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BRIEFING KIT

Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific - Briefing Kit 2013

CONTENTS
ROAP Key Documents
OCHA Offices In The Asia-Pacific Map OCHA Flyers OCHA In The Asia-Pacific Where We Work Tools & Services Coordination Saves Lives Emergency Response Response Preparedness Regional Partnerships Humanitarian Analysis Communications With Communities Minimum Preparedness Package Disaster Response In Asia And The Pacific Guide Emergency Response Deployments Global Focus Model Asia-Pacific Maps ROAP Map Catalogue Natural Hazard Risk In Asia-Pacific Storm Seasons In Asia-Pacific Human Footprint In Asia-Pacific Regional Partnerships: ASEAN, SAARC and SPC Humanitarian Snapshot 27 28 29 30 31 32 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 23 24 25 3

OCHA Corporate Communications


Contributions Guide: How To Give To OCHA Responding In A Changing World Strategic Framework Financial Tracking Service 35 36 37 38

OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP) Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 2288 1234 E-mail: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA

OCHA Offices in the Asia-Pacific


OCHA Offices in the Asia-Pacific As of 2013
Nepal
Humanitarian Advisor Team Kathmandu
3 staff Tel: +977 1 554 8553 Fax: +977 1 554 8597 Email: ocha-nepal@un.org

As of January 2013

Japan
MON GOL IA Regional Office Country Office Humanitarian Advisor Team

Humanitarian Advisor Team Kobe


2 staff Tel: +81 78 262 5557 Fax: +81 78 262-5558

Bangladesh

DPR KOREA RO KOREA C H IN A JAPAN

Philippines
Country Office Manila
31 staff Tel: +63 2 901 0265 Fax: +63 2 901 0200

Humanitarian Advisor Team Dhaka


1 staff Tel: +88 (2) 815 0088 Fax: +88 (2) 811 7811 NEPAL BHUTAN BANGLADESH INDIA MYANMAR

Myanmar

Indonesia
LAO PDR THAILAND VIET NAM PHILIPPINES PALAU MICRONESIA (FSO) Northern Mariana Islands (U.S.) Guam (U.S.)

Country Office Yangon

Country Office Jakarta

40 staff Tel: +95 1 230-5682

12 staff Tel: +62 21 314 1308 Fax: +62 21 319 000 03

Thailand

Regional Office for AsiaPacific (ROAP) Bangkok


24 staff Tel: +66 (0) 2 288 2611 Fax: +66 (0) 2 288 1043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org MALDIVES

CAMBODIA

Papua New Guinea


4 staff Tel: +675 321 2877 Fax: +675 321 1224

Humanitarian Advisor Team Port Moresby

SRI LANKA

BRUNEI DARUSSALAM M A L A Y S I A SINGAPORE

Sri Lanka

Fiji
D O N E S I A PAPUA NEW GUINEA SOLOMON ISLANDS TIMOR-LESTE TUVALU

Country Office Colombo

Regional Office for the Pacific (ROP) Suva


6 staff Tel: +679 331 6760 Tel: +679 331 6761 Fax: +679 330 9762

18 staff Tel: +94 11 452 8689 Fax: +94 11 452 8690

New Caledonia (Fra.) AU ST R AL IA


Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

FIJI

1,000 km
The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

Map Doc Name: OCHA_ROAP-Office Overview_v6_130301

OCHA IN ASIA-PACIFIC

OCHA has offices in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Japan, Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Sri Lanka. It also has regional offices in Thailand and Fiji.

Asia and the Pacific is the worlds most disaster-prone region. Every year, millions of people in this region are affected by natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical storms, flooding, landslides and volcanic eruptions. These events are becoming more frequent and severe, compounded by the effects of climate change and growing population density.
OCHA plays a key role in dealing with the consequences of disasters. It leads and coordinates international humanitarian preparedness and response efforts throughout the region in support of national governments. The OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific supports 36 countries and 14 territories. It focuses in particular on 12 countries that are highly vulnerable to hazards and have a low capacity to respond. OCHA works with these countries to ensure coordinated and effective international responses to emergency situations.

For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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OCHAS WORK IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC FOCUSES ON FOUR KEY AREAS:
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
When a disaster occurs, it is critical to have the right people in the right place at the right time. OCHAs regional office maintains a strong and diverse team of emergency response experts on staff ready to deploy as soon as disaster strikes.
OCHAs staff work with governments and other humanitarian actors to assess needs, produce situation updates, facilitate civil-military coordination, and ensure aid gets to those who need it most. OCHA provides the first wave of surge response for all new emergencies in the Asia-Pacific region.

FROM MARCH 2004 TO DECEMBER 2012

70
Staff from OCHAs regional offices in Thailand and Fiji took part in 70 emergency response deployments

RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS
Good planning leads to good response. OCHAs emergency preparedness work enables Humanitarian Country Teams, national governments and regional organizations to rapidly identify, evaluate, and respond to a wide spectrum of emergencies.
OCHA strengthens the capacity of humanitarian organizations at the country and regional levels to provide timely and effective responses to the needs of populations affected by disasters. OCHAs Regional Office in Asia-Pacific has developed the Minimum Preparedness Package (MPP), an initiative that delivers preparedness support tailored to suit country-specific needs.

HUMANITARIAN ANALYSIS
Gathering, managing and analyzing information in a timely and systematic manner is key to making the right decisions in a disaster response situation. OCHA is leading efforts to harness existing and new technologies for humanitarian risk analysis and needs assessment.
The Global Focus Model (GFM) - a humanitarian risk tool developed by OCHAs Regional Office in Asia and the Pacific - is being used by OCHA throughout the world to identify geographic hotspots that represent high humanitarian risk and to strategically analyze hazards, vulnerabilities and response capacities at the country level. In order to strengthen humanitarian analysis capacity, OCHA is working with government technical agencies as key partners in disaster management processes. OCHAs collaboration with these agencies is translating into stronger preparedness and better responses.

REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS
Sustained relations, built on trust and mutual respect, are vital when preparing for and responding to humanitarian emergencies. This is the basis for OCHAs work in partnership building among humanitarian actors across the Asia-Pacific region.
By building strong partnerships with regional, national and non-governmental organizations, OCHA is boosting regional and country-level preparedness. It is ensuring that different humanitarian actors are able to exchange important information and work towards common goals in a productive and coordinated manner. As national and international militaries play a key role in disaster response in the Asia-Pacific region, OCHA works with key partners to strengthen humanitarian civil-military coordination at both national and regional levels. This is achieved through systematic engagement in advocacy, training, response preparedness and policy development.

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WHERE WE WORK

OCHAs Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific coordinates emergency preparedness and response in the worlds most disaster prone region.
Countries in the Asia-Pacific suffer disproportionately from the effects of natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical storms, flooding, landslides and volcanic eruptions. Urbanization, migration, climate change and population growth are all contributing to increasing regional vulnerability to humanitarian crises. Recognizing the scale of the humanitarian challenges and the value of preparedness for disaster in the region, OCHA established its regional office for Asia and the Pacific in 2005. Based in Thailand, OCHAs regional office supports 36 countries and 14 territories in Asia and the Pacific, with a total of 141 national and international staff.
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

36 14 141

COUNTRIES

TERRITORIES

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL STAFF

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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WHAT WE DO
OCHA in Asia and the Pacific focuses on a wide range of activities, from emergency response and preparedness to humanitarian coordination, partnership building and information management.
OCHAs regional office comprises experienced staff who respond to emergencies immediately by deploying at the onset of a disaster in the region. They offer a range of critical services in disaster response situations, such as inter-cluster coordination, humanitarian financing, information management, reporting, communications and civil-military coordination. While Asia and Pacific countries are increasingly developing their own skills and capability to respond to emergencies, OCHA is helping governments to achieve greater national leadership in coordination as well as to raise international support where needed.

OCHA has offices in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Japan, Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Sri Lanka. OCHA also has a regional office in Fiji, which covers the Pacific region.

HUMANITARIAN CHALLENGES IN THE REGION IN 2012


The Asia-Pacific region laid claim to ten of the fifteen most deadly global disasters

DURING THE PAST DECADE ON AVERAGE:

157 55

MILLION AFFECTED THOUSAND KILLED

by natural disasters in the region annually

78.2%
ASIA

The Global percentage of people affected by natural disasters in the Asia-Pacific region

32.3% of the worlds ongoing conflicts in 2012 took place in Asia-Pacific

32.3%

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TOOLS & SERVICES

In major humanitarian crises, OCHA helps national governments access humanitarian tools and services that provide life-saving relief and protection to disaster-affected people.
These tools and services help Member States and other partners make betterinformed decisions, assist vulnerable people more effectively, and ensure a more predictable approach to emergency response. OCHA also manages a number of financial systems and strategic tools designed to ensure vital humanitarian funds are available quickly and have the greatest impact possible.
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) Flash Appeals OCHA Emergency Cash Grant United Nations Disaster Assessment & Coordination Team (UNDAC) Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Rapid Impact Assessments Humanitarian Information Centres (HIC) Civil-Military Coordination

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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THE CENTRAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE FUND (CERF)


Ensures that people affected by emergencies are able to receive assistance quickly and in a consistent manner
Assures that money goes where it is most needed in the

FLASH APPEALS
Used to structure coordinated humanitarian responses during

the first three to six months of emergencies


Usually issued within one week of the onset of an emergency Provides a concise overview of urgent life-saving needs,

network of international humanitarian organizations Comprises a grant facility of up to US$450 million and a loan facility of $50 million
Replenished annually through contributions from

including recovery projects to be implemented within the appeals time frame

OCHA EMERGENCY CASH GRANT


Covers the most pressing needs of people affected by disasters Maximum $100,000 allocation per disaster from a single donor Once approved, disbursed within 10 days and spent within

governments, the private sector, foundations and individuals


Established by the UN General Assembly in 2006,

created by all nations for all victims of disasters and managed by the Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator on behalf of the United Nations Secretary-General

two months
Pays for immediate relief operations including local purchases of

relief items, logistics support and, if needed, for personnel to assist the Humanitarian Coordinator in relief coordination

UNITED NATIONS DISASTER ASSESSMENT & COORDINATION TEAM (UNDAC)


UNDAC teams are trained emergency managers from different countries and international organizations who can deploy at short notice to anywhere in the world. As part of the international emergency response system for sudden-onset emergencies, UNDAC is designed to help the UN and governments of disasteraffected countries during the first phase of an emergency. UNDAC is managed by OCHA, which is responsible for dispatching UNDAC teams when requested to do so by national governments or Humanitarian Coordinators in affected countries. UNDAC personnel are available around the clock and their services are provided free of charge to affected countries.

URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE (USAR)


USAR services are vital in the immediate aftermath of disasters such as earthquakes, cyclones, storms and floods. USAR teams can be deployed in affected areas within 48 hours of a disaster occurring. They use specialized search-and-rescue equipment including search dogs to rescue and provide life-saving medical care to people trapped under collapsed structures. OCHA, as Secretariat to the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG), plays a critical role in the deployment of USAR teams.

