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Instructional Design Project:

A Yearbook Basics Workshop using Adobe InDesign and Photoshop CS6

Daniel Kilback EDTECH 503 (Fall 2012) Submitted to Dr. Yu-Hui Ching December 10, 2012

Table of Contents
Synthesis Reflection................................................................................................................. Part 1 - Topic............................................................................................................................. Part 1a - Stated Learning Goal............................................................................................ Part 1b - Audience............................................................................................................... Part 1c - Rationale............................................................................................................... Part 2 - Analysis Report............................................................................................................ Part 2a - Needs Description................................................................................................ Part 2a1 - Needs Assessment Survey............................................................................ Part 2a2 - Needs Assessment Data Report................................................................... Part 2b - Description of the Learning Context..................................................................... Part 2b1 - Learning Context........................................................................................... Part 2b2 - Transfer Context............................................................................................ Part 2c - Description of Learners......................................................................................... Part 2d - Task Analysis Flow Charts.................................................................................... Part 3 - Planning....................................................................................................................... Part 3a - Learning Objectives.............................................................................................. Part 3b - Objectives and Assessment Matrix Table............................................................. Part 3c - ARCS Table.......................................................................................................... Part 4 - Instructors Guide........................................................................................................ Part 5 - Learner Context........................................................................................................... Part 5a - Learning Materials................................................................................................ Part 5b - Assessment Materials........................................................................................... Part 5c - Technology Tool Justification................................................................................ Part 6 - Formative Evaluation Plan........................................................................................... Part 6a - Formative Review Plan......................................................................................... Part 6b - One-to-One Evaluation......................................................................................... Part 6c - Small Group Evaluation........................................................................................ Part 6d - Field Trial.............................................................................................................. Part 7 - Formative Evaluation Report....................................................................................... Part 7a - Evaluation Survey or Rubric................................................................................. Part 7b - Expert Review Report........................................................................................... Part 7c - Comments on Change.......................................................................................... Part 8 - AECT Standards Grid.................................................................................................. Professional Standards Addressed (AECT)........................................................................ Course Goals and Objectives.............................................................................................. AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503)............................................................. Appendices............................................................................................................................... Appendix A - InDesign Template Checklist... ...................................................................... Appendix B - 4x6 Photoshop Template Checklist................................................................ Appendix C - 3x5 Photoshop Template Checklist............................................................... Appendix D - Yearbook Spread Rubric................................................................................ Appendix E - Past Yearbook Samples................................................................................ 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 8 8 8 8 9 16 16 17 18 20 23 23 24 24 25 25 25 25 26 27 27 28 28 29 29 30 31 33 33 34 35 36 37

Synthesis Paper
In my first discussion post in this course I defined Instructional Design as something that involves the creation of a variety of resources, materials, and assessments meant to coalesce in an engaging, and thoughtful, learning experience. Through my participation in this course, this initial view has remained firm, and when thinking of a real world metaphoric comparison, I arrived quickly at the notion of building a house. This course has culminated in the compilation of a variety of educational artifacts that have come together to form this Instructional Design Project. Much like building a house requires a firm foundation (Instructional Design Project topic), architectural plans (IDP lesson ideas), researching and resourcing materials (ID reading and research), construction (ID project development), and finishing work (compiling the IDP) before someone moves in (putting the plan into action), this project has taken a similar path in its development. Architects consider the needs of the owners when designing a floor plan and look for the most efficient methods to meet these needs. Much like the architect, the Instructional Designer focuses on skill acquisition. During the initial stages of this course, I found myself deep in the dense text of Smith and Ragan and wondered how the educational concepts presented would dovetail and connect to one another during the design process. What I found was that the reading provided rich background knowledge that then made the design process meaningful. It was the act of drilling down from the over arching concepts I wanted students to grasp, into the specific tasks and skills themselves, that crystalized the concept of Instructional Design in my mind. Smith and Ragan noted, When projects become complex, at some point the term planning no longer fits and design becomes a better descriptor (6). This idea moved from being an abstract notion to a profound realization for me, as my experience as an educator had been rooted in individual lesson plans that led to content-based unit plans. The process of breaking down individual tasks and looking at each step of the learning process has caused me to question how I used to plan. Lesson planning is simply the act of filling time with activities to keep students busy, while Instructional Design involves identifying necessary skills and developing activities that will engage students as they acquire and refine these new skills. The process of building a house is not one that can be done in isolation. The best houses result from significant collaboration amongst the architect, the contractor, the builder, and the owner. The process engaged in this course was much the same. Having the opportunity to see other Instructional Design Projects being built, and also to receive feedback on the construction of my own, proved quite valuable. Suggestions to flesh out my objectives, rework my Task Analysis Flow Charts, and develop more specificity in my tasks have resulted in a stronger project. This would not have happened without having had the opportunity to post my work and receive feedback from my instructor and my peers. Moving forward, I believe that the experience of engaging in the development of an Instructional Design project such as this will only make me a more well-rounded educator. Through this course my appreciation for well-designed lessons has evolved, and my understanding of what students need has expanded. In my current role as a High School Assistant Principal I believe that understanding the process of Instructional Design will aid me in planning more effective professional development for my staff, running more clear and concise staff meetings, and make me empathetic to the sheer amount of work that goes into the design of good lessons. Building a perfect house is an endeavor that requires constant revision and reflection. The same holds true for designing a perfect unit for instruction. References Smith, P. L., & Ragan, T. J. (2005). Instructional design (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Keller, J. M. (1987). The systematic process of motivational design. Performance & Instruction, 26 (9/10), 1-8.

Part 1. Topic
1a. Learning Goal After two, one-hour classes, students will create a basic two-page yearbook!spread!using InDesign CS6. Students will place photos, altered using Photoshop CS6, inside the spread and stylize elements of the spread to suit the photos being placed in the InDesign document. 1b. Audience The target group for this instructional design project is a group of 19 High School Juniors who have been pre-enrolled in the HS Yearbook class at ASK. 1c. Rationale Students in the Yearbook class at ASK enter the course with mixed levels of exposure to the complex software they will be using to create our school yearbook. I have chosen to create a series of scaffolded lessons that will assist students in learning the basic interfaces of Adobe InDesign and Photoshop CS6. Additionally, students will acquire fundamental skills related to creating a print-ready document with images they have edited. Understanding how InDesign and Photoshop work together are complex and foundational understandings that yearbook students must effectively grasp. Once students have the ability to edit images and place them in a document that has been properly prepped for print, they can then move toward the more creative task of adding design features to their layouts. This Instructional Design Project focuses on the basic knowledge and experience needed to begin working on building creative yearbook spreads intended for print production. This project contains both supplantive and generative strategies. Approximately 85% of the project would fall under the supplantive strategy as many of the tasks involve a specific goals that must be completed in a limited time (Smith & Ragan, 2005, p. 143). The remaining 15% of the project could aptly be described as generative as students are permitted to make some design choices relating to colour and font selection. The major instructional strategy this project employs can be classified as procedural. This project includes steps that are scaffolded and well organized and intended to be delivered in sequence. Students must follow the complex steps in order to produce a suitable end product. As Smith and Ragan recommend, procedure-based strategies involve requiring the learner to (1) Recognize a situation in which the procedure is applicable, (2) recall the procedure, (3) apply the steps in the procedure, (4) if required, make decisions a the decision points, (5) if required, choose correct branches, (6) complete steps in required branches, (7) ascertain that the procedure has been applied appropriately (Smith & Ragan, 2005, p. 190). The logically developed steps that relate to creating files with specific settings, adjusting images using specific methods, and building frames using precise coordinates and measurements all speak to the procedural nature of the project itself.

