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Second Annual Dominican American National Roundtable Summary May 28-30, 1999 By Tomas Alberto Avila RI Convention
Second Annual Dominican American National Roundtable Summary May 28-30, 1999 By Tomas Alberto Avila RI Convention

Second Annual Dominican American National Roundtable Summary

May 28-30, 1999

By Tomas Alberto Avila

RI Convention Center Providence RI

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Table of Content

Second Annual Dominican American National Roundtable

3

___________________________

Economic Development

_____________________________________________________________

4

Presenters:

5

_______________________________________________________________________________

Immigration Reform

5

Presenters:

5

_______________________________________________________________________________

Honorable Charles Rangel Remarks

__________________________________________________ The Health Status of Dominicans in the US: Disparities in Care and Access

_________________

6

7

Presenters: 8 _______________________________________________________________________________

El Systema de Salud en la Republica Dominicana

9

Presenter: Jose Polanco 9 _____________________________________________________________________

NALEO Campaign Training Presentation

9

2 nd Annual Dominican-American National Roundtable

9

Elements of a Campaign

9

____________________________________________________________________

Field Operations

10

Message: Developing a Winning Message

10

“Compelling Reason for Action”

10

Your Message:

10

The Message Box

11

Field Operations

11

Session Objective

11

Projecting Voter Turnout:

12

Polling

__________________________________________________________________________

12

Migration Trends by Dominicans and other Caribbean nationals to the United States

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Introduccion de Libro

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17

The Hosting Organization

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DARN Mission Statement

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A generation that cares

20

In the News

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Conference looks at needs of Dominicans

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CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DOMINICANA

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CELEBRADA EN PROVIDENCE

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Por Victor F. Capellan

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CONFERENCEAGENDA

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____________________________________________________

Friday May 28/viernes 28 de mayo

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Saturday May 28/sabado 29 de mayo

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Sunday May 30/domingo 30 de mayo

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Tomás Alberto Ávila

Second Annual Dominican American National Roundtable

The conference brought together over 500 Dominican-American and friends of the Dominican

community from throughout the country. The DANR is a combined national effort of grassroots

and nonprofit organizations and business entities to set advocacy goals, increase lobbying efforts,

promote social justice, improve civic education and increase citizen participation.

This year, the annual Dominican-American National Roundtable conference took place in

Providence, Rhode Island at the Rhode Island Convention Center from May 28 to May 30. The

theme of the conference was "Towards the New Millennium." and focused on topics of

education, health and public safety, the upcoming Census 2000, economic development, and

political empowerment.

Many months of planning and countless hours of work culminated in this gathering and produced

a weekend full of excitement, learning opportunities, sharing of ideas and plenty of Dominican

pride. It was a pleasure and an honor to shared exciting experiences at the Second Annual

Dominican-American National Roundtable.

Many Dominicans from across the nation took the initiative to attend this important and historic

event for the Dominican community. At the brink of a new century, and the end of the 2oth

century, the decades ahead are filled with opportunities for our community. However, with

opportunity comes responsibility. We have taken the responsibility to be proactive and to

represent our organizations, community, state, family, and ourselves and brought your ideas and

determination to work for a better tomorrow. We must be proud of what we have accomplished,

but we must be even more hopeful for what the future holds for our community and us. We must

build the alliances necessary with our Latinos brothers and sisters to promote our combined

agenda at the highest levels of this country.

As I think of the turn of the century and reflect on the status of our community nationwide, I

believe that we are in good hands. This movement has brought us together to work not for

ourselves and our own interests, but for the future well being of our community and the well

being of our children.

As President and, fellow teammate in this organization, and as a Proud Dominican, my

commitment is to ensure that this organization progresses forward. This progress and growth

must be nurtured and cared for as if a fragile child and I assure you that I will continue to work

with energy and pride to defend this movement and to provide the leadership necessary for a

successful transition into the 21 st Century. I am proud to serve as National President of the

DANR movement and to have the opportunity to work along side great leaders such as the

experienced members of the National Steering Committee and the energetic and committed

young people of the Rhode Island planning committee.

Thank you once again for your commitment I commend you for your investment in our

community and for caring enough to travel hundreds of miles or for coming from just around the

comer. We will all work together to ensure that DANR promotes the best of what Dominicans

have to offer, and to work with other groups on our common goals and issues. Together we can

move our agenda forward and ensure a better community for all in the 21 st Century. Following

Tomás Alberto Ávila

this introduction, you’ll find a summary of the conference that will provide you with brief

description of the different workshops and the agreements reached.

Tomás Alberto Ávila this introduction, you’ll find a summary of the conference that will provide you

Juan Casimiro makes a dynamic economic development presentation at the conference

Economic Development

The main concern of this specific event was to discuss how lack of economic development has

affected the actual status of Dominicans and other urban community residents by limiting the

amount of social and political power possible to them.

Because of the lack of economic power within the community, the residents of inner cities have

no control over their immediate environment. Also mentioned was that, as a new immigrant

group to the US, Dominicans has not flexed networking and connections that other immigrant

groups, such as the Asian community have put to great use. For example, in a Latino community

1 dollar spent at a Latino-owned business circulates 10 times before entering larger markets. In

comparison, 1 dollar spent in an Asian neighborhood might experience 100 exchanges before

leaving the community. This illustrates the how some groups are more supportive of each other.

Also touched upon was the economic power of Latinos and other immigrant groups. These

amounts reached into the hundreds of millions, but because minorities' spending has no one-

group economic direction another reason for this is lack of job stability. Minorities have little or

no educational or training background.

One highlight of this was the situation of adolescents with little background and uncertain

employment; many turned to other forms of income such as drugs dealing.

What one panelist, Juan DeLos Santos, offered was the analogy of not just offering a hungry

person one fish, but providing that person with the means or "the rod" to support themselves for

a lifetime.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Therefore, there is still hope by channeling the direction of economic development in the

community. Namely, by having credit unions extend

Presenters:

Bienvenido Garcia - Moderator

Panelists

Juan Casimiro

Janet Pichardo

Deyanira del Rio

Juan de los Santos

Rafael Ginebra

Immigration Reform

Mr. Matos began the symposium by giving a brief overview of immigration. Immigration is

under federal jurisdiction and not local. For a bill to be binding it must pass through congress.

Matos emphasized that Dominicans have to find ways to highlight issues that effect them

specifically. One of these is the doing away with of Sanctuary provisions that protect

undocumented immigrants that are witnesses to or victims of a crime. Another such issue is the

income requirement for affidavits of support, which was increased in the new immigration laws

to 125% of the federal poverty level. One study suggested that as many as 40% of Dominicans

now living in the US would have been denied entry had the affidavit of support law been

changed earlier.

Mr. Peguero began his presentation by stating that between 1996 when immigration reform was

passed and 1998 40,000 immigration cases were rejected at the American consul in the

Dominican Republic. Because of the new laws many families are being forced to live separately

which causes problems not only for the individual family but for the community as well?

Peguero's idea is to implement some sort of insurance policy for immigrants so that the

community can guarantee the US governments that the immigrants coming from the island will

not become public charges

Mr. Schwartz, who has 20 years of experience empowering immigrant communities,

emphasized the need for the Dominican community to form coalitions with other groups to effect

immigration laws. These groups include other ethnic groups, academia, business, labor etc. The

first job of Dominicans is to unify within the Dominican community and then reach out to the

other communities. Organize on the local level to effect national issues and be focused on

results, not obsessed with an "all or nothing" ideal. Small victories can mean a great deal to the

people that are in need. According to Schwartz, the important issues on the agenda for groups to

be fighting are repealing several of the immigration reform laws including the affidavit of

support restrictions and to support bills already introduced in the house and the senate.