HUMANITARIAN INFORMATION CENTRES (HIC)


HICs support the humanitarian community in the systematic and standardized collection, processing and dissemination of information. HICs play a crucial role in improving humanitarian coordination, situational understanding and decision-making. They complement the information management capabilities of national authorities, as well as in-country development and humanitarian actors. While Humanitarian Coordinators have the overall responsibility to oversee the work of HICs, this task is commonly assigned to OCHA.

RAPID IMPACT ASSESSMENTS


OCHA plays a key role in coordinating international, multi-sectoral needs assessments in disaster-affected countries. At the policy level, OCHA co-chairs the IASC Needs Assessment Task Force and advises and develops guidance for the Coordinated Assessment Pool and Roster (CASPAR). In the field, OCHA and its partners conduct rapid assessments in new or deteriorating emergencies, to provide an evidence base for humanitarian interventions and appeals. As a preparedness measure, OCHA works with partners to ensure procedures are in place to efficiently execute needs assessments when needed. In environmental disaster situations, OCHA facilitates the provision of environmental expertise and mobile laboratories from countries willing to donate resources. Working with other humanitarian and environmental partners, OCHA also develops policies, guidelines and tools for environmental emergency response.

CIVIL-MILITARY COORDINATION
In humanitarian operations with a military presence, OCHA leads the establishment and management of interaction with military actors. This role is particularly essential in complex emergencies and high-risk environments. It helps to facilitate humanitarian access, the protection of civilians and the security of humanitarian aid workers. OCHA facilitates dialogue and interaction between civilian and military actors. It also provides support through training and advocacy on the guidelines that govern the use of foreign military and civil defence assets.

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COORDINATION SAVES LIVES


OCHA is responsible for the coordination of international humanitarian assistance.

HUMANITARIAN & EMERGENCY RELIEF COORDINATOR

Coordination is a vital component of humanitarian action. OCHA brings together all the actors involved in the delivery of humanitarian assistance to ensure efficient, cost effective, and well-coordinated responses to emergencies.
This includes putting in place: Strong humanitarian leadership at the country level through the appointment of experienced Humanitarian Coordinators A well-coordinated humanitarian structure to which all relevant organizations can contribute in an effective and systematic fashion Humanitarian Country Teams inclusive of all major humanitarian actors Common and well-understood funding tools and mechanisms to mobilize financing quickly and efficiently when responding to crises
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

OCHAs coordination mandate comes from General Assembly resolution 46/182, adopted in December 1991 to:
Strengthen the UN response to complex emergencies and natural disasters Improve the overall effectiveness of humanitarian operations in the field Establish a robust coordination framework for international humanitarian assistance

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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The international humanitarian system has put in place a set of concrete actions aimed at transforming the way in which the humanitarian community responds to emergencies.
It focuses on three key areas in order to improve the timeliness and effectiveness of a collective response:

LEADERSHIP
Improving the timeliness and effectiveness of the collective response through stronger leadership

COORDINATION
More effective coordination structures

ACCOUNTABILITY
Improved accountability for performance and to affected people

The Cluster System


One of the key new elements introduced by the 2005 Humanitarian Reform was the cluster system, aimed at improving the way international humanitarian actors organise themselves in an emergency. The cluster system addresses gaps and strengthens the effectiveness of humanitarian response through partnerships. It ensures predictability and accountability in international responses by clarifying the division of labour among organisations and clearly defining roles and responsibilities of humanitarian actors within different sectors.

OCHAs role in the Cluster System


Clusters are created whenever major emergencies require a multi-sectoral response involving a wide range of international humanitarian actors. Humanitarian Coordinators can also apply the cluster approach in on-going emergencies. OCHA plays a central role in ensuring a smooth operation of the cluster system. At the global level, OCHA works closely with cluster lead agencies and NGOs to develop policies, coordinate inter-cluster issues, disseminate operational guidance and organise field support. At the country level, it helps to ensure that the humanitarian system functions efficiently under the Humanitarian Coordinators leadership. OCHA also plays a key role in ensuring coordination between clusters at all phases of the response, including needs assessment, joint planning, implementation, coordinating resource mobilization, and monitoring and evaluation. It is responsible for establishing senior-level inter-cluster coordination forums to discuss and endorse strategic and operational decisions related to the humanitarian response.

Coordinating preparedness
The key to effective response is the state of preparedness in advance of a crisis. By ensuring that the right structures and partnerships are in place, OCHA and its humanitarian partners are able to prepare effectively for any humanitarian situation. OCHA works with national governments, regional bodies and other agencies to implement and test measures that help save lives in an emergency. It provides support for contingency planning, hazard mapping and early warning reports. Through its regional and country offices, OCHA is on constant standby to deploy staff at short notice to emergencies. It supports several surge-capacity mechanisms and networks that enable the broader humanitarian community to respond rapidly to disasters and conflicts.

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EMERGENCY RESPONSE

When a disaster occurs, it is critical to have the right people in the right place at the right time. OCHA leads and coordinates emergency response efforts in support of national governments in Asia-Pacific countries. With its rapid response teams on constant standby, OCHA provides the first wave of surge response for all new emergencies in the region.
OCHA in Asia-Pacific maintains a strong and diverse team of emergency response experts on staff. They are ready to deploy as soon as disaster strikes to help save lives and respond to the urgent needs of affected populations.

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OCHAs response teams assist national governments and humanitarian country teams OCHA responds on in humanitarian coordination, humanitarian financing, needs assessments, information average to 10 emergencies every year in Asia-Pacific management, reporting, communications and civil-military coordination.
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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INTER-CLUSTER COORDINATION
OCHA brings together all the actors involved in the delivery of humanitarian assistance to ensure efficient, cost effective, and successful responses to emergencies. It leads the international communitys efforts to establish a robust and effective humanitarian coordination system at both the global and country level, in support of the national government. OCHA ensures that the various humanitarian clusters (groupings of humanitarian organizations that deal with specific sectors of humanitarian action) work together effectively and in a well-coordinated manner.

REPORTING
During an emergency, OCHA issues situation reports providing a comprehensive overview of the humanitarian situation. The reports are issued within 24 hours of the emergency and provide a snapshot of needs, response and gaps. The reports are used to help actors directly involved in the humanitarian emergency be aware of on-going work and to inform the wider humanitarian community about developments in the field. It is also used for resource mobilization.

HUMANITARIAN FINANCING
Following a crisis, humanitarian actors in the field can immediately provide life-saving assistance using financing tools managed by OCHA. OCHA disaster management teams deploy and coordinate appeals to the Central Emergency Response Fund, Flash Appeals, Consolidated Appeals, and pooled funds. OCHA ensures that this vital humanitarian financing reaches priority programmes in a timely and fair manner, with the greatest impact possible.

MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS


OCHAs unique advocacy role enables it to speak for the interests of the broader humanitarian community as well as people affected by disaster or conflict. During an emergency, OCHA spokespersons provide regular press briefings and interviews for the media on the overall humanitarian situation. They play a key role in ensuring the humanitarian community speaks with one voice and keep attention focused on the most important humanitarian needs and issues.

NEEDS ASSESSMENTS
Successful humanitarian responses are also informed by consistent, reliable, credible and timely needs assessments and analysis of humanitarian information. OCHA coordinates international efforts to assist disaster-affected countries to conduct rapid assessments and develop strategies to respond. Taking into account existing national capacities and methodologies, OCHA is working with partners at the regional level to promote assessment approaches that are reliable, predictable and accountable.

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
OCHA recognizes the importance of gathering reliable data on the locations of people in need, what they urgently need, who is best placed to assist them, and the value of this information for effective and timely humanitarian assistance. When an emergency occurs, OCHAs information management officers immediately start working with key partners to produce standard information products to support coordination of all the humanitarian organizations and the response operation. These include - Who does What Where (3W) databases, contact lists and meeting schedules.

CIVIL-MILITARY COORDINATION
In humanitarian operations with a military presence, OCHA leads the establishment and management of interaction with military actors. It supports humanitarian and military actors through training and advocacy on the guidelines that govern the use of foreign military and civil defence assets and humanitarian civil-military interaction. OCHA also seeks to establish a predictable approach to the use of these assets by considering their use during preparedness and contingency-planning activities.

MAPPING
In emergency situations, high-quality maps are essential for successful relief planning and action. OCHA produces a variety of maps used to inform strategic responses, including reference maps, hazard maps, climate and storm maps, emergency situation maps and humanitarian snapshots. Partner agencies, donors, and the media are all important users of these maps.

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TOOLS & SERVICES

RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS

Good planning leads to good response. This is the basis for OCHAs emergency preparedness work, or Minimum Preparedness Package (MPP).
The MPP is a systematic and holistic approach to emergency preparedness, aimed at strengthening the capacity of Humanitarian Country Teams, national governments and regional organizations to rapidly identify, evaluate, and respond to a wide spectrum of emergencies. The MPP provides preparedness support that is tailored to suit country-specific needs. It enables Humanitarian Country Teams to effectively utilize their internal coordination system to request or help mobilize international humanitarian assistance. It also allows OCHA to measure the impact of its preparedness support. Focus countries in Asia-Pacific:
The MPP is being implemented in the focus countries identified through the Global Focus Model as having a combination of hazards, vulnerabilities and capacities that makes them a high risk for emergencies. For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact: Bangladesh, Cambodia, DPR Korea, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam.

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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The MPP targets eight critical areas of response, or Positive Response Outcomes

Humanitarian country teams and governments understand basic roles, responsibilities and capacities and can make appropriate use of international response mechanisms Humanitarian country teams and governments are able to initiate joint assessments and utilize the findings

Inclusive humanitarian coordination structures are established and functioning immediately following onset of an emergency

3 5 7

4 6 8

Inter-agency funding documents (e.g. Flash Appeal and CERF applications) are issued within 72 to 96 hours following onset of an emergency Humanitarian country teams have an agreed emergency communication strategy and are communicating with affected communities Government and international responders create an enabling environment for collective humanitarian response actions and agreement on triggers for accessing resources

Humanitarian country teams are able to produce key information and reporting products to support coordination, analysis and decision-making Effective coordination exists between humanitarian country teams, governments, the military, civil society and others

Delivery Phases of MPP:


1 2 3

The implementation timeframe for MPP support varies according to the needs and capacities of each country.

1 - INITIATION

Scoping mission, during which preparedness gaps and needs are assessed in detail.

2 - DESIGN

The preparedness package is tailored according to the specific requirements of the country.

3 - DELIVERY

Activities requiring multiple weeks or months to put in place - such as contingency planning or data preparedness are implemented.

4 - COMPLETION

A simulation exercise to test the various components and an evaluation to measure the impact of preparedness and agree on follow-up steps.

