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Academic Portfolio

Gregory P. Perreault, A.B.D. Missouri School of Journalism

November 20, 2013

Table of Contents

PREFACE

3

RESEARCH

4

RESEARCH STATEMENT: EXPLORING RELIGION & M EDIA

4

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

5

PUBLISHED

5

BOOK CHAPTERS UNDER CONTRACT

5

JOURNAL ARTICLES UNDER REVIEW

5

CONFERENCE PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS

6

NON-AUTHORED RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS

7

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS

8

TEACHING

9

TEACHING P HILOSOPHY: TEACHING IS AFFECTIVE

9

TEACHING RESPONSIBILITIES

10

THE NEWS M EDIA (J1000-M ISSOURI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM)

10

PRINCIPLES OF A MERICAN JOURNALISM (J1100-M ISSOURI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM)

10

NEWS W RITING (J2100-M ISSOURI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM)

11

FOUNDATIONS OF M EDIA INVOLVEMENT (W ASHINGTON JOURNALISM CENTER)

11

W ASHINGTON NEWS & PUBLIC DISCOURSE (W ASHINGTON JOURNALISM CENTER)

12

REPORTING IN W ASHINGTON (W ASHINGTON JOURNALISM CENTER)

12

INTERNSHIP IN W ASHINGTON (W ASHINGTON JOURNALISM CENTER)

13

SERVICE

14

SERVICE P HILOSOPHY: SERVICE IS GIVING B ACK

14

SERVICE RESPONSIBILITIES

15

INTEGRATION OF WORK AND GOALS

16

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

17

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

17

APPENDICES

18

APPENDIX A: SAMPLE SYLLABI

18

GAME OVER! CRITICAL STUDIES ON NEWS AND THE DIGITAL GAME— LARGE LECTURE

18

RELIGION IN THE NEWS— UPPER-LEVEL SEMINAR

24

APPENDIX B: STUDENT EVALUATIONS

31

APPENDIX C: A DVISOR TEACHING EVALUATION

35

Preface

This academic portfolio has been prepared for two purposes: to present a clear picture of the trajectory of my academic career for others and to help remind me of the big picture in terms of academia. As a current doctoral student at the Missouri School of Journalism, my research program may still be young however it is clear that my interest lie in the interaction of two phenomena: media and religion. As Hoover (2004) notes, the lines between those phenomena are getting thinner and thinner. People take away deep religious meanings from interactions with Siri on their iPhone, plotlines in video games or a sense of what is “good religion” from what they read in the news. At the same time, traditional religious organizations have begun to use media for their own purposes, Evangelical Christians use LOST as a text for Bible studies and Mormons emphasizing YouTube and Hulu as outlets for proselytizing. My research explores this interaction, emphasizing the use of religion as an analytical concept that helps humans make meaning out of their existence. Teaching works on the flipside of the research codebook. As teachers our job is to give students the skills to make meaning out of bite-sized portions of their existence. As an instructor in J1000 and J1100, my job has been to teach students media literacy skills—skills they need in order to be an informed citizen in America. In J2100 and in the courses I taught at the Washington Journalism Center, the mission seems solely practical from a distance: to teach students to report and to write. But on a deeper level, learning these practices in an experiential manner helps journalist students understand who they are, what they’re good at, and why they want to do the work they do. As academics it is truly a privilege to get to do this sort of work and as a result it is incumbent upon us to provide some measure of service back to the academy and to our profession. My work as an officer for the Religion and Media Interest Group at AEJMC and as web content developer and manager for the Religion Newswriters Association is my way of addressing many of the deficiencies in understanding about religion and media that is so essential to what I research and teach.

In the pages that follow you’ll find my exploration of these parts of my academic career.

Research

Research Statement: Exploring Religion & Media

The interaction between religion and media is at the soul of contemporary society. Religious groups have increasing means with which to challenge and debate the presentation of their faith in media, and media is increasingly being used for religious functions itself. These two research problems are actually singular, in that the increase in media channels also allows for increasing avenues of religious expression. My work addresses this research problem by examining three primary aspects: how media producers interpret religion in order to make meaning for a public, how people from minority religions respond to messages from a dominant religion paradigm and, most practically, how journalists can better cover religion, while executing in particular the informing and discourse facilitation functions of journalism. My dissertation, which I expect to complete by August 2014, aims to challenge the dominant paradigm of secularism as normative in American culture and argue that what is more compelling in examining our mediascape is the concept of Protestant normativity. A sort of religious hegemony exists at an unconscious level in our media and it privileges Protestant modes of thought: pluralism, structure and traditional concepts of what constitutes religious practice. This is examined through interviews with digital game journalists and narrative framing analysis of digital game journalism. In digital games, many of the most popular games are still made outside of this protestant normative frame of reference. Exploring how journalists mediate digital game content from outside of America in comparison to gaming content from America, allows us to see in the negative space the ways in which religious hegemony operates. I am also in the midst of a research project for the book “The Electronic Church.” My book chapter will explore how Evangelical Christians form community in massively multiplayer role-playing games. This is a piece of a much larger agenda I would like to expand on. Digital games are a vital area for exploration in religion and media, if only as a result of the wide spread use of the technology. Seventy-eight percent of households play digital games regularly—when digital games take into account everything from Angry Birds on the iPhone, to Farmville on Facebook to Call of Duty. Yet if the religion is applied as an analytical concept, a number of interesting elements of the digital game emerge: its ritualistic nature, its role in identity formation and the ways in which games both reaffirm and subvert religious authority structures. This is why some scholars have argued that digital games act as religion. If we take into account the growth of the digital game industry and the decline of traditional religious institutions, we get a picture of our historical moment. Religion will not be supplanted by digital games, but rather many of the historical functions religion has served are being served in new ways. My research will examine how Christians are grappling with the religious nature of the media they are using and how it helps or hinders attempts to form online community.

As a subfield within journalism and mass communication research, religion and media is gaining traction in part because our daily news and politics confirm that religion is a key element in the lives of many across the globe. Religion and media research now appears not only in its specialized, peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Media and Religion, but also in numerous high level journals. My work makes contributions to this field and in my future work, I plan to particularly push the research agenda on the theories of orientalism and hegemony a bit further. These two theories are quite related, as Said (1979) acknowledges, and when applied to America, the hegemonic structure of our media system has often been implied to be implicitly Protestant normative. My work provides shape to how religious hegemony operates. In the short term, I plan to submit my research on this topic to top-tier journals. In the long term, I would like to situate myself as a scholar of orientalism and hegemony, and on a practical level, as an emerging media and religion researcher.

Research Experience

Published

Perreault, G. (2013in press). Teaching Religion and Media: Syllabi and Pedagogy. Journal of Media and Religion, 12(3).

Perreault, G. (2014) Coverage of Islam in English Egyptian News Publications. Journal of Media and Religion//Accepted

Book Chapters Under Contract

Perreault, Gregory P. (2014) Evangelicals and Digital Gaming. The Electronic Church in the Digital Age: Cultural Impacts of Evangelical Mass Media. Santa Barbara, CA:

Praeger.

Journal Articles Under Review

Perreault, G., & Rodgers, S. Newsroom size and journalistic experience as key factors in the interaction between health journalists and public health organizations.

Submitted to Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly (Feb. 2014)

Perreault, G. Vedic religion in video games: a case study of Asura’s Wrath

Submitted to Games & Culture. (Nov. 2012)

Perreault, G. P. Mickey Mouse Magic with Interactivity and Immersion: A Case Study of Kingdom Hearts.

Submitted to Journal of Popular Culture (Dec. 2012), Revise and Resubmited (Aug. 2013).

Perreault, Gregory P. Description, Image, Violent Games and God: A Concept Explication of Depiction.

Submitted to Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media (May 2013).

Perreault, G., Hudson, B. & Cai, D. “Lord, forgive them; they know not what they do”:

The Divine and the Damned in News Coverage of Executed Texas Death Row Inmates.

Submitted to American Journalism (Nov. 2013)

Perreault, G. Book Review—eGods: Faith versus Fantasy in Computer Gaming

Submitted to Journal of Media & Religion (July 2013)

Perreault, G. Book Review—Of God and Games: A Christian Exploration of Video Games

Submitted to Journal of Media & Religion (July 2013)

Conference Papers and Presentations

Perreault, G. Mediating Video Game Violence: A Case Study of GamePro Magazine, 1991-1999. 2014 International Communication Association Conference. Seattle, Washington. 22-26 May 2014.

Perreault, G., Jenkins, J., Swasy, A. & Perreault, M. “Mrs. Jesus?” A hegemonic press love affair with Jesus the bachelor. 2014 International Communication Association Conference. Seattle, Washington. 22-26 May 2014.

Duffy, M., Page, J. & Perreault, G. Moral metaphors in News Coverage of the 2013 Government Shutdown. 2014 International Communication Association Conference. Seattle, Washington. 22-26 May 2014.

Perreault, G. & Morrison, A. Conflict Suppression in News Negotiations of the Mormon Baptism for the Dead and the Holocaust. The Center for Media, Religion and Culture at University of Colorado-Boulder’s International Conference on the Global View. Boulder, CO. 13 January 2014.