Radhames Peguero

Manuel Matos

Rick Swartz

Presenters:

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Tomás Alberto Ávila Congressman Rabgel (D-NY) addresses the Roundtable ' s crow of 500 attendees. Seating

Congressman Rabgel (D-NY) addresses the Roundtable ' s crow of 500 attendees. Seating to his

left are:Assemblyman Adriano Espillat, DARN President Victor Capellán and Quisqueya In

Action Presiden Elvys Ruiz.

Honorable Charles Rangel Remarks

US House of Representatives (D-NY)

Saturday May, 1999

U.S. Rep. Charles B. Rangel said that public education - historically the steppingstone to success

in the United States for poor and immigrant children - is a "national disgrace." The New York

Democrat spoke to the Dominican-American National Roundtable, an organization that follows

in the tradition of the NAACP and other groups galvanized by issues of civil rights and political

empowerment.

The disgrace lies in the money that is being spent for poor results, adding that Dominican-Ameri-

cans who have achieved personal success have a responsibility to "go back and mentor a child or

adopt a school."

The community must make sure that those who run public schools are not content with a school

that fails "because of the poverty or the color of the student, or where that student lives," Rangel

said.

Unless young people are trained to take advantage of the opportunities this country has to offer,

he said, they would be taken advantage of.

What makes this conference exiting, is the fact that it's just the beginning. Within this room

you've brought extra ordinary people with extra ordinary backgrounds who are willing to share

Tomás Alberto Ávila

their experiences for the betterment of the community. The most important thing that makes this

event more successful is the presence of the young people.

When I hear the Europeans in this country talking about ethnic cleansing in other parts of the

world, it makes me wonder what they called it when they came to this continent and cleansed the

native people and then went to Africa and cleansed our brothers against their will.

We are in the period of the Internet the Concorde and the period of international commerce and

interdependence of all nations, NAFTA was the first time that this country recognized the Latino

community and gave Mexico the recognition it deserved. Now we must to keep that recognition

moving forward and change the Caribbean Basin Initiative and expand it.

  • I find it troubling about Europeans in this country who'll rather talk about their journey in the

May Flower and were proud to be called immigrants when they arrived here but now feel that

there are to many immigrants.

We need to make sure that we leave a better world for our children than the one we have. And

need to make sure that those in charge of the school system don't become content with the

decaying of our school systems competitive process.

  • I strongly feel that success shouldn't be measured with how much money you make, but instead

it should be measured with the giving back to the community as mentors to help those that need

help in the community. Next year will be very important, because there'll be the reapportioning

of the political lines and we don't know where they are going to end up. We must have unity in

our community in order to secure success.

The Health Status of Dominicans in the US:

Disparities in Care and Access

Dr. Rodriguez began the panel explaining that Dominicans in the United States suffer from a

lack of access to good health care. In this country no individual can be denied emergency

medical care but because of the expense of providing this care fulfilling that right can be

difficult. Hospitals have to face the fact that health care is very expensive and that there will

always be a population in need of free care.

In the Dominican Republic only about 20% of the population has medical insurance. All care in

public hospitals is free. Thus many Dominicans are not used to the type of health care system

used in the United States. What is important then is that instead of creating a welfare approach

to healthcare in which the hospitals are forced to pick up the cost of care for those who are

unable to pay is to fight for insurance coverage for all people who need it.

Ms. Mejia began her presentation saying that, just as Martin Luther King Junior had a

dream, she too has a dream which is to see the health system working for the people. Ms.

Mejia is part of a program in New York City called "Voices of the Community" trying to

improve the health and access to care of immigrants in New York City especially in the

area of Washington Heights. The need for this type of program is evident. In her

presentation Ms. Mejia showed that 67% of the residents of Washington Heights are

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Latino of which she estimates as many as 60% may be Dominican. In 1990, the average

per capita income of residents of Washington Heights was $13,022. For Dominicans in

the same area the per capita income was only $6,641 as opposed to the $21,333 per capita

income of Caucasian residents. Unemployment among Dominicans in Washington

heights was at 8.5% in 1990. The unemployment rate for Puertoricans was 2.4% and for

Caucasians was 3.7%. In the city of New York as a whole as many as 28% of adults

between the age of 18 and 64 did not have medical insurance in 1996 as opposed to a rate

of 19% nationally. However, Ms. Mejia was careful to add that in general Dominicans

are a relatively healthy population compared to other those of other new immigrants.

Ms. Murillo focused her presentation the fight to get insurance for uninsured immigrants.

She noted at the beginning that in the state of Rhode Island, hospitals do not pay taxes in

return for the free care that they are obliged to give out in their emergency rooms. With

the recent boom in temporary employment agencies who usually do not offer health

insurance and the trends among employers to cut insurance benefits or make them more

expensive, the number of uninsured individuals is still of great concern. Ms. Murillo

urged the audience to work together in their home states to find ways to get coverage for

people who are in need and lobby for the use of tobacco settlement money for health-

related purposes.

Dr. Felipe Rodriguez

Miriam Mejia

Luisa Murillo

Presenters:

Tomás Alberto Ávila Latino of which she estimates as many as 60% may be Dominican. In

Tomás Alberto Ávila

El Systema de Salud en la Republica Dominicana

Presenter: Jose Polanco

Dr. Polanco pasó dos meses trabajando en una clinica en el area del Cibao en la Republica

Dominicana y nos habló de sus experiencias durante ese tiempo. La Republica Dominicana está

dividida en 8 regiones de mas o menos el mismo tamano por la secretaria de la salud. Cada area

mantiene su hospital publico pero muchos de los recursos han sido usado para mantener los

edificios y pagar los medicos y enfermeras.

Entonces muchas veces no hay medicamentos ni instrumentos suficientes para los pacientes. Por

esta razon la mayoria de la gente que pueden pagar su estadia en una clinica privada prefieren

hacerlo para no tener que ir a los hospitales publicos.44% de la población Dominicana usa

clinica privada mientras 49% usan el systema pública 70% de los pacientes pagando las clinicas

lo estan haciendo de su propio bosillo porque no tienen seguro medico.

En la clinica donde trabajaba el Dr. Polanco una visita a la emergencia costó $7 y tirar una placa

$18 ($RD288). Muchas personas tienen que decidir si van a tirarse una placa o comprar los

medicamentos porque no tienen el dinero para pagar los dos. Aqui en los Estados Unidos y

especialmente en Rhode Island Polanco indentificó el problema de la falta de medicos que

hablan espanol y la falta de conociemiento del systema Estadounidense de salud que tienen los

nuevos inmigrantes.

NALEO Campaign Training Presentation

2 nd Annual Dominican-American National Roundtable

Marcelo Gaete-Tap

Director of Constituency Services

202-546-2536/email mgaete@naleo.org

The campaign plan is a road map for the effective implementation of the strategic goals of the

campaign. The campaign plan incorporates various elements including message, field

operations, and finances into a comprehensive blueprint for achieving victory.

Elements of a Campaign

Political Assessment

Candidate, Opponent, major issues, and the district’s “big picture”

Message

What is a political Message

Message Targeting

Campaign Structure

Campaign Roles

Campaign Organizational Chart

Field Operations

 

Elements of Targeting

Volunteers

Petition Drive

Voter Registration

Canvassing

Voter Identification

Election Day

Finances

Political Fundraising

Campaign Budget

Calendar

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Message: Developing a Winning Message “Compelling Reason for Action”

Session Objective:

Presenters will provide participants with the basic elements of developing a campaign message.

Participants will analyze their campaign’s strengths and weaknesses, learn the different uses of

free media and paid media. Participants will also learn the process for making strategic decisions

in delivering an effective message.