Part 2. Analysis Report


2a. Needs Description 2a1. Needs Assessment Survey The following 15 question needs assessment survey was completed in a meeting with the 19 High School Juniors who have been pre-enrolled in ASKs Yearbook class for the 2013-2014 school year.

Needs Assessment Survey


Circle the answer that best applies. 1. Have you ever used Adobe Photoshop? 2. Have you ever used Adobe inDesign? 3. Have you ever exported a document from one file format to another? 4. Are you color blind? 5. Have you ever linked one document to another using hyperlinks? 6. Have you ever created a document and adjusted the preference settings of that document for the purpose of printing? 7. Have you ever edited a photo using some photo editing software? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No

Using a scale of 1 - 5 with 1 being not comfortable at all, and 5 being very comfortable answer the following questions. 8. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to operate a computer. 9. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to follow directions. 10. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to learn manage nested files in a folder. 11. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to learn new software. 12. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe your experience with Mac OS X. 13. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe your attitude toward learning new tech related skills.

Answer the following questions with a list. 14. List the photo-editing software you have used.

15. List the word-processing software you are familiar with.

Part 2. Analysis Report


2a. Needs Description 2a2. Needs Assessment Data Report The survey revealed some excellent information relating to the existing skills of the students who will be involved in this project. All students responded and completed the survey. Of the six rating-scale questions, four were designed to determine the level of the students computer competency while the other two were designed to determine a level of logical thinking. (Of note: the second question dealing with logical thinking used the term nested folders which was unfamiliar to the students. Consequently, in the development of the chart below referencing Logical Thinking, the question was eliminated in the compilation of the results.) Just under 50% of the students rated themselves as being able to follow directions. Most of the students responded with a high level of confidence in their ability to effectively operate a computer, their familiarity with OS X, and with their ability to learn new software. Tech Ability Logical Thinking

4% 25%

5% 9% Not Comfortable Somewhat Comfortable Moderately Comfortable Quite Comfortable Very Comfortable 38% 21% 5% 5%

24% 63%

Experience with Software 8 4 0

Experience with Photo Editing

Color Blind

12 6 Photoshop InDesign 0 Yes No

16 8 0 Yes No

Comfortable Learning New Software (Rating Scale) Comfortable with Mac OS X (Rating Scale) 10 8 6 4 2 0 1 2 6 3 4 5

Needs Assessment Survey - Results


1. Have you ever used Adobe Photoshop? 2. Have you ever used Adobe inDesign? 3. Have you ever exported a document from one file format to another? 4. Are you color blind? 5. Have you ever linked one document to another using hyperlinks? 6. Have you ever created a document and adjusted the preference settings of that document for the purpose of printing? 7. Have you ever edited a photo using some photo editing software? 8. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to operate a computer. 1 (0 Students), 2 (0 Students), 3 (9 Student), 4 (6 Student), 5 (4 Students) 9. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to follow directions. 1 (1 Student), 2 (1 Student), 3 (1 Student), 4 (12 Student), 5 (4 Students) 10. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to learn manage nested files in a folder. 1 (0 Students), 2 (11 Students), 3 (4 Students), 4 (1 Student), 5 (3 Students) 11. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe you ability to learn new software. 1 (1 Student), 2 (3 Students), 3 (10 Students), 4 (2 Students), 5 (3 Students) 12. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe your experience with Mac OS X. 1 (2 Students), 2 (1 Student), 3 (5 Students), 4 (8 Students), 5 (3 Students) 13. On a scale of 1 to 5 describe your attitude toward learning new tech related skills. 1 (0 Students), 2 (3 Students), 3 (5 Students), 4 (2 Students), 5 (9 Students) 14. List the photo-editing software you have used. - Photoshop, Paint, iPhoto, Kid Pix, Pixlr, Instagram, Picasa 15. List the word-processing software you are familiar with. - Word, Google Docs, Pages Yes (8) Yes (3) Yes (10) Yes (1) Yes (7) Yes (2) Yes (15) No (11) No (16) No (9) No (18) No (12) No (17) No (4)

Part 2. Analysis Report


2b. Description of the Learning Context 2b1. Learning Context The Yearbook Basics training seminar will be presented in a computer lab equipped with 20, 20-inch iMacs (2009) with 3.06 Core 2 Duo processors and 4 GB of Ram. These computers have Adobe Creative Suite 6 installed and are connected to the school network via a 2009 Mac XServe. Students have personal accounts and will log into the iMacs and connect to the XServe automatically. Folders for this project will be created in their user profiles managed on the XServe. Consequently, local hard drive space will not be an issue and student folders will be accessible on any of the Macs in our school. Each of these computers is supported with access to our student network 20 MB Fibre internet connection. These 20 iMacs have been designated as student computers. The staff computer is a 27-inch iMac (Late 2009) with 2.8 GHz Intel Core i7 processor and 4 GB Ram. The staff computer is connected to a Hitachi Star Board via HDMI for the purposes of displaying content to the class. Students will also have access to an HP LaserJet Pro CM1415fnw color MFP printer for printing their final spreads. 2b2. Transfer Context Students who complete the Yearbook Basics training correctly will be able to create and print sample yearbook spreads for the yearbook class they will be enrolled in. The initial project in the yearbook class requires students to create sample yearbook spreads, print and display these samples, and then build group consensus with respect to design layout. Having taken this initial training seminar, students will be well-prepared for the initial training and projects being assigned in this class. Additionally, the instruction provides students with the basic training needed to create print-ready documents independently. Students can then transfer these skills and apply them to other content areas when developing projects that involve graphic design elements of graphic design. The skills learned in this training seminar will assist students in presenting their thoughts and ideas in a creative and visual manner. 2c. Description of Learners The learners involved in the Yearbook Basics training session are High School Juniors, ages 16 - 17 years, who have pre-enrolled in the ASK Yearbook class for the fall of 2013. Typically these students enter the class with a minimal amount of exposure to, and experience with, the Adobe Creative Suite platform. This training session has been designed to give students a brief introduction to the software they will be using and will serve as an introduction to the type of work being undertaken in this class. At present,19 students have enrolled in this class and the class is comprised of 13 girls and 6 boys. These students are all currently enrolled in ASK, which is a private school in located in the Hawalli area in the state of Kuwait. The demographics of this group are 5 Asian, 5 North American Caucasian, 2 North American African American, 1 European Caucasian, and 6 Arab. 42% of the students enter the class with some exposure to Photoshop while 16% have used InDesign. 79% of the students have digitally edited a photo using some application and 1 student is color blind. 53% of the students rate themselves as moderately comfortable learning new software while 42% rate themselves as being above average in their comfort with OS X. Typically, students enrolling in this class are looking to fulfill a technology credit component for graduation purposes and are generally focused and high achieving. There is an application process to be completed to gain entry into the course. This application involves a written statement of purpose and a skills inventory and questionnaire along with submission of example photos taken by the student. By enrolling in the course, students are making a commitment to meet outside of the regular class time for the purposes of documenting school events and sporting activities. 8

Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 1 - Setting up the InDesign Template

Is InDesign CS 6 installed on your computer?