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REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS

Sustained relations, built on trust and mutual respect, are vital when preparing for and responding to humanitarian emergencies. This is the basis for OCHAs work in partnership building among humanitarian actors across the Asia-Pacific region.
The scale and scope of the Asia-Pacific regions challenges in disaster management and emergency response require working together in new ways, with new partners. OCHA engages with regional organizations to build strong regional relationships. It supports the efforts of regional entities that seek a greater role in mobilizing and coordinating disaster responses within their region. By building strong partnerships with regional, national and non-governmental organizations, OCHA is boosting regional and country-level preparedness. It is also ensuring that different humanitarian actors are able to exchange important information and work towards common goals in a productive and coordinated manner.
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
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Recognizing the important role played by national and international militaries in disaster response in the Asia-Pacific region, OCHA is working with key partners throughout the region to strengthen humanitarian civil-military coordination at both national and regional levels. This is being achieved through systematic engagement in advocacy, training, response preparedness and policy development. OCHA advocates for principled humanitarian civil-military coordination in both civilian and military forums throughout the region.

works with:
National and international militaries including as the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF)

Governments and National Disaster Management Offices across the Asia-Pacific region, guiding them on how to effectively manage incoming humanitarian assistance during an emergency, and also how to provide assistance to other countries when disaster strikes. This includes convening large discussion fora and producing the Asia-Pacific Disaster Guide on how to access and manage international humanitarian assistance www.unocha.org/asiadisasterguide

Intergovernmental organizations in the region including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), and Pacific Islands Forum (PIF)

Humanitarian donors worldwide who have an interest in the Asia-Pacific region

Regional mechanisms that bring together humanitarian responders and practitioners, including civil society, academia and the private sector. This includes the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Regional Network (IASC) and Asian Disaster Response and Reduction Network (ADRRN)

OCHA chairs the following regional coordination forums:


The IASC Humanitarian Network for Asia-Pacific is a coordinating forum for humanitarian partners dedicated to disaster preparedness and response in the region. Network members include regional representatives of the IASC, NGOs, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement and the UN system. They assist Humanitarian Coordinators, Humanitarian Country Teams, national governments and NGO partners to enhance inter-agency preparedness, response and early recovery capacity in the region. The Regional Humanitarian Communications Network comprises more than 50 members from across the region who share information and training resources. They discuss common advocacy and information strategies on humanitarian issues.

For more information, contact lasker@un.org

For more information, contact mildren@un.org

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HUMANITARIAN ANALYSIS

Gathering, managing and analyzing information in a timely and systematic manner is key to making the right decisions in a disaster response situation. OCHA is leading efforts to harness existing and new technologies for humanitarian risk analysis and needs assessment.
January 2013 - For Internal OCHA Use Only Sorted by FOCUS

The Global Focus Model (GFM) - a humanitarian risk tool developed by OCHAs regional office in Asia-Pacific - is being used by OCHA throughout the world to identify geographic hotspots that represent high humanitarian risk and to strategically analyze hazards, vulnerabilities and response capacities at the country level.
For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

Infrastructure

Environment

Dependency

Institutional

Livelihood

Economic

% weight of indicator within category (33=33.3) HC / OCHA OFFICE / REGION HC HC HC

50
8.6 7.0 8.7 9.5 5.8 8.1 3.8 7.9 4.4 5.0 4.2 4.6 5.8 7.2 8.1 5.3 2.4 4.0 0.3 9.2 6.8 4.3 1.7 2.8 1.0

50
7.3 5.2 6.3 7.1 4.5 6.4 5.8 4.8 4.4 3.7 2.3 5.3 6.2 3.7 5.4 0.9 0.5 3.5 2.1 1.0 0.0 1.7 1.1 0.4 0.9 7.9 6.1 7.5 8.3 5.2 7.3 4.8 6.4 4.4 4.4 3.2 5.0 6.0 5.4 6.7 3.1 1.5 3.8 1.2 5.1 3.4 3.0 1.4 1.6 0.9

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7.7 6.9 6.6 5.3 7.4 7.5 5.5 5.6 7.0 7.0 7.4 4.6 4.4 4.9 4.7 7.1 3.7 2.5 2.3 1.2 1.1 1.9 1.2 1.0 2.5

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7.5 6.9 7.2 5.0 6.1 6.4 7.6 5.0 7.3 6.8 7.6 5.9 5.3 4.8 4.2 4.4 6.1 3.1 3.7 1.1 1.3 1.6 2.4 1.2 1.4

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2.7 5.2 4.6 1.7 2.9 3.5 1.7 1.8 1.3 1.4 2.0 2.3 4.5 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.0 4.6 1.2 2.0 1.8 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.2

5
4.4 5.9 6.1 4.0 7.5 6.2 3.1 5.7 7.6 6.3 7.1 3.3 2.8 3.7 4.9 4.7 6.0 2.0 2.3 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.3 2.8 3.1 6.2 6.4 6.3 4.2 5.8 6.1 5.2 4.5 5.7 5.5 6.1 4.4 4.7 3.8 3.6 4.6 4.0 3.2 2.6 1.4 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.3 1.8

33
8.1 5.8 6.0 4.9 6.4 4.1 8.0 4.9 5.8 7.3 5.7 5.1 5.3 5.9 4.3 6.5 5.5 4.7 5.5 1.9 2.9 3.1 5.3 2.0 4.1

33
6.6 5.9 5.9 5.4 7.1 5.2 6.5 5.4 6.8 7.3 5.9 5.8 3.8 5.3 3.6 6.5 7.0 3.3 6.6 1.9 3.2 2.8 3.3 2.5 1.6

33
6.2 7.0 5.4 4.7 9.2 6.0 5.0 5.2 6.1 5.8 8.7 3.7 4.6 3.8 4.6 7.2 6.6 3.8 3.4 1.4 1.4 1.3 2.2 2.5 1.2 7.0 6.2 5.8 5.0 7.6 5.1 6.5 5.2 6.2 6.8 6.8 4.9 4.6 5.0 4.2 6.7 6.3 3.9 5.2 1.7 2.5 2.4 3.6 2.4 2.3

COUNTRY

HAZARD

VULNERABILITY

CAPACITY

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP
2.4 2.2 1.8 1.7 1.3 0.0 1.0 0.0 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.5

Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043

Myanmar Nepal Bangladesh Philippines Papua New Guinea India DPR of Korea Indonesia Cambodia Lao PDR Timor-Leste Sri Lanka Thailand Viet Nam China Bhutan Mongolia Malaysia Maldives Japan New Zealand Rep. of Korea Brunei Darussalam Australia Singapore

ROAP

7.0 6.2 6.5 5.8 6.2 6.2 5.5 5.3 5.5 5.6 5.4 4.8 5.1 4.8 4.9 4.8 3.9 3.6 3.0 2.7 2.4

9.9 8.8 5.5 9.9 5.2 3.0 7.1 7.7 6.3 4.5 5.2 9.9 5.5 4.9 3.0 3.1 6.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 1.0

ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP

ROAP

HC

ROAP

HC

ROAP

ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP ROAP

ROAP ROAP

Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA

Focus
7.3 6.5 6.4 6.2 6.1 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.1 3.5 2.9 2.8 2.3

Risk

2013 Global Focus Model

Humanitarian

Poverty

Natural

Human

18

OCHAS FOCUS COUNTRIES IN ASIA-PACIFIC IN 2013:

Effective needs assessment is an essential component of a good response operation, particularly in the early hours, days and weeks as the scale and extent of an emergency, and the response to it, are defined. OCHA is utilizing the latest available tools and technology for needs assessment in its operations in the region to ensure better analysis of needs on the ground. In order to strengthen humanitarian analysis capacity at the country level, OCHA is working with government technical agencies as key partners in disaster management processes. OCHAs collaboration with these agencies is translating into stronger preparedness and better responses.

BANGLADESH CAMBODIA DPR KOREA INDONESIA LAO PDR MYANMAR NEPAL PAPUA NEW GUINEA PHILIPPINES SRI LANKA TIMOR-LESTE VIETNAM

Geographic information is also central to OCHAs information management activities. OCHA creates maps to support a number of key functions. The target audience for OCHA maps is the general public. Partner agencies, donors, and media are all important users of the maps produced by OCHA.

Hazard maps describe the risks affecting different countries at different times. Reference maps provide valuable baseline data (i.e. population density, average temperature, etc.) to put events in context. Situation maps overlay operational information over an effected area to assist in coordination.

Humanitarian snapshots incorporate maps and graphics to summarize complex situations and deliver advocacy messages.

ASIA

PACIFIC
19

WWW.UNOCHA.ORG/ROAP
HUMANITY . NEUTRALITY . IMPARTIALITY . INDEPENDENCE

COMMUNICATIONS WITH COMMUNITIES

OCHAs Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific delivers communications with communities coordination and technical support services, advocates for improving communications with people affected by crises and seeks to mainstream communications with communities principles into the humanitarian programme cycle.
Communications with communities is an emerging field of humanitarian response that seeks to meet the information and communications needs of people affected by crises. OCHA believes that:
Communication is a form of assistance as important as water, food and shelter. Without access to information disaster survivors are unable to access the help they need or be effective in their own recovery. Communication is by definition a two-way process and efforts to ensure disaster survivors are able to communicate with responders are particularly important. Effective communication requires resources, a consistent and clearly articulated approach, and hence in a large scale emergency, a communications coordination mechanism can better support cross cluster efforts.

For further information on OCHA ROAP, contact:

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA
20

Information is a vital form of aid in itself People need information as much as water, food, medicine or shelter. Information can save lives, livelihoods and resources.
- IFRC, World Disasters Report 2005

Humanitarian partners need a thorough understanding of peoples needs in order to mount an effective response. Communications with communities principles are applicable across the humanitarian programme cycle, from preparedness (for example early warning systems) through to implementation of programmes and monitoring and evaluations (including the perspectives of affected communities in evaluations). In practice, effective communications with communities work includes establishing ways in which disaster survivors can source the information they need to make informed choices and ensure their voices are heard by responding agencies. This work involves using all available communications channels including newsletters, radio, television, SMS and face to face work. In the case of self-help information, especially for those who cannot be reached, communications with communities is about delivering life-saving assistance.

What is OCHAs role?


For OCHA as an organization, communications with communities efforts focus on delivering improved information and communication services for affected communities in preparedness for and in response to a crisis, working to include more voices from affected communities into OCHA products including public information (including social media), advocacy, needs assessments, monitoring and evaluating and policy development. To date, OCHA has focused on three main areas of work in the emerging sector:
services. 1. Coordination OCHAs regional office has collaborated on a coordination and technical support mechanism in the Philippines and Myanmar and is supporting partners in delivering coordination services in Bangladesh and Nepal. Within the UN 2. Advocacy. and through the CDAC Network (of which OCHA is a founding member) OCHA has led on elevating communications with communities as a priority concern in humanitarian programming, recognizing that information in itself is a form of assistance, within the international humanitarian system. within 3. Mainstreaming OCHA. OCHA has initially moved to incorporate the principles and activities into the suite of tools and services that the organization provides such as preparedness training and its standard operation procedures for disaster response.