Perreault, M., Jenkins, J. & Perreault, G. Religious Iconography in Sports Celebrity Imagery. The Center for Media, Religion and Culture at University of Colorado- Boulder’s International Conference on the Global View. Boulder, CO. 12 January

2014.

"How's This for Digital Lesson Design." Panel Presentation hosted by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Reynolds Journalism Institute. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Washington, D.C., 2013.

Perreault, G., Hudson, B. & Cai, D. “Lord, forgive them; they know not what they do”:

The Divine and the Damned in News Coverage of Executed Texas Death Row Inmates. 2013 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference. Washington, D.C. 11 August 2013.

Perreault, G., Rodgers, S. & Stemmle, J. Prescribing the News: Newsroom size and journalistic experience as key factors in the interaction between health journalists

and public health organizations. 2013 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference. Washington, D.C. 8 August 2013.

Perreault, G. Text, Image, Violent Games and God: A Concept Explication of Depiction. 2013 International Communication Association Conference. London, England. 18-21 June 2013.

Swasy, A. & Perreault, G. A Commentary Echo Chamber: Twitter as an Information Subsidy in the Coverage of U.S. Senate Candidate Todd Akin. 2013 International Communication Association Conference. London, England. 18-21 June 2013.

Perreault, G. Mickey Mouse Magic with Interactivity and Immersion: A Case Study of Kingdom Hearts. 2012 National Communication Association Conference. Orlando, FL. 16 November 2012.

Perreault, G. RPG Religion: Depictions of Religion in Contemporary Console Games. The Center for Media, Religion and Culture at University of Colorado-Boulder’s International Conference on Digital Religion. Boulder, CO.

  • 13 January 2012.

Perreault, G. “Coverage of Islam in English Egyptian News Publications.” 2011 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference. St. Louis, MO.

  • 11 August 2011.* Won Top Student Paper Award.

Perreault, G. “Kingdom Hearts: Immersion, Interactivity, Intertextuality and…Goofy?” (Research-in-progress) 2011 Popular Culture & American Culture Association Conference. San Antonio, TX. 20 April 2011.

Perreault, G. “Citizen Journalism on Islam in Egypt.” The Center for Media, Religion and Culture at University of Colorado-Boulder’s International Conference on Islam and the Media. Boulder, CO. 5 January 2010.

Perreault, G. “Can you be a Christian and a Journalist? Obvi.” The 2010 National College Media Conference. Louisville, KY. 29 Oct. 2010.

Perreault, G. “Up Against the Wall: Learning to Work with School Administrators.” The 2010 National College Media Conference. Louisville, KY. 29 Oct. 2010.

Non-authored Research Contributions

Newton, E. (2013) Searchlights and Sunglasses Field Notes from Journalism in the Digital Age. Miami, FL: The Knight Foundation. [Digital Textbook].

  • § Contributed research, teaching activities and supplementary learning materials to the “learning layer” of the textbook.

Research In Progress

Duffy, M., Page, J. & Perreault, G. Sticking it to Obamacare: A rhetorical analysis of Affordable Care Act advertising and social media.

Submitted to the American Academy of Advertising (October 2013)

Duffy, M., Page, J. & Perreault, G. Moral metaphors in News Coverage of the 2013 Government Shutdown.

Submitted to the International Communication Association

Perreault, G. Critiquing Religion: Journalism Commentary Blogs’ Critiques of Religion News.

Submitted to the International Communication Association

Perreault, G. Mediating Video Game Violence: A Case Study of GamePro Magazine,

1991-1999.

Submitted to the International Communication Association

Perreault, G., Jenkins, J., Swasy, A. & Perreault, M.F. Mrs. Jesus?” A hegemonic press love affair with Jesus the bachelor.

Submitted to the International Communication Association

Perreault, G. Birth of Gaming Religion: A Case Study of GamePro Magazine.

Perreault, G., Craft, S., & Perreault, M.F. Religion News Gatekeeping.

Perreault, G. & Hooper, H. Ethics and Law in Emulator Video Gaming.

Teaching

Teaching Philosophy: Teaching is Affective

Learning is when a student takes the practical and conceptual information necessary for a career and makes it matter in his or her heart. This foundational philosophy shapes how I conceive of the teacher’s role, the goals I have in a classroom and how I enact those goals. The teacher serves as a coach—pointing students toward the information they need, challenging students to be successful in the midst of their failures and cheering students in the midst of their successes. Coaching also assumes a level of personal interaction with students, as well as a stake in their success. A professor has an unprecedented amount of influence to help students achieve their dreams. And by granting a personal touch to what one does, a professor can help make that happen. The intimate nature of the coaching role also helps inform my research. Understanding new forms of popular media and new trends in news media can help me learn the ways in which religious hegemony is and is not moving through our culture. And as I have learned just as a beginning teacher, students are many times more versed in the practicalities of new media forms than senior scholars. In the media classes I have taught, the goal has always been the same—to help students get a sense of why the media looks the way it does. This requires helping students learn to think critically about news, movies, video games and other types of media. By learning to think critically about content and getting a sense of the structure, economics, history and culture of the media, students develop the skills they need to better citizens and better media consumers. There are two primary ways in which I address those goals: through one-on- one meetings with students and experiential learning. One-on-one meetings give students a chance to talk about what they care about, look at the problems raised in the class critically, and help them see how concepts from class apply. This is also the forum in which students provide examples about emerging media forms that I can examine in class and in my research. Experiential learning helps put this application into action. I’m a true believer in the Missouri Method: learning by doing. As a faculty member who oversaw experiential learning in Washington, D.C., I would have my journalism interns spend several days at soup kitchens and homeless shelters in historically poor districts. This was a way for them to apply the concept that the people of the city, not just government officials, had great stories to tell. Students amazed me with the stories they would draw out of their experience and then publish in their internship. Teaching to the heart rather than just the mind ensures that long after classes have concluded and degrees are distributed, students have concepts and skills inside them they can take to share with others.

Teaching Responsibilities

The News Media (J1000-Missouri School of Journalism) Enrollment~200 Students Duration: Fall 2013-Present Responsibility: Lead Instructor

Description: This course is designed to help students become more discriminating news media consumers and citizens and provide the basic skills for media literacy. The course helps students critically assess news content, recognize the difference between news and opinion or advertising, and provide students a framework to understand the new(s) media environment. The class includes discussions of major trends and issues in journalism and advertising, including the impact of new communication technologies on media performance.

Curricular revisions: Students from the Fall 2013 argued with reason that the textbook was too advanced for what the class required. I adopted a new textbook for the spring and restructured the flow of the class material in keeping with the organization of the textbook. Students also expressed frustration about the writing exercises, which appeared to be busy work.In the spring, I reconceptualized them to be more group oriented. Through activities with classmates, I hope students are better able to see the big pictureof the class.

Principles of American Journalism (J1100-Missouri School of Journalism)

Enrollment~200 Students Duration: Spring 2013 Responsibility: Apprentice Instructor in the class in Fall 2012 and then Lead Instructor.

Description: The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with concepts and functions of journalism in American society. This class explores underlying principles of journalism, relationships among journalism and other social institutions and values, and current issues and problems facing journalists. By the end of the course, students should have developed familiarity with how journalism works, as well as some perspective on how well (or not) journalism performs its function in American society. The required class for journalism majors, this class exploration is aimed at making students more analytical practitioners of journalism, more informed media consumers, and more critical writers and thinkers about why things are they way they are in journalism.

Curricular revisions: As an apprentice instructor, I noted the difficulty of administering event papers. Students were to attend three academic events throughout the semester and then, within 48 hours, write a response to the event. In the spring, I administered one event essay, but supplemented it with an ethics essay and a media economics essay to help them connect issues from the class with current events.

News Writing (J2100-Missouri School of Journalism) Enrollment~20 Students Duration: Fall 2011-Summer 2012 Responsibility: Lead Instructor

Description: Using the lens of news writing, J2100 emphasizes the skills needed for all emphases – excellent writing and information gathering. Accurate media writing requires more than the ability to craft words. It requires accuracy, curiosity and attention to detail. The class encompasses a variety of activities – reading, discussing, knowing current events, learning grammar, gathering information and interviewing, and most important – writing and revising. During the class, students learn to apply critical thinking skills to evaluate credibility of sources and information, gather information efficiently through reading, interviewing and researching, and write clearly for a variety of media while adhering to deadlines.

Curricular revisions: The first time I taught the class, students in evaluations recommended that I make better use of examples when trying to teach writing concepts. The administrator for the Missouri news writing program echoed this in a review of my teaching. I integrated this into the Spring and Summer 2012 classes through a greater emphasis on peer review and lab classes to review each others work as a team.

Foundations of Media Involvement (Washington Journalism Center)

Enrollment~15 Students Duration: Fall 2008-Spring 2011 Responsibility: Apprentice Instructor from Fall 2008-Spring 2010 then Lead Instructor

Description: News media are at a crossroads and many professionals would even say that the entire industry is in a crisis. A class aimed at the largely Protestant Christian students at the Washington Journalism Center, this class utilizes lectures, discussion, readings and service learning to raise questions about the role Christians should play in media and culture. Topics covered range from contemporary challenges in journalism to historical tensions between the Church and popular culture to the arguments for and against working as journalists. Students will work collaboratively and individually to develop their understanding of their sense of vocation in this industry. They will also be required to engage the city through community service projects.