Your Message:

Your campaign message is the central reason why you are running for office and why people

should vote for you. It must be clear, concise, contrast you from others, and be persuasive. In

short it should provide the voter with a compelling reason for action and a clear reason for voting

for you. Your message should be short and clearly articulated by the campaign.

Developing Your Message

In developing your campaign message the first step is to take an in-depth analysis of your

strengths and weaknesses and how they will come into play in the campaign. Every

candidate/campaign needs to determine what is the central reason for seeking public office.

  • 1. What are my strengths and weaknesses?

  • 2. Why am I the most qualified person for elected office?

  • 3. Why should I run now?

Answer these questions with regards to your opponent.

NOTE: Discuss all your skeletons with your campaign team—they will come out.

Defining the Race

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Every campaign needs to identify the critical issues that voters in the district care about, and how

the campaign will address then. This means having discussions with opinion leaders in your

district, conducting polling, and studying local press coverage.

  • 1. What are the issues facing the district?

  • 2. What do the voters care about?

  • 3. What is this election race going to be about?

The Message Box

You know your candidate, you have researched the district and the key issues, you have studied

your opponent, and you are developing a core message, now you can begin developing themes

about the various issues that the campaign will articulate.

Your Message

Opponents Message

What do we say about our campaign?

What do they say about their campaign?

What do we say about them?

What do they say about us?

Field Operations

Targeting “Deciding which voters to talk to”

Session Objective

Presenters will provide participants with the basic elements of developing a Campaign Field

Plan. Participants will conduct a numbers analyzes that will result in a targeting plan.

Participants will receive a handout detailing the various roles in a campaign and a mock

organizational chart. Participants will learn the various elements of putting together a field plan.

Targeting:

Targeting is an analysis of voting patterns in an electoral district that result in your campaign

identifying the numerical formula for winning the election.

Targeting will include identifying

likely voters, the number of votes needed to win, the geographic area of voting patterns in the

district, demographic analysis of those mostly likely to vote, and issues that move voters in the

district.

Elements of a Targeting Plan

Projecting Voter Turnout:

Tomás Alberto Ávila

(Average Turnout for similar election) X (Total current registration) = Projected Voter Turn Out

Divide precinct into High, Medium, and Low turn out.

(Note: It helps if you color coordinate the district by turnout projection)

Votes Needed to Win

Projected Vote / 2 + 1 = Votes Needed to Win

Using a Voter File

Using a Voter File will allow your campaign to identify who is likely to be voting by

demographic categories such as gender, age, ethnicity etc. Your campaign will also be

able to identify voting performance: likely voters, occasional voter, new voters etc.

Research similar race

Sometimes researching previous campaigns in your district will provide a sense of where

and who is your possible base vote. For example, if you are running in a non-Latino

majority district, studying previous Latinos on the ballot will give your campaign a sense

of how she or he fared in the district, precinct by precinct.

Polling

Polls are expensive! Your campaign needs to decide early on if spending a significant

part of your budget on polling is worth it. If your campaign cannot afford a poll—

Research, Research, Research! Read all of the local papers, especially the letters to the

editor. Talk to different segments of the community. Don’t guess what people are

thinking-ASK!!

If your campaign will be conducting a poll to help you design your message, carefully

word the questions on the poll. Your first poll, a bench mark poll, will help you establish

name identification, discover the general mood of voters, identify the ‘hot button’ issues

and test your message.

Later your campaign can conduct various kinds of polls to track

your message and identify what issues are persuading swing voters.

Field Operations

Who, How and When will we talk to Voters”

Elements of a Field Plan

Your campaign field plan is an important element of your campaign. It describes your voter

contact strategies and sets goals for all your volunteer work. The plan must specifically outline

WHOM the campaign will visit, HOW they will contact voters and WHEN voters will be

contacted.

The fundamental elements of the plan include voter registration, petition gathering, canvassing,

phonebanking, and the vote by mail program. These elements must be organized at different

times during your campaign depending on whom you need to contact.

Voter Registration

Tomás Alberto Ávila

An aggressive voter registration program is very important for a candidate that doesn’t

have enough of a base vote to win the election. A registration drive can also be important

if your election is in a city or district that has seen recent increases in U.S. citizenship

The main goal of a voter registration drive to your campaign is to increase your base over

your opponents. It does your campaign no good to invest in voter registration if it will

help your opponent.

If your campaign decides to do voter registration, please remember the following:

Target your voter registration in precincts that will most likely vote for you.

Door-to-door voter registration, while harder and more time consuming, is better for you than

site registration.

Registration at big sites, like markets or swap meets, are only effective if you are running in a

large district, because these sites attract people from all over.

Learn the entire voter registration rules and deadlines.

Follow up and track all the citizens that you have registered to vote.

Train your volunteers well, it will save you from discarding cards or trying to fix cards, by

tracking down voters.

Questions to ask yourself.

Do you need to increase your base vote?

How much time to allocate for a good voter registration drive?

Is any other candidate or organization going to be registering voters?

Petition Gathering

Gathering signatures on your nominating petition is critical. Signature gathering is

important because it obviously gets you on the ballot, but you can use this period to begin

doing targeted precinct walking and talking to voters. Although most cities and school

boards allow candidates to collect a minimal amount of signatures and pay a fee to get on

the ballot, this campaign activity can be your first contact with voters in your district.

When you begin to collect signatures you must remember the following steps:

Have a map of your district.

Know any and all eligibility rules for those who can sign your petition.

Get a list of all registered voters, if you are going to walk door to door.

Have a prepared Biography or introduction letter/brochure of who you are and

why you are running.

Create a database of all voters who signed candidate petitions.

Send a thank you letter to all those who sign your petition, once you have

been officially place on the ballot.

Gathering petitions is one of the first steps in developing your field campaign.

Having volunteers gathering signatures is a training tool for your campaign. We believe

that targeted petition gathering in your base is a great way to introduce your natural base

Tomás Alberto Ávila

with your campaign. Remember that although you define a segment of the community as

your base, you still need to cultivate their support towards you.

Canvassing

Most campaigns spend a lot of time and energy in canvassing their district. It is

believed that face to face contact between candidate or volunteer and voter is the best

means of voter contact and voter persuasion. They are right! What most candidates do

not realize is that target canvassing is even more effective

Targeted canvassing means that the campaign is going to target voter households,

rather than walking to every door or every voter in the district. Unless your campaign

starts early enough and has enough volunteers, to visit every house, then has the ability to

return and talk to all undecided voters, your campaign must decide whom you will be

able talk to. Targeting will give you parameters on who talk to while walking precincts.

We recommend that a canvass program include three targets:

Candidate walking: All high propensity (Always Voting) voter households (hh)

Volunteer walking: All high propensity voter ‘hh’ + soft base (sometimes voting)

‘hh’ + always voting swing hh.

Get-Out-The-Vote walking: All identified YES voters.

If you do not have enough ID’d yes, and then we suggest you focus on turning out

your base.

Your canvass program is volunteer intensive; therefore, it demands a highly

organized headquarters operation. Your campaign must designate a Precinct Coordinator

who is responsible for all aspects of the canvassing program. They are responsible for

building precinct kits, training volunteers, tracking voter contacts, and assigning precincts

to be walked.

What is a precinct Kit? A precinct kit includes the following:

Map of the Precinct

A Voter list

Canvassing Instructions and a Script to talk to voters

Tally sheet

Campaign Literature

Campaign talking points

Pen and paper

How do I track all voter contact?

It is critical that your campaign set up a system of tracking all your voter contacts. While

we recommend using a voter file that allows you to update and manipulate data, you can

also keep a running count of all your voter responses.

Your Data Manager should record

voter contact operations, canvassing, phonebanking, and candidate contacts.

Furthermore, if you have the budget, we believe that every voter that commits to voting

for you should receive a GOTV mailer, letter, or a post card from the candidate and any

voter who is undecided should receive one with a strong persuasion message.

