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Getting It RightPaying for Performance

Through Variable Pay


Ken Abosch
Marilu Malague
Your Presenter(s)
Ken Abosch, Lincolnshire Office
847.442.3580
ken.abosch@hewitt.com
Marilu Malague, Woodlands Office
281.882.6268
marilu.malague@hewitt.com
Bottom Line on Top
Variable pay has become the primary
mechanism to pay for performance today
There are sub-optimal practices that
are inhibiting the effectiveness of
variable pay plans
Now is the time to Get it Right!
Road Map for Todays Discussion
Variable Pays Role in Pay for
Performance Today
Learning From Our Mistakes
Getting it Right:
Criteria and Tools
Your Questions!
Sources of Information
Variable Compensation
Measurement
Broad-based plans
Created in 1996
More than 380 cash
variable pay plans
300 companies
1.9M employees
Plan characteristic driven
database
Prevalence
Effectiveness
Hewitt Salary Increase
Survey
Created in 1976
Fortune 1000 companies
1,156 companies in 2009
Merit/overall salary
increases
Salary structure movement
Variable compensation
Special topics
Variable Pays Role in
Pay for Performance Today
Use of Variable Pay
47%
70%
88%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
20 Years Ago 10 Years Ago Today
Percent of Companies With a Variable Pay Plan
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 19902009
Participation in Variable Compensation
74%
41%
81%
52%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
10 Years Ago Today
Prevalence in Variable Pay Plans By Employee Group
Salaried Exempt Salaried Nonexempt
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 19902009
Increasing Line of Sight
35% 35%
13%
45%
53%
28%
20%
38%
64%
18%
10%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
20 Years Ago 10 Years Ago Today
Focus of Variable Pay Plans Based on Plan Type
Individual Performance Plans Business Incentives
Cash Profit Sharing Gainsharing
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 19902009
Growing Role of Individual Performance
17%
36%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
10 Years Ago Today
Inclusion of Individual Performance in Variable Pay Metrics
Source: Hewitt Variable Compensation Measurement

(VCM) database 20002009
Budgeted Spending: Base Salary Increases
in Decline
5.5% 5.4%
4.2%
3.9%
2.5% 2.5%
0%
1%
2%
3%
4%
5%
6%
7%
8%
9%
10%
20 Years Ago 10 Years Ago Today
Percent of Payroll
Salaried Exempt Salaried Nonexempt
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 19902009
Budgeted Spending: Variable Compensation
on the Rise
4.0%
3.0%
9.6%
5.0%
12.0%
6.5%
0%
1%
2%
3%
4%
5%
6%
7%
8%
9%
10%
20 Years Ago 10 Years Ago Today
Percent of Payroll
Salaried Exempt Salaried Nonexempt
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 19902009
Projecting Future Budgeting
2.5%
11.8%
2.0%
16.0%
0%
2%
4%
6%
8%
10%
12%
14%
16%
18%
20%
Today 10 Years From Now
Percent of Payroll
Base Salary Increase Budget Variable Pay Budget
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 20092010
Focus on Total Cash to Attract/Retain Talent
Salary Level
$50,000 $100,000 $250,000
C
o
m
p
e
n
s
a
t
i
o
n
Talent Risk Zone
Total Cash
Base Salary
Variable Pay Has Become a Global
Phenomenon
0 20 40 60 80 100
Source: Hewitt Salary Increase Survey 20072008
United States
Canada
Venezuela
Puerto Rico
Mexico
Chile
Brazil
Argentina
United Kingdom
Switzerland
Sweden
Spain
Netherlands
Italy
Hungary
Germany
Belgium
Austria
Thailand
Taiwan
Singapore
Philippines
Malaysia
Korea
Japan
India
Hong Kong
China
Australia
Why the Dramatic Shift to Variable Pay
Fixed vs. variable costs
Need to focus and drive behaviors
Need to create alignment
Perceived control
Shareholders/analysts value it
Learning From Our Mistakes
Plan Weights
Employee With
$50,000 Salary
(5% Bonus Target)
Corporate 50%
Net Income 25% $625
Revenue 25% $625
Business Unit 20%
Cash Flow 10% $250
Revenue 5% $125
Quality 2.5% $62.50
On-Time Delivery 2.5% $62.50
Department 20%
Safety 10% $125
Attendance 10% $125
Individual 10%
Attendance 2% $50
Project Completion 3% $75
Idea Creation 5% $125
100% $2,500