Curricular revisions: Throughout my experience in teaching this class, I administrated the service learning component. For some students, their service learning was the most vibrant, instructive part of their semester but only if it was organized. At first, we had different contractors set up the projects and then I would administer the academic side of it, but eventually I set up the projects myself. Too much of the academic experience rested on the foundation of clear organization and when the projects were haphazard or mismanaged, students were unable to glean

anything from the experience. By managing both the administration and the academics, I was able to ensure that students learned about the city and about themselves through the service learning experience.

Washington News & Public Discourse (Washington Journalism Center) Enrollment~15 Students Duration: Fall 2008-Spring 2011 Responsibility: Co-Instructor from Fall 2008-Spring 2011

Description: It’s impossible to study how Washington works without discussing journalism. Through readings and lectures, students in this class study how the history of wire services, newspapers and the Internet is interwoven with the history of the American public square. Also, students study how the future of news and politics will be affected by what happens in news bureaus, networks and magazines based inside the Beltway. This class also addresses modern patterns of news consumption, such as how we turn to entertainment, the Internet, mobile devices and other sources for news. Students discuss how journalists can respond to these trends and study how the media marketplace is responding. With help from classic books about the national press, this seminar will help students prepare for their futures in an industry in which Washington will always play a crucial role. Students will choose a topic and additional readings while preparing a research project addressing a current issue or trend facing the national or global press.

Curricular revisions: My Co-Instructor, Prof. Terry Mattingly and I observed that students had difficulty managing the research paper. For many students, this was their first experience writing a research paper. Over time, Prof. Mattingly and I added more lab sessions for research papers into the curriculum so students could troubleshoot issues they’d run into. It was also a good way to encourage students to manage the time well.

Reporting in Washington (Washington Journalism Center) Enrollment~15 Students Duration: Fall 2008-Spring 2011 Responsibility: Co-Instructor from Fall 2008-Spring 2011

Description: Journalists who work in Washington need all the basic reporting skills as well as mastery of new media skills. This reporting class emphasizes story development, research and interviewing skills, using one of the most intense news environments in the world as its classroom. The emphasis will be on short-form, hard-news reporting and writing -- the kind used in wire services, newspapers, the World Wide Web and broadcasting. Guest lecturers from the industry will discuss interviewing, computer research, multi-platform reporting and other selected topics. The course begins with the basics but quickly moves to advanced topics. Students submit story ideas, background research folders and rough drafts of stories.

Curricular revisions: Students were required to produce a story each week, but struggled to get that story often during their first week in Washington. In some

cases, that first week was a train wreck that would set the tone for a students entire semester. Prof. Mattingly and I removed the requirement of a story from the first week of the class to give students a chance to get acclimated to Washington, D.C. and their internship.

Internship in Washington (Washington Journalism Center)

Enrollment~15 Students Duration: Fall 2008-Spring 2011 Responsibility: Apprentice Instructor from Fall 2008-Spring 2010 then Lead Instructor

Description: In journalism, there is no substitute for professional experience and bylines above a Washington dateline help. The Washington Journalism Center internship offers experience in mainstream newsroom posts that offer hands-on work in reporting and writing. The class provides experience in a "mentored" environment, while also asking students to reflect on their experiences as part of WJC's emphasis on calling and vocation. Internships will occupy roughly 25 hours a week for 11 weeks of the semester. Grading is be based on input from the internship supervisor, as well as a portfolio of final versions of news stories, weblog posts and other materials written and published during the internship.

Curricular revisions: As an apprentice instructor, I observed that students were terrified of their internship experience. To some degree thats natural, but to remind students that this was a guided experience and that they werent in Washington alone, I began inviting students to meet me for lunch or coffee near their office once or twice during the semester. For students to have a chance to debrief some of their experiences in a one-on-one environment proved to be very healthy for their experience in the internship and in the domestic study program.

Service

Service Philosophy: Service is Giving Back

Academics live a life of incredible privilege. This is not to dismiss the incredible hard work that it takes to become an academic or to work as an academic. But no one achieves a Ph.D. alone. It comes from the shared investment of faculty, colleagues, and, at the very least, the scholars who preceded us and enriched our minds. Service is about giving back to the communities that helped us get there: the community of scholars and the community of practitioners. As a scholar of religion and media, I have been the beneficiary of insider knowledge about the journals interested in research from this subfield, about conferences that would be most illuminating and about graduate programs that would support my research. As the current newsletter editor for the religion and media interest group (AEJMC), I try to make such knowledge public. I do this through soliciting senior level scholars to share what they have learned about research and teaching in this forum and collecting paper calls to make available. Furthermore, I have always been so thankful for the thoroughness, and kind- nature, of reviewers in this subfield. So I also serve as a reviewer for the interest group on topics related to news and emerging media. It can be easy, however, for people to end up in research bubbles and not to venture outside their niche. So I also review for the journalism studies division (ICA) to ensure that I am bring my literature outside of my niche. But beyond the scholarly community, it is also important to give back to practitioners. As a former journalist, I owe much of my research skills and scholarly interests to my experience in journalism. So I continue to freelance on the topics I research to share the experience not just with other journalists but also with a journalism audience. I serve as a regular blogger on video game and religion for the Huffington Post. The position came as a result of research I have conducted on religious imagery in video games and continuing to blog with them has proven to be an excellent place to get practical, down-to-earth responses on the lofty concepts I research. The best advice I received as a journalist was to “serve your newsroom.” This indicated to me that I needed to develop a willing spirit—willing to be thrown at the stories that needed to be told even when they were outside my comfort zone. I broaden that concept in considering my life as an academic: “serve your community.” This community includes scholars, journalists and the public. They helped me get to where I am and it is a privilege to be able to give back.

Service Responsibilities

Religion and Media Interest Group, (2012current) Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication

Newsletter Editor (2013current)

Reviewer (2013current)

Assistant to the Book Review Editor (2012-2013)

Journalism Studies Division, (2012current) International Communication Association Reviewer (2013current)

Integration of Work and Goals

My professional experience in journalism continues to inform my fascinations with the worlds of technology and religion and how media connects the two.

As a reporter for the Town-Crier (Wellington, Fla.) and the Palm Beach Post, I had to consistently think about my reporting with photos, video and text for print, online and magazine formats. Multimedia journalism has always been a part of my experienceat the Town-Crier, a community publication, I had to perform a significant number of tasks with little. This approach to journalism would have been unthinkable just five years prior, but thanks to changes in internet, smart phones, social media, and the expectations of our audience, I had the opportunity to explore this new journalism paradigm and consider new ways to communicate information. More recently I worked with the Religion Newswriters Association to create a searchable, web-friendly and mobile-friendly database of supplementary religion materials. These materials are meant to serve reporters who cover religion regularly or as an ancillary topic in their beat. My passion for religion emerged during my time as a reporter at the Palm Beach Post. As a reporter on community sports, I remember looking through my list of upcoming stories and seeing a wide variety of faiths represented: a story regarding a community softball team from the local evangelical Christian megachurch, a profile piece on a local yoga instructor and a story on senior citizen sports offerings through the local Jewish Community Center. Yet West Palm Beach had a large, and growing, Muslim population—why were they not represented in my story budget? I never heard of any stories in the Muslim community. Was it because they did not play sports? Was it because they did not send out press releases? Or was it that I was simply too scared to look for stories there? Spotting this obvious hole in my coverage opened my eyes to a wide variety of misrepresentations and misunderstandings about religion that I had never noticed before. In reconciling my experience with technology in the newsroom and religion in my coverage, I have become convinced that new technology creates both great challenges and great opportunities to religious understanding. In my research, I have addressed through examining religious discourse and depictions in various emerging media forms: in particular digital games and blogs. In my teaching, I show students how concepts like structural biasthe natural biases of news work that shape the content produced—and the market orientation of the news business have created expedient labels and short cuts to religious traditions. This expediency strips a religion of its complexity and can obliterate any sense of the reality of the tradition. Making journalism students aware of such biases can prepare them to be more thoughtful when they are in the newsrooms themselves. My professional experience serves as the foundation of what I do theoretically and practically. The people who continue to work in journalism inspire me that media can improve, religious representations can improve and discourse about religion can improve because it rides on that backs of people who genuinely care about the world around them.

Professional Presentations

  • § Perreault, Gregory P. Can you be a Christian and a Journalist? Obviously.The 2010 National College Media Conference. Louisville, KY. 29 Oct. 2010.

  • § Up Against the Wall: Learning to Work with School Administrators.

____. The 2010 National College Media Conference. Louisville, KY. 29 Oct. 2010.

Professional Development

Certificate in Teaching from the Apprenticeship in Teaching Program.