Vote By Mail

Tomás Alberto Ávila

During the past ten years, California has seen political campaigns become more

sophisticated and targeted. A very effective campaign tool that more and more

campaigns are using is the vote by mail. The goal of a vote by mail program is to

organize your soft base of voters, (supporters who have a poor voting history) to vote by

mail (VBM).

If your campaign decides to run a VBM program, you must remember one thing, follow

up, follow up, and follow up. Campaigns sometimes do not realize that doing a VBM

program means that you are talking to a targeted voter three or four times. You must

follow up with a voter once they receive their application. Then follow up to remind

them to mail in the application. Follow up again, so they know that if they haven’t

mailed in their ballot, they must walk it in to the polling place.

The process demands that your campaign set up a tracking system so that the campaign

can follow VBM voters. Many times this program is a campaign within the bigger

campaign.

NOTE: If your campaign has the resources, and your city or county allows the campaign

to actually pick up VBM applications from voters, we suggest that you purchase a

business reply which allows you to place on the back of all the VBM applications a

“Postage Paid For.” This makes it even easier for your targeted voters to just fill out the

application and mail it without a stamp.

Voter Identification:

All campaigns come down to this fundamental aspect, voter identification. Your

campaign goal must be to identify enough voters that will turnout to vote for you on

Election Day. Based on your targeting, you must determine if the majority of your voter

identification will be persuasion or GOTV/turnout. (NOTE: Some campaigns like to

identify 25% over the 50+1 needed to win.)

Base turnout means that your targeting you has identified enough voters to win the

election if they vote. Then your identification has become a tool for getting your voter

out to vote. Your volunteers should talk to voters with an emotional/ “call to action”

message that encourages voting. For example, this historic election, or an opportunity to

elect the first Latina/o or scare people about your opponents.

Persuasion means that your targeting identified a large swing-voting block that you need

to convince. The persuasion message must be compelling and contrast you from your

opponent. Experienced volunteers and the candidate must contact this group of voters.

This work is a key part of victory.

Voter Identification is ultimately done to prepare for Election Day and GOTV. Most

campaigns will have done both persuasion voter contact and base turnout voter contact.

Therefore, your GOTV program will be to push out those turnout voters and to confirm

that your persuasion voters will be voting for you.

Get-Out-The-Vote, GOTV

Tomás Alberto Ávila

GOTV is the culmination of all your campaign hard work. Your voter contacts and

campaign activities build towards turning out your supporters on Election Day. GOTV is

doing everything in your power to get out all your supporters to vote on Election Day.

Your GOTV list must include only your ID’d yes voters. Your volunteers must be stay

focused on getting those yes voters out to the polls.

GOTV really starts 3 days prior to Election Day. We encourage your campaign to begin

calling all yes and reminding them where they will vote on Election Day. GOTV efforts

should include door hangers for all your yes voters the day before Election Day or early

on Election Day. Door hanging is the final reminder of the BIG DAY.

NOTE: don’t turnout your opponent’s voters!

Election Day

On Election Day, your campaign goal is to get all the identified yes voters to the polls.

You do this through face-to-face visits by volunteers, or phone calling. Periodically

throughout the day, you can clean up your list by going to the polls and verifying who has

actually voted. This process allows you to cross off all the voters that have already voted.

Now instead of starting the day with 100 identified supporters in a precinct the number

decrease. This process is called “Poll Checking” and it helps maximize your time by not

spending time on voters who have already voted for you. This gives your campaign the

ability to focus on those voters who have yes to vote.

Get-Out-The-Vote, GOTV Tomás Alberto Ávila GOTV is the culmination of all your campai gn hard work.

Ambassador Vega shares a moment with Washington DC delegates, Roberto Alvarez and

Alejandra Castillo.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Migration Trends by Dominicans and other Caribbean nationals to the United States

By Ambassador Bernardo Vega

Malysis of the trends in legal and illegal migration, criminal deportees and the negative impact of

the 1996 U.S. immigration legislation

Everyday United States foreign policy is being determined by U.S. domestic considerations. The

way United States citizens feel and the strength, with which they express these feelings,

determine how their congressmen vote on foreign related matters.

The Caribbean community residing in the United States, and particularly the Dominican one, is

being hurt by United States legislation which effects its capacity to migrate legally, have access

to social security, education and health services. Members of that community have to express

their opinion on these issues. In order to do that, they must first become United States citizens

and then they must vote in United States elections.

During the second half of the 20~ Century, Caribbean legal migration to the United States has

been increasing in every of the last four decades. During the 1960's, 470 thousand people from

the Caribbean migrated to the United States, compared to only 123 thousand in the prior decade.

Although the growth trend has continued, since the 1970's the growth rate has been decreasing.

In the 1960's the growth rate was 282% when compared to the prior decade. The growth rate

came down in the 1970's to 57% and to only 18% in the 1980's. The growth years of Caribbean

legal migration to the United States are coming to a halt and might even present a declining trend

for the first time in more than half a century.

Contrary to the last 30 years, in the last decade, Caribbean legal migration to the United States

has remained relatively constant. This has been due to a stricter U.S. immigration policy. Yearly

flows in the last ten years have fluctuated between 89,000 to 117,000, with the exception of 1991

when 140,000 Caribbean immigrants were legally admitted, primarily due to an increase in

Haitians. During this period an average of 107,000 entered to the United States each year.

However, as a percentage of total legal migration to the United States, Caribbean migration has

decreased. Between 1986 and 1988 17% of all total immigrants admitted to the United States

were from the Caribbean. This proportion dropped to 8% between 1989 and 1990, moving up to

13% since 1994. In the last 10 years, 1.17 million legal immigrants came to the United States

from the Caribbean, representing 11 % of total legal migration.

Introduccion de Libro

Esta edición de ORDEN PARLAMENTARIO SIMPLE va dedicada a todas las organizaciones

de habla hispana que operan en los Estados Unidos de Amenca, en especial, a todas aquellas que

hacen esfuerzos por lograr Ia unidad para el bienestar y el progreso de las distintas comunidades

donde estan integradas y a toda la gente en los paises de habla castellana

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Este esfuerzo se hace para llenar una necesidad importante en el desenvolvimiento de las

reuniones de cualquier grupo Esta obra esta' basada en Ia experiencia personal de su autor y de

sus observaciones en diferentes tipos de organizaciones.

El principal propósito de este folleto es lograr que cada persona que participa en reuniones

contribuya al funcionamiento y efectividad de las mismas.

Aquellos que conciente o inconcientemente monopolizan y anarquizan dentro de un grupo,

prefieren que no se utilicen reglas en las reuniones. Un procedimiento parlamentario, aun el mas

simple, democratiza a los grupos usuarios, evita el monopolio o la anarquia y contribuye a que se

desarrollen rapida y eficazmente las acciones que desea tomar el grupo.

La hispanidad continua su crecimiento cuantitativo y cualitativo dentro de los Estados Unidos y

sigue buscando lazos culturales, sociales, religiosos y hasta politicos entre las diferentes

nacionalidades de origen hispano. Las organizations representatives de nuestras comunidades

tambien avanzan en tecnologia, especialmente en la informatica. El uso de programas

computarizados, fascimiles, modems, discos compactos, videos, tecnologia digital y el internet,

no son un mito para las organizaciones hispano-parlante que operan en este pais.

Con toda esa tecnologia a nuestra merced, no se podria lograr ni objetivos minimos comparados

a los que obtienen asociaciones de barrios pobres en paises donde estos adelantos no son

populares, sino utilizamos en nuestras reuniones un orden parlamentano por mas simple que

parezca.