More information is more widely available than ever before; making better use of this information will reap rewards. On offer is a better way of designing humanitarian response, whereby people determine their own priorities and communicate them to those who would assist.
- OCHA, Humanitarianism in the Network Age - Including World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2012

ASIA

PACIFIC
21

WWW.UNOCHA.ORG/ROAP
HUMANITY . NEUTRALITY . IMPARTIALITY . INDEPENDENCE

MINIMUM PREPAREDNESS PACKAGE


A Systematic and Holistic Approach to Emergency Preparedness

MPP

The MPP ensures that humanitarian country teams, national authorities and regional organizations can rapidly and effectively identify, evaluate and respond to humanitarian emergencies.

THE MPP TARGETS EIGHT CRITICAL AREAS OF RESPONSE, OR

POSITIVE RESPONSE OUTCOMES


Humanitarian country teams and governments understand basic roles, responsibilities and capacities and can make appropriate use of international response mechanisms Inclusive humanitarian coordination structures are established and functioning immediately following onset of an emergency Humanitarian country teams and governments are able to initiate joint assessments and utilize the findings

1
Humanitarian country teams have an agreed emergency communication strategy and are communicating with affected communities

2
Humanitarian country teams are able to produce key information and reporting products to support coordination, analysis and decision-making

3
Inter-agency funding documents (e.g. Flash Appeal and CERF applications) are issued within 72 to 96 hours following onset of an emergency

6
Effective coordination exists between humanitarian country teams, governments, the military, civil society and others

5
Government and international responders create an enabling environment for collective humanitarian response actions and agreement on triggers for accessing resources

GOOD PLANNING LEADS TO GOOD RESPONSE

OCHA REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ROAP)


Executive Suite, Second Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Tel: +66 (0) 2288 1234 Fax: +66 (0) 22881043 Email: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap @OCHAAsiaPac www.facebook.com/UNOCHA

22

Disaster Response in Asia and the Pacific: A Guide to International Tools and Services

Produced at the request of Asia-Pacific Governments, the Guide assists disaster managers in understanding the interaction between national, regional and international humanitarian response mechanisms by:
Creating a common understanding of available disaster response and disaster preparedness tools

Preparedness

Response

Response Preparedness

DISASTER

WHAT IS IN IT?

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN ARCHITECTURE TOOLS AND SERVICES FOR DISASTER RESPONSE TOOLS AND SERVICES FOR DISASTER PREPAREDNESS
HOW CAN IT BE USED? To increase understanding of the tools and services available in the region To support emergency decision-making in small-, medium- and large-scale disasters To help locate international technical expertise before and at the onset of a disaster To facilitate partnerships between humanitarian actors To inform academic curricula at national and regional learning institutions

WHAT THE GUIDE ANSWERS For each entry, the Guide answers the following questions:

WHAT IS IT? WHO IS IT FOR? HOW IS IT ACCESSED?


TOTAL NUMBER OF ENTRIES IN THE GUIDE
Response preparedness tools and services International humanitarian architecture

34

38

47
www.unocha.org/asiadisasterguide
Response tools and services 23

DISASTER RESPONSE IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC - A Guide to International Tools and Services

DISASTER RESPONSE IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC


A Guide to International Tools and Services

Supporting emergency decision-making in small, medium and large-scale disasters Helping to identify appropriate international technical expertise before and during crises Promoting partnerships between humanitarian actors SCOPE OF THE GUIDE: RESPONSE & RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS

u
Recovery Mitigation

Regional Office for Asia-Pacific Deployments


as of January 2013
53 51 50 49 48
21,28 4 38 30

54 55

2 3

52

20

12
37

05 J F M A M J J A

20

D
7 8 9 10

14 45

47 46

18 19 53 1 47 20,48,54

13,39

50 15

200

41,52 17

34,40 6,27,31,46 55

2011

1,22,26,43 1,3,5 1

33 29 7,8,10,42

23 12,25 9,11 51 16 35,44, 49 24 32

45 44 43 42 41 40

11 12

2,36

200 7
14

13

39

20

10

38 37 34 33

15 16

ROAP Deployments

31

29 28

27 26

Indonesia Philippines Pakistan Sri Lanka Myanmar PNG Vanuatu Cambodia China Cook Is. Timor-Leste Bangladesh Bhutan DPR Korea Fiji India Japan Lao PDR Maldives Mongolia Nepal Palau Samoa Solomon Is. South Asia Thailand 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

3 3 3

4 4

1. Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Maldives: Indian Ocean Tsunami 26 Dec 2004 2. Cook Islands: Cyclone Percy 26 Feb 2005 3. Indonesia: Nias Earthquake 28 Mar 2005 4. Pakistan, India: South Asia Earthquake 8 Oct 2005 5. Indonesia, Aceh Floods 12 Dec 2005 6. Philippines, Leyte Landslide 14 Feb 2006 7. Indonesia, Mt. Merapi Volcano 19 Apr 2006 8. Indonesia, Yogyakarta earthquake 26 May 2006 9. Timor-Leste, Unrest May 2006 10. Indonesia, Earthquake and Tsunami 18 July 2006 11. Timor-Leste, Surge Support Mar 2007 12. Solomon Islands: Earthquake & Tsunami 2 Apr 2007 13. South Asia: Floods 20 Jun 2007 14. DPR Korea: Floods 5 Aug, 2007 15. Bangladesh: Cyclone Sidr 15 Nov 2007 16. Papua New Guinea: Cyclone Guba 20 Nov 2007 17. Myanmar: Cyclone Nargis 2 May 2008 18. China: Sichuan Earthquake 12 May 2008 19. Lao PDR: Floods 14 Aug 2008 20. Philippines: Mindanao Unrest Aug 2008 21. Pakistan: Conflict Sep 2008

2009
25 24 23 22
9 9

35

32

30

19 21 20
22. Sri Lanka: Surge Support 23. PNG: Floods & Sea Swells 24. Fiji: Floods 25. Solomon Island: Floods 26. Sri Lanka: Surge Support 27. Philippines: Surge Support 28. Pakistan: Conflict 29. Indonesia: West Java Earthquake 30. Bhutan: Earthquake 31. Philippines: Typhoon Ketsana 32. Samoa: Earthquake & Tsunami 33. Indonesia: Sumatra Earthquake 34. Philippines: Typhoon Parma 35. Vanuatu: Volcano 36. Cook Islands: Cyclone 37. Mongolia: Dzud 38. China: Qinghai Earthquake 39. Pakistan: Floods 40. Philippines: Typhoon Megi 41. Myanmar: Typohoon Giri 42. Indonesia: Mt. Merapi Volcano 43. Sri Lanka: Floods 44. Vanuatu: Cyclone Vania 45. Japan: Earthquake & Tsunami 46. Philippines: Typhoon Nesat 47. Cambodia: Floods 48. Philippines: TS Washi 49. Vanuatu: Cyclone Jasmine 50. Nepal: Flood 51. PNG: Flood 52. Myanmar: Rakhine conflict 53. Cambodia: Floods 54. Philippines: Typhoon Bopha 55. Palau: Cyclone Bopha Nov 2008 10 Dec 2008 11 Jan 2009 1 Feb 2009 Jun 2009 Jun 2009 Jul 2009 2 Sep 2009 21 Sep 2009 26 Sep 2009 29 Sep 2009 30 Sep 2009 2 Oct 2009 26 Nov 2009 11 Feb 2010 Winter 2010 14 Apr 2010 July 2010 16 Oct 2010 22 Oct 2010 26 Oct 2010 6 Jan 2011 13 Jan 2011 11 Mar 2011 27 Sep 2011 18 Oct 2011 16 Dec 2011 Feb 2012 May 2012 May 2012 Jun 2012 Sep 2012 Dec 2012 Dec 2012

20
18

08

36

17

24

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

2013 Global Focus Model

WHY A GLOBAL FOCUS MODEL? A challenge faced by OCHA, and indeed all humanitarian organisations, is how to ensure that resources are allocated where they are most needed, and in an impartial, equitable and transparent manner. This allocation of resources must strike a balance between the immediate needs of ongoing emergencies while ensuring preparedness for future events. To address these challenges for the Asia-Pacific region, OCHAs Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP) developed a risk model in 2007 to analyze hazards, vulnerabilities and response capacity at the country-level using a range of quantitative indicators. Since then, the model has been adopted as a corporate risk model and updated each year as part of OCHAs annual work planning cycle. The latest version - the 2013 Global Focus Model (GFM), covers 192 countries in eight regions falling under the supervision of OCHAs Coordination and Response Division (CRD) in New York.

OCHA FOCUS COUNTRIES IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC The region remains the worlds most natural disaster prone, with almost 40% of registered disaster events between 1980 and 2012. Population growth, environmental degradation, and the growth of mega cities in low-lying flood plains and earthquake zones have increased the exposure of millions to natural hazards. The impacts were felt mostly by the poorest segments of society, making natural disasters a significant obstacle to achieving the MDGs in the region. The region also accounted for about one third of the worlds ongoing conflicts in 2012. As an evidence-base, a key use of the model in Asia and the Pacific is to define country priorities for response preparedness work. ROAP concentrates its work on a group of Focus Countries that have the highest overall risk based on hazards, vulnerability and capacity. This approach has been validated over the past five years with 90% of all ROAP emergency deployments taking place in recognized Focus Countries. ROAPS 2013 FOCUS COUNTRIES Bangladesh Cambodia DPR Korea Indonesia Lao PDR Myanmar Nepal Papua New Guinea Philippines Sri Lanka Timor-Leste Vietnam

Covered by CRD Asia and the Pacific Covered by (ROAP) CRD Central Asia and the Caucases (ROCCA) Asia and the Pacic (ROAP) Central and East Africa (ROCEA) Central Asia and the(ROLAC) Caucases (ROCCA) Latin America and the Caribbean Middle East and North AfricaAfrica (ROMENA)(ROCEA) Central and East Pacific (ROP) Latin America and the Caribbean (ROLAC) Southern Africa (ROSA) Middle East North Africa (ROMENA) Western and Centraland Africa (ROWCA) Pacific (ROP) Southern Africa (ROSA) Western and Central Africa (ROWCA)

FOR MORE INFORMATION


Craig Williams Information Services Branch Room D-107, Palais des Nations, Geneva 1211, Switzerland williamscv@un.org +41 79 444 4139 John Marinos Info. Management Officer OCHA ROAP Bangkok, Thailand marinosj@un.org +66 81 912 9853

Fig. 1 - The 2013 GFM covers 192 countries in eight OCHA regions

The model comprises a risk component drawn entirely from quantitative indicators, as well as a humanitarian component reflecting issues more directly related to OCHAs work. The model identifies hazard-prone countries that combine high vulnerability to hazards and low capacity and are therefore more likely to request, or accept, support from the international community. The model is designed to be a pragmatic and practical tool to inform managers, allow for a more effective use of resources and guide the work of staff within OCHAs strategic framework and annual work plan.