Georgetown University. 2009-2010. Teaching Mentor: Dr. Diana Owen Involved creating syllabi, teaching a guest lecture, shadowing a teaching mentor and attending a series of seminars on best practices for teaching.

o

o

Preparing Future Faculty Program. University of Missouri Graduate School. 2013- current.

o

Required shadowing a faculty member at a different university (Dr.

o

Jay Self, chair of communication at Truman State University) Creation of an academic portfolio

o

A two-semester seminar class on the inside workings of the university, expectations for faculty in terms of research, teaching and service.

Appendices

Appendix A: Sample Syllabi

Game Over! Critical Studies on News and the Digital Game Large Lecture

J2500 “Game Over!” Critical Studies on News and the Digital Game

University of Missouri School of Journalism

Time/Location: 9:30 a.m.- 11:00 a.m. WF, Location XXX Greg Perreault, M.A. Office: XXXX Office hours: XXX

I. Course Description Game Over! Critical Studies on News and the Digital Game (3 credit hours)

This class will examine the intersection of video games and news. This class will be an in-depth analysis of the social, political and moral messages, functioning as commentary on contemporary events, incumbent in video game narrative and play. We will examine the degree to which video games function as a critical medium—challenging and at times affirming aspects of society. We will also examine the news coverage of the video game medium, which at various stages has been lauding, hostile and fearful. We will also explore the phenomena of “newsgames,” games produced by academic and journalistic institutions for the purpose of delivering news or supplementary information to news casts.

You’ve all read the reports—news readership and news viewership is plummeting. With that in mind, the class seeks to deconstruct the idea of “journalism” and reconsider how people can collect and deliver information using the media and mediums with which they are most comfortable. Recent statistics note that 78 percent of people play video games on a regular basis (the definition of video games here including everything from Angry Birds to Call of Duty, Farmville to Fable III). And that statistic is only growing as the youngest generation (as digital natives) grow up in a world in which gaming is not a niche hobby but rather a part of the air they breathe. So this class will keep an eye toward the future of news: how can video games function in news/informational capacity? What does the traditional news media’s attitude toward gaming imply? And how can news organizations harness this medium to win new news media consumers?

Who is this class for? If you are interested in the way the news media covers new technologies, if you are interested academically or professionally in video games, if you are interested in the future of news and information—this class is for you. This class will demand your participation and your willingness to explore mediums and subject matter with which you are not familiar. If you don’t want to talk seriously about video games or the news, you’ll find this class uncomfortable. Required texts for this class will require a mix of traditional textbooks, scholarly books and video games. You will be required to play games for class, but more than that, you will be required to think and take notes while you do so. This is a critical class so you will be discouraged from consuming your media passively. This class will also be reading and writing intensive. Your opinions will be valued in this class, but you will be expected to learn and practice the art of backing up your thoughts concretely.

Game Over! Syllabus

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Spring 2013

This class is geared toward Freshman and Sophomore students and considered an entry point into the scholarly study of journalism.

The successful student, upon completion of this class, will have:

A greater understanding of the interaction between video games and news through the

lens of the video game medium, the news medium and the news game.

An understanding of the basics of critical/cultural analysis. Why is it worthwhile to deconstruct concepts like “video game” and “journalism” and what benefit does such an effort have both academically and practically?

Constructed and carried out a textual analysis study on a news or video game item as a part of a team.

Learned the essence of research paper writing and produced an academic research paper eligible for consideration at an undergraduate mass communication research conference. Gained an understanding of the role of media in society and have a sense for why the media is the way that it is.

II. Required Texts

Books

1)

“Media in Society” by Richard Campbell et al.

2)

“The Video Game Theory Reader” by Mark Wolf & Bernard Perron (Eds).

Digital Games

3)

“Final Fantasy IV” (Available on iOS, Android, Nintendo eShop, PS Store)

4)

“Grand Theft Auto III” (Available on iOS, Android, PS Store)

5)

“Angry Birds” (Available on iOS, Android, PS Store, Nintendo eShop, Xbox Live)

6)

“Dead Space” (Available on iOS, Android, PS Store, Xbox Live)

7)

“Chrono Trigger” (Available on iOS, Android, PS Store, Nintendo eShop)

8)

Assorted Readings as assigned

III. Course Schedule

Week 1: “How to be Media Critical”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 1

Week 2: “What is Media?”-- Read Campbell et al., Chap. 2; Wolf & Perron, Introduction; Angry Birds (Short Paper 1 Due—What is a Game?)

Week 3: “Visual Literacy”-- Read Campbell et al., Chap. 3

Week 4: “Narrative Formulas and Storytelling”—Read Campbell et al, Chap. 4; Wolf & Perron, Chap. 10; Final Fantasy IV (Short Paper 2 Due—Storytelling Final Fantasy)

Week 5: “Politics of Games”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 5; Bogost, Chap from Persuasive Games

Week 6: “Discoursing Games”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 6; Grand Theft Auto III (Short Paper 3 Due—Subversive Messages in Grand Theft Auto III)

Game Over! Syllabus

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Spring 2013

Week 7: “Economics of Media”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 7

Week 8: “Gaming Public Discourse”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 8; Bogost introduction;

Week 9: “Representations”—Read Campbell et al., Chap. 9; Wolf & Perron, Chap. 5; Dead Space (Short Paper 4 Due—Religious Representations in Dead Space)

Week 10: “Technology and Society”— Campbell et al., Chap. 10; Wolf & Perron, Chap. 6

Week 11: “Globalization”— Campbell et al., Chap. 11

Week 12: “Gender & Robots”—Wolf & Perron, Chap. 7 and 8; Chrono Trigger (Short Paper 5 Due—Post-human Anxiety in Chrono Trigger)

Week 13: Essay Exam

Week 14: Final Paper Presentations

Week 15: Final Paper Presentations

III. GRADING

Grade weights

The elements of the course will contribute to the final grade in approximately these weights:

Final Team Research Paper

30 percent

Essay Exam

30 percent

Short Papers (5)

20 percent

Participation

20 percent

Final Paper—In this paper, your team will critically explore a digital game. You will want to (1) explore news coverage of the game, (2) examine scholarly discussio n of the game, the series and/or the genre, (3) connect course readings to critical analyze the gameplay and narrative of the game and (4) discuss the implications the selected game has on the future of news and information and how the news coverage shapes how we think about this game and games in general.

Short Papers—Throughout the class, you will be assigned five different games to play. The format in which you play the game is up to you, as is how far your progress in the game. Based on experience, I would say that it is difficult to critically assess a game unless you’ve logged at least 10 hours on it. In short 2 page response papers, you will analyze the game in light of current readings.

Game Over! Syllabus

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Spring 2013

Essay Exam—This exam will assess your critical thinking and media literacy skills. It will be completely in essay format.

Class Participation—You are expected to attend class regularly and to participate in class activities. Come prepared with questions and thoughts from the readings.

98-100% A+

78-79% C+

94-97% A

74-77% C

90-93% A-

70-73% C-

88-89% B+

68-69% D+

84-87% B

64-67% D

80-83% B-

63-60% D- 59% & below

IV. ACADEMIC POLICIES

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is fundamental to the activities and principles of a university. All members of the academic community must be confident that each person's work has been responsibly and honorably acquired, developed and presented. Any effort to gain an advantage not given to all students is dishonest whether or not the effort is successful.

Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to the following:

Use of materials from another author without citation or attribution.

Use of verbatim materials from another author without citation or attribution.

Extensive use of materials from past assignments without permission of your instructor.

Extensive use of materials from assignments in other classes without permission of your instructor.

Fabricating information in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Fabricating sources in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Fabricating quotes in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Lack of full disclosure or permission from editors when controversial reportorial techniques, such as going undercover to get news, are used.

Misrepresenting yourself to a source – not identifying yourself as a J2100 student.

Misrepresenting your reporting techniques such as describing a scene as if you were there when you weren’t there.

Interviewing MU sources – faculty or students, friends or family members unless your instructor has given express permission to use any of those for a source. Violating the conflict of interest rule – writing stories on subjects or interviewing people with whom you have a connection, e.g. Writing a story about an event that your organization sponsored or using sources from those events in other stories.

When in doubt about plagiarism, paraphrasing, quoting or collaboration, consult with your instructor. For closed-book exams and exercises, academic misconduct includes conferring with other class members, copying or reading someone else's test and using notes and materials without prior permission of the instructor. For open-book exams and exercises, academic misconduct includes copying or reading someone else's work.

Game Over! Syllabus

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Spring 2013

Classroom Misconduct

Classroom misconduct includes forgery of class attendance; obstruction or disruption of teaching, including late arrival or early departure; failure to turn off cellular telephones leading to disruption of teaching; playing games or surfing the Internet on laptop computers unless instructed to do so; physical abuse or safety threats; theft; property damage; disruptive, lewd or obscene conduct; abuse of computer time; repeated failure to attend class when attendance is required; and repeated failure to participate or respond in class when class participation is required.

IMPORTANT: Entering a classroom late or leaving a classroom before the end of the period can be extremely disruptive behavior. Students are asked to arrive for class on time and to avoid early departures. This is particularly true of large lectures, where late arrivals and early departures can be most disruptive. Instructors have the right to deny students access to the classroom if they arrive late and have the right to dismiss a student from the class for early departures that r esult in disruptions.