Yes

Create a new folder on your desktop called Spreads.

Launch InDesign CS6

Create a New InDesign Document using File, New options

No

Under Document Preset choose Custom

Locate an install disc and install the software. Under Intent choose Print Make changes where needed Set Number of Pages to 3

No

Yes Click ok

Are the Intent, Number of Pages, Start Page, Page Size, and Bleed set correctly?

Set Start Page to 1

Set Page Size to Custom Save document as Yearbook Spread inside the Spreads folder on your desktop.

Set Bleed to 3 mm on Top, Bottom, Inside, and Outside

Name Page Size as Yearbook

Close InDesign Set Height to 280 mm Set Width to 210 mm

Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 2 - Setting up the 4x6 Photoshop Template

Is Photoshop CS 6 installed on your computer? Yes

Create New Folder called psd inside the Spreads folder.

Launch Photoshop CS6

Create a New Photoshop Document using File, New options

No

Under Document Preset choose Custom

Locate an install disc and install the software. Set width to 6 inches

Set height to 4 inches

Set resolution to 300 dpi

Set color mode to CMYK Close Photoshop Make changes where needed No

Save psd document as 4x6 inside psd folder nested in the Spreads folder.

Yes Click ok

Are the width, height, resolution and color mode set correctly?

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Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 3 - Setting up the 3x6 Photoshop Template

Is Photoshop CS 6 installed on your computer? Yes

Create New Folder called psd inside the Spreads folder.

Launch Photoshop CS6

Create a New Photoshop Document using File, New options

No

Under Document Preset choose Custom

Locate an install disc and install the software. Set width to 5 inches

Set height to 3 inches

Set resolution to 300 dpi

Set color mode to CMYK Close Photoshop Make changes where needed No

Save psd document as 4x6 inside psd folder nested in the Spreads folder.

Yes Click ok

Are the width, height, resolution and color mode set correctly?

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Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 4 - Completing the Yearbook Spread - Part 1

Is InDesign CS6 an appropriate software choice for teaching students how to create a print-ready sample yearbook spread?

Yes

Move provided Sample Images folder into Spreads folder, create images folder inside Spreads folder, Open Yearbook Spreads template

Select Rectangle Tool, draw a square across page 2 & 3, ll will color, adjust using opacity

Select Rectangle Tool, draw a square across top of page. Select Text Tool and enter the title of the page, adjust font, and adjust size

No Select Rectangle Frame Tool, draw a square, adjust to 3in by 5in, use ctrlc, ctrl-v to copy the frame 5 more time, adjust using percentage, place at will.

Select another approach.

Select Rectangle Frame Tool, draw a square, adjust to 4in by 6in, use ctrlc, ctrl-v to copy the frame 5 more time, adjust using percentage, place at will.

Review your page, do you have a background color, a title, and 12 picture frames? No Yes Make changes where needed

Save indesign document and close InDesign

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Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 4 - Completing the Yearbook Spread - Part 2

Is Photoshop CS6 an appropriate software choice for teaching students how to adjust and edit photos?

Yes

Open the 3x5 Photoshop template.

Select a sample image from the sample images: folder that you would like to use in your spread and open it using Photoshop.

Click cmd+a and then cmd+C and copy the photo.

No

In Photoshop, navigate back to the 3x5 template and use cmd+v to paste the image onto the template.

Select another approach. Click cmd+T to access the Free Transform Tool.

Hold down the shift+alt keys and adjust the size of the photo.

Once the photo is the size you want it slick enter to apply the transformation.

Once the photo is the size you want it slick enter to apply the transformation. No

Close Photoshop.

Yes

Have you adjusted 6 images using the 3x5 template?

Select File, Save As, name the image, set it as a jpeg, and save it to the images folder inside the Spreads folder.

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Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 4 - Completing the Yearbook Spread - Part 3

Is Photoshop CS6 an appropriate software choice for teaching students how to adjust and edit photos?

Yes

Open the 4x6 Photoshop template.

Select a sample image from the sample images: folder that you would like to use in your spread and open it using Photoshop.

Click cmd+a and then cmd+C and copy the photo.

No

In Photoshop, navigate back to the 3x5 template and use cmd+v to paste the image onto the template.

Select another approach. Click cmd+T to access the Free Transform Tool.

Hold down the shift+alt keys and adjust the size of the photo.

Once the photo is the size you want it slick enter to apply the transformation.

Once the photo is the size you want it slick enter to apply the transformation. No

Close Photoshop.

Yes

Have you adjusted 6 images using the 4x6 template?

Select File, Save As, name the image, set it as a jpeg, and save it to the images folder inside the Spreads folder.

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Part 2. Analysis Report


2d. Task Analysis Flow Charts

Step 4 - Completing the Yearbook Spread - Part 4

Is InDesign CS6 an appropriate software choice for teaching students how to create a print-ready sample yearbook spread?

Yes

Open the Yearbook Spread InDesign le.

Select a 3x5 ratio frame

Click cmd+d to place the photo

No

navigate in the dialogue box to the images folder and select the image you wish to use. Click OK.

Select another approach.

Right Click on the frame, navigate to Adjust Proportions select ll frame proportionally. Enter appropriate captions and adjust font size and type as desired. No Have you placed six 3x5 ratio images?

Select 3 to 6 photo frames and use the fx button to apply a desired effect.

No Have you created appropriate caption boxes and applied effects?

Using the Rectangle Marquee Tool, create 12 small caption boxes and place them on the spread near individuals photo frames

Yes Yes No

Yes Have you placed six 4x6 ratio images?

Select a 4x6 ratio frame

Select File, Save, then select File, Export.

Click cmd+d to place the photo

Select Press Quality, Select Use Document Bleed Settings, Click OK Right Click on the frame, navigate to Adjust Proportions select ll frame proportionally. Close InDesign navigate in the dialogue box to the images folder and select the image you wish to use. Click OK.

