that I use

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Using a peripheral, such as a scanner or a digital camera Troubleshooting technology when things go wrong

Choosing the right software or peripheral for my task Knowing the correct words for describing what I do on the computer

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...

When I...

Used a new piece of software

Found new uses for software familiar to me Used a peripheral Used correct vocabulary Shared my ICT skills with someone else in the class Solved an ICT problem

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S37

NAME:

Thinking about... Me
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Expressing my thoughts and feelings about an issue or event Recognizing what I value

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Becoming aware of who or what influences my behaviour Getting to know what other people think and feel about an issue or event Making better choices Getting to know my strengths Finding ways to overcome my weaknesses

Becoming more responsible

Learning about how people live in my community and around the world

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Achieved my goal Shared my feelings

When I...

Accomplished something new by myself

Realized that my opinion was influenced by
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Understood that other people may have different feelings and opinions Made the right decision Learned something new about my community

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Next time
I think I will work on...

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S38

Having more confidence in myself

NAME:

Thinking about... Cooperating with Others
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...
Accepting others as they are Knowing what others need Listening to others Participating in classroom activities Planning and carrying out tasks with others Following the team’s plan Improving the way I work in a team Helping others to do their best

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Exchanging my ideas with others

Knowing what worked and didn’t

Self-evaluation
During this project, I...
Was respectful to others Recognized others’ needs Was flexible Was patient Could have worked harder

When I...

Participated actively in the group

Could have behaved more appropriately with group members Expressed my ideas to others Was helpful to others Contributed to the team effort

Next time
I think I will work on...

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LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S39

NAME:

Thinking about... Communicating
Setting my goals
I would like to work on...

Defining the purpose of my message Knowing my audience Selecting the right medium Communicating orally Communicating through writing Communicating visually

¿ ¿

DATE:

How?

Communicating musically or with sound Communicating physically Communicating through symbols

Getting my message across to my audience

Self-evaluation

During this project, I...

When I...

Communicated successfully

Understood the purpose of the message Was able to organize my thoughts Expressed my ideas clearly Was aware of my audience Was understood by my audience Received helpful feedback from peers

Used the medium to convey my message Informed others Could have explored other media

Next time

I think I will work on...

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

evaluation tool
S40

TEACHER TOOLS

TEACHER TOOLS MAP

TEACHER TOOLS
Module 1 Student Assessment & Evaluation Reference Tool Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide (Units 1-5) Cross-Curricular Competency Observation Tools MODULE 2 MODULE 1 T2 T14 T3

Module 2 Student Assessment & Evaluation Reference Tool Student Assessment & Evaluation Guide (Units 1-4) Cross-Curricular Competency Observation Tools

T10 T14

T9

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

educational tools map
T1

MODULE 1 STUDENT ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION REFERENCE TOOL
1. Learning Activites Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies
Intellectual competencies 1. Uses information 2. Solves problems 4. Uses creativity Methodological competencies 3. Exercises critical judgment

Subject-Specific Competencies

Deconstructs landscapes in the territory

Uses cartographic language

Grasps the meaning of human actions with regard to territory Relates different geographic scales Considers how the territorial issue is dealt with Describes the complexity of the territorial issue Evaluates proposals of the groups involved

5. Adopts effective work methods 6. Uses information and communications technologies Personal and social competencies

2. Interpret territorial issues

7. Achieves his/her potential 8. Cooperates with others Communication-related competency 9. Communicates appropriately

3. Build a consciousness of global citizenship Shows the global nature of a geographic phenomenon

Evaluates solutions to global issues Examines human actions in terms of the future

Note: Photocopy this page to follow the numerical references in Columns 3 & 4 of the Unit Student Assessment & Evaluation Guides

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T2

1. Understand the organization of a territory

TOOLS UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Presenting

2. BRAINSTORM ON THE “FIRST WORLD” & “THIRD WORLD”, & ON THE CONCEPT OF POVERTY

Brainstorming

3, 4, 9

Students are introduced to the concepts of the First and Third World as well as to the concept of poverty. Through brainstorming, they will start to reflect on what poverty means in Canada versus in the “developing” world. 3. POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MIX & MATCH GAME

Open-Ended Questions/Discussion

Allows for students to relate their own experiences to a social issue and to communicate in a group setting.