Under MU policy, your instructor has the right to ask for your removal from the course for misconduct, disruptive behavior or excessive absences. The instructor then has the right to issue a grade of withdraw, withdraw failing or F. The instructor alone is responsible for assigning the grade in such circumstances.

Dishonesty and Misconduct Reporting Procedures

MU faculty are required to report all instances of academic or classroom misconduct to the appropriate campus officials. Allegations of classroom misconduct will be forwarded

immediately to MU's Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Allegations of academic misconduct will be forwarded immediately to MU's Office of the Provost. In cases of academic misconduct, the student will receive at least a zero for the assignment in question.

Professional Standards and Ethics

The School of Journalism is committed to the highest standards of academic and professional ethics and expects its students to adhere to those standa rds. Students should be familiar with the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists and adhere to its restrictions. Students are expected to observe strict honesty in academic programs and as representatives of school- related media. Should any student be guilty of plagiarism, falsification, misrepresentation or other forms of dishonesty in any assigned work, that student may be subject to a failing grade from the instructor and such disciplinary action as may be necessary under University regulations.

Audio and Video Recordings of Classes

Students may make audio or video recordings of course activity for personal use and review unless specifically prohibited by the faculty member in charge of the class. However, to foster a safe learning environment in which various viewpoints are respected, the redistribution of audio or video recordings or transcripts thereof is prohibited without the written permission of the faculty member in charge of the class and the permission of all students who are recorded. (Collected Rules and Regulations, University of Missouri, Sect. 200.015, Academic Inquiry, Course Discussion and Privacy)

University of Missouri-Columbia Notice of Nondiscrimination

The University of Missouri System is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action institution and is nondiscriminatory relative to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age,

disability or status as a Vietnam-era veteran. Any person having inquiries concerning the

Game Over! Syllabus

5

Spring 2013

University of Missouri-Columbia's compliance with implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, or other civil rights laws should contact the Assistant Vice Chancellor, Human Resource Services, University of Missouri- Columbia, 1095 Virginia Ave., Room 101, Columbia, Mo. 65211, (573) 882-4256, or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education.

Accommodations

If you have special needs as addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act and need assistance, please notify me immediately. The school will make reasonable efforts to

accommodate your special needs. Students are excused for recognized religious holidays. Please let me know in advance if you have a conflict.

ADA Compliance

Students with Disabilities:

If you anticipate barriers related to the format or requirements of this course, if you have emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need to make a rrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please let me know as soon as possible.

If disability related accommodations are necessary (for example, a note taker, extended time on exams, captioning), please register with the Office of Disability Services (http://disabilityservices.missouri.edu), S5 Memorial Union, 882-4696, and then notify me of your eligibility for reasonable accommodations. For other MU resources for students with disabilities, click on "Disability Resources" on the MU homepage.

Religious Holidays

Students are excused for recognized religious holidays. Let your instructor know in advance if

you have a conflict.

Intellectual Pluralism

The University community welcomes intellectual diversity and respects student rights. Students who have questions concerning the quality of instruction in this class may address concerns to

either the Departmental Chair or Divisional leader or Director of the Office of Students Rights and Responsibilities (http://osrr.missouri.edu/). All students w ill have the opportunity to submit an anonymous evaluation of the instructor(s) at the end of the course.

Game Over! Syllabus

6

Spring 2013

Religion in the NewsUpper-Level Seminar

J3700 Religion in the News

University of Missouri School of Journalism

Time/Location: 9:30 a.m.- 11:00 a.m. WF, Location XXX Greg Perreault, M.A. Office: XXXX Office hours: XXX

I. Course Description

Religion in the News (3 credits)

The First Amendment covers both Freedom of Religion and Freedom of the Press. Yet the two sides of the First Amendment don’t always see each other, and they don’t always see eye-to eye. It also keeps from favoring or disfavoring religions. While this may not happen legally (anymore), there is a lively debate about religious hierarchy as it appears in the media.

This class will examine the relationship between Religion and News. This course will focus on depictions of religion in the mainstream press, as well as explore attitudes toward the press found in American religious traditions.

This course should help you develop an awareness of the ways in which the general news media frame issues related to religion. The course will help you discern trends both obvious and subtle in the news coverage of religions and religion-related issues. You will find that some religions receive more coverage and that coverage often takes place within the context of issues involving political, cultural and societal questions. In this course, you should gain:

  • - the historical background of the relationship between religion and press in America—

from the Puritan dominated 17 th Century to present day.

  • - an understanding of the major religious traditions in America—where are they situated

in the “hierarchy” of American religion coverage.

  • - an understanding of how American religions are represented and misrepresented—what journalistic processes bring about misrepresentations and what could be done to improve?

  • - an understanding of the unheard voices in the American press—in journalism we value proportionality in our coverage, but we also value colorful characters in our stories. It would be a mistake to not see those as in conflict. Where are moderating voices in the American press?

Religion and the News Syllabus

1

Spring 2012

- an understanding of the cultural/theological approaches to the press in America. So faiths boycott the news. Others write letters to the editor. So bully the press in the pulpit. How do different faiths respond to the institution of journalism?

II. Required Textbooks

1)

“Unsecular Media” by Mark Silk.

2)

“Religion in the News” by Stewart Hoover.

3)

“From Yahweh to Yahoo! The Religious roots of the Secular Press” by Doug Underwood.

III. Course Schedule

*Each week of the semester, lecture and discussion will be held on Wednesdays and media monitoring presentations will be held on Fridays.

Week 1: “Religion in the Press: Why we should care”—Read Stout, Chap 1.; Hoover, Chap. 1

Week 2: “Prophetic Journalism”—Read Underwood, Chap. 1; Buddenbaum & Mason, Chap. 1

Week 3: “Did the Press Create Protestantism?” –Read Underwood, Chap. 2 and 3

Week 4: “The Greeley Ethic, Journalism and the Christian history of the American Press”—Read Underwood, Chap. 4 and 5; Olasky reading from “Prodigal Press”

Week 5: “Journalism is a religion”—Underwood, Chap. 8 and 9; Rosen reading;

Week 6: “Cult of Science in the Press”—Underwood, Chap. 11 and 12; Silk, Chap. 3

Week 7: “Press, Politics and Religion”—Underwood, Chap. 13 and 15; Silk, Chap. 4-6

Week 8: “Jesus without Journalists”—Underwood, Chap. 16-18

Week 9: “Blind Spots”—Underwood, Chap. 19; Mattingly reading from “Blind Spot”

Week 10: “Problems in Religion Coverage”—Hoover, Chap. 4-6; Silk, Chap. 1

Religion and the News Syllabus

2

Spring 2012

Week 11: “World Religions”—Stout, Chap. 4; Assigned reading on an American faith tradition

Week 12: “Cultural Religion”—Stout, Chap. 5; Buddenbaum & Mason, Chap. 16

Week 13: “Religious Readers”—Hoover, Chap. 7 and 8.

Week 14: “Where we are”-- Buddenbaum & Mason, Chap. 27

Week 15: Final Paper Presentations

Religion and the News Syllabus

3

Spring 2012

III. GRADING

Grade weights

The elements of the course will contribute to the final grade in approximately these weights:

Final Paper

50 percent

News Media Monitoring

20 percent

Article Critiques

20 percent

Class Participation

10 percent

98-100% A+

78-79% C+

94-97% A

74-77% C

90-93% A-

70-73% C-

88-89% B+

68-69% D+

84-87% B

64-67% D

80-83% B-

63-60% D- 59% & below F

Final Paper—In this paper, you will critically explore the coverage of a religious issue in the press and present a research, expositional essay on the topic within 10-15 pages. This paper is not expect to contain original research, but it is expected to be critical. The final paper will include a literature review, historical context of the issue and a presentation of recent coverage.

News Media Monitoring—At the beginning of the semester, you will choose a religious issue to monitor and each week you will provide updates on coverage of the issue in class presentations and short, 2-page response papers. Over the course of the semester, you will be expected to gradually apply your readings to the coverage you are seeing.

Article Critique—At three different times during the semester, you will critique and respond to the coverage of a news story involving religion.

Class Participation—You are expected to attend class regularly and to participate in class activities. Come prepared with questions and thoughts from the readings.

IV. ACADEMIC POLICIES

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is fundamental to the activities and principles of a university. All members of the academic community must be confident that each person's work has been responsibly and honorably acquired, developed and presented. Any effort to gain an advantage not given to all students is dishonest whether or not the effort is successful.

Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to the following:

Use of materials from another author without citation or attribution.

Use of verbatim materials from another author without citation or attribution.

Extensive use of materials from past assignments without permission of your instructor.

Extensive use of materials from assignments in other classes without permission of your instructor. Fabricating information in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Religion and the News Syllabus

4

Spring 2012

Fabricating sources in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Fabricating quotes in news or feature stories, whether for publication or not.

Lack of full disclosure or permission from editors when controversial reportorial techniques, such as going undercover to get news, are used.

Misrepresenting yourself to a source – not identifying yourself as a J2100 student.

Misrepresenting your reporting techniques such as describing a scene as if you were there when you weren’t there.