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Part 3. Planning
3a. Learning Objectives (list): 1. Students will be able to navigate the InDesign CS 6 interface and create a print ready document. 1.1 Students will open the InDesign application. 1.2 Students will create an InDesign document and adjust the document settings in the launch menu. 1.3 Students will locate and use the Rectangle Tool to create a background image and will solid color fill. 1.4 Students will locate and use the Rectangle Tool to create 6 caption boxes and a title box. 1.5 Students will locate and use the Rectangle Frame Tool to create 6 picture frames, 6 caption boxes. 1.6 Students will place and link pictures into frames using the cmd+D keyboard short cut. 1.7 Students will save, adjust print preference settings, and export a print-ready document. 2. Students will be able to navigate the Photoshop interface and adjust images to be used in an InDesign document. 2.1 Students will open the Photoshop application. 2.2 Students will create a Photoshop document and adjust the document settings in the launch menu. 2.3 Students will locate and use the Copy and Paste functions using the cmd+c and cmd+v keyboard shortcuts. 2.4 Students will locate and use the Free Transform Tool to resize their photos by using the cmd+T and shift+cmd keyboard shortcuts. 2.5 Students will locate and use the Auto Tone, Auto Contrast, and Auto Color settings from the menu bar. 2.6 Students will differentiate and convert and RGB images to CMYK using the image mode settings. 2.7 Students will adjust image settings and save images to the images folder. 3. Students will create and manage a folder with subfolders and document links. 3.1 Students will create a new folder and name it Print Folder 3.2 Students will create a sub-folder inside Print Folder, label it Images, and save all exported photoshop images to this folder. 3.3 Students will save the InDesign document inside the folder labelled Print Folder. 3.4 Students will save the Photoshop document inside the folder labelled Print Folder. 4. Students will select and use complementary colors. 4.1 Students will identify complimentary colors using a reference website. 4.2 Students will convert Hex color key to CMYK values using a website conversion tool. 4.3 Students will locate and create new color swatches in the swatch palette in InDesign. 4.4 Students will create, add, label, and use new color swatches to InDesign swatch palette.

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Part 3. Planning
3b: Objectives and Assessment Matrix Table
Learning Objectives 1.0 Blooms Taxonomy Classification Application Format of Assessment Performance Description of Test Form Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Submitted Sample Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Submitted Sample Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Submitted Sample Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Submitted Sample

Sample Items Completion of completed yearbook spread sample.

1.1

Application

Performance

Launch InDesign and open application.

1.2 1.3

Application Application

Performance Performance

The InDesign document will be created, named, and saved. Create a background using the Rectangle Tool.

1.4

Application

Performance

Create 6 caption boxes and a title box.

1.5

Application

Performance

Create a series of frames using the Rectangle Tool.

1.6

Synthesis

Performance

Link the photos to the frames, position them appropriately, and scale them if needed. Exported file will be complete and ready to print. Completion of the adjusted photos using Photoshop.

1.7 2.0

Application Application

Performance Performance

2.1

Application

Performance

Launch Photoshop and open the application.

2.2 2.3

Application Application

Performance Performance

The Photoshop document will be created, named, and saved. Open the image files, copy them, and place them into the Photoshop document. Resize the photos using the Free Transform Tool.

2.4

Application

Performance

2.5

Analysis

Performance

Adjust the Tone, Contrast, and Color using the Auto Settings.

2.6

Analysis

Performance

Convert RGB sample images to CMYK.

2.7

Application

Performance

New saved images will be appropriately sized, colored, and saved. Created a folder called Print Folder. Created a subfolder inside Print Folder called Images. InDesign document is saved inside Print Folder. Photoshop folder is saved inside Print Folder. Create a complementary color scheme using website. Identify complementary color schemes.

3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 4.0 4.1

Application Application Application Application Analysis/Synthesis Comprehension

Performance Performance Performance Performance Performance Performance

Submitted Sample Submitted Sample Submitted Sample Submitted Sample Submitted Sample Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Observation Checklist Submitted Sample

4.2

Application

Performance

Convert HEX colors to CMYK values using web app.

4.3

Application

Performance

Identify color swatch palette.

4.4

Application

Performance

Create and save new color swatches.

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Part 3. Planning
3c: ARCS Table Categories & Subcategories ATTENTION A.1. Perceptual arousal Pose the following series of questions and have students stand if they are answering yes and sit if they are answering no. Have you ever used Adobe Photoshop? Have you ever used Adobe InDesign? Have you taken a picture in the last month? Have you taken a picture in the last week? Did you take a picture yesterday? Did you see the yearbook from last year? Did you buy the yearbook from last year? Once all students are sitting, pose the following questions related to the previous yearbook and record student responses on the whiteboard in the classroom. What did you like about it? What didnt you like about it? What can we improve? Consider adding questions on the fly to keep student interest. Process Questions

A.2. Inquiry arousal

A.3. Variability RELEVANCE R.1. Goal orientation

Express to the students that there is a direct connection between producing a quality yearbook that is accurate, complete, and visually pleasing to the amount of time they are willing to devote to learning the software being used in this class and experimenting with it. Discuss the roles that will be assigned in the yearbook class; photographer, layout, photo organizer, editor, photoshop artist. Emphasize that regardless of the roles all students must have a minimum level of competency with the software being used. Highlight that collaboration is a key element of the class and that being competent in the software allows for greater idea sharing and more meaningful conversations. Review last years Elementary School and Middle/High School yearbooks. Assess the Staff and Senior Personality from the MS/HS examples below and compare them with the grade level spreads from the ES book. Focus on how paying attention to detail and having a high level of competency impacts what you can do visually with a spread.

R.2. Motive matching

R.3. Familiarity

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Part 3. Planning
3c: ARCS Table (continued) Categories & Subcategories Confidence C.1. Learning requirements Explain to the students that they will be learning skills in this class that can not only be used to create a yearbook, but can also be transferred to other classes when working on creative-based projects. Further, these skills can be used in their free time to alter photos or prep pages to share on a social network. Clearly relate to the students that initially the user-interface of both InDesign and Photoshop will seem overwhelming but that once they have spent some time working with it, the complexity will decrease as they increase their familiarity with it. Encourage the students to pay close attention to the seminar lessons as they will provide a sound foundation moving forward and into the class itself. Provide examples for the students of quality yearbook spreads that have been created using InDesign. Emphasize that creativity has no limit and that the only limit for their spreads lies in their imagination and willingness to learn. Sample 1 - http://www.memorybook.com/View_Sample/ 2012_MemHighSchool/index.html Sample 2 - http://www.yearbooks.biz/?event=Showcase.Gallery&category=5 Sample 1 - http://www.yearbooks.biz/?event=Showcase.Gallery&category=4 Process Questions

C.2. Success opportunities

C.3. Personal control

Satisfaction S.1. Natural consequences Emphasize to students that there will be a premium placed on effort and collaboration in this class. Explain that collaboration will involve working together, sharing ideas, peer review, and class presentations of their completed work. Spotlight for the students that periodically there will be an opportunity to share their design work with the other students in the class and that the goal is to learn from each other as we develop skills that will allow us to create a product together. While working through the lessons, have students review their own work in relation to the directions and critique it.