Learning From Our Mistakes
Learning From Our Mistakes
Salary
Increases
Annual
Bonus
Special
Recognition
Executives X X
Directors X X
Managers X X
High-Level
Exempt
X X
Other Exempt X X
Nonexempt X X
Learning From Our Mistakes
$1.0M

$1.5M

$3.0M

$6.5M
Maximum
Target
Threshold
Funding
Funding Gap
Funding Required by Plan
Actual Available Funding
Learning From Our Mistakes
Corporate
Results
X X X X X
Business
Unit Results
Department
Results
Individual
Results
X
Non-

exempts
Entry
Exempts
Managers Directors Executives
Learning From Our Mistakes
Distribution of Total Payout as % of Target
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
0
%
-
7
0
%
7
0
%
-
7
5
%
7
5
%
-
8
0
%
8
0
%
-
8
5
%
8
5
%
-
9
0
%
9
0
%
-
9
5
%
9
5
%
-
1
0
0
%
1
0
0
%
-
1
0
5
%
1
0
5
%
-
1
1
0
%
1
1
0
%
-
1
1
5
%
1
1
5
%
-
1
2
0
%
1
2
0
%
-
1
2
5
%
1
2
5
%
-
1
3
0
%
1
3
0
%
-
1
3
5
%
>
1
3
5
%
Total Payout as % of Target
#

o
f

I
n
c
u
m
b
e
n
t
s
Company Perf as % of Goal
Learning From Our Mistakes
2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009
Business Performance
Bonus Payout
Learning From Our Mistakes
Percent of Goal vs Percent of Total Target Incentive
R
2
= 0.1331
70%
90%
110%
130%
150%
170%
190%
50% 70% 90% 110% 130% 150% 170% 190% 210% 230% 250%
% of Goal
%

o
f

T
a
r
g
e
t

I
n
c
e
n
t
i
v
e
Salary to Midpoint Comparison Bonus Payout Calculation
Learning From Our Mistakes
Grade

Midpoint
Employee
Salary
$5,000
Less
Salary
Over
Midpoint
Calculated

Bonus

Payment
$10,000
$5,000
$5,000
Actual

Bonus
Paid
=
Learning From Our Mistakes
Participation Requirements
No formal requirements to participate
Communication
Year-end pay statement left on desk
Plan Administration
Payout 5 months after close of year
Create focus
on required
results
Share in
successes
and failures
Facilitate
ideas
and
improvements
Motivate
desirable
behaviors
Improve
performance
The
Role of
Variable
Pay
Getting it Right:
Criteria and Tools
Getting It Right!
It has never been more critical to get variable pay
right
Role in pay for performance
Increasing investments
Management expectations
External scrutiny
Getting It Right: Diagnosis and Ongoing
Plan Validation
Common goals with clear linkages
Controllable
Relevant to the Business
As few as possible
As much direct influence on outcomes as possible
Accrued
Reflective of actual results
Increasing
Be as inclusive as possible
Competitive
Appropriate pay at risk given line of sight and role
Minimal performance standards
Reflective of pay philosophy and culture
Balanced between realistic and challenging
Understandable and communicated goals
Goals shared before plan starts
Progress reports
Not overly burdensome
Should include assessment of continuous
improvement
Plan Administration
Communication
Plan Mechanics
Participation Requirements
Targets
Eligibility
Funding
Line of Sight
Measures
Alignment
Getting it Right: Performance Measures
Problem
The current STI was not effectively rewarding for business and
individual performance
Before Program Redesign
Eligibility limited to Directors and above
Program only paid for corporate resultsno consideration for Business
Unit performance
Individual component (10% of base) was not aligned to an appropriate
target, ill defined, subjective, and traditionally always paid
Companys recommendation was to have 4 to 5 measures weighted
at 2.5% to 2%
Annual

STI
Award
+
=
Corporate
Results
Assigned Target
Individual
10% of Base
Getting it Right: Performance Measures
Many alternative design approaches and performance measures considered
Many alternative design approaches and performance measures considered
Additive
Opportunities
(Funding = Sum of Required Payments)
Measure
A
Measure
B
Measure
C
+ +
=
Earned

Award
Measure

A
Measure
B
Measure
C
+ +
=
Earned

Award
Hybrids
(Funding = Sum of Required
Payments Modified by Pool Size)
Multiplicative
Models
(Funding = Sum of Required Payments)
Measure
A
Measure
B
Measure
C
X
=
Earned