Interviewing MU sources – faculty or students, friends or family members unless your instructor has given express permission to use any of those for a source. Violating the conflict of interest rule – writing stories on subjects or interviewing people with whom you have a connection, e.g. Writing a story about an event that your organization sponsored or using sources from those events in other stories.

When in doubt about plagiarism, paraphrasing, quoting or collaboration, consult with your instructor. For closed-book exams and exercises, academic misconduct includes conferring with other class members, copying or reading someone else's test and using notes and materials without prior permission of the instructor. For open-book exams and exercises, academic misconduct includes copying or reading someone else's work.

Classroom Misconduct

Classroom misconduct includes forgery of class attendance; obstruction or disruption of teaching, including late arrival or early departure; failure to turn off cellular telephones leading to disruption of teaching; playing games or surfing the Internet on laptop computers unless instructed to do so; physical abuse or safety threats; theft; property damage; disruptive, lewd or obscene conduct; abuse of computer time; repeated failure to attend class when attendance is required; and repeated failure to participate or respond in class when class participation is required.

IMPORTANT: Entering a classroom late or leaving a classroom before the end of the period can be extremely disruptive behavior. Students are asked to arrive for class on time and to avoid early departures. This is particularly true of large lectures, where late arrivals and early departures can be most disruptive. Instructors have the right to deny students access to the classroom if they arrive late and have the right to dismiss a student from the class for early departures that result in disruptions.

Under MU policy, your instructor has the right to ask for your removal from the course for misconduct, disruptive behavior or excessive absences. The instructor then has the right to issue a grade of withdraw, withdraw failing or F. The instructor alone is responsible for assigning the grade in such circumstances.

Dishonesty and Misconduct Reporting Procedures

MU faculty are required to report all instances of academic or classroom misconduct to the appropriate campus officials. Allegations of classroom misconduct will be forwarded immediately to MU's Vice Chancellor for Student Services. Allegations of academic misconduct will be forwarded immediately to MU's Office of the Provost. In cases of academic misconduct, the student will receive at least a zero for the assignment in question.

Professional Standards and Ethics

Religion and the News Syllabus

5

Spring 2012

The School of Journalism is committed to the highest standards of academic and professional ethics and expects its students to adhere to those standards. Students should be familiar with the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists and adhere to its restrictions. Students are expected to observe strict honesty in academic programs and as representatives of school- related media. Should any student be guilty of plagiarism, falsification, misrepresentation or other forms of dishonesty in any assigned work, that student may be subject to a failing grade from the instructor and such disciplinary action as may be necessary under University regulations.

Audio and Video Recordings of Classes

Students may make audio or video recordings of course activity for personal use and review unless specifically prohibited by the faculty member in charge of the class. However, to foster a safe learning environment in which various viewpoints are respected, the redistribution of audio or video recordings or transcripts thereof is prohibited without the written permission of the faculty member in charge of the class and the permission of all students who are recorded. (Collected Rules and Regulations, University of Missouri, Sect. 200.015, Academic Inquiry, Course Discussion and Privacy)

University of Missouri-Columbia Notice of Nondiscrimination

The University of Missouri System is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action institution and is nondiscriminatory relative to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability or status as a Vietnam-era veteran. Any person having inquiries concerning the University of Missouri-Columbia's compliance with implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, or other civil rights laws should contact the Assistant Vice Chancellor, Human Resource Services, University of Missouri- Columbia, 1095 Virginia Ave., Room 101, Columbia, Mo. 65211, (573) 882-4256, or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education.

Accommodations

If you have special needs as addressed by the Americans with Disabilities Act and need

assistance, please notify me immediately. The school will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your special needs. Students are excused for recognized religious holidays. Please let me know in advance if you have a conflict.

ADA Compliance

Students with Disabilities:

If you anticipate barriers related to the format or requirements of this course, if you have emergency medical information to share with me, or if you need to make arrangements in case

the building must be evacuated, please let me know as soon as possible.

If disability related accommodations are necessary (for example, a note taker, extended time on exams, captioning), please register with the Office of Disability Services (http://disabilityservices.missouri.edu), S5 Memorial Union, 882-4696, and then notify me of your eligibility for reasonable accommodations. For other MU resources for students with disabilities, click on "Disability Resources" on the MU homepage.

Religious Holidays

Students are excused for recognized religious holidays. Let your instructor know in advance if

you have a conflict.

Intellectual Pluralism

Religion and the News Syllabus

Spring 2012

6

The University community welcomes intellectual diversity and respects student rights. Students who have questions concerning the quality of instruction in this class may address concerns to either the Departmental Chair or Divisional leader or Director of the Office of Students Rights and Responsibilities (http://osrr.missouri.edu/). All students will have the opportunity to submit an anonymous evaluation of the instructor(s) at the end of the course.

!