S.2. Positive consequences

S.3. Equity

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Part 4. Instructors Guide


Introduction Gain Attention Begin the class by having the students take their seat. Once you have the attention of the class, pose the following series of questions and have students stand if they are answering yes and sit if they are answering no. ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Have you ever used Adobe Photoshop? Have you ever used Adobe InDesign? Have you taken a picture in the last month? Have you taken a picture in the last week? Did you take a picture yesterday? Did you see the yearbook from last year? Did you buy the yearbook from last year?

Inform Learners of Purpose ! Give one copy of each of the last three school yearbooks to each student. Explain that these yearbooks are desk copies that must remain in the computer lab and that they are meant to be used for reference and inspiration. ! Explain that this Yearbook Basics training seminar is meant to give each student the foundational skills that will allow them to actively participate and contribute in the development of the next school yearbook. ! Point out that while there are many roles that will be assigned in the yearbook class (photographer, layout, photo organizer, editor, photoshop artist) that everyone must demonstrate a minimum level of competency with the key software being used to create the yearbook and that is why they are participating in this seminar. Arouse Interest and Motivation ! Allow the students some time to browse through last years yearbook. Ask them to focus on the things that they find appealing. The focus here should be on the positive. Once a few minutes have passed, pose the following questions to the students and write down the answers generated onto the whiteboard in the classroom. ! ! ! ! What did you like about last years yearbook? What stood out? What could have been improved? What would you like to see in the next yearbook that wasnt in the last one?

! Explain to the students that there is a direct connection between producing a quality yearbook and the amount of time they are willing to devote to learning the software being used in this class and experimenting with it. Preview the Learning Activity ! Explain to the students that each of the yearbooks on their desks are a compilation of yearbook spreads. ! Focus their attention on the fact that there are essentially only a handful of spreads in any yearbook (class photos, personality shots, staff photos, candids, team and activity pages) and that these spreads come together to form the book itself. ! Emphasize that the purpose of the seminar is to provide each student with the opportunity to learn the skills to create the framework for any spread (proper size, proper document settings, color selection) that they wish to create. ! Highlight that any spread, regardless of content, has a set of basic elements that are tied to color, paper size, and photo quality.

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Body Recall Relevant Prior Knowledge (10 Minutes) ! Emphasize to students that there will be a premium placed on effort and collaboration in this workshop. ! Explain that collaboration will involve working together, sharing ideas, peer review, and helping one another. ! Review the student responses on the whiteboard and ask the students to keep in mind some of these comments while looking at the past three school yearbooks (Appendix E) and the sample yearbook spreads we will be accessing using the internet. Present information and examples (10 Minutes) ! Play up the notion that creativity has no limit and that the only limit for their spreads lies in their imagination and willingness to learn. ! Have the students take some time to consider some of the following yearbook spreads. ! Sample 1 - http://www.memorybook.com/View_Sample/2012_MemHighSchool/ index.html ! Sample 2 - http://www.yearbooks.biz/?event=Showcase.Gallery&category=5 ! Sample 3 - http://www.yearbooks.biz/?event=Showcase.Gallery&category=4 Focus Attention or Gain & Direct Attention (15 Minutes) ! Do a whip around and ask each of the students to identify one thing from one of the spreads they have seen today that they really liked. ! Explain to the students that creating some of the things that they liked is a complex process but that they can do it if they are willing to learn. ! Clearly relate to the students that initially the user-interface of both InDesign and Photoshop will seem overwhelming but that once they have spent some time working with it, the complexity will decrease as they increase their familiarity with it. ! Encourage the students to pay close attention to the seminar lessons as they will provide a sound foundation moving forward and into the class itself. Employ Learning Strategies or Guide or Prompt Use of Learning Strategies (5 Minutes) ! Stress to the students that the skills they will learn in this seminar will aid them in the yearbook class. ! Encourage the students to work hard and to pay close attention as they follow along with the instructor through each of the stages of these lessons. Practice or Provide for and Guide Practice (Last 30 Minutes of Session 1, First 40 Minutes of Session 2) ! Provide students with ample time to work on each step of the assignments. ! Demonstrate each of the steps on using the computer and projector. ! Move around the room and observe students practicing and setting up their documents. ! Review steps with students who may need additional assistance. Evaluate Feedback or Provide Feedback ! Explain to the students that the evaluation of this activity will take place in the creation of their final project and that they should be working to meet each of preference and design elements identified by their instructor. ! Observe student participation and encourage quiet partner assistance when needed. ! Encourage and support students who are having difficulty following along with the lesson

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Conclusion Summarize and Review (10 Minutes) ! Review the steps of the lesson remind the students that they have learned a variety of valuable skills in the seminar: ! How to navigate an InDesign file. ! How to navigate a Photoshop file. ! How to adjust InDesign and Photoshop file settings. ! How to apply design elements in InDesign. ! How to alter images in Photoshop. ! How to save, organize, and link files. Transfer Learning (5 Minutes) ! Explain to the students that they will be learning skills in this class that can not only be used to create a yearbook, but can also be transferred to other classes when working on creative-based projects. Further, these skills can be used in their free time to alter photos or prep pages to share on a social network. Re-motivate and Close (5 Minutes) ! Spotlight for the students that periodically there will be an opportunity to share their design work with the other students in the class and that the goal is to learn from each other as we develop skills that will allow us to create a product together. ! Express to the students that there is a direct connection between producing a quality yearbook that is accurate, complete, and visually pleasing to the amount of time they are willing to devote to learning the software being used in this class and experimenting with it. Assess Learning ! Evaluate the student files at the end of the lessons considering the overall design combined with the use of appropriate file settings. Use a variety of measures outlined in the Learning Objectives. Provide Feedback and Remediation ! Review the activity and engage in a discussion with students using the following questions as a guide. ! What did you learn? ! How would you rate the level of difficulty of the lessons? ! Can you see a link between what you learned in these lessons and the final design of a yearbook? ! What went well in this activity? ! What would you chance about this activity to improve it?

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Part 5. Learner Context


5a: Learning Materials The following learning materials will be used for instructor preparation and instructional purposes. Learning Materials Creating the InDesign Template (Video) Creating the Photoshop Templates (Video) Creating the Yearbook Spread (Video) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Sample Images Sample 1 Sample 2 Sample 3 Sample 4 Sample 5 Sample 6 Sample 7 Sample 8 Sample 9 Sample 10 Sample 11 Sample 12 Sample 13 Sample 14 Sample 15 Sample 16 Sample 17 Sample 18 Sample 19 Sample 20 Instructors Guide Purpose This video is to be used as a reference for the instructor to follow when guiding the students through the portion of the workshop centered on creating the InDesign Template. This video is to be used as a reference for the instructor to follow when guiding the students through the portion of the workshop centered on creating the Photoshop Template. This video is to be used as a reference for the instructor to follow when guiding the students through the portion of the workshop centered on creating the final yearbook spread.

These sample images will be used by the students in the development of their individual yearbook spreads. These sample images have been uploaded to Dropbox for easy downloading. All of the images were shot on November 20th and 21st by the designer of this project. All persons featured have signed a school photo permission waiver.