Award
X
Measure
A
Measure
B
Measure
C
+
X =
Earned

Award
Modifiers
(Funding = Sum of Required Payments)
Award Pools
(Funding = % of Profit)
Participant A
Participant B
Participant C
Participant D
Discretionary
Plans
(No Specific Funding Mechanism)
Recommendations
Expanded plan eligibility deeper in the organization (all exempt
employees)
Aligned the incentive plan and employees to the business goals
Getting it Right: Performance Measures
Job Level Incentive Target
Incentive Weighting
Individual Modifier Corporate Business Unit
Executives/

Sr. Vice Presidents
40% 100% N/A N/A
Vice Presidents 30% 70% 30% +/-

15%
Directors 20% 50% 50% +/-

25%
Managers 10% 40% 60% +/-

25%
Professionals/

Specialty Roles
5% 30% 70% +/-

35%
X =
Corporate
Results
Business
Unit
Results
+
Individual
Modifier
Annual

STI
Award
Diagnosis and Ongoing Plan Validation:
How One Plan Measured Up
Measures Corporate, 50%
Individual, 50%
Performance measured at Corporate and individual levels
Measures aligned with Plan Objectives
Eligibility Exempt Employees >$60,000 85%
Exempt Employees <$60,000 78%
Funding Performance trigger
High eligibility and high spend
Alignment Consistency in the pay out of awards across all employee levels
Common measure or measures across all eligible employee groups
Line of Sight Primary focus on Corporate Measure
Measures are balanced across all levels (i.e., not too much on Corporate)
Plan Mechanics Relationship between amount of stretch in goal setting and formula parameters is reasonable
Pay out is below target if objectives are not met
Thresholds and maximums are reasonable
Pay outs for key contributors relative to average is 175%
Targets Pay out targets +/- 10% to 15% of market targets
Degree of stretch built into performance target: moderately low stretch
Participation
Requirements
Gate for individual performance
Part-time employees are eligible
Must be employed on the last day of the measurement period
Communications Direct and indirect
Only payout targets and maximum are communicated
Frequency: Quarterly
Plan Administration No process in place to evaluate the plan
Takes 24 person weeks to administer
Incentive Plan Scorecard:

How One Plan Measured Up
Variable Pay Index

Scorecard Score
Maximum
Score
Overall Score Effective Zone 696 1,000
Score
Maximum
Score
1.

Measures Effective Zone 100 150
2.

Eligibility Highly Effective Zone 75 100
3.

Funding Highly Effective Zone 75 100
4.

Alignment Highly Effective Zone 75 100
5.

Line of Sight Effective Zone 50 100
6.

Plan Mechanics Effective Zone 62.5 100
7.

Targets Highly Effective Zone 75 100
8.

Participation Requirements Highly Effective Zone 100 100
9.

Communication Highly Effective Zone 83.5 100
10.

Plan Administration Ineffective Zone 0 50
Diagnosis and Ongoing Plan Validation
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
-2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Measures Eligibility Funding Alignment
Line of Sight Plan Mechanics Targets Participation Requirements
Communication Plan Administration
Measures
Eligibility
Funding Alignment
Line

of
Sight
Plan

Mechanics
Targets
Participation

Requirements
Communication
Plan
Administration
VPI

Scorecard
Highly Effective

Zone
Effective

Zone
Partially
Effective Zone
Ineffective

Zone
Incentive Plan Scorecard
Overall Score Overall Score
Ineffective Zone Partially Effective Effective Zone Highly Effective Companys Score
0249 250499 500749 7501000 696
XYZ Company
0
Ineffective Zone
Partially Effective Zone Effective Zone
Highly Effective Zone
1000
The analysis details each design characteristic through speedometers

that
compares to both best practice, our normative VCM Database, or a

selected
peer group
Getting It Right:
Answering Critical Questions
How does our
annual incentive
plan compare to
best practices?
How can we demonstrate to
our leaders how our plan
supports business
objectives?
How does our
annual incentive
plan compare to
those in my
industry?
How can we
change our annual
incentive plan to
make it more
effective?
What characteristics have
the greatest impact on plan
effectiveness?
Your Questions
Your Presenter(s)
Ken Abosch, Lincolnshire Office
847.442.3580
ken.abosch@hewitt.com
Marilu Malague, Woodlands Office
281.882.6268
marilu.malague@hewitt.com

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