Religion and the News Syllabus

Spring 2012

7

Appendix B: Student Evaluations

- Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course Universify of Missouri-Columbia Form A - 3 Instructor: Perreamlt,Gregory
-
Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course
Universify of Missouri-Columbia
Form A - 3
Instructor: Perreamlt,Gregory Pearson
Semester: Fal]. 2011
Course Subject: JoURN
Catalog Number: 21oo
Section: 01p
Course Id: oozgZr
Description: uews
Class Numberi 22348
Department or Unit: ,touRNAJ,rsM sr
Number of Respondents: 18
Section I
Consumer Information
SA4
A3
D2
SDr
# Resp.
Mean
Course content and expectatiolls were presented clearly
60. o
40. o
o.0
o.o
15
3.6
1
I
The instructor was interested in student leaming
AII things considered, the instructor taught effectively
80.0
20.o
0.0
0.o
15
3.8
80.0
20.o
0.0
0.o
15
3.8
J
1
Section II
Diagnostic Feedback
Higb 5
4
3
Low I
# Resp.
Mean
Instructor's organization ofthe course
51
.1
27.8
11
.1
0.0
0.0
4.5
1.
18
2.
Instructor's voice
83
.3
5.6
5.6
0.0
5.6
18
4.6
3.
Instructor's explanations
55.6
33.3
5.6
0.o
5.6
18
rl .3
4.
Ability to present alternative explanations
66.7
27
.8
0.o
5.6
0.o
18
4.6
Use of examples and illustrations
55.6
27.8
11.1
0.0
5.6
5.
18
4.3
Quality of questions or problems raised
.1
27
.A
11.1
o.0
0-o
18
4.5
6.
51
7- Student confidence in instructor's knowledge
77
.8
16.7
5.6
0,0
0.0
18
4.7
0.o
8.
Instructor's enthusiasm
88
-2
11
.8
o.0
0.0
L7
4-9
9.
Encouragement given students to exptess themselves
76.5
17.6
0.o
o.0
5.9
t7
4.6
t7
10. Answ'em to student questions
70
.6
5.9
7.7 .6
5.9
0.0
4.5
I1. Availability of extrahelp when needed
a2 -4
11
.8
0.o
5-9
0.o
17
4.7
I 2. Instructor's language proficiency
94
-L
5.9
0.0
0.o
0.0
L7
4.9
I3. Instructor's use oftechnology
64.7
23.5
.8
0.0
0.0
t7
11
4.5
Section rII General Evaluation
E
QG
S
F'
P
# Rcsp,
Mean
l. The course as a whole
64
5.9
4.5
_7
29.4
0.o
0.0
L7
The content ofthe course
58.8
29.4
s.9
5.9
2.
0.o
L7
4.4
Section [V Information for Other Students
E
QG
S
F'
P
# Resp.
Mean
52.9
35.3
11
.8
0.0
1.
Use of class time
0.0
L7
4.4
t7.6
2.
Amount you learned in the course
70
-6
11
.8
o.0
o.o
4.5
1-7
3.
Relevance aud usefulness of course content
76.5
t7 -6
5-9
0.o
0.0
L7
4-7
4- Evaluafive and grading techniques (tests,papets,projects)
3s.3
4L.2
5.9
11
.8
5_9
L7
3.9
5.
Reasonableness
of assigned work
35
.3
47.6
17.6
29
.4
0.o
t7
3.6
Clarity of student responsibilities and requirements
47.L
29.4
L7.6
0.0
t7
4.L
6.
5_9
Section V General Information About Your Students (percent of respondents)
o/o Completed
Wanted Course
Course Is
Class
Expected Grade
o/o Attendance
Assigned Work
Yes
In major
Freshrnan o.o
A
0-25
0-25
72.2
94 -4
11 .1
o-o
o. o
No
In minor
B
26-54 o.o
26-50
7-6.7
o -o
Soplromore'12.2
so.o
o. o
Neutral
Elective
Junior
C
51-75
5l-75
s.6
o - o
o - o
22.2
2't.a
o. o
o.o
Omit
General
Senior
D
o.o
76-90
'16-90 L6.7
s. G
o. o
o. o
other
o .0
Graduate o. o
F
o.o
91-100
e4-4
9l-100 77.9
Omit
s.6
Other
S
NA
NA
0.0
o-o
o-o
o.o
Omit
s-6
U
o.o
Omit
5-6
Omit
s.6
Omit
11 .1
l2-18-t I -SEIC-I 59-362
Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course Universitj' of Missouri-Columbia FormA-3 Sernester: Spring 2012 Instructor: Perreault.Gregory Pearson
Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course
Universitj' of Missouri-Columbia
FormA-3
Sernester: Spring 2012
Instructor: Perreault.Gregory Pearson
Section: 0ls
Course Subject: JorrRN
Course Id: 007821
Catalog Number: 21oo
Class Numberi 226]-3
Description: NEws
Number of Respondents:
15
Deparfment or Unit: JoirRNAlrsM sr
',W
Percent Responding
SA4
A:
DZ
SDT
# Resp.
Mean
spcfinn T
Consumer Informatiou
0.0
0.0
3.5
50.0
50.0
_L 11
Courr" conteut and expectations were presented clearly
1.
85.7
t4.3
0.0
0.0
L4
3.9
2.
The instructor was interested in student learning
0.0
t4
3.6
64 .3
35.7
o.0
3.
All thines considered, the instructor taught effectively
)
t
Lorv 1
# Resp.
Mean
High 5
3
Spnfinn TT T)iaqnostic Feedback
4.2
20.o
80.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
1.
Instructor's organization ofthe course
0.0
0.0
15
4.9
93
.3
6-7
0.0
2.
Instructor's voice
0.0
0.0
15
4.3
46.7
40
.0
13
.3
3.
Instructor's exPlanations
0.0
0.0
15
4.2
55-5
53
.3
13.3
Ability to present altemative expianajions
4.
40.0
26.7
0.0
0.0
4.t
l.5
33
.3
Use of exanples and iilustrations
5.
40.0
.0
20
.0
0.0
0-0
15
4.2
40
6.
of questions or problems raised-
Quality
0.0
0.0
15
4-7
-3
26.7
0.0
73
7.
Student confidence iu instructor's knor'vledge
0.0
e1
26.7
0.0
aq
15
65.7
8.
lnstructor's enthusiasm
0.0
0.0
15
4.7
66.7
33
.3
0.0
9.
Encouragement given students to expless themselves
s3.3
46.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
4.5
10. Answels to student questiotls
0.0
15
4.7
80
.0
1s .3
0.0
b.,
i
1.
Availability of extra help when needed
o?
?
6.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
4-9
LJ
I
2.
Instructor's language profi ciency
A1
ta
2
46.7
20.o
0.0
0.0
15
13- Iirstructor's use of teclnology
Mean
E
F
P
# Resp.
S
Sanfinn TTT General
Evaluation
QG
6.7
6.7
15
13
.3
46,7
26.7
1.
The course as a whole
33.3
6-7
6-7
15
3.5
20.0
2.The content of the course
eo^linn TV Tnfnr.mcfinn for C)ther Students
E
F
P
# Resp.
Mean
QG
S
66.7
.3
0.0
0.0
15
4.L
20
-o
13
Use of class time
1.
A9
.3
60
.0
0.0
e.f
0.0
J-5
33
2.
Amount you learned in the course
4.3
46.7
0.0
0.0
6.'t
15
46
-7
3.
Relevance and usefulness ofcourse content
3.4
20.0
26.7
33.3
IJ
.5
6.7
15
Evaluative and grading techniques (tests,papers'proj ects)
4.
)R
'l
6.7
15
3.1
13-3
20
-0
33-3
5.
Reasonableness of assigned u'orIi
0.0
0.0
15
3.8
20
40
.0
40
.0
_o
6.
Claritv of student responsibilities and requiretneuts
Section V General Information About Your Students (percent of respondents)
% Cornpleted
Assigred Work
Wanted Course
0-25
0-25
o. o
major
Freshman 40 . o
A
6.7
o. o
Yes
66.7
In
10o. o
26-50
26-50
o. o
o. o
No
ln minol
o. o
Sopiromore
50 . o
B
53
.3
2o.o
51-75
o.o
Neutral 13.3
Omit
o. o
Elective
General o. o
Other
Junior
o . o
o. o
C
40
.0
o . o
'16-90 51-75 20 . o
76-90
Senior
0.0
6.7
o. o
D
91-i00 e3 .3
9l-100 80. o
Graduate o. o
F
0.0
o. o
NA
o.o
NA
o.o
Ornit
Other
0.0
o. o
S
o ' o
Omit
Ornit
Omit
o. o
o. o
o. o
U
0.0
Omit
0.0
06{rs-
I:-sElc- I 9-40
Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course Universify of Missouri-Columbia Form A - 3 fnstructor: PerreaultrGregory Pearson
Student Evaluation of Instruction and Course
Universify of Missouri-Columbia
Form A - 3
fnstructor: PerreaultrGregory Pearson
Semester: Surnmer 2012
Course Subject: ,JouRN
Section: 03
Catalog Number: 2100
Courseld:007821
Description: NEws
Class Numberi t7o73
Department or Unit: lToIlRNArrsM sr
Number of Respondents: 14
Section I
Consumer Information
SA4
A3
D2
SDI
# Resp.
Mean
1.
Course content and expectations were presented clearly
92.3
7.7
0.0
0.0
13
3.9
2.
The instructor was interested in student learning
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
13
4.0
3.
All things considered, the instructor taught effectively
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
1"2
Section II
Diagnostic Feedback
)
High 5
4
3
Low 1
# Resp.
Mean
1.
Instructor's organization ofthe course
92.9
7.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
4.9
2.
Instructor's voice
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
14
5.0
3.
lnshuctor's explanations
92.9
7,L
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
4.g
4.
Ability to present alternative explanations
78. 6
2L.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.8
1,4
5.
Use of examples and illustrations
92.9
7.t
0.0
0.0
0.0
t4
4.9
6.
Quality of questions or problems raised
8s.7
14.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
t4
4.9
7.
Student confidence in instructor's knowledge
100. 0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
t4
5.0
8.
Instructor's enthusiasm
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
5.0
9.
Encouragement given students to express themselves
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
o.o
L4
5.0
92.9
7.t
10.
Answers to student questions
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
4.9
11.
Availability of extra help when needed
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
5.0
1 2. lnstructor's language profi ciency
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
t4
5.0
13.
Instructor's use of technology
85.7
14.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
L4
4.9
Section III
General
Evaluation
E
QG
S
F
P
# Resp.
Mean
1.
The course as a whole
61 .5
30.8
7.7
0.0
0.0
13
4.5
2.
The content ofthe course
61.5
30.8
0.0
0.0
13
4.5
Section [V
Information for Other Students
E
QG
S
F
P
# Resp.
Mean
I
1.
Use of class time
69.2
30.
0.0
0.0
0.0
13
4.7
2.
Amount you leamed in the course
76.9
23.L
0.0
0.0
0.0
13
4.8
3.
Relevance and usefulness ofcourse content
84.6
15.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
13
4.8
4.
Evaluative and grading techniques (tests,papers,projects)
s3.8
30.8
15.4
0.0
0.0
13
4.4
5.
Reasonableness of assigned work
38.5
30.8
30.8
0.0
0.0
13
4.!
6.
Clarity of student responsibilities and requirements
53.8
38.
s
7-7
0.0
0.0
13
4.5
Section V General Information About Your Students (percent of respondents)
o/o Completed
Wanted Course
Course Is
Class
Expected Grade
o/o Attendance
Assigned Work
Yes
Freshman o. o
A
0-25
0-25
64.3
ln major 92.9
7.L
o. o
o. o
No
B
26-50 o.o
14 .3
ln minor
Elective o. o
General o. o
Other
o. o
Sophomore 3s. z
78.6
o.
o
Neutral 14 .3
Junior
s7.L
C
5I-75 26-50
7.L
5I-75
o. o
o. o
Omit
Senior
D
76-90
76-90
7.1
o. o
o.o
o. o
o. o
Graduate o. o
F
o. o
o.o
91-100
e2.s
91-100 e2.e
Omit
7.L
Other
S
NA
NA
o. o
o.o
o.o
o.o
Omit
7.L
U
Omit
o.o
7.t
Omit
7.L
Omit 7.t
09-20-12-sEtc-5-8
Student Bvaluation of Instruction and Course University of Missouri-Columbia Form B - 3 Instructor: PerreaultrGregory Pearson
Student Bvaluation of Instruction and Course
University of Missouri-Columbia
Form B - 3
Instructor: PerreaultrGregory Pearson
Semester: Spring 201-3
Course Subject: JoURN
Section: 03
Catalog Number: 1100
Course Id: 007859
Description: PRrNcs oF AM .touRN
Class Number2 24493
Department or Unit: JouRNArrsM sr
Numtrer of Respondents: 164
Percent Responding
Section I
Consumer Information
SAA
A3
Dz
SDl
# Resp.
Mean
q2
Course content and expectations v,'ere presented cleatly
0
nn
a
?o
1.3
L52
3.5
1
2
The instructor was interested in student learning
74.2
23. 8
o.7
151
-L.5
A11 thiiigs considered, ilie iirstrucior taught effectively
oc . +
Section II
Diagnostic Feedback
High 5
4
3
2
Lorv I
# Resp.
Mean
1.
Instructor's organization ofthe course
59.
AI
9
34
5.6
0.0
0.6
-O
1"62
2.
Sequential presentation of concepts
54.7
33.
5
8.1_
1.9
1.9
151
4.4
3.
Instructor's explanations
54.0
35.
10
4
8.1
0.6
l_ 6-L
4. L-
4.
Abiiity to present altemative explanations
36.
5.6
2.5
1.9
6
161
5.
Use of exampies and illustrations
74-1-
18
.5
4.9
L.2
L.2
L6Z
4.6
6.
Instructor's enhancement of student interest
69.
I
22.2
4.3
L.2
4.6
1_62
7.
Student confidence in instructor's knowledo"
1<.)
77
-2
19.
1
0.5
L.9
4.7
8.
Instructor's enthusiasrn
80.2
15.0
z-5
0.0
4.2
L62
4.7
qo
9.
Ciarity of course objectives
o
27
.2
7.4
3.1
2.5
L62
4.4
10.
Interest level ofclass sessions
58.6
30.9
8.0
1t
1".2
L62
4.4
11.
Availabilif of extra iielp when needed
aqR
27
.8
L8 -4
3.8
4.4
158
4.1
o?
I 2. Instructor's ianguage profi ciency
90.1
0.0
0.0
0.6
161
4.9
13.
Instructor's use oftechnology
75.8
18.6
ttr
2.5
0.5
16i"
4.7
Section III
General Evaluation
E
QG
S
F
P
# Resp.
Mean
1.
The course as a whoie
47
.8
32
.9
13.7
L.2
15L
4.2
2.The content ofthe course
39.1
38
.5
15. s
5.6
7.2
161
4.7
Section IV
Information for Other Students
E
QG
S
F
P
# Resp.
Mean
,?
1.
Use of class tirre
e
44.4
8.8
L.9
t.2
160
4.3
2.
Amount you leamed in the course
45
.6
35.6
L2.5
0.0
160
4.2
3.
Relevance and usefulness ofcourse content
53.8
26.2
L6.2
1.9
10
160
4.3
4.
Evaluative and grading tecluiques (tests,papers,projects)
2L.9
33.
1
29 .4
9.4
6.2
150
3.5
5.
Reasonableness of assigned work
47.2
40.0
13.1
5.0
0.6
A2
160
6.
Ciarily of student responsibilities and requirements
a1
0
40.0
L2.5
5.6
0.o
160
A'
Section V General Information About Your Students (percent of respondents)
% Cornpleted
Wanted Course
Course Is
Class
Expected Grade
o/o Attendance
Assigned Work
Yes
0-25
75.6
In major
93 .3
Freshrnan a2 .9
A
?,
0-25
1
o. o
2 .4
No
6.7
In minor
0.6
26-50
Sophornore LL.6
26-50
B
47.O
o. o
r-.8
Neutral 1s.2
Elective
Junior
o. o
1. B
14.0
51-75
1.I
51-75
C
7 .3
Ornit
2.4
General
!.2
Senior
o. 5
D
L.2
76-90
e.1
16-90 L2.2
Other
Graduate o. o
2 .4
0.0
91-i00 86.6
91-100 73.8
F
Omit
2.4
Other
NA
o. o
0.0
o.o
NA
0.5
S
Omit
Omit
3. o
U
0.0
2.4
Omit
1.8
Omit
3.7
06-24-l 3-SEIC-5 1-l 48