This guide is to be used by the teacher.

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Part 5. Learner Context


5b: Assessment Materials The following assessment materials will be used in this workshop. Assessment Material InDesign Template SelfEvaluation Checklist Photoshop 3x5 Template Self Evaluation Checklist Photoshop 4x6 Template Self Evaluation Checklist Final Yearbook Spread Rubric Purpose This checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial InDesign Template. This checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial Photoshop 3x5 Template. This checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial Photoshop 4x6 Template. This rubric will be used by the instructor when evaluating the final yearbook spreads.

5c: Technology Tools and Justification The following technology tools will be used to support the learning project. Technology Tools iMacs with OSX Mountain Lion YouTube.com Rationale This workshop has been designed using the Mac and OSX platform as our campus is currently transitioning from Windows to Mac. YouTube is a familiar tool to share videos. The tutorial screencasts created for this workshop have been uploaded and shared for the instructors use. Dropbox is a common tool used to share documents easily and securely. The sample images for this project have been loaded into a shared folder and linked from the learning materials section. InDesign is the software program used by students in the ASK Yearbook Class to produce our annual yearbook. Photoshop is the software program used to alter and adjust all photos for the ASK Yearbook and is the software program taught in the course. This tool will allow the instructor to show the tutorials to the students and to guide students through the InDesign and Photoshop userinterfaces. The color printer in the Yearbook Lab will allow students to print off their spreads at the conclusion of the workshop.

DropBox

Adobe InDesign CS 6 Adobe Photoshop CS 6

Hitachi StarBoard

Color Printer

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Part 6. Formative Evaluation Plan


6a: Expert Review Plan My expert reviewer is Tim Allen. Tim has been working at ASK for the past 3 years and has recently made a shift from 8 years of teaching High School English to High School Technology. This is Tims second year in the Technology Department and his 10th year teaching. Tim has been involved in yearbook development in all of the school he has worked in. The materials in this project were submitted to him for review on Wednesday, December 5th and the review was completed on December 8th. Tim was asked to consider the scope of the project and provide feedback on its usefulness as an introductory workshop for students to take before beginning the yearbook class he teaches. Tim was asked to focus on the sequential nature of the tasks, the method of delivery, and whether the time-frame allotted for the workshop itself was appropriate. 6b. One-to-One Evaluation One to one evaluations will carried out by identifying and engaging three students from the student group using the read-aloud-think-aloud technique. The students will be identified by using the results from the Needs Assessment Survey which was conducted to ascertain student understanding of, and experience using, Adobe CS 6. This survey will allow the designer to identify and select three students who meet the following criteria: ! One student with no experience using Adobe CS6 ! One student with little experience using Adobe CS6 ! One student with some experience using Adobe CS6 Smith and Ragan have determined that the read-aloud-think-aloud technique is particularly appropriate when evaluating instruction that has a print - or computer-based component. The guiding questions below are intended to provide the instructor with a more comprehensive picture of student understanding as students work through the content being presented. The feedback provided by students will assist the designer in making adjustments to course content to better suit the learners needs. One-to-One Guiding Questions 1. Can you please summarize the instructions? 2. Can you please explain to me what we are doing and why we are doing it? 3. Are the graphics provided useful to understanding what we are doing? 4. Are you able to follow along with the instructors model? 6c. Small Group Evaluation The complete audience for the Yearbook Basics activity is 19 students. Six students will be identified to participate in the Small Group and will follow along with the workshop without any direct involvement or support from the instructor unless absolutely necessary. the results from the Needs Assessment Survey will again assist the instructor in selecting six students who meet the following criteria: ! Two students with no experience using Adobe CS6 ! Two students with little experience using Adobe CS6 ! Two students with some experience using Adobe CS6 The designer will be given directions to allow this group of six students to sit in close proximity to one another and to interact and assist each other throughout each of the lessons. Upon completion of the evaluation the designer will pose a series of questions to the small group to gauge feedback about the topic and the lesson.

25

Part 6. Formative Evaluation Plan


Small Group Questions 1. How comfortable were you with learning new software? 2. Are the skills being taught too complex for students to understand? 3. How did you feel about the instructional method of guided practice? 4. Was there anything about the presentation that was unclear? If so, what was it? 5. Did the graphics assist you in understanding what we are doing? 6. What needs to be improved to make the instruction more engaging for students? 7. Was this Yearbook Basics workshop worth your time? Do you think that it will assist you in the Yearbook Class itself? 6d: Field Trial The field trial will be completed with a group of 19 High School Juniors who have been pre-enrolled in ASKs Yearbook class for the 2013 - 2014 school year. The workshop will be led by the current yearbook teacher who will instruct the three, one-hour lessons that comprise the Yearbook Basics Workshop. The teacher will model the instruction, provide and distribute handouts, assist with student questions, guide the students through the project, and have the students complete an evaluation survey at the conclusion of the workshop. The designer will be in the room taking notes focussing on student understanding and response, scaffolded presentation, and student success.

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Part 7. Formative Evaluation Report


7a: Evaluation Survey or Rubric Please review each of the sections of the workshop and provide comments and suggestions. Individual Section Evaluation 1. Learning Goal, Audience, Rationale Comments: 2. Needs Assessment, Learning Context, Transfer Context, Description of Learners, Task Analysis Flow Charts Comments: 3. Planning, Learning Objectives, Objectives and Assessment Matrix, ARCS Table Comments: 4. Instructors Guide Comments: 5. Learning Materials, Assessment Materials, Technology Tools and Justification Comments:

Please use the rating scale below and rate each of the elements below: 1 (Strongly Disagree), 2 (Disagree), 3 (Agree), 4 (Strongly Agree) Individual Section Evaluation 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 The material as a whole was clear and easy to follow. Comments: The graphics were presented in proper sequence. Comments: The activities followed a logical and sequential order. Comments: The timeframe was appropriate for the material to be covered. Comments: This workshop will benefit students. Comments: The terms used were clearly defined. Comments: The examples used were appropriate for the lesson. Comments:

27

Part 7. Formative Evaluation Report


7b: Expert Review Report I gave the materials to Mr. Allen on December 4th and we sat down and conferenced on December 6th. The focus of the conference was to review his feedback on the section-bysection evaluation and the general evaluation. Section-by-section Evaluation Mr. Allens comments on the section-by-section evaluation were generally positive and constructive. Section 1 - The Learning Goal, Audience Description, and Rationale were clearly written. Mr. Allen identified that he would have like to have seen more description relating to the creative elements of designing a yearbook. Section 2 - The needs assessment was seen as complete and informative. Mr. Allen remarked that looking to identify color blindness was not something he had ever done in his years as a yearbook advisor or teacher. He identified the task-flow-analysis charts as not being descriptive enough and lacking connection at times with the learner materials. Section 3 - Mr. Allen felt that the learning objectives that were identified were both appropriate and applicable to the subject matter at hand. Section 4 - Mr. Allen felt that this section of the project needed some time elements and guidelines included in it. Section 5 - The learning materials were seen as solid and appropriate to the skill level of the students. General Evaluation For the general evaluation portion of his evaluation, Mr. Allen used a rating scale to agree or disagree with statements related to the project. He also provided comments and recommendations for improving the project. 1. The material as a whole was clear and easy to follow. ! The materials were clear and easy to read. The design was clean. Score: 4 2. The graphics were presented in proper sequence. ! The graphics were at times not aligned with the tutorial video. The graphics need to include references to the tools used in each piece of software. Score: 3 3. The activities followed a logical and sequential order. ! Very much so. Score: 4 4. The timeframe was appropriate for the material to be covered. ! This assignment needs only two, one-hour sessions. Score: 3 5. This workshop will benefit students. ! This workshop is something I would like to build into my course content. Score: 4 6. The terms used were clearly defined. ! Yes. Score: 4 7. The examples used were appropriate for the lesson. ! Very much so. Score: 4 7c: Comments on Change A disconnect between the Task Analysis Flow Charts and the Video Tutorials were identified by the SME. Upon reflection, I agreed with him that developing more specificity and including references to the tools used in InDesign and Photoshop (ie: Rectangle Marquee Tool, Free Transform Tool) would not only benefit the instructor and student but would also dove tail with the learning objectives in a more meaningful way. The content and assignments of the project were seen as being at an appropriate level for the students who are the target audience of this project. My SME was extremely positive and engaged in the process of reviewing this project. I felt as though he was invested in the concept as it related directly to one of the classes that he is currently teaching. He indicated that the idea of having a pre-course introduction workshop to gather information about the students who will be in his class is something that he will endeavor to build into his course curriculum and yearly planning. 28

Part 8. AECT Standards Grid


Professional Standards Addressed (AECT) The following standards, developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), and used in the accreditation process established by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), are addressed to some degree in this course. The numbers of the standards correspond to the numbers next to the course tasks show on the list of assignments. Not all standards are addressed explicitly through student work. Assignments meeting standard in whole or part Standard 1: DESIGN 1.1 Instructional Systems Design (ISD) 1.1.1 Analyzing 1.1.2 Designing 1.1.3 Developing 1.1.4 Implementing 1.1.5 Evaluating 1.2 Message Design 1.3 Instructional Strategies 1.4 Learner Characteristics Standard 2: DEVELOPMENT 2.0 (includes 2.0.1 to 2.0.8) 2.1 Print Technologies 2.2 Audiovisual Technologies 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.4 Integrated Technologies Standard 3: UTILIZATION 3.0 (includes 3.0.1 & 3.0.2) 3.1 Media Utilization 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 3.4 Policies and Regulations Standard 4: MANAGEMENT 4.0 (includes 4.0.1 & 4.0.3) 4.1 Project Management 4.2 Resource Management 4.3 Delivery System Management 4.4 Information Management Standard 5: EVALUATION 5.1 Problem Analysis 5.2 Criterion-Referenced Measurement 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 5.4 Long-Range Planning X X ID Project X ID Project X X X X X X ID Project ID Project; ID Case Analysis ID Project ID Project ID Project Selected Discussion Forums; ID Project

X ID Project X ID Project X ID Project X Reading Quiz; ID Project X (all assignments)

X (all assignments) X ID Project

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COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES The overall goal for the course is for each student to consider and use the systematic process of instructional design to create an instructional product. To achieve this goal, students will engage in activities that promote reflective practice, emphasize realistic contexts, and employ a number of communications technologies. Following the course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the historical development of the practice of instructional design with regard to factors that led to its development and the rationale for its use 2. Describe at least two reasons why instructional design models are useful 3. Identify at least six instructional design models and classify them according to their use 4. Compare and contrast the major elements of three theories of learning as they relate to instructional design 5. Define instructional design. 6. Define the word systematic as it relates to instructional design 7. Define learning and synthesize its definition with the practice of instructional design 8. Relate the design of instruction to the term educational (or instructional) technology 9. Describe the major components of the instructional design process and the functions of models in the design process 10. Provide a succinct summary of various learning contexts (declarative knowledge, conceptual, declarative, principle, problem-solving, cognitive, attitudinal, and psychomotor) 11. Build an instructional design product that integrates major aspects of the systematic process and make this available on the web. a. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with needs, learner, context, goal, and task analyses i. Create and conduct various aspects of a front-end analysis

ii. Identify methods and materials for communicating subject matter that are contextually relevant b. Describe the rationale for and processes associated with creating design documents (objectives, motivation, etc.) i. Construct clear instructional goals and objectives

ii. Develop a motivational design for a specific instructional task iii. Develop assessments that accurately measure performance objectives c. Select and implement instructional strategies for selected learning tasks i. Select appropriate media tools that support instructional design decisions

d. Describe the rationale and processes associated with the formative evaluation of instructional products i. Create a plan for formative evaluation 30

12. Identify and use technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. 13. Apply state and national content standards to the development of instructional products 14. Meet selected professional standards developed by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 15. Use various technological tools for instructional and professional communication

AECT STANDARDS (Applicable to EDTECH 503) 1.0 Design


1.1 Instructional Systems Design 1.1.a Utilize and implement design principles which specify optimal conditions for learning. 1.1.b Identify a variety of instructional systems design models and apply at least one model. 1.1.1 Analyzing 1.1.1.a Write appropriate objectives for specific content and outcome levels. 1.1.1.b Analyze instructional tasks, content, and context. 1.1.2 Designing 1.1.2.a Create a plan for a topic of a content area (e.g., a thematic unit, a text chapter, an interdisciplinary unit) to demonstrate application of the principles of macro-level design. 1.1.2.b Create instructional plans (micro-level design) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.2.d Incorporate contemporary instructional technology processes in the development of interactive lessons that promote student learning. 1.1.3 Developing 1.1.3.a Produce instructional materials which require the use of multiple media (e.g., computers, video, projection). 1.1.3.b Demonstrate personal skill development with at least one: computer authoring application, video tool, or electronic communication application. 1.1.4 Implementing 1.1.4.a Use instructional plans and materials which they have produced in contextualized instructional settings (e.g., practica, field experiences, training) that address the needs of all learners, including appropriate accommodations for learners with special needs. 1.1.5 Evaluating 1.1.5.a Utilize a variety of assessment measures to determine the adequacy of learning and instruction. 1.1.5.b Demonstrate the use of formative and summative evaluation within practice and contextualized field experiences. 1.1.5.c Demonstrate congruency among goals/objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment measures. 1.3 Instructional Strategies 1.3.a Select instructional strategies appropriate for a variety of learner characteristics and learning situations. 1.3.b Identify at least one instructional model and demonstrate appropriate contextualized application within practice and field experiences. 1.3.c Analyze their selection of instructional strategies and/or models as influenced by the learning situation, nature of the specific content, and type of learner objective. 1.3.d Select motivational strategies appropriate for the target learners, task, and learning situation. 1.4 Learner Characteristics 1.4.a Identify a broad range of observed and hypothetical learner characteristics for their particular area(s) of preparation. 1.4.b Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the selection of instructional strategies. 1.4.c Describe and/or document specific learner characteristics which influence the implementation of instructional strategies. 31