2

Allows for students to interpret how location (geography) can relate to a social issue.

In teams, students match given Open-Ended Discussion descriptions to the correct Income (higher-, middle-, lower-income) and basic human needs category. Group discussion on geographic location, poverty and quality of life issues. 4. CHILD & YOUTH POVERTY IN CANADA DISCUSSION/MATH ACTIVITIES

Complete Mix & Match Handout in Teams

1, 2, 3, 5, 8

Allows for students to explore analytical and reflective thinking.

Allows for students to explore the relationship between geographic location, poverty and quality of life issues and Allows for students to practice gain awareness about the working and problem-solving global unequal distribution of in teams. wealth. Allows for students to explore creative thinking and explain reasoning. 3, 4, 5, 6 1, 2, 3

1, 2, 3

Develop Budget Students will reflect on what ICT Research living in poverty means in Canada versus in developing countries through discussion and working out concrete math problems. 5. POVERTY QUIZZES Students complete selected Web quizzes. Q&A

Open-Ended Questions/Discussions

Allows for students to explore creative thinking and explain reasoning. Allows for students to apply mathematical skills to a simulated life situation.

Allows for students to explore the relationship between geographic location, income group and quality of life and development issues. Allows for students to explore a social issue from a global and national perspective. 2

Allows for students to explore interactive computer skills. 3, 4, 5, 6 Allows for students to explore analytical and reflective thinking. Allows for students to explore interactive computer skills.

Internet Navigation

Allows for students to interpret how location (geography) can relate to a social issue.

6. BEGIN WORK ON LEARNING TREE STORYBOARD TEAM PROJECT Now that the project has been introduced, ask students to meet in their teams and begin by assigning different roles to team members.

Brainstorming

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8

Role Assignment Project Planning

Allows for students to explore working in teams, problem solving and decision-making.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about territorial issues, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T3

1. WORLD MAPPING

Students draw picture of the world as they see it – How do they present it?

Drawing

3, 4, 9

Allows for students to explore creative thinking and explain and present reasoning.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to situate the First and Third World, explore the complexity of territorial boundaries, and develop a global perspective.

TOOLS UNIT 2: POVERTY, HUNGER & FOOD SECURITY
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Open-Ended Lead class discussion based on Questions/Discussion article: "Pre-empt silent killers like hunger,”... Students will be introduced to the extent of hunger in the world in relation to other "natural disasters" that receive more media attention. 2. CONDUCTING A LIFE INTERVIEW

Ask students to interview their parents on what life was like for them growing up. Students should hand in a written summary of their interview in a question-and-answer format. 3. A DAY IN THE LIFE: Role-Playing a Script

Interviews

1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Report Writing

Allows for students to practice interpreting information, identifying key issues, empathizing with other peoples' points of view, and communicating in writing. Allows for students to practice interpreting information, roleplaying, empathizing with other peoples' points of view, and communicating in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a personal or national perspective. Note: This activity is intended for a culturally diverse classroom.

Visit the "published scripts" section of the Farm Radio Network's Web site and assign students to pre-selected scripts (or choose your own). Students role-play the script in teams to the class. 4. WEB QUEST Students will learn about what is being done to help solve the problem of hunger and food security around the world. In teams, review examples of international cooperation projects and Canadian examples from the Web sites provided.

Media Integration

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a global perspective.

Team Presentation

Research Using ICT

1-9

Allows for students to practice collecting and interpreting information, identifying assumptions, judging actions, troubleshooting, and communicating in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a global perspective and Canada's role in taking action for change.

Students list three examples one from each kind of initiative: trade, media, community projects and answer these questions: • What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community?

5. WORK ON LEARNING TREE STORYBOARD TEAM PROJECT

Researching Information Developing Content Communicating Information & Ideas

1-9

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams toward building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/ trunk = symptoms of problem, roots = causes, clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation], ground = global situation, beaver = role of Canada)

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication.