Es importante que nadie alegue ignorancia de las reglas parlamentarias. Que. no Mayan excuses,

evasion de Los trabajos, agendas incompletas o reuniones canceladas. Antes de comenzar

cualquier reunion se debe establecer un me todo como guja, para evitar discusiones estenles y

viciosas.

La historia del órden parlamentano viene de los tiempos en que los reyes ingleses comenzaron a

darle participación a la gente que no pertenecia a la nobleza en las decisiones del pais, para no

ser culpados de las repercuciones negativas. De all surgi6 el famoso Parlamento Ingle's

("English Parliament"), que con el tiempo se convirtió en el principal gobierno civil ingles, con

un Primer Ministro a la cabeza. En los Estados Unidos, un militar de carrera de nombre Henry

Martyn Robert elabord un manual de procedimiento parlamentano que public6 el siglo pasado y

que fue acogido por el Congreso como guia oficial. Muchas de esas reglas son parte de lo

tratado en esta obra.

Lo arriba expuesto indica que los miembros del grupo que se reune son responsables de tomar

decisiones, malas o buenas, y que sin un procedimiento parlamentano como el que se presenta en

esta obra, probablemente Ilegue a consensos rapidos y democráticos.

El autor.

Cosme Perez

Tomás Alberto Ávila

The Hosting Organization

Quisqueya In Action, Inc. is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization dedicated to improve the lives of

Dominicans/ Latinos in the City of Providence, Quisqueya is celebrating its 11th anniversary this

year and over the years it has become a powerful institution within the Latino community. Our

major goals include youth empowerment, economic community development and cultural

awareness. This organization has been the catalyst organization in developing a movement

within young people called "A Generation that cares."

Our organization was founded in 1987 in the wake of a successful Dominican Festival, which

was organized by a group of young Dominicans. The intent of the Festival is to cultivate and

promote a better understanding of the Dominican culture and its traditional values. Presently, this

Festival is the biggest event held by Latinos in the State of Rhode Island. This year the Festival,

in its 11th version, created such an impact that month after many people are still talking about it!

Throughout the years, our work has been significant. We have organized and educated parents to

take more active roles in the school life of their children. Hundreds of school aged children have

participated in the summer performing arts and tutorial assistance program organized by

Quisqueya In Action, Inc. We also conducted a successful Citizenship program where most of

our graduates have become United States Citizens.

As the hosts of this year's conference, we would like to encourage you to participate in this

historic event and be part a movement that will set the footprint of action for the generations to

come!

DARN Mission Statement

(Adopted by members DANR Sunday June 14 1998 at the Washington Meeting)

The Dominican-American National Roundtable (DANR) is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization

seeking to bring together the different voices of all Dominicans and create a national forum for

analysis, planning, and action concerning Bio-psychosocial political issues which affect the lives

of Dominican-Americans in the United States. Our thrust is to facilitate a dialogue that will

include, but not limited to, grassroots, nonprofit, religious, social, political and business entities

to generate the appropriate social, political empowerment in areas where large number of

Dominican-American reside.

The DANR will dedicate its efforts towards ensuring Dominican-Americans the free and full

exercise of the rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Constitution of the United States of

America. In particular, the Roundtable will work to influence the decision-making process in the

United States so that the Dominican-American community obtains greater access to and fairness

in education; economic development; health and human services; Technology and Information;

public safety; solutions to substance abuse; and immigration reform. To help attain this

objective, the organization will endeavor to advance the political and economic empowerment of

the Dominican-American community by assisting in its nationwide organization. The association

will also closely monitor and act upon policy issues in the United States which affect

Dominican-Americans and are of relevance to Dominicans.

The Roundtable believes that the fulfillment of duty by each individual is a prerequisite to the

rights of all. The DANR will strive to create awareness in the Dominican-American community

that rights and duties are interrelated in every social, cultural, economic and political activity.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

The Dominican-American National Roundtable firmly believes that culture is the highest social

and historical expression of human existence. The Roundtable considers that the ties that bind

the Dominican- American identity must be rooted, above all, in the cultural heritage of our

community, which in turn enriches this great nation of diverse origins. The Roundtable will

promote and disseminate all forms of cultural expression of the Dominican-American

community.

These goals will be achieved only if the Dominican-American community is organized in such a

way that all its diverse sectors are fairly represented in the Roundtable. The organization will

reach out to all sectors, including the younger generations, so as to ensure the broadest

participation of all Dominican-Americans.

Tomás Alberto Ávila The Dominican-American National Roundtable firmly believes that culture is the highest social and

National Dominican Leader Margarita Cepeda addressing the DARN participantas during the

opening of the conference.

A generation that cares

The First Annual Dominican National Roundtable Conference held in the city of Miami,

hosted by the Dominican American National Foundation (DANF) of South Florida and

supported by the office of New York State Assemblyman Adriano Espaillat, ad the youth

organization Quisqueya In Action in December of 1997, united a group of more than 200

Dominican Americans for the first time in a now historical two day event The concern for the

image, the future, and the overall well being of all Dominicans in the United States made

possible the birth of the Dominican American National Roundtable (DANR) movement,

composed of a nationwide think tank with it's focus on empowering it's people.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

The theme of this conference was, "The National Agenda" which consisted of workshops and

symposiums that dealt with, youth education, public safety, substance abuse, health and human

services, community organizing, political empowerment, immigration reform, economic

development and how to prepare for the upcoming challenges of the new millennium. This

gathering brought together prominent leaders and elected public officials of Dominican origin

from many States with historically large population of Dominicans such as Washington,

Philadelphia, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Chicago, Florida, as well as

Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic, among others.

Immediately following the First Dominican American National Roundtable Conference, a

meeting took place, at Alianza Dominicana of New York. There, Leaders of the Dominican

community created the National Interim Steering Committee for DANR. Again, in April of 1998,

members of the now established interim steering committee met at the Dominican Studies

Institute of City College of New York to coordinate several meetings to rally support for the

DANR across the country. During, a two-day mini- conference in June of 1998, in Washington

D.C, 47 members of the DANR met with Federal and State officials to introduce the DANR and

the adopted National Agenda.

The outcome of this initial stage of organizational development is, the institution of a permanent

governing board directors with the immediate goal of establishing an office in Washington D.C

to set national presence for the Dominican American community in the United States.

"Towards the New Millennium: Strengthening Organizational Development for Dominican

Communities in the United States

Tomás Alberto Ávila The theme of this conference was, "The National Agenda" which consisted of workshops

Congressman Rangel and his assistant Zenaida Mendez shared a moment with conference

attendees.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

In the News

Conference looks at needs of Dominicans

The Dominican-American National Roundtable, a group of community leaders, begins its second national meeting.

By GINA MACRIS

Journal Staff Writer

PROVIDENCE- U.S. Rep. Charles B. Rangel said yesterday that public education - historically

the steppingstone to success in the United States for poor and immigrant children - is a "national

disgrace." The New York Democrat spoke to the Dominican-American National Roundtable, an

organization that follows in the tradition of the NAACP and other groups galvanized by issues of

civil rights and political empowerment.

"We have to make sure that education is a priority,"

Rangel told an audience of about 500, gathered at the Rhode Island Convention Center from

throughout the United States and the Dominican Republic. The disgrace lies in the money that is

being spent for poor results, Rangel said, adding that Dominican-Americans who have achieved

personal success have a responsibility to "go back and mentor a child or adopt a school."

The community must make sure that those who run public schools are not content with a school

that fails "because of the poverty or the color of the student, or where that student lives," Rangel

said.

Unless young people are trained to take advantage of the opportunities this country has to offer,

he said, they will be taken advantage of.

Bernardo Vega, the Dominican Republic's ambassador to Washington, was to address an evening

banquet.