2.0 Development
2.0.1 Select appropriate media to produce effective learning environments using technology resources. 2.0.2 Use appropriate analog and digital productivity tools to develop instructional and professional products. 2.0.3 Apply instructional design principles to select appropriate technological tools for the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.4 Apply appropriate learning and psychological theories to the selection of appropriate technological tools and to the development of instructional and professional products. 2.0.5 Apply appropriate evaluation strategies and techniques for assessing effectiveness of instructional and professional products. 2.0.6 Use the results of evaluation methods and techniques to revise and update instructional and professional products. 2.0.7 Contribute to a professional portfolio by developing and selecting a variety of productions for inclusion in the portfolio. 2.1 Print Technologies 2.1.3 Use presentation application software to produce presentations and supplementary materials for instructional and professional purposes. 2.1.4 Produce instructional and professional products using various aspects of integrated application programs. 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based technologies. 2.1 Print Technologies 2.1.3 Use presentation application software to produce presentations and supplementary materials for instructional and professional purposes. 2.1.4 Produce instructional and professional products using various aspects of integrated application programs. 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies 2.3.2 Design, produce, and use digital information with computer-based technologies.

3.0 Utilization
3.1 Media Utilization 3.1.1 Identify key factors in selecting and using technologies appropriate for learning situations specified in the instructional design process. 3.1.2 Use educational communications and instructional technology (SMETS) resources in a variety of learning contexts. 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 3.3.1 Use appropriate instructional materials and strategies in various learning contexts. 3.3.2 Identify and apply techniques for integrating SMETS innovations in various learning contexts. 3.3.3 Identify strategies to maintain use after initial adoption.

4.0 Management
(none specifically addressed in 503)

5.0 Evaluation
5.1 Problem Analysis 5.1.1 Identify and apply problem analysis skills in appropriate school media and educational technology (SMET) contexts (e.g., conduct needs assessments, identify and define problems, identify constraints, identify resources, define learner characteristics, define goals and objectives in instructional systems design, media development and utilization, program management, and evaluation). 5.2 Criterion-referenced Measurement 5.2.1 Develop and apply criterion-referenced measures in a variety of SMET contexts. 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 5.3.1 Develop and apply formative and summative evaluation strategies in a variety of SMET contexts. SMET = School Media & Educational Technologies 32

Appendix A

InDesign Template Checklist


The following checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial InDesign Template.

InDesign Template Self-Evaluation Checklist 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Did you create a folder and title it Spreads? Did you set the intent to Print? Did you set the number of pages to 3? Is the width of the document set to 210mm? Is the height of the document set to 280mm? Did you save the new document as Yearbook Spread? Did you save the new document inside the Spreads folder on your desktop?

Yes

No

For Student Reference.


The images below are labeled with a number and are screenshots of the areas referenced in the checklist above. #1 # 2-5

# 6-7

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Appendix B

4x6 Photoshop Template Checklist


The following checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial Photoshop 6x4 Template. 6x4 Photoshop Template Self-Evaluation Checklist 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Did you create a folder and title it psd? Did you save the psd folder inside the Spreads folder on your desktop? Did you set the width to 6 inches? Did you set the height to 4 inches? Did you set the resolution to 300 pixels per inch? Did you set the color mode to CMYK? Did you name the template 4x6 and save it inside the psd folder nested inside the Spreads folder? Yes No

For Student Reference.


The images below are labeled with a number and are screenshots of the areas referenced in the checklist above.

# 1-2

# 2-6

#7

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Appendix C

Appendix C - 3x5 Photoshop Template Checklist


The following checklist will be used by students when self-evaluating their initial Photoshop 3x5 Template.

6x4 Photoshop Template Self-Evaluation Checklist 1 2 3 4 5 Did you set the width to 5 inches? Did you set the height to 3 inches? Did you set the resolution to 300 pixels per inch? Did you set the color mode to CMYK? Did you name the template 3x5 and save it inside the psd folder nested inside the Spreads folder?

Yes

No

For Student Reference.


The images below are labeled with a number and are screenshots of the areas referenced in the checklist above.

# 1-4

#5

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Appendix D

Appendix D - Yearbook Spread Rubric


The following rubric will be used by the instructor when evaluating the final yearbook spreads.

Date: ______________________ Students Name: ______________________


6x4 Photoshop Template Self-Evaluation Checklist

3 Points
The document settings are all set appropriately. The background is created, color applied, opacity adjusted, and the frame is locked in place. The title was created with the rectangle frame tool, text was entered, font size adjusted, default font changed. 6 - 3x5 photo frames were created, some were adjusted, aspect ratio intact, frames are placed in appealing manner. 6 - 4x6 photo frames were created, some were adjusted, aspect ratio intact, frames are placed in appealing manner. 12 text boxes were created, appropriate text entered with correct spelling. Photos are linked and proportions are adjusted. 3 design elements are evident. PDF is exported with print quality, bleeds, and saved in the Spreads folder. The Spreads folder contains images, psd, and sample images folder, with all requisite files.

2 Points
One of the document settings is incorrect. One of the identified elements is not completed.

1 Point
Two of the document settings are incorrect. Two of the identified elements is not completed.

0 Points
More than two of the document settings are incorrect. More than two of the identified elements is not completed.

Document Settings

Background Color and Opacity

Spread Title

One of the identified elements is not completed.

Two of the identified elements is not completed.

More than two of the identified elements is not completed.

3x5 Boxes

One of the identified elements is not completed.

Two of the identified elements is not completed.

More than two of the identified elements is not completed.

4x6 Boxes

One of the identified elements is not completed.

Two of the identified elements is not completed.

More than two of the identified elements is not completed.

Text Boxes

One of the identified elements is not completed. One error in placing and linking photos. 2 design elements are evident. One of the identified elements is not completed. One of the identified elements is not completed.

Two of the identified elements is not completed. Two errors in placing and linking photos. 1 design element is evident. Two of the identified elements is not completed. Two of the identified elements is not completed.

More than two of the identified elements is not completed. More than two errors in placing and linking photos. No design elements are evident. More than two of the identified elements is not completed. More than two of the identified elements is not completed.

Linked Photos

Design Elements

Exported PDF

Folder

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Appendix E

Past ASK Yearbook Spreads - Part 1

These images are samples of the spreads created for the ASK Yearbook. These are for your reference and inspiration. Remember, we are starting at the beginning of the process with this workshop - but we need to begin with the end in mind.

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Appendix E

Past ASK Yearbook Spreads - Part 2

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Appendix E

Past ASK Yearbook Spreads - Part 3

39

Appendix E

Past ASK Yearbook Spreads - Part 4

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