2013 Global Focus Model OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Executive Suite, 2nd Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Ave, Bangkok, Thailand ocha-roap@un.org, www.unocha.org
25

Infrastructure Infrastructure

January 2013 - For Internal OCHA Use Only January 2013 - For Internal OCHA Use Only - DRAFT v1 130111

Sorted by FOCUS Sorted by FOCUS

Environment Environment

Dependency Dependency

Institutional Institutional

Poverty Poverty Livelihood Livelihood

Economic Economic

50

50

COUNTRY / OCHA OFFICE / REGION % weight of HC indicator within category (33=33.3)

50 HAZARD 50 HAZARD 8.6 7.3 7.9


7.0 0.0 5.2 0.9 6.1 1.8 8.7 0.7 6.3 1.7 7.5 2.8 9.5 0.7 7.1 1.5 8.3 2.3 5.8 0.5 4.5 0.6 5.2 0.8 8.1 0.7 6.4 0.8 3.8 5.8 0.3 0.2 7.9 4.8 0.8 0.7 4.4 4.4 1.1 0.0 5.0 3.7 4.2 4.6 5.8 7.2 8.1 5.3 2.4 4.0 0.3 9.2 6.8 4.3 1.7 2.8 1.0 2.3 5.3 6.2 3.7 5.4 0.9 0.5 3.5 2.1 1.0 0.0 1.7 1.1 0.4 0.9 7.3 0.8 4.8 0.3 6.4 0.7 4.4 0.5 4.4 3.2 5.0 6.0 5.4 6.7 3.1 1.5 3.8 1.2 5.1 3.4 3.0 1.4 1.6 0.9

35 35 25 5 35VULNERABILITY 35 25 5

33

33

33

33 CAPACITY 33 33 CAPACITY 8.1 6.6 6.2 7.0


5.8 3.7 6.0 1.1 4.9 1.1 6.4 2.4 4.1 2.0 8.0 2.6 5.9 2.2 5.9 1.9 5.4 1.6 7.1 1.8 5.2 2.0 6.5 2.6 7.0 1.3 5.4 1.0 4.7 1.1 9.2 3.1 6.0 1.2 5.0 1.6 6.2 2.4 5.8 1.3 5.0 1.3 7.6 2.4 5.1 1.7 6.5 2.3

HC / OCHA OFFICE / REGION HC ROAP HC CRD ROAP Nepal Liechtenstein CRD ROAP Bangladesh Germany HC ROAP Philippines CRD Netherlands ROAP Papua New Guinea CRD Norway ROAP India CRD Denmark ROAP DPR of Korea CRD Finland HC ROAP Indonesia CRD Sweden ROAP Cambodia CRD Luxembourg ROAP Lao PDR ROAP Timor-Leste HC ROAP Sri Lanka @ ROAP Thailand ROAP Viet Nam ROAP China ROAP Bhutan ROAP Mongolia ROAP Malaysia ROAP Maldives ROAP Japan ROAP New Zealand ROAP Rep. of Korea ROAP Brunei Darussalam ROAP Australia ROAP Singapore

COUNTRY Myanmar

VULNERABILITY 7.7 7.5 2.7 4.4 6.2


6.9 1.4 6.9 1.8 5.2 0.8 6.6 1.4 7.2 1.8 4.6 1.1 5.3 1.3 5.0 1.9 1.7 1.1 7.4 1.2 6.1 1.9 2.9 0.8 7.5 0.9 5.5 0.7 5.6 0.7 7.0 0.8 7.0 7.4 4.6 4.4 4.9 4.7 7.1 3.7 2.5 2.3 1.2 1.1 1.9 1.2 1.0 2.5 5.9 1.3 6.4 2.0 6.1 1.4 6.3 2.2 4.0 1.4 4.2 2.6

7.0

9.9

6.2 1.5 6.5 1.5 5.8 1.4 6.2 1.4 6.2 1.3 5.5 1.3

8.8 0.3 5.5 0.7 9.9 1.0 5.2 0.7 3.0 1.3 7.1 1.0

7.5 1.3 5.8 1.8 6.4 3.5 6.2 6.1 1.4 1.9 1.9 1.4 7.6 1.9 1.7 1.7 3.1 1.3 5.2 1.4 5.0 1.8 5.7 4.5 1.2 1.9 1.8 1.3 7.3 1.3 7.6 5.7 1.2 1.7 2.0 1.2 6.8 1.4 6.3 5.5 7.6 5.9 5.3 4.8 4.2 4.4 6.1 3.1 3.7 1.1 1.3 1.6 2.4 1.2 1.4 2.0 2.3 4.5 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.0 4.6 1.2 2.0 1.8 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.2 7.1 3.3 2.8 3.7 4.9 4.7 6.0 2.0 2.3 2.1 1.9 2.4 2.3 2.8 3.1 6.1 4.4 4.7 3.8 3.6 4.6 4.0 3.2 2.6 1.4 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.3 1.8

4.9 2.1 5.8 3.2 7.3 5.7 5.1 5.3 5.9 4.3 6.5 5.5 4.7 5.5 1.9 2.9 3.1 5.3 2.0 4.1

5.4 1.9 6.8 1.0 7.3 5.9 5.8 3.8 5.3 3.6 6.5 7.0 3.3 6.6 1.9 3.2 2.8 3.3 2.5 1.6

5.2 1.4 6.1 0.9 5.8 8.7 3.7 4.6 3.8 4.6 7.2 6.6 3.8 3.4 1.4 1.4 1.3 2.2 2.5 1.2

5.2 1.8 6.2 1.7 6.8 6.8 4.9 4.6 5.0 4.2 6.7 6.3 3.9 5.2 1.7 2.5 2.4 3.6 2.4 2.3

5.3 1.3 5.5 1.2 5.6 4.8

7.7 1.0 6.3 0.7 4.5 9.9

5.4 5.1 4.8 4.9 4.8 3.9 3.6 3.0 2.7 2.4 2.4 2.2 1.8 1.7

5.2 5.5 4.9 3.0 3.1 6.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 1.3 0.0 1.0 0.0

OCHA Presence CRD New York & Geneva Regional Office Country Office Liaison Office Humanitarian Advisor Team

2013 Edition - Developed by the OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP). - Index scores not to be reused by third parties without express written permission from Maplecroft. - For further information please contact Craig Williams (williamscv@un.org) or John Marinos (marinosj@un.org).
26

Focus Focus
7.3 6.5 1.4 6.4 1.4 6.2 1.4 6.1 1.4 5.8 1.3 5.6 1.2 5.6 1.2 5.5 1.1 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.1 3.5 2.9 2.8 2.3 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.5

Risk Risk

2013 Global Focus Model 2013 Global Focus Model % weight of indicator within category (33=33.3)

Humanitarian Humanitarian

Natural Natural Human Human

Regional Office for Asia-Pacific: Map Catalog (as of Oct 2013)


! (

OCHAs Regional Office for Asia-Pacic (ROAP) covers 36 countries and 14 territories in the Asia-Pacic region. It is based in Thailand, with oversight for the Regional Sub-office for the Pacic in Fiji, and OCHAs presence in Papua New Guinea and Nepal. ROAP also provides technical support and surge capacity to OCHA eld offices in Indonesia, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and the Philippines, as well as to the many countries in the region where OCHA does not have a presence. ROAP is pleased to announce that weve completely refreshed our map catalogue. The result is nearly 100 updated regional and country-specic maps for the Asia-Pacic Region.
! (

\ !

\ !

\ !

EAST SEPIK

# Manam
! ! !
!

ENG A WEST ERN HIG HLA NDS


Mount Hagen

# # Ritter Island Langila


! ! !

Garbuna Group

INDONESIA

WEST ERN

GU LF

MO RO BE

PA P U A NEW GUINEA
! !
! ! ! !

\ !

Gulf of Papua

NO RTHE RN

Popondetta
! !

CENTRA L Port ! \ Moresby

# Lamington # Victory
! !
! !

# Waiowa

MI LNE BAY
!

AUSTRALIA

Coral Sea

Cyclone Season: Nov to Apr Peak month: February

! ! ! !
! ! ! !

! ! !
!

Regional Reference Maps show baseline geographic and operational information about the Asia-Pacic. In addition to showing the OCHA presence in the region they show information such as maximum temperatures, climate classication, major air routes, language families, population density, elevation, etc.

Country Reference Maps are basic geographic maps for the Focus countries in the Asia-Pacic region. They highlight the Common Operational Datasets which ROAP has compiled as part of its data preparedness activities. Older maps are available for non-Focus Countries.
! ^

Uvs Bayan-O'lgii

Xo'vsgol Selenge Darxan-Uul Bulgan Zavxan Arxangai Orxon Dornod

Xovd To'v Govisu'mber Govi-Altai Bayanxongor O'vorxangai Dundgovi

Map Doc Name: MNG_reference map_120828 Creation Date: 28 Aug, 2012 Projection/Datum: Lat/Lon WGS84 Web Resources: http://ochaonline.un.org/roap Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Agency of Land Affairs, Construction, Geodesy, and Cartography, Natural Earth Disclaimers: The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

C H I N A

Weekly Situation Maps form a major component of ROAPs monitoring and early warning activities. Their purpose is to highlight signicant events being monitored by ROAP , this includes natural disasters, deteriorating or complex emergencies, disease outbreaks, and upcoming elections.
KATHMANDU
! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

ASIA PACIFIC REGION 10-16 September, 2013

Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot from the OCHA Regional Office in Asia and the Pacific
Probability of Above/Below Normal Precipitation (Sep - Nov 2013) Above normal rainfall MONGOLIA normal DPR KOREA CHINA RO KOREA
KOBE

) Forces of the Philippines which began on 9 Sep has displaced over 62,000

PHILIPPINES

Conflict between the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) and the Armed

people in Zamboanga and Basilan, as of 14 Sep. Nearly 43,000 people are now living in 25 evacuation centers. 52 people have been killed, 66 injured, and approximately 100 have been taken hostage. Overall it is estimated that there are over 235,000 people affected. Source: UN and Government sources

Below normal rainfall JAPAN

" v
3

SOLOMON ISLANDS

BHUTAN NEPAL
! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

" p

Over 13,000 people have been impacted by flash flooding in Guadalcanal. Severe food shortages have been reported. The response is being managed at the provincial level with national support. There has been no request for international assistance. Source: OCHA

INDIA

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

MYANMAR

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

PA C I F I C OCEAN

" Disaster Response Force (NDRF) Teams have been deployed to 10 u districts of Bihar that have been severely affected by heavy flooding. Media
4

INDIA

As of 14 Sep, the Ministry of Home Affairs reported that 11 National

BANGLADESH

Bay of Bengal

YANGON

LAO VIETNAM PDR 5 THAILAND


! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

reports suggest that over 200 people have lost their lives and over 6 million people are affected. Source: NDMA and Media

VIETNAM

Northern Mariana Islands (U.S.)


MANILA

BANGKOK

CAMBODIA

COLOMBO

SRI LANKA 7

BRUNEI DARUSSALAM

Sout h PHILIPPINES China Sea

Guam (U.S.)