The weekend conference at the Convention Center, only the second national meeting of the

Dominican American organization, was called to develop a strategic plan for addressing issues

such as political empowerment, economic development, immigration and education.

One session dealt with efforts to ensure that Dominican-Americans are accurately counted in the

next U.S. Census.

Their numbers will have an impact on financing of government social service and educational

pro-grams, as well as the reapportionment of political jurisdictions, according to Adriano

Espaillat, a Dominican-American who is a member of the New York State Assembly.

"America benefits from new blood. That's not going to charge," Espaillat said, alluding to the

constant stream of immigration that has fed. the United States throughout its history.

"America reinvents itself every other decade," he said.

Espaillat estimated that there are about a million Dominican-Americans in the United States,

about 30,000 of them in Rhode Island.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Two Dominican-Americans in Rhode Island waged unsuccessful battles for public office last

fall, including Victor F. Capellan, who lost the District 20 House Seat to Joseph Almeida by only

20 votes.

Capellan, who works as executive director of the Center for Hispanic Policy and Action

(CHisPA), is also serving as national president of the Dominican-American Roundtable and was

a key organizer of yesterday's event.

He said the Roundtable adds national clout to Latinos' political. strength in Rhode Island.

"We want to organize," he said. "We want to register citizens to vote and to be counted in the

census" as well as enhance the economic prospects for Dominican-Americans, Capellan said.

Bilingual education is especially important, said Capellan, who entered a bilingual program at

the Roger Williams Middle School in Providence when he arrived from the Dominican Republic.

Bilingual education was ad-dressed in an afternoon symposium yesterday.

Done correctly, bilingual education allows youngsters to progress with academic subject material

while they learn English, Capellan said, and English speakers can do the same while learning

Spanish.

Capellan and Juan Pichardo, president of the Dominican-American Political Action Committee,

are among several prominent Latinos in Providence who have become a frequent presence at

meetings of the Providence School Board

.

Most recently they have criticized the building of new elementary and middle schools on the site

of a former landfill off Hartford Avenue and the national search for a new superintendent of

schools.

They say the high-powered search has ignored the grassroots of the community and the only

candidate who comes from within the school system, Latino administrator Tomas Ramirez.

CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DOMINICANA CELEBRADA EN PROVIDENCE

Por Victor F. Capellan

Presidente Nacional

El futuro de las comunidades Dominicanas en los Estados Unidos fue el tema central de la

conferencia Nacional Dominicana celebrada en Providence, RI el pasado mes de mayo. Durante

esta conferencia en segunda version se reunieron mas de 500 Dominicanos y amigos/as de la

comunidad Dominicana para tratar temas de interes y disfrutrar de eventos tipico culturales

Dominicanos. Esta conferencia organizada a nivel local por Quisqueya en Acción conto con la

participación de lideres Dominicanos a todos niveles de nuestra sociedad a travez de todo el pais.

La direción de la conferencia estuvo a cargo de un grupo de lideres a nivel nacional

representando las comunidades donde hay gran numeros de Dominico-Americanos.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Los temas centrales de la conferencia y del movimiento nacional Mesa Redonda fueron el Censo

2000, el desarrollo economico, la salud, la educación bilingue, el empoderamiento politico y las

reformas de inmigración. Estos temas los cuales tocan a todos los Latinos fueron debatidos y

diferentes estragias se presentaron para poder trabajar en los mismos. Todo los presentes

tuvieron la oportunidad de presentar su punto de vista y de escuchar a expertos en los diferentes

temas que se prensentaron.

Durante el encuentro el cual se llevo a cabo en Centro de Convenciones de Rhode Island estuvo

presente el Honorable Embajador Dominicano en Washington, DC Bernardo Vega. El

Embajador Vega quien recientemente resigno esta posición la cual sirvio con honor por varios

años fue una de las columna de apoyo mayor para esta conferencia. Bernardo Vega le entrego al

publico un discurso en el cual detallo la situación trans-nacional del Dominicano aqui y alla.

También, en este magno evento dirigido en su mayoria por jovenes Dominicanos tuvo el honor

de recibir al Congresista que representa el mayor numero de Dominicanos el Honorable Charles

Rangel. El Democrata Rangel, quien representa el sector de Washington Heights en Nueva

York, pudo proveer a lo mas de 500 presentes durante su discurso una voz de aliento y de

empoderamiento ya que hablo de la importancia del pueblo Dominicano en las eleciones

Estadounidenses. El Congresista Rangel exalto a la comunidad Dominicana en Nueva York, por

su gran labor dia tras dia y alabo a todos sus lideres por el trabajo que desempeñan.

Mas que nada la importancia de esta conferencia organizada por la Mesa Redonda Dominicana

(DANR- conocida por sus ciclas en íngles) fue la participación masiva de los presentes

descandose una gran participacion de jovenes y de mujeres Dominicanas. DANR la cual es una

organización, no partidaria y sin fines de lucro que busca crear un foro pro-activo centralizado

en temas que afectan las vidas de los Dominico-Americanos que residen en los Estados Unidos

estuvo complacida por el trabajdo realizado por la organización afitrion, Quisqueya en Acción.

La Mesa Redonda Nacional Dominico-Americana está basada en Miami, Florida con afiliadas en

Washington D.C., New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Rhode Island, Maryland,

Massachusetts y Puerto Rico. La organización fué constiuida durante la primera Mesa Redonda

Nacional Dominico-Americana la cual se llevó a cabo el 6 y 7 de diciembre de 1997 en Miami,

Florida con la participación de mas de 200 líderes y activistas representando varios estados. En

esta nueva etapa DANR seguira trabajando para agregar al exito total de esta conferencia. Para

seguir adelante construyendo una agenda nacional DANR estara firmando miembros para crecer

la organizacion a nivel de base.

La importancia de este grupo es que los Dominicanos se estan organizando a nivel nacional para

poder juntos a sus hermanos Mexicanos, Puertoriqueños, Cubanos entre otros poder tener una

presencia en el debate nacional y influir sobre el futuro del pueblo Latino en los Estados Unidos.

Esta inquietud nace de la necesidad de que en la union esta la fuerza y para el pueblo

Dominicano unirse al Concilio Nacional de La Raza, al National Puerto Rican Forum o cualquier

otro movimiento Nacional, primeros tenemos que estar organizados y bien representados para

poder participar como iguales y poder aportar nuestra parte también a esos esfuezos. La

conferencia pudo proveer el foro necesario para organizar un movimiento nacional y como si

fuera poco se llevo a cabo aqui en Rhode Island, el cual fue el primer estado americano visitado

por el patricio nacional Dominicano Juan Pablo Duarte.

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Por su parte Quisqueya en Acción se lleno de galardones por todos los que participaron por su

labor inigualable. La conferenicia fue un exito rotundo organizada por jovenes que gracias a la

vision de la fundadora de Quisqueya en Acción, Margarita Cepeda siguen adelante con respeto y

siempre honrando el nombre del Dominicano por su labor desinterasada. Quisqueya en Acción

ha de sentirse orgullosa y todos los que componen esta gran organización porque llevaron el

nombre de los Dominicanos en Rhode Island por todo lo alto a cada rincon de la nacion

americana.

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Friday May 28/viernes 28 de mayo

4:00pm - 8:00pm

Arrival/Llegada

8:30pm - 12:30pm

Welcome Reception/Recepcion

Welcome Address /Bienvenida

Elvys Ruiz President, Quisqueya In Action, Inc.