1, 2, 3

Presenting Information & Ideas Developing Creativity Working in Teams

Applying Terminology

In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying models, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others' views.

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about territorial issues, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T4

1. READING MEDIA ARTICLE: Introduction to Hunger

Brainstorming

3, 4, 9

Allows for students to relate their own experiences to a social issue and to communicate in a group setting.

2

Allows for students to interpret how location (geography) can relate to a social issue.

TOOLS UNIT 3: POVERTY, HEALTH & HIV/AIDS
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Active Listening

2. ON-LINE HIV/AIDS QUIZ

Direct students to choose among the selected on-line quizzes (or feel free to make up your own based on the Fact Sheets provided). 3. WEB CASE STUDY Read real life stories of youth/ children living or affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa and Canada on the Web sites provided.

Q&A

3, 4, 5, 6

Internet Navigation

Allows for students to explore analytical and reflective thinking. Allows for students to explore interactive computer skills.

2

Allows for students to interpret how location (geography) can relate to a social issue.

Research Using ICT Report Writing

1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

In teams, choose two life stories from Africa and Canada; discuss what are the similarities and differences. Each team will submit a written report on its findings. 4. WEB QUEST Students will learn about what is being done to solve the problem of HIV/AIDS around the world. Research Using ICT Team Presentation

Allows for students to practice interpreting information, identifying key issues, troubleshooting, empathizing with other peoples’ points of view, defending a position and communicating in writing as well as in a group.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a national and global perspective.

1-9

In teams, review examples of international cooperation projects and Canadian examples from the Web sites provided. Students list three examples and answer the following questions for each: • What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community? 5. WORK ON LEARNING TREE STORYBOARD TEAM PROJECT

Allows for students to practice collecting and interpreting information, identifying assumptions, judging actions, troubleshooting, and communicating in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a global perspective and Canada’s role in taking action for change.

Researching Information Developing Content Communicating Information & Ideas Presenting Information & Ideas Developing Creativity Working in Teams

1-9

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/ trunk = symptoms of problem, roots = causes, clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation], ground = global situation, beaver = role of Canada).

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication. In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying models, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about territorial issues, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

Applying Terminology

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T5

1. BEFORE & AFTER, TRUE OR FALSE QUIZ

Ask students to complete the “HIV/AIDS Before & After Quiz” individually. Then ask a volunteer to read Sibongile’s testimonial, which reveals the myths and facts about AIDS. Based on the testimonial just heard, re-do the True or False Quiz as a class.

Q&A

1, 2, 3, 4, 9

Allows for students to explore analytical and reflective thinking.

2

Allows for students to interpret how location (geography) can relate to a social issue.

TOOLS UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Divide class in teams. Go to the UNESCO Photo Exhibit Web site and assign a photo to each team. Each team will review the brief description of the water problem(s) illustrated in its photo and prepare a short report on the following: • What is the general problem? • What specific example(s) illustrate(s) the problem • What is the proposed solution, if any?

Report Writing

Teams will present their reports to the class. 2. TRACKING WATER CONSUMPTION Brainstorming Students will discover the uses Charting of water in their daily lives. They will also identify the activities that use the most water, and start thinking about how to reduce wastes of water. They will also think about how access to water in Canada is different than access in developing countries. 3. TALKING ABOUT WATER Research Using ICT Option 1: Water Story Report Writing Illustrations Assign students to read one of the water stories from the 2003 International Year of Fresh Water Web Site. Ask students to draw a picture to illustrate an aspect of the story related to water. The text of the original story should accompany their illustration. If possible, create a display in the classroom of all the student illustrations. Option 2: Make Your Own Proverb Ask students to visit the “Proverbs” section of the International Year Creative Writing of Fresh Water Web Site. Here students will read many proverbs about water that originate from many countries around the world. In their project teams, ask students to come up with their own proverb on water based on what they have learned in class. They can also think about sayings that their parents or grandparents use, and then change these sayings into something about water. Ask teams to present and explain their proverbs to the class. 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9 Allows for students to relate their own personal experiences to a social issue, interpret the consequences of their actions, practice problem solving, and explore analytical thinking. 1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a national and global perspective.