25 people were killed, half of whom were from Lao Cai, the " landslides. x worst affected province. The Government has provided 200 tons of relief " items to those affected. Humanitarian agencies are coordinating with the v Government. Source: ECHO, Gov. of Vietnam

Ten provinces in northern Vietnam have been affected by flash floods and

" )

PALAU

MICRONESIA (FSO)

MARSHALL ISLANDS

" people have been killed, and there is an estimated 50,000 people in need u
of food assistance for the next 3 months. Source: UN RCO Stirep No. 3

LAO PDR

Seven provinces remain flooded after heavy rain which began in June. 17

MALDIVES

" y
I

M A L AY S I A SINGAPORE N D O N E S I A PA P U A NEW GUINEA TIMOR-LESTE


PORT MORESBY

INDIAN OCEAN

NAURU

" p
TUVALU

JAPAN

Tropical Storm Man-Yi has made landfall in Japan with sustained wind speeds of approximately 84 km/h. Local media report one person has died and five missing and at least 112 injured due to the storm. Sources: GDACS, PDC, Media

JAKARTA

SOLOMON ISLANDS

Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Aus.)

Christmas Island (Aus.)

" v
2

No casualties have been reported. y evacuated. Source: AHA Center

Tokelau 7 INDONESIA On 15 Sep, Mt. Sinabung erupted forcing over 3,700 people to be (N.Z.)

Emergency Situation Maps have been produced by ROAP in response to a specic event or issue. A historical archhive of these maps is maintained in the Map Centre.
! ^

The Philippines: Zamboanga Humanitarian Snapshot (as of 3 October, 2013)


BACKGROUND
Salaan

! ^
Lunzuran Boalan Taluksangay

Pasonanca

Tumaga Zambowood

Santa Maria Elementary School 1,000 - 2,000


Santa Maria Tetuan

Putik
Arena Blanco

Cawa-cawa Shoreline Cluster

Al-jahra Mosque Tumaga 1,000 - 2,000

Zamboanga City 2,000 - 3,000 National High School


1,000 - 2,000

3,000 - 4,000

Zone III

3,000 - 4,000 Tetuan Central School


Kasanyangan Santa Barbara Santa Catalina Rio Hondo

Zone I Cawa-cawa Shoreline

3,000 - 4,000
Talon-Talon National High School
Talon-Talon

JOAQUIN ENRIQUEZ SPORTS COMPLEX

25,300
Sibuco

Mariki

VANUATU FIJI

FIJI
SUVA

Ongoing Emergencies
Myanmar: Rakhine State. ) Niue (N.Z.) ) Myanmar: Kachin State.
Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), GDACS, PDC, Unisys. Precipitation forecast: The International Research Institute for Climate and Society - Aug 2013 Forecast for the Sep-Oct-Dec season

Grande Santa Cruz

Zamboanga City

1,000

km

Map Doc Name: OCHA_ROAP_Sitmap_130916 GLIDE number(s) FL-2013-000111-VNM

AUSTRALIA

New Caledonia OCHA Office or Presence


! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Flooded Areas Tropical Cyclone Path

TONGA

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

Creation date: 03 October 2013

Sources: DSWD IX, NDRRMC, OCD 9, Protection Cluster, GADM, Feedback: ochaphilippines@un.org

Disclaimers: The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

MYITKYINA

Historical Climate/Storm Maps show the historical monthly precipitation as well as historical storm tracks (1956-2009). There are maps for each month as well as maps for the Bay of Bengal, Northwest Pacic, and South Pacic basins.

Historical Monthly Data on Average Precipitation and Tropical Storms


Ir tysh
A

Average monthly precipitation and all tropical storms recorded for the month between 1956 and 2009
Ob
Ye n isey
A n gar

JANUARY
Historical Average Monthly Precipitation (mm) - WORLDCLIM Below 10 100 - 150 150 - 200 200 - 250 250 - 300 Above 300 10 - 25 25 - 50 50 - 75

ur

S yr

MONGOLIA
D a rya
g
uan
e H

A m u D a rya
us
In d

DPR KOREA

75 - 100

Jammu & Kashmir Aksai Chin CHINA

All tropical storms recorded from 1956 to 2009 - UNISYS

RO KOREA
Yan g tze

Tropical Depression

B ra hmapu t r a

Arunashal Pradesh

JAPAN

Tropical Storm Category 1 Category 2 Category 3

NEPAL INDIA
G ange s

BHUTAN
Xi Jia

BANGLADESH

ng

Category 4 Category 5

MYANMAR
Irrawaddy

LAO PDR

THAILAND

VIET NAM

PHILIPPINES

CAMBODIA

SRI LANKA BRUNEI DARUSSALAM M A L AY S I A MALDIVES SINGAPORE

PALAU MICRONESIA (FSO)

Map Doc Name: OCHA_ROAP_Monthly_Climate_JAN_v3_110519 GLIDE Number: n/a Creation Date: 19 May 2011 Projection/Datum: Behrmann Web Resources: http://ochaonline.un.org/roap Nominal scale at A4 1:42,000,000 0 750 Kilometers Map data source(s): WOLRDCLIM, UNISYS, UN Cartographic Section, Global Discovery Disclaimers: The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. 1,500

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

SOLOMON ISLANDS

TIMOR-LESTE
Dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the parties.

Cocos (Keeling) islands (Aus.)

A Humanitarian Snapshot map is a full-page visual of key thematic issues and trends related to a specic crisis. It uses georeferenced information and narrative summaries to provide context and insight to the causes and trends of an emergency.
MYANMAR

HUMANITARIAN CROSS-LINE MISSION TO KACHIN STATE, (7-10 September, 2013)


KEY FIGURES - KACHIN STATE AND NORTHERN SHAN STATE IDPs REACHED IN CONFLICT AREAS BY CONVOYS (2012-2013)
6,490 6,445 4,809

Myitkyina

Myitkyina
Waingmaw Mogaung OVERVIEW Waingmaw

x11 KACHIN STATE

Momauk

Laiza No. 3 Market Je Yang Hpun Lum Yang

Woi Chyai Camp


4,300 IDPs

MYANMAR

CHINA

State Capital Township

BHAMO

IDP Camp

The ROAP map collection can be accessed through the following: OCHA-ROAP website: www.unocha.org/roap Reliefweb: www.reliefweb.int OCHA intranet (OCHAnet): http://ochanet.unocha.org/OS/Regional_Offices/Asia_Pacic

For more information please contact: John Marinos - marinosj@un.org

Creation date: 22 Oct 2013 Feedback: ocha-roap@un.org www.unocha.org/roap The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

SO UTHER N CHIM BU EAST ERN HIG HLA NDS Lae HIG HLA NDS

Goroka

WEST NEW BRITAIN

# Kimbe# Karai # EAST Pago NEW BRITAIN


! !

Solomon Sea

Reference Map

Mongolia

O'mnogovi

Long Island

R U S S I A N

Bamus

BO UG AINV ILL E
! !

MA DANG

# Karkar
! !

Madang

Lolobau

# # Ulawun #
!

# Bam
! ! !

Bismarck Sea

WEST SEPIK

Regional Hazard Maps highlighting areas and populations at risk to a variety of natural hazards. There are maps on earthquakes, tropical storms, volcanoes, ooding, drought, wild res, as well as maps for multi-hazard analysis. Man-made or complex emergencies are represented through maps showing IDP and refugee populations in the region.

Country Hazard Maps PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Natural Hazard Risks show hazard risk from earthquakes, tropical storms and volcanoes on the main map panel. An inset graph represents the area of the country affected by varying levels of risk from seven natural hazards including tsunamis, storm surge, ooding and drought. Maps are available for the 12 ROAP Focus Countries.
Seismic, Volcanic and Tropical Storm Risk All Natural Hazard Risks
Legend

The bar chart shows the degree of exposure to natural hazards and the percentage of area affected (per country). Tsunami and storm surges are a threat to coastal regions, particularly gulfs, bays, and estuaries. The flood hazard results from river floods and torrential rain. The hazard of dryness and drought is caused by major deviations from the normal amounts of precipitation. The frost hazard depends on the elevation and the latitude.

\ ! !

OCHA office or presence

\ Country capital ! \ !

! ( Major town or city # Holocene volcano


!

Tsunami Hazards
!

Storm surge Tsunami Tsunami and Storm surge International boundary Province boundary

MA NUS # St. Andrew Strait

NEW IREL AND


! ! ! ! !

# Rabaul

Rabaul

(c) 2009, Munich Reinsurance Company, Munich Re Geo Risks Research Department
! !
! !

Earthquake Intensity Modified Mercalli Scale Degree I-V Degree VI Degree VII Degree VIII Degree IX-XII Tropical Storm Intensity Saffir-Simpson Scale One: 118-153 kmh Two: 154-177 kmh Three: 178-209 kmh Four: 210-249 kmh Five: 250+ kmh

Map Doc Name: OCHA_PNG_Hazard_v5_130507 7 May, 2013 Creation Date: Behrmann/WGS84 Projection/Datum: Web Resources: http://ochaonline.un.org/roap
0 150 Kilometers 300

# Bagana

SOLOMON ISLANDS
! !
! ! !

Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Global Discovery, PNG National Statistical Office, Smithsonian Institute, Pacific Disaster Center, UNISYS, Munich Reinsurance Group
!

Honiara
!
! ! ! ! !

\ !

Disclaimers: The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.
! ! ! ! !

!
! ! !

! !

! ! ! ! ! !
! !

\ !

Legend
! ^
F E D E R A T I O N
!

Capital City Cities Major Roads Aimag Boundaries Soum Boundaries Rivers
! (

! ^

ULAANBAATAR
Xentii

Su'xbaatar

Dornogovi

100 Kilometers

200

! ^ ! ^

Taluksangay National High School

9,000 - 10,000

The situation in Zamboanga city and Basilan province, southern Philippines, and its surrounding areas is now a humanitarian crisis with an estimated 170,000 people affected. The violence has left approximately 208 people dead, with tens of thousands affected and over 10,000 homes destroyed. Continued humanitarian assistance is required to help these most vulnerable people. ZAMBOANGA AND BASILAN EMERGENCY KEY FIGURES

! ^

170,000
people affected

Mampang Elementary School


Mampang

125,400
people displaced houses burned

10,160 47

evacuation centers

Tigtabon

Evacuation Centres Total IDPs < 1,000


xxxx

Airport Community Hall Mosque

> 1,000

Conflict Areas Houses Burned


http://philippines.humanitarianresponse.org www.unocha.org www.reliefweb.int

School Sports Stadium

Chipwi

100,000
displaced

91,000
registered IDPs A 11-truck humanitarian convoy led by the UN and other humanitarian partners delivered food, medicines, and other items to displaced communities living in the Woi Chyai Camp in Laiza town. Significantly, this is the first time that cross-line missions have been permitted to deliver humanitarian assistance to Laiza since December 2011. These missions supplement the aid delivered on a regular basis by local NGOs. The conflict in Kachin and northern Shan State has displaced an estimated 100,000 people. The number of registered IDPs staying in camps in these areas has reached more than 91,000 including over 53,000 in areas beyond the Governments control. Since the beginning of the conflict in 2011, cross-line missions were conducted to border areas, covering only approximately 20 per cent (some 10,000 IDPs) of the total caseload in areas beyond Government control. Full and sustained access to all displaced locations is essential to provide assistance to all people in need.