Guest/Invitado Especial: Lincoln Chafee

Mayor City of Warwick, RI

University Ballroom -Radisson Hotel

Some workshops have changed Please check your schedu1e to note the

changes Algunos talleres han cambiado, por favor revise su, lista para

organizar su horario

Saturday May 28/sabado 29 de mayo

7:30am - 8:30am

8:30am - 9:30am

Registration /Registraci6n - Exhibit Area

Breakfast & Welcome/Desayuno y Bienvenida

Guest/Invitada Especial: Margarita Cepeda

President, Dominican-American National Foundation

9:30am to 11:00am

Symposiums - *Please see workshops & symposiums list for more details

lista de talleres y simposiums para más detalles

  • A) Census 2000/ Censo 2000 -Room 552 A&~

  • B) Economic Development / Desarrollo Econonomico -Room 557 A&B

C) The Health Status of Dominicans in the US -Room 553A &/ Estatus

de la salud de los Domincanos en los EU

11:15am -12:30pm

Workshops / Talleres

7) Dominican Art and Culture -Room 553A

La cultura y el arte dominicano

Tomás Alberto Ávila

2) The do's and don’ts of starting a business -Room 552A L05 pros y

contras al empezar Un nuevo negocio

3) Homophobia: A barrier in the Dominican Community

Homofobia: Una barrera en la comunidad Dominicana Room 553B

4) Dominicans On-line -Room 557A

Dominicanos en la red tecnologica

5) Dominican Folklore / Folklore Domincano -Room 557B

6) Public Safety / Seguridad Publica -Room 552A

11:15am -12:30pm

Concurrent Special Interest Workshops/ Talleres de interes especial

concurrentes

I) Women in New York making Waves -Room 550A Mujere5 en Nueva

 

York creando

 

II)

Basic

Political

Training -Room 550B Entrenamiento Poiltico

Basico

12:30pm - 1:45m

Lunch Almuerzo - Ballroom A

Speakers (Invitados

Honorable Charles Rangel

US House of Representatives (D-NY)

Honorable Adriano Espaillat

State Assemblyman (D-NY)

Symposiums - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

  • D) Bilingual education / Educación Bilingue-Room 552 A&B

  • E) Political empowerment / Empoderamiento Politico Room 553 A&B

  • F) Immigration Reform / La reforma de inmigracion – Room 551 A&B

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Workshops / Talleres

7)

Organizational Development/Desarrollo Organizacional Room

552A

8) Education Part II / Educacion - Segunda Parte -Room 552A

9)

Dominican Women / La Mujer Domincana -Room 553A

10) Community empowerment/ Empoderamiento comunitario -Room

557B

Tomás Alberto Ávila

11) Social and sports dubs in community building -Room 553A Clubs

deportivos y socio-culturales en el desarrollo comunitario

12) Dominican workers and the impact on unions -Room 553B Los

trabajadores dominicanos y el impacto en 1as uniones

3:45pm - 5:00pm

Concurrent Special Interest Workshop

Talleres de interes especial concurrentes

  • I) The Health System in the Dominican Republic -Room 550A El Sistema de la Salud en la Republica Dominicana

II)

Duarte's Philosophy -Room 550B

El pensamiento Duartiano y su impacto en nuestro desarrollo

5:00pm - 6:30pm

Break / Descanso

6:30pm - 7:30pm

Reception/Reception -Exhibit Area

7:30pm - 10:00pm

Banquet /Banquete -Ballroom A

Speaker/ Invitado:

Bernardo Vega

Ambassador of the Dominican Republic

Special Video Address/ Video Especial

Hillary Rodham- Clinton

First Lady of the US / Primera Dama de los EUA

Awards Presentation

Presentacion de Reconocimientos

Special/ Presentation by/ Presentacion Especial:

Grupo de baile de Quisqueya En Accion: Mama Tingo -RI Grupo de

Baile Folkloriko de Alianza Domincana -NY

10:00pm - 1:00pm

Dance / Baile NY District 6 Jazz Band: Clave Azul

International DJ

Sunday May 30/domingo 30 de mayo

9:00am -10:00am

Breakfast / Desayuno -Ballroom A

Guests/ Invitados: Jack Reed

US Senator (D-RI)

Rick Swartz

President, Rick Swartz Assoc.

10:00am - 12:Oom

Interest Workshops /Talleres de Interes

-Junta de Desarrollo de Gualey

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Rebuilding after Hurricane Georges

Coordinator/ Coordinadores

Arells Moran (DR)

-Advanced Political Training

Entrenamiento Politico Avanzado

Coordinator/ Coordinadores

Marcelo Gaete (DC)

-Book Presentation: Orden Parlamentario

Pesentacion de libro: Orden Parlamentario

Coordinator/ Coordinadores

Cosme Perez (FL)

10:00am -12:00pm

Annual Meeting/ Reunión Annual -Ballroom A

12:OOm - 1:00pm

Departure/ Despedida -Ballroom A

(Lunch on your own /Almuerzo no incluido)

Participants

Last Name

First name

Affiliation

Sorano

Gallegos

Abreu

Rafael

Partido Revolucionario

Acevedo

Manuel

Acosta

Sandra

Student

Adames

Nita

Alianza Dominicana

Adams

Albert

Alianza Dominicana

Almanzar

Juan

Alianza Dominicana

Almonte

Tomasina

J&M Enterprises

Alvarez

Patricia

Alianza Dominicana

Alvarez

Roberto

Alvarez

Arlee

Federacion de

Aponte

Bruno

Alianza Dominicana

Aponte

Jocelin

Alianza Dominicana

Arcia

Celeste

Alianza Dominicana

Aybar Jimenez

Radhames F.

Asociacion de Clubes de

Baez

Carolina

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Baez

Maribel

Baez

Isabel

CHISPA

Baez-Malone

Milady

Barrera

Lazaro

CHISPA

Batista

Milagros

Alianza Dominicana

Belliand

Ramon

CHISPA

Bello

Jose

Cornell University

Bernol

Betty

CHISPA

Bodden

Maureen

Quisqueya en Accion

Breton

Judy

Alianza Dominicana

Brito-Felix

Maria

Brown

Alcadia

Brown

Vernon

Quisqueya In Action

Burgos

Nercy

Conjunto Folklorico

Burgos

Jasmin

Conjunto Folklorico

Burgos

Wanda

Alianza Dominicana

Cabezas

Dagmaris

Mares Consutlants

Cabral

Diana

Dominican 2000

Cabrera

Francisco

Contacto TV

Cabrera

Nancy

Alianza Dominicana

Calderon

Johanna

Student

Calderon

Wendy

Alianza Dominicana

Camilo

Jackie

Cancel

Maria

Alianza Dominicana

Candelario

Ginatta

Smith College

Canela

Denise M.

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Castillo

Aurey

Conjunto Folklorico

Castillo

Frank A.

Own Interest

Castillo

Daina

Conjunto Folklorico

Castillo

Dayanira

Castillo

Amelia

Student

Castillo

Daviana

Conjunto Folklorico

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Castillo

Aljendra

Office of National Drug

Catucci

Candida

Cepeda

Marilyn

Quisqueya In Action

Cepeda

Fahiola

Cepeda

Rafaela

Cepeda

Nancy

Cepeda

Cepeda

Margarita

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Collado

Nino

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Collado

Belgica

New York City Board of

Columna

Manuel A.

CHISPA

Consuegra

Norelys R.

Senator Jack Reed's Office

Contreras

Maria

Alianza Dominicana

Cornelio

Jose

Clay Park Labs

Cornelio

Enrique

Alianza Dominicana

Cruz

Emil

Alianza Dominicana

Cruz

Jonathan

Conjunto Folklorico

Cruz

Domingo

Conjunto Folklorico

Curtin

Alicia

Nurse Practictioner

De Los Santos

Ingrid

CHISPA

De los Santos

Luis

BRISC

De'Oleo

Nurys

Assistant to Congressman

Del Carmen Giron

Maria

CHISPA

Del Monte

Masiel

Student

Del Rio

Deyanira

Natl. Federation of

Del Rosario

Guarionex

Student

Delossantos

Cristiana

University of RI

Diaz

Nury

Diaz

Mariano

NSA

Diaz

Nancy

The MET Center

Diaz

Junot

Dominican 2000

Diaz

Sheila

World Travel Services

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Diaz

Junot

Alianza Dominicana

Diaz

Daisy

Dicent

Julio

Alianza Dominicana

Dinzel

Yrthya

Dominican 2000

Dominguez

Daisy

Domican 2000

Dominquez

Ivan

Alianza Dominicana

Dunker

Yris

Dominican American

Duran

Darling

Conjunto Folklorico

Duran

Gilda

Mass Prevention Ct.