1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9

Allows for students to interpret information, explore their creativity and presentation skills.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to understand the meaning of human actions with regard to territory and examine these actions in terms of the future in relation to the global issue of water scarcity.

1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9

Allows for students to relate their own experiences to a social issue, explore creative thinking and explain and present reasoning.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to understand the meaning of human actions with regard to territory and examine these actions in terms of the future in relation to the global issue of water scarcity.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T6

1. PHOTO RESEARCH: Introduction to Water Problems

Internet Research

1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9

Allows for students to practice interpreting and synthesizing information, problem solving, decision-making and communicating in writing.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to learn about the different issues related to water around the world and that action needs to be taken to preserve this limited resource.

TOOLS UNIT 4: POVERTY, THE ENVIRONMENT & WATER continued
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

4. WEB QUEST

Team Presentation

In teams, review examples of international cooperation projects and Canadian examples from the Web sites provided. Students list three examples and answer the following questions for each: • What organization is responsible for the project? • What are they trying to do? • How is it affecting the community?

5. WORK ON LEARNING TREE STORYBOARD TEAM PROJECT

Researching Information Developing Content Communicating Information & Ideas Presenting Information & Ideas Developing Creativity Working in Teams

1-9

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards building their Learning Tree Storyboards (branches/trunk = symptoms of problem, roots = causes, clouds = solutions to the problem [ideal situation], ground = global situation, beaver = role of Canada).

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication. In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying models, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about territorial issues, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

Applying Terminology

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T7

Students will learn about what is being done to help solve the problem of water scarcity around the world.

Research Using ICT

1-9

Allows for students to practice collecting and interpreting information, identifying assumptions, judging actions, troubleshooting, and communicating in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social issue from a global perspective and Canada’s role in taking action for change.

TOOLS UNIT 5: POVERTY & BASIC HUMAN NEEDS MODULE WRAP-UP
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

2. SHOW & TELL

Post in the classroom the World Maps (Unit 1), Water Illustrations (Unit 4) and Proverbs (Unit 4) that the students have produced in previous units. Give students a chance to mingle, view the artwork and discuss the work with their classmates. 3. PRESENTATION OF LEARNING TREE STORYBOARD TEAM PROJECTS

Group Sharing/Interaction

7, 8, 9

Allows for students to present their interpretation of global issues to their peers.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to present their interpretation of global issues to their peers.

Group Presentation Working in Teams

1-9

Communicating & Presenting All teams will give 5-minute Information & Ideas presentations about their country-specific Learning Tree Storyboard Project. They will decide how to present their projects – whether they will give a general overview of all the Learning Trees or focus on a specific tree and theme. 4. GROUP WORK EVALUATION Peer Evaluation

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication. In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying models, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views. 1, 2, 3, 9

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about territorial issues, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

After class presentations, hand out the cooperative learning group evaluation and the individual evaluation tools you feel are most appropriate for your students. These can be completed in class and as homework at the teacher’s discretion.

Individual Evaluation

Allows for students to exercise Allows for students to evaluate critical judgment and practice their personal and group reflective thinking. development in building consciousness as global citizens.

1, 2, 3

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 1

student assessment & evaluation guide
T8

1. JIGSAW PANEL DISCUSSION

Each team will select one aspect of its Learning Tree Storyboard Project to present to the class in a panel discussion format.