4,430 3,500

4,300

4 2
Mar

1
1,533

1
Sep

1
Apr

2012

Jun

Jul

Feb

Jun

2013

Number of convoys

Mek
on g Salw ee n

KACHIN STATE AND NORTHERN SHAN STATE IDP FIGURES

38,000 IDPs 53,000


Government areas Areas beyond Government control

THE KACHIN RESPONSE PLAN FUNDING UPDATE

50.9m
required
In US$

36.8m
gap

14.1m
funded

27

Natural Hazard Risk in Asia-Pacific

Natural Hazard Risk in Asia-Pacific


Natural Hazard Risk
MO NGO LIA

Earthquake Intensity
(Modified Mercalli Scale)
Degree I-V Degree VI Degree VII Degree VIII Degree IX-XII Insufficient data

This map shows area of risk from earthquake activity, volcanic eruptions and tropical storms according to established risk scales.
DPR KOREA JAPAN

JAMMU & KASHMIR AKSAI CHIN

RO KOREA CHINA

NEPAL

ARUNASHAL PRADESH

BHUTAN

Earthquake intensity risk is shown using the 1956 version of the Modified Mercalli Scale (MM), describing the effects of an earthquake on the surface of the earth. The zones indicate where there is a probability of 20% that degrees of intensity shown on the map will be exceeded in 50 years. Pacific islands and countries too small to be easily visible are represented by boxes giving an approximate level of equivalent risk based on data from Munich Reinsurance Company's NATHAN system. Tropical storm risk is taken from the Munich Reinsurance Company's World Map of Natural Hazards and shows tropical storm intensity based on the five wind speeds of the SaffirSimpson Hurricane Scale. The zones indicate where there is a 10% probability of a storm of this intensity striking in the next 10 years. Volcanic risk is indicated by the locations of Holocene volcanoes, defined as having shown activity within the past 11,500 years approximately, up to 2002.
MARSHALL ISLANDS

Tropical Storm Intensity


(Saffir-Simpson Scale)
One: 118-153 kmh Two: 154-177 kmh Three: 178-209 kmh Four: 210-249 kmh Five: 250+ kmh Holocene Volcano

BANGLADESH IN DIA MYANMAR LAO PDR PHILIPPINES Northern Mariana Islands (U.S.) Guam (U.S.)

THAILAND

VIET NAM CAMBODIA

Country Naming Convention


UN MEMBER STATE Territory or Associated State
DISPUTED TERRITORY

SRI LANKA MALDIVES BRUNEI DARUSSALAM M A L A Y S I A SINGAPORE

PALAU

MICRONESIA (FSO)

Pacific Ocean
NAURU

0 K I R I B A T I Kilometers

2,000

Indian Ocean
I N D O N E S I A PAPUA NEW GUINEA

TUVALU SOLOMON ISLANDS Wallis and Futuna (Fra.) Tokelau (N.Z.) SAMOA American Samoa (U.S.) French Polynesia (Fra.) Niue (N.Z.) TONGA Cook Islands (N.Z.)

Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Pacific Disaster Center (PDC), Natural Hazard Assessment Network (N ATHAN) by the Munich Reinsurance Company (Munich Re.), UNISYS, Smithsonian Institute, UNEP/GRID Disclaimers: The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

TIMOR-LESTE Christmas Island (Aus.) Cocos (Keeling) islands (Aus.)

VANUATU

FIJI New Caledonia (Fra.)

A UST RA LIA Norfolk Island (Aus.)

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Regional Office for Asia Pacific (ROAP) Executive Suite, 2nd Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Ave, Bangkok 10200, Thaniland

NEW ZEALAND

Storm Seasons in the Asia-Pacific


The graph below was created by calculating the historical storm activity for each region and for each month as a percentage of the total for that region. For example approximately 25% of all storm activity in the South Pacic occurred in February, while nearly 0% took place in August and September.

Storm season in the South Pacic runs from November to April. February is the peak month for storm activity. Storm season in the Eastern Indian Ocean/Bay of Bengal runs from September to May. January is the peak month for storm activity. Storm season in the Northwest Pacic runs from June to December. August is the peak month for storm activity.

Bay of Bengal

North West Pacific

Eastern Indian Ocean South Pacific

25%

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb
25% Peak storm activity South Pacific

Mar

Apr

May

Percentage of Historical Storm Activity (1956 - 2009)

20%

Peak storm activity 19% NW Pacific

Nor

thWe st Pa cifi
c

Sou
Peak storm activity Bay of Bengal 18%

15%

th P a

cifi

fB yo Ba

10%

g en

al

Less than 5% of historical storms

Data Source: UNISYS Storm tracks 1956-2009

Human Footprint in Asia-Pacific Human Footprint in Asia-Pacific


The Human Footprint
KAZAKHSTAN MONGOLIA

Human Foot Print Index


0 1 - 10 10 - 20 20 - 30 30 - 40 40 - 60 60 - 80 80 - 100

KYRGYZSTAN TAJIKISTAN DPR KOREA


JAMMU & KASHMIR AKSAI CHIN

JAPAN

RO KOREA CHINA

Pacific Ocean

Human influence on the earths land surface is a global driver of ecological processes on the planet, on par with climatic trends, geological forces and astronomical variations. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University joined together to systematically map and measure the human influence on the earths land surface today. The analysis indicates that 83% of the earth's land surface is influenced directly by human beings, whether through human land uses, human access from roads, railways or major rivers, electrical infrastructure (indicated by lights detected at night), or direct occupancy by human beings at densities above 1 person per km 2. The authours refer to the human influence on the lands surface measure as the "Human Footprint."

PAKISTAN NEPAL BHUTAN

ARUNASHAL PRADESH

BANGLADESH INDIA MYANMAR LAO PDR

UN MEMBER STATE Territory or Associated State


DISPUTED TERRITORY

Country Naming Convention

THAILAND CAMBODIA VIET NAM SRI LANKA

Northern Mariana Islands (U.S.) PHILIPPINES Guam (U.S.)

0 Kilometers

2,000

PALAU BRUNEI DARUSSALAM M A L A Y S I A SINGAPORE

MARSHALL ISLANDS MICRONESIA (FSO)

Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Wildlife Conservation Society, Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) Disclaimers: The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

K NAURU

MALDIVES I N D O N E S I A PAPUA NEW GUINEA TIMOR-LESTE Christmas Island (Aus.) Cocos (Keeling) islands (Aus.)

SOLOMON ISLANDS

TUVALU Tokelau (N.Z.) Wallis and Futuna (Fra.) SAMOA American Samoa (U.S.) FIJI Niue (N.Z.) French Polynesia (Fra.) Cook Islands (N.Z.)

Indian Ocean

VANUATU

New Caledonia (Fra.) AUSTRALIA

TONGA

United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Regional Office for Asia Pacific (ROAP) Executive Suite, 2nd Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Ave, Bangkok 10200, Thaniland

Norfolk Island (Aus.)

NEW ZEALAND NEW ZEALAND NEW ZEALAND

Regional Partnerships: ASEAN, SAARC and SPC Regional Partnerships: ASEAN, SAARC

and SPC
Regional Partnerships
The Asia-Pacific region contains a diverse array of cultures, environments, and societies. One of the fastest growing economic regions in the world, it is also the most disaster-prone. While natural disasters affect the region frequently, as this region continues along its path of development, regional partnerships will be essential in developing the capacities of countries to reduce risk and vulnerability, and to respond to disasters. Key partnerships: South Asia Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)

Country Naming Convention


UN MEMBER STATE Territory or Associated State
DISPUTED TERRITORY

MONGOLIA
Jammu & Kashmir

DPR KOREA
Aksai Chin Arunashal Pradesh

0 Kilometers

2,000

CHINA

AFGHANISTAN PAKISTAN

RO KOREA

JAPAN

NEPAL INDIA

Map data source(s): UN Cartographic Section, Food and Agriculture (FAO), Global Discovery Disclaimers: The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

BHUTAN

P a c i f i c

O c e a n

BANGLADESH MYANMAR LAO PDR Northern Mariana Islands (U.S.) Guam (U.S.) MARSHALL ISLANDS PALAU MICRONESIA (FEDERATED STATES OF)

SAARC
SRI LANKA MALDIVES

THAILAND

VIET NAM PHILIPPINES

CAMBODIA BRUNEI DARUSSALAM M A L AY S I A SINGAPORE

I N D O N E S I A

NAURU PAPUA NEW GUINEA SOLOMON ISLANDS TUVALU

K I R I B A T I

ASEAN
I n d i a n O c e a n

TIMOR-LESTE

Tokelau (N.Z.) Wallis & Futunu (Fra.)SAMOA FIJI American Cook Samoa (U.S.) Islands (N.Z.) French Polynesia (Fra.) Niue (N.Z.) TONGA Pitcairn (U.K.)
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian affairs (OCHA) Regional Office for Asia Pacific (ROAP) Executive Suite, 2nd Floor, UNCC Building, Rajdamnern Nok Ave, Bangkok 10200, Thailand http://www.unocha.org/roap

VANUATU

AUSTRALIA

New Caledonia (Fra.)