Appendix C: Advisor Teaching Evaluation

UNIVERSITY Of MISSOURI MrssouRr scHool oF JOURNALTSM JOURNALISM STUDIES DEPARTMENT TO: School of Journalism Doctoral Teaching
UNIVERSITY Of MISSOURI
MrssouRr scHool oF JOURNALTSM
JOURNALISM STUDIES DEPARTMENT
TO: School of Journalism Doctoral Teaching Program
CC: Greg Perreault, Doctoral Student, Instructor of J1100
RE: Classroom Teaching Evaluation
I observed Greg Perreault's classroom teaching in J1100, Principles of American Journalism, on
April 9, 2013. Jl100 is an introductory course that is designed to familiarize students with
major
issues and concepts in journalism studies and is required for journalism majors and minors.
Greg's class has a total of 197 students, mostly freshmen. In addition to the classroom
observation, I also reviewed Greg's syllabus and assignment instructions.
The topic of his lecture on that day was on journalists' ethical duties and codes. Overall, I was
very impressed with Greg's meticulous preparation and effective delivery. His lecture was
structured, coherent and clearly presented. Considering the size of the class, he was especially
effective in engaging the students through questioning, dialogues and case studies.
The following are my notes on specific aspects of Greg's classroom teaching.
First, his lecture was thoughtfully structured and efficiently organized. The lecture time was
from
I I a.m. to 72:15 p.m., a total of 75 minutes. He first gave some brief feedback on the exam
that the students had taken the week before, and then spent about 5 minutes reviewing what the
course had covered thus far. He reviewed the three metaphors ofjournalism and the economic
challenges faced by today's media. This review nicely led into the main topic of that
day's
lecture on journalists' ethical duties. He started the topic by asking "why do ethics matter?" and
led a ten-minute class discussion on a familiar case regarding one of the most iconic and
controversial9lll photos which featured men falling off the World Trade Center. He then laid
out a conceptual framework and explained in detail several key concepts in ethics including
morality, perfect duties vs. imperfect duties, and consequentialism vs. deontologicalism. He
used several telling examples to illustrate each concept, and then focused on the particular case
of the 1994 Pulitzer winner Kevin Carter's photos covering the Sudan famine. He used the case
not only to explain the concepts of perfect duties and imperfect duties but also to engage the
students in discussion on how best to balance professional requirements and moral standards.
After wrapping up the discussion, he spent the rest of the class time explaining the requirements
for a take-home assignment based on the content and discussion of the lecture. The assignment
was an essay focusing on how to make an ethical decision when facing a journalistic dilemma.
Greg finished the lecture at around 12:05, and left some time for students to ask questions about
the lecture and the assignment. Overall, I would say his lecture had a clear structure and a logical
flow and progression.
201 NeffHall Columbia, MO 65211 Phone: 573-882-0860 Fax: 573-884-5400
M i ssour i's Ft
alsh ip IJ n ia ersi ry
Second, I am especially impressed by Greg's positive rapport with the students and his ability to
Second, I am especially impressed by Greg's positive rapport with the students and his ability to
engage students with critical thinking. I noticed that he made regular eye contact with students
and used body language (e.g. hand motions, walking around) effectively to keep students
engaged. During the class discussions, apparently he knew all the names of at least a dozen
students who participated in the discussion. After a student answered the question, he would
respond by first acknowledging the student's input, by saying something like "that's a good
point, Mellissa." He then recaptured and sometimes reframed the student's main point and
raised a follow-up question in order to further the discussion. For example, after a student said
news value should be a consideration in whether to run a controversial photo in the newspaper,
Greg asked her what specific news value and news impact journalists need to consider. To make
a point about ethical dilemmas and boundaries, Greg shared his personal experience during 9/11
and talked about the historical significance of news for informing the public. During the
discussion, the students seemed to feel at ease engaging in the discussion, and students sitting in
both the front rows and the far back would raise their hands to answer the questions, which was
indicative of the range of the class engagement.
Third, the material covered during his lecture was well balanced in breadth and depth and
between concrete examples and abstract concepts. He used examples appropriately and
effectively. Other than the two cases he used for class discussion, he gave a wide range of
relevant examples to explain abstract concepts and theoretical arguments. For example, when he
was trying to explain ethical dilemmas and rationales for personal judgment, he used the
example of the computer game Bioshock, ..
in which the player is presented with the choice at
various points in the game to either exploit characters in the game to gain more energy for the
player character, or spare each character for a smaller amount of resources. This example, I
would assume judging from the students' reaction, is something familiar to the students and thus
easily made sense for them. At another point, Greg used Walter Williams' Joumalist's Creed,
which should be familiar to the J-School students, to talk about journalists' ethical
responsibilities.
In addition, I would like to make a note on Greg's effective use of Prezi for his lecture
presentation. The advantage of Prezi is its capacity to help visualize content and the ease of
navigation between texts, and images and videos. It also shows a clear path of the navigational
sequences, which is ideal for a structured lecture presentation. I have, however, seen some Prezi
presentations where the visual stimulation is excessive to the point of distraction. Greg's use of
the medium avoided these errors and was quite effective. His presentation was clean and simple,
highlighting the key words and concepts rather than using longer sentences and excessive
quotations. The presentation included clear signals of topic shifts and transitions. The videos
and images were all well prepared and were easy to pull out for presentation. I would say Greg's
use of Prezi was instrumental in his organized delivery of the lecture and by keeping students
visually stimulated, it also enhanced the students' leaming experience.
Overall, I found Greg a very effective teacher especially considering the large size of the class.
This was perhaps the most prepared and the best-delivered class I have observed among the
doctoral students.
Please let me know if you have any questions or if you would like me to
Please let me know if you have any questions or if you would like me to elaborate on any of the
above observations.
=hn/r
Yong Yolz,fn.O. f
Associate Professoi of Journalism Studies