Communicating & Presenting Information & Ideas

1, 4, 7, 8, 9

Allows for students to interpret Allows for students to explore information, share with others, the interconnection between and adjust to take into global issues. account others’ views, and communicate in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

MODULE 2 STUDENT ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION REFERENCE TOOL
1. Learning Activites Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies
1. Uses information 2. Solves problems 4. Uses creativity Methodological competencies 3. Exercises critical judgment

Contemplates the past of social phenomena Considers social phenomena in terms of duration

5. Adopts effective work methods 6. Uses information and communications technologies Personal and social competencies

Looks at social phenomena in their complexity 2. Interprets social phenomena using the historical method

Establishes the factual basis of social phenomena

Puts his/her interpretation of social phenomena in 7. Achieves his/her potential perspective 8. Cooperates with others 3. Constructs a consciousness of Communication-related citizenship through the competency study of history 9. Communicates Seeks the foundations of appropriately his/her social identity

Explains social phenomena

Considers the factors that govern social participation

Note: Photocopy this page to follow the numerical references in Columns 3 & 4 of the Unit Student Assessment & Evaluation Guides

Establishes the contribution of social phenomena to democratic life Understands the purpose of public institutions

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 2

student assessment & evaluation guide
T9

Intellectual competencies

Subject-Specific Competencies

1. Examines social phenomena from a historical perspective

TOOLS UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Students play a version of Bingo. They must find students who can answer questions related to globalization. Those who complete any two rows of their Globalization Bingo Cards win. 2. HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION MAPPING

Using ICTs Students are assigned (in Using Cartographic Language teams) one of four stories related to the Fact Sheet on Working in Teams the History of Globalization. Each story will require students to do specific Web Quest and World-Mapping activities.. 3. BEGIN WORK ON MAGAZINE RADIO PROGRAM TEAM PROJECT

Researching Information

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9

Allows for students to use information for problem solving, to adopt their work methods to a specific task using new technologies, and to explore communicating appropriately in teams and in a larger group setting. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8

1, 2,

Allows for the introduction of important benchmarks in the history of globalization, helping students to explore social phenomena in order to later interpret these phenomena into a present-day perspective.

Brainstorming

After the project has been introduced, students will meet in their teams and begin by assigning different roles to team members.

Role Assignment Project Planning

Allows for students to explore teamwork, problem solving and decision-making.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about social phenomena, apply it to their own work, and encourage global collective action.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 2

student assessment & evaluation guide
T10

1. GLOBALIZATION BINGO

Interacting with Classmates

1, 2, 3, 4, 8 Allows for students to use information, relate their own experiences to a social issue, and explore their creativity while solving problems.

1, 2, 3 Allows for students to reflect on how globalization can increase the connections between people and the rest of the world and the role they can play in influencing these connections.

TOOLS UNIT 2: GLOBALIZATION & MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

In groups, students will research and profile an MNC and evaluate its record as a global corporation. 2. FILM DISCUSSION: The Corporation

Team Work

Students will watch this Canadian documentary and then discuss the issues raised about the rise of The Corporation, the role and influence it has in today's society, the challenges raised by its omnipresence and possible responses to these challenges.

Class Discussion

1, 3, 9

Allows for students to practice interpreting media portrayals, identifying key issues, empathizing with other peoples' points of view, and communicating in a group setting.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social phenomenon from a historical perspective and its present-day context.

3. NGO PROFILING: What Does a NonReport Writing Governmental Organization Look Like? In groups, students will research and profile a nongovernmental organization (NGO) in order to evaluate how it is responding to the challenges of globalization and multinational corporations.

1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 8

Allows for students to apply investigative research, interpret information using new technologies and to communicate in writing and in groups.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social phenomenon from a historical perspective and its present-day context.

4. WORK ON MAGAZINE RADIO PROGRAM TEAM PROJECT

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards producing their live 13-minute Magazine Radio Program to present to the class.

Researching Information Developing Content Communicating Information & Ideas Presenting Information & Ideas Developing Creativity Working in Teams Using ICTs

1-9

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication.

1, 2, 3

Applying Terminology

In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying communication technologies and various methods of communication, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others' views.

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about social phenomena, apply it to a hands-on multimedia project, and encourage global collective action.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 2

student assessment & evaluation guide
T11

1. MNC PROFILING: What Does a Multinational Look Like?

Report Writing

1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 8

Allows for students to apply investigative research, interpret information using new technologies and to communicate in writing and in groups.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to explore the nature, complexity and implications of a social phenomenon from a historical perspective and its present-day context.