SPC
NEW ZEALAND

The Philippines: Zamboanga Humanitarian Snapshot (as of 3 October, 2013)


BACKGROUND
Salaan

Lunzuran Boalan

Taluksangay

Taluksangay National High School

9,000 - 10,000

Pasonanca

Tumaga Zambowood

The situation in Zamboanga city and Basilan province, southern Philippines, and its surrounding areas is now a humanitarian crisis with an estimated 170,000 people affected. The violence has left approximately 208 people dead, with tens of thousands affected and over 10,000 homes destroyed. Continued humanitarian assistance is required to help these most vulnerable people. ZAMBOANGA AND BASILAN EMERGENCY KEY FIGURES

Santa Maria Elementary School 1,000 - 2,000


Santa Maria Tetuan

Putik
Arena Blanco

Cawa-cawa Shoreline Cluster

Al-jahra Mosque Tumaga 1,000 - 2,000

170,000
people affected

Zamboanga City 2,000 - 3,000 National High School


1,000 - 2,000

3,000 - 4,000

Zone III

3,000 - 4,000 Tetuan Central School


Kasanyangan Santa Barbara Santa Catalina Rio Hondo

Mampang Elementary School


Mampang

125,400
people displaced houses burned

Zone I Cawa-cawa Shoreline

3,000 - 4,000
Talon-Talon National High School
Talon-Talon

10,160 47

JOAQUIN ENRIQUEZ SPORTS COMPLEX

25,300
Sibuco

Mariki

evacuation centers

Tigtabon

Evacuation Centres Total IDPs < 1,000


xxxx

Airport Community Hall Mosque

Grande Santa Cruz

Zamboanga City

> 1,000

Conflict Areas Houses Burned


The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

School Sports Stadium

Creation date: 03 October 2013

Sources: DSWD IX, NDRRMC, OCD 9, Protection Cluster, GADM

Feedback: ochaphilippines@un.org

http://philippines.humanitarianresponse.org

www.unocha.org

www.reliefweb.int

HUMANITARIAN CROSS-LINE MISSION TO KACHIN STATE, (7-10 September, 2013)


KEY FIGURES - KACHIN STATE AND NORTHERN SHAN STATE IDPs REACHED IN CONFLICT AREAS BY CONVOYS (2012-2013)
6,490 6,445 4,809

Myitkyina

100,000
displaced

Myitkyina
Waingmaw Mogaung OVERVIEW Waingmaw

91,000
registered IDPs A 11-truck humanitarian convoy led by the UN and other humanitarian partners delivered food, medicines, and other items to displaced communities living in the Woi Chyai Camp in Laiza town. Significantly, this is the first time that cross-line missions have been permitted to deliver humanitarian assistance to Laiza since December 2011. These missions supplement the aid delivered on a regular basis by local NGOs. The conflict in Kachin and northern Shan State has displaced an estimated 100,000 people. The number of registered IDPs staying in camps in these areas has reached more than 91,000 including over 53,000 in areas beyond the Governments control. Since the beginning of the conflict in 2011, cross-line missions were conducted to border areas, covering only approximately 20 per cent (some 10,000 IDPs) of the total caseload in areas beyond Government control. Full and sustained access to all displaced locations is essential to provide assistance to all people in need.

4,430 3,500

4,300

4 2
Mar

1
1,533

1
Sep

1
Apr

2012

Jun

Jul

Feb

Jun

2013

Number of convoys

x11 KACHIN STATE

KACHIN STATE AND NORTHERN SHAN STATE IDP FIGURES

38,000 IDPs 53,000


Government areas Areas beyond Government control

Momauk

Laiza No. 3 Market Je Yang Hpun Lum Yang

Woi Chyai Camp


4,300 IDPs

THE KACHIN RESPONSE PLAN FUNDING UPDATE

MYANMAR

CHINA

50.9m
required
In US$

36.8m
gap

State Capital Township IDP Camp

14.1m
funded

BHAMO

Cambodia: Flooding

(as of 18 October 2011)

In the worst flooding since 2000, heavy monsoon rains and a series of tropical storms caused extensive flooding across Southeast Asia, affecting 18 of Cambodia's 24 provinces.
LAO PDR THAILAND

Otdar Meanchey Preah Vihear Banteay Meanchey Siem Reap Stung Treng Ratanak Kiri

247 1 million 46,403


killed

affected

households displaced

Pailin Battambang Pursat Kampong Chhnang Kampong Speu

Kampong Thom Kratie Mondul Kiri

Normal pattern of flooding in Cambodia


In the wet season (May to Oct), water from the Mekong causes the Tonle Sap to reverse flow, expanding the lake to six times its dry season size

Kampong Cham

Koh Kong

Phnom Penh

Prey Veng Kandal Svay Rieng

In the dry season (Nov to Apr), water from the Tonle Sap flows south and joins with the Mekong at Phnom Penh.

VIETNAM

Takeo Kampot Preah Sihanouk Kep

Extent of lakes and rivers during dry season (Nov to Apr) Extent of lake during normal wet season (May to Oct) Estimated extent of 2011 floods
Water levels and the Mekong and rivers throughout Cambodia are monitored by the Mekong River Commission (http://ffw.mrcmekong.org/) and the Cambodian Department of Hydrology and River Works (http://www.dhrw-cam.org/) 30 July. Tropical Storm Nok Ten crosses Viet Nam and Lao PDR 25 Sep. Mekong reaches flood state at Tan Chau 10 Oct. 3 flood stations are close to record levels reached in 2000

Chronology of the emergency

J u ly

Aug

Se pt

Oc t

EK

ONG

Lake To n l e S a p

Contributions Guide: How To Give to OCHA

OCHAs mandate
The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) thanks you for your interest in assisting the victims of emergencies all over the world.

OCHAs mission is to alleviate human suffering in disasters and emergencies; advocate the rights of people in need; promote preparedness and prevention; and facilitate sustainable solutions.
OCHA is a department of the United Nations Secretariat, and is responsible for ensuring a coordinated, timely and effective international response in support of Government-led humanitarian relief efforts in natural disasters and other crises. OCHA has specific responsibility for ensuring effective field-level coordination, provision of information management services in support of humanitarian action, management of pooled funding mechanisms to ensure fast and flexible humanitarian financing, advocacy for affected populations and standard-setting and normative development for enhanced humanitarian response. OCHA is also mandated to mobilize resources on behalf of the international aid community (United Nations and international non-governmental organizations).

Donations to OCHA
Give to OCHA OCHA is mandated to mobilize resources on behalf of the international aid community (United Nations and international NGOs) and relies on voluntary contributions for 95 per cent of its budgetary requirements. The organization gladly accepts donations from governments, individuals and corporations. If you want to make a direct contribution to support OCHAs coordination, information management, humanitarian financing, advocacy and policy development work, please contact OCHAs Donor Relations Section for bank details at donateOCHA@un.org. For more information about OCHAs work in Asia-Pacific, please visit www.unocha.org/roap. Please make cheques payable to United Nations and indicate in the bottom left-hand corner that it is for OCHA unearmarked. You can also insert a crisis of choice, e.g. OCHA Myanmar. Mail to: UN-OCHA, Donor Relations Section, Room S12, Palais des Nations, 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland.

Visibility for Contributions


OCHA maintains the Financial Tracking Service (FTS). FTS is a global database that records all international humanitarian contributions (both cash and in-kind) to emergencies. This funding information is displaced in real time on the website: http://fts.unocha.org

Contacting OCHA
Please contact: UN-OCHA, Donor Relations Section, Room S12, Palais des Nations, 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland. Telephone: +41 22 917 1690 and email: unas@un.org.

For more information on OCHA, please visit www.unocha.org/roap


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Responding in a Changing World - OCHA makes your aid more effective

OCHA makes emergency response quicker, more predictable and more equitable

In 2013, we will continue to coordinate response, mobilize resources for the humanitarian system through international appeals, manage rapid-response funds, speak out for people in need, vigorously defend humanitarian principles, negotiate access to those in need, and provide critical information and analysis as crises unfold.

OCHA continues to strive to manage and deliver its services more effectively

Having taken steps to rationalize our field presence and build a sustainable budget, OCHA will strive to improve the delivery of our core services in 2013, according to our 2010-2013 Strategic Framework goals, including strengthening OCHA performance management and administration, maintaining a more flexible structure and improving field leadership.

OCHA adds value to every humanitarian dollar spent

We are small and cost effective. At a time of economic austerity, our services help your humanitarian funds go further and faster. We help you make better decisions by providing you with the most strategic and timely information on needs, priorities and gaps that will help save lives and reduce vulnerability.

OCHA provides strong leadership in humanitarian affairs

Through the Emergency Relief Coordinator role and a stronger process at the country level, OCHA provides valuable leadership and facilitates coordination to ensure the humanitarian community delivers predictable and needs-driven emergency assistance and engages in pro-active preparedness.

OCHA speaks out on behalf of people affected by conflict and disaster so that their rights are respected and their needs met
To ensure aid reaches whoever needs it most, OCHAs neutral role allows us to speak out publicly when necessary, but also behind the scenes. This includes negotiating with parties on issues such as access, or protection of civilians and aid workers, and promoting core humanitarian principles.

OCHA sets a clear and principled humanitarian policy agenda

OCHA sets an evidence-based policy agenda to identify emerging trends and to guide the international community in developing common policy and advocacy positions, based on humanitarian principles. In 2013, our policy guidance will continue to help the humanitarian system evolve and adapt more proactively to the changing environment.

OCHA is an increasingly important humanitarian fund manager

More than 140 Member States rely on OCHA to manage their humanitarian donations and make sure that relief or protection reaches people when they most need it. We help funds reach priority aid programmes in a timely and fair way, and coordinate appeals and common plans to ensure the greatest impact possible.

OCHA services are a low-cost investment in improved humanitarian action

In 2012, OCHA coordinated US$8.78 billion of humanitarian programming to assist 54 million people affected by the worlds worst humanitarian crises.
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OCHA's Strategic Framework for 2010-2013 has 3 Goals and 11 Objectives:


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1: A more enabling environment for humanitarian action

3: Strengthened OCHA management and administration

To meet these challenges OCHA:


Has 1,876 staff: 43 per cent in West, Central and Southern Africa 18 per cent in the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia 8 per cent in Latin America and the Caribbean 7 per cent in Asia and the Pacific 13 per cent in Geneva 11 per cent in New York Supporting: 22 Humanitarian Coordinators A wide range of humanitarian organizations working through the cluster system Governments of countries affected by disasters and crises Works out of: 22 Country Offices 5 Regional Offices 3 Sub-Regional Offices 14 Humanitarian Support Units Headquarters in New York and Geneva

In 2011 OCHA will cost US$250 million, million, of which must be raised from In 2013, OCHA will cost US$270.5 of $208 whichmillion $255.9 million voluntary contributions must be raised from voluntary contributions.
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2: A more effective humanitarian coordination system

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Financial Tracking Service

http://fts.unocha.org/
FTS provides an overview of humanitarian contributions to emergencies by recording cash and in-kind assistance from all sources of funding.

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Financial Tracking Service (FTS) is a global, real-time database recording all reported international humanitarian aid since 1992.
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FUNDING STATUS OF APPEALS FTS provides details of each inter-agency appeal, showing funding needs, response to date and remaining gaps.

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FUNDING BY COUNTRY FTS provides detailed humanitarian funding information for any country in the world.

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GLOBAL OVERVIEW TABLES Global overview tables provide summary reports of worldwide funding by donor, recipient organisation, emergency and sector. CUSTOM SEARCH A custom search enables users to refine queries and export data to an Excel file for easy download. Queries can also be saved and exported as RSS and XML feeds.

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QUICK SEARCH BY DONOR AND DESTINATION COUNTRY This simple search will show all contributions by the donor and/or to the destination country that you select, for the current and previous years. TREND ANALYSIS Funding trends allow users to analyse donor behaviour over time.

We need your reports


FTS can only record contributions that are reported to it. Up-to-date, accurate information makes FTS a powerful coordination tool that provides all stakeholders with an overview of humanitarian action, funding gaps and priorities in each emergency.

DONATE NOW Help make a difference by donating to the Central Emergency Response Fund.

To report contributions, e-mail: fts@un.org


Website: http://fts.unocha.org Website: http://fts.unocha.org

Creation date: date: 9 20 Oct 2013 Creation Feb 2011

Feedback:fts@un.org fts@un.org Feedback:

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.