Durango

Gloria

CHISPA

Edmonds

Mira

CHISPA

Eduardo

Abimael

Escano

Rafael

Instute Duartiano

Espinal

Dr. Miguel

Dominican American

Espinosa

Ingrid

Conjunto Folklorico

Estevez

Rafael

Comite de Ayuda a la

Eusebio

Heidi

Edelman Public

Fairchild

Ivelisse

Columbia University

Feliu

Cinthya

Conjunto Folklorico

Feliu

Sra.

Conjunto Folklorico

Felix

Cintron

Feliz

Karina

Aliamza Dominicana

Feliz

Karina

Alianza Dominicana

Feliz

Leonor

Fernandez

Venecia

Coca Cola

Fernandez

Estela

Conjunto Folklorico

Fernandez

Eulalio

Instituto Duartiano del

Fernandez

Fernando

Upper Manhattan

Fernandez

Kery

Conjunto Folklorico

Ferreras

Julio

Asociacion Dominicana

Figueroa

Monico

CHISPA

Figueroa

Ernesto

CHISPA

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Frias

Celesta

Student

Frias Reyes

Florencio

CHISPA

Galuan

Marilu

Gangemi

Aura

Garcia

Kathy

The MET Center

Garcia

Nives

Garcia

Luis Alberto

Conjunto Folklorico

Garcia

Miguelina

Quisqueya Travel

Garcia

Zorina

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Garcia

Mirca

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Garcia

Ana

Special Assistant to the

Garcia

Brigida

Bronx Community

Garcia

Miguelina

Quisqueya Travel

Garcia

Bienvenido

Urban League of RI

Garcia

Aixa

Conjunto Folklorico

Garcia

Zorina

Fundacion Sonrisas

Garcia Reyes

Ana I.

CUNY, Hostos

Garcia-Galli

Elba

CHISPA

Garigen

David

University of Dayton

Gautreau

Jorge

NY Dominican Officers

Genao

Eduardo V.

South Bronk High School

Gil

Epifanio

Concilio

Gilbertson

Greta

Fordham Universirty

Gilsian

Pujadas

Alianza Dominicana

Ginebra

Rafael

Dominican American

Goldman

Roberta

Memorial Hosp. Of

Gomez

Domingo

University of Daydon

Gomez

Eduardo

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Gomez

Domingo A.

Gomez, M.D.

Ellis

Dept. of Family Med.

Gomez, M.D.

Delia

Gonzales

Anainda

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Gonzales-Jar

Aida

La Gran Alianza de

Gonzalez

Carmen

World Travel Services

Gonzalez

Hortensia

Dominican Womens

Gould

Gladys

Casa de Español

Gracia

Margaret

Conjunto Folklorico

Green Velez

Ken

University of Illinois at

Greene-Velez

Kenneth

Dominican American

Greene-Velez

Kenneth

Dom. Amer. Midwest

Guerrero

Eddy

Democrat Washington

Guerrero

Minerva

Alianza Dominicana

Guerrero

Luis

Teacher - Kennedy HS

Guillen

Gypsy D.

Guridy

Julio

Dominican Cultural

Guzamn Vargas

Altagracia

May Kane

Guzman

Carol

Florida International

Guzman

Roberto

Florida International

Guzman

Carol

Florida International

Ham

Roger

Harris

Sandra

Northern Manhattan

Hasbun

Mirtha

Haschel Investments

Hasbur

Tony

Haschel Investment

Herasme

Oscar

Dominican American

Hernandez

Yubelkis

CHISPA

Hernandez

Maria

Alianza Dominicana

Hernandez

Dario

Conjunto Folklorico

Hernandez

Cesarina

Rhode Island Childrens

Herrera

Ludy

New York City Board of

Herrera

Genaro

Dominican American

Hidalgo

Juana

Alianza Dominicana

Hidalgo

Felix

Inda-Fernandez

Minerva

Infante

Josephine

Hunts Point Economical

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Itzigsohn

Jose

Brown University

Jimenez

Manuel

Jimenez & Assoc.

Jimenez

Luis

Corona Travel & Tours

Jimenez

Mercedes

Dominican American

Jones

Christina

Georgetown University

Jones

Mavel

Georgetown University

Keomorokot

Jim

Keomoushe ??

Santi

ADVANTAGE

Keppis

Laura

Board of Education

Lantigua

William

Concilio

Lantigua

Juleika

Alianza Dominicana

Lantigua

Juleyka J.

Lantigua

Rafael

Lantigua

Rafael

Lantigua

Juleyka J.

Lazala

Francisco

Alianza Dominicana

Levy

Ana

Concilio

Levy

Benjamin

Concilio

Lopez

Deyanira

Lopez

Henry

Teacher

Luna

Maria

National Democratic

Malone

Milady Baez

N.Y. Public School

Marcelino

Yania

CHISPA

Marshall

Gina

Marte

Cesar D.

Martinez

Tulia

Alianza Dominicana

Martinez

Llaquelin

Martinez

Miguel

Northern Manhattan

Martinez

Wendy

Fado-NY

Martinez

Aura

Alianza Dominicana

Martinez

Altagracia

Mateo

Hector

Alianza Dominicana

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Matos

Carlos

Comm. Of Mass

Maunir

Miled

Conjunto Folklorico

Medina

Alba

CHISPA

Medina-Martinez

Ana

Greater Lawrence

Mejia

Jose

Juan Pablo Duarte

Mejia

Miriam

Alianza Dominicana

Mejia

Mirian

Alianza Dominicana

Melo

Francisco

Alianza Dominicana

Melo

Carmen

Alianza Dominicana

Miguelina

Nilda

Minaya

Jina

Johnson & Wales

Morales

Hugo

Dominican Foundation

Morales

Gladys

Dominican Foundation

Morales

Yocasta

Childrens Arts & Science

Morel

Rafael

Asoc. Com.Dom.Fla

Morel

Cynthia

Morel Cpayba

Rafael

Asociacion de

Morilla

Cira

Quiqueya en Accion

Moya

Samuel

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Muñoz

Renee

Dominican Womens

Murphy

Ramon

Presidentof Ass. Of

Nero

Rafaela

Protective Service for

Noctenius

Jeannette

Latino Council on

Noguera

Olga

Department of Human

Norman

Kate

CHISPA

Nuñez

Ms. Kenia

City of atlantic city

Nuñez

Judy

Quisqueya - Dominican

Nuñez-Cedeno

Rafael

University ofIllinois at

Nuñez-Cedeño

Rafael

Dom. Amer. Midwest

Nuosu

Matthew

University of Michigan

O'Neal

Hector P.

Asociacion Dominicana

Ocasio

Alina

Riedc

Tomás Alberto Ávila

Orellana

Blanca

CHISPA

Paula

Franmy

Student

Paulina

Xiomara

Payero

Elizabeth

Alianza Dominicana

Peay

Lenore M.

Ft. George Community

Peguero

Rhadames

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Peguero

Novella

Dominican Amer. Natl.

Peña

Jacinta

Latin American Student Association

Perez

Estela W.

Wynn's International

Perez

Cosme