TOOLS UNIT 3: GLOBALIZATION, FREE TRADE OR FAIR TRADE?
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Classification and Analysis of Students will rummage through Information their house and look for Class Discussion products or things that may have come from another country. Ask them to make a list of the objects and their country of origin. In the classroom, lead a class discussion on the products brought in by the students (and by the teacher). 2. COCOLOCO: Producing a Chocolate Bar Production Simulation Team Work

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9

First, brainstorm with students on the type of work done by each group involved in the chocolate production and distribution chain. Now divide the class into teams and give each group a chocolate bar. Ask students to cut up the chocolate bar according to the share that they think each chocolate production and distribution group should receive, based on their costs and the amount of work they do. 3. FAIR TRADE ROLE-PLAY

Allows for students to explore analytical, creative and reflective thinking while communicating in a smaller and larger group setting.

2, 3

Students will learn about the issues related to the production and distribution of chocolate, and other traded goods.

In a role-play scenario, a fair trade organization wants to convince a store or coffee shop to carry fair trade products. In teams, students will role-play a conversation between the fair trade representatives and the coffee shop or store managers. For each side, ask students to think about the arguments for and against. 4. WORK ON MAGAZINE RADIO PROGRAM TEAM PROJECT

Role-Play

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9

Team Work

Allows for students to practice interpreting information, identifying key issues, roleplaying, empathizing with other peoples’ points of view, defending a position and communicating in a group.

1, 2, 3

Based on what they have learned in previous activities, students will take on different points of view and practice developing arguments in support of or against a Fair Trade alternative.

Researching Information Developing Content Communicating Information & Ideas Presenting Information & Ideas Developing Creativity Working in Teams Using ICTs

1-9

Based on theme and roles assigned at the beginning of the module, students carry out their project research in teams towards producing their live 13-minute Magazine Radio Program to present to the class.

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication.

1, 2, 3

Applying Terminology

In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting inform-ation, applying communication technologies and various methods of communication, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views.

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about social phenomena, apply it to a hands-on multimedia project, and encourage global collective action.

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 2

student assessment & evaluation guide
T12

1. CONSUMER ANALYSIS: Where Does That Come From?

Information Gathering

1, 2, 3, 4, 9

Allows for students to relate their own experiences to a social issue, to explore analytical and reflective thinking and to communicate in a group setting.

2, 3

Students will become sensitized to the extent to which products sold in Canada come from another country (especially developing countries). And, based on their experiences, will reflect on the considerations related to the production and distribution of these products.

TOOLS UNIT 4: GLOBALIZATION & TRADE MODULE WRAP-UP
Learning Activities Performance Assessment Cross-Curricular Competencies Subject-Specific Competencies

Each radio team will select one news story to “trade” with another team. 2. PRESENTATION OF MAGAZINE RADIO PROGRAM ROLE-PLAY Each team will present its 13-minute Magazine Radio Program Role-Play to the class.

Group Presentation Working in Teams Communicating & Presenting Information & Ideas

1-9

Allows for students to move from experience to information gathering, to analysis, to action and communication. In particular, allows for students to practice framing problems, collecting and interpreting information, applying communication technologies and various methods of communication, negotiating with others, resolving conflicts, building consensus, adjusting to take into account others’ views. 1, 2, 3, 9

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to integrate what they have learned about social phenomena, apply it to a hands-on multimedia project, and encourage global collective action.

3. GROUP WORK EVALUATION

Peer Evaluation After class presentations, hand Individual Evaluation out the cooperative learning group evaluation and the individual evaluation tools you feel are most appropriate for your students. These can be completed in class and as homework at the teacher’s discretion.

Allows for students to exercise Allows for students to evaluate critical judgment and practice their personal and group reflective thinking. development in building consciousness as global citizens.

1, 2, 3

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS MODULE 2

student assessment & evaluation guide
T13

1. JIGSAW NEWS STORY TRADING

Communicating & Presenting Information & Ideas

1, 4, 7, 8, 9

Allows for students to interpret information, share with others, and adjust to take into account others’ views, and communicate in groups.

1, 2, 3

Allows for students to share with classmates their knowledge about the theme they have been researching throughout the module.

CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES OBSERVATION TOOL
STUDENT’S NAME: Demonstrates competency development in a variety of contexts (learning activities, project, etc.).

Key features: Gathers information Puts information to use Systemizes the information-gathering process Evaluation Criteria Consultation of various sources Effective research strategies

INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCY: USES INFORMATION (CCC1)

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

Logical orientation of information Use of information in new contexts

Key features: Analyzes the components of a situational problem Tests possible solutions Adopts a flexible approach Evaluation Criteria Accurate definition of the problem Variety and relevance of solutions proposed Scope of the analysis Application of strategies developed to other situations Context 1.

INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCY: SOLVES PROBLEMS (CCC2)

Context 2.

Context 3.

Evaluation of possible strategies

Key Features: Forms an opinion Expresses his/her judgment Qualifies his/her judgment Evaluation Criteria

INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCY: EXERCISES CRITICAL JUDGMENT (CCC3)

Proper formulation of a question and its implications Openness to questioning of the judgment Appropriateness of the criteria used Well-reasoned justification of the judgment Application of strategies

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

CCC observation tool
T14

Critical analysis of information

CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES OBSERVATION TOOL continued
STUDENT’S NAME:

Demonstrates competency development in a variety of contexts (learning activities, project, etc.).

Key features: Becomes familiar with all the elements of a situation Explores Adopts a flexible mode of operation Evaluation Criteria Exploration of new ideas Exploration of different ways of doing things Context 1.

INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCY: USES CREATIVITY (CCC4)

Context 2.

Context 3.

Originality of connections among the elements of a situation

Key features: Considers all aspects of a task Adjusts his/her approach Analyzes his/her approach Evaluation Criteria Perseverance in performing the task

METHODOLOGICAL COMPETENCY: ADOPTS EFFECTIVE WORK METHODS (CCC5)

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

Appropriate choice of methods Broadening and adaptation of work methods Effectiveness of the outcome Accuracy of his/her assessment of the effectiveness of the methods chosen

Key Features: Uses appropriate technologies Takes full advantage of these technologies Evaluates his/her use of this technology Evaluation Criteria Effectiveness of his/her use of the technological resources in a given learning context Reuse of ICT processes and procedures in new situations Use of appropriate interaction, communication and troubleshooting strategies Analysis of his/her choices, successes and difficulties

METHODOLOGICAL COMPETENCY: USES INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES (CCC6)

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

CCC observation tool
T15

Use of his/her personal resources

CROSS-CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES OBSERVATION TOOL continued
STUDENT’S NAME:

Demonstrates competency development in a variety of contexts (learning activities, project, etc.).

Key features: Recognizes his/her personal characteristics Takes his/her place among others Makes good use of his/her personal resources Evaluation Criteria Expression of his/her feelings, values and opinions in interaction with others Realistic assessment of his/her potential Recognition of the impact of his/her actions on his/her successes and difficulties Demonstration of perseverance

PERSONAL & SOCIAL COMPETENCY: ACHIEVES HIS/HER POTENTIAL (CCC7)

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

Key features: Contributes to team efforts Uses teamwork effectively Interacts with an open mind in various contexts Evaluation Criteria Recognition of the needs of others Appropriate attitudes and behaviours Active participation in the work of the team

PERSONAL & SOCIAL COMPETENCY: COOPERATES WITH OTHERS (CCC8)

Context 1.

Context 2.

Context 3.

Contribution to improving the way the team works together

Key Features: Becomes familiar with various modes of communication Uses various modes of communication Manages the communication process Evaluation Criteria Coherence of the message Use of appropriate vocabulary or symbols Observance of practices, codes and conventions Appropriateness of the message for the context and audience Self-analysis and evaluation Context 1.

COMMUNICATION-RELATED COMPETENCY: COMMUNICATES APPROPRIATELY (CCC9)

Context 2.

Context 3.

©

LEARNING MATERIALS

A DIFFERENT WORLD: TOOLS FOR STUDENTS & TEACHERS

CCC observation tool
T16

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Learning Materials (LEARN)