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2 FEBRUARY 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM

LGBT

LONNIE TAGUE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

News

 

Now online at MetroWeekly.com

Last Word: Jason Collins signs with Brooklyn News: Jack Evans targets Arizona Super Bowl

Holder Raises the Bar

Attorney General tells state-level counterparts to defend principles of equality

LGBT LONNIE TAGUE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE News Now online at MetroWeekly.com Last Word: Jason

by Justin Snow

A TTORNEY GENERAL ERIC Holder appeared to give state attorneys general the green light to stop defending bans

on same-sex marriage during a speech in Washington Tuesday. While not explicitly ordering his counterparts in the states to defy state law, Holder articulated a philosophy that requires attorneys general to lead, par- ticularly on civil rights. “Any decisions – at any level – not to defend individual laws must be exceed- ingly rare. They must be reserved only for exceptional circumstances. And they

must never stem merely from policy or

political disagreements – hinging instead

on firm constitutional grounds,” Holder said Feb. 25 at the winter meeting of the National Association of Attorneys Gen- eral, expanding on remarks first made to The New York Times. “But in general, I believe we must be suspicious of legal classifications based solely on sexual ori- entation. And we must endeavor – in all of our efforts – to uphold and advance the values that once led our forebears to declare unequivocally that all are created equal and entitled to equal opportunity.” Holder spoke about his own experi- ence in early 2011 when he and President Barack Obama determined that the Jus- tice Department would no longer defend

Holder

the constitutionality of Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, defining mar- riage as between a man and a woman. “Our actions were motivated by the strong belief that all measures that dis- tinguish among people based on their sexual orientation must be subjected to a heightened standard of scrutiny – and, therefore, that this measure was uncon- stitutional discrimination,” Holder said. According to Holder, all justice pro- fessionals are called “not merely to use our legal system to settle disputes and punish those who have done wrong, but to answer the kinds of fundamental ques- tions – about fairness and equality – that have always determined who we are and who we aspire to be, both as a nation and

COURTESY GREEN LANTERN

LGBTNews

as a people.” That decision by Holder and Obama proved significant for the two landmark same-sex marriage cases that were ultimately taken up by the Supreme Court. During oral arguments before the Supreme Court last March, Obama’s Solicitor General Donald Verrilli not only argued against DOMA, but also against California’s ban on same-sex marriage. June’s broad Supreme Court ruling striking down Section 3 of DOMA in the Windsor case has led to a number of victories for marriage equality in the nearly eight months since, with every federal judge — whether appointed by a Democratic president or a Republican president — to consider state same- sex marriage bans finding them to be unconstitutional, and in many cases pointing to an aspect of the Windsor decision in their rulings. Earlier this month, a U.S. District Court found Virginia’s same-sex mar- riage ban unconstitutional. Virginia is one of several states where the state attorney general has chosen to not defend a state ban on same-sex marriage, labeling such a law unconstitutional. On Feb. 20, Oregon Attorney Gen-

eral Ellen Rosenblum joined attorneys general in Virginia, Nevada and Penn- sylvania in announcing she would apply heightened scrutiny and not defend her state’s same-sex marriage ban during pending litigation. “The law in this area is developing and it is now clear that there is no ratio- nal basis for Oregon to refuse to honor the commitments made by same-sex couples in the same way it honors the commitments of opposite-sex couples,” Rosenblum said in a statement. “Because we cannot identify a valid reason for the state to prevent the couples who have filed these lawsuits from marrying in Oregon, we find ourselves unable to stand before federal Judge McShane to defend the state’s prohibition against marriages between two men or two women.” Similar decisions were also made by attorneys general in California and Illi- nois before same-sex marriage was legal- ized in those states. With more than 40 lawsuits challeng- ing same-sex marriage bans in dozens of states, it seems likely Holder’s example could lead more state attorneys gener- al to abandon their defense of prohibi- tions on same-sex marriage. According

to Michael Cole-Schwartz, a spokesper- son for the Human Rights Campaign, Holder’s leadership should inspire state attorneys general to consider “how they defend the indefensible.” “With numerous courts finding bans on marriage equality to be unconsti- tutional, it’s clear that those standing against denying marriage to loving and committed couples will be on the right side of history,” Cole-Schwartz told Metro Weekly. During his remarks Tuesday, Hold- er reiterated statements he made after the Obama administration’s decision to not defend DOMA was announced, stating that “America’s most treasured ideals” were not given the full force of law instantaneously. “On the contrary:

Our ideals are continually advanced as our justice systems – and our Union – are strengthened; and as social science, human experience, legislation, and judi- cial decisions expand the circle of those who are entitled to the protections and rights enumerated by the Constitution,” Holder said. “As attorneys general, we are called to serve,” he concluded. “We are expected to lead.” l

COURTESY GREEN LANTERN LGBT News as a people.” That decision by Holder and Obama proved significant

Greg Zehnacker’s

Death Hits Beyond Green Lantern

Co-owner of D.C. bar remembered across various communities for his charity and friendliness

by John Riley

G REG ZEHNACKER, CO-OWNER OF THE GAY BAR

Green Lantern and a longtime fixture in the D.C. area’s

nightlife scene, died in his sleep Tuesday morning, Feb. 18,

according to a statement issued by the Thomas Circle venue.

Starting in the mid-1970s, Zehnacker began working in local nightlife and restaurant establishments, first as a coat check person at Rascals, later working at Lost and Found, Pier 9, Badlands and Peppers in a variety of roles, including lighting assistant, bartender and general manager. Zehnacker also worked in real estate. While acting as general manager at Peppers in 1995, Zehnacker met John Colameco, who later became his business partner when the two bought the Green Lantern in 2001. “He was the face, the driving force behind the Green Lantern,” says Colameco. “He was ‘Mr. Green Lantern.’ He made it from

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WARD MORRISON

LGBTNews

nothing into what it is today.” Zehnacker used his position as co- owner of the Green Lantern to host several fundraisers and other events for local charities and community organiza- tions, including The DC Center’s HIV/ AIDS Prevention Working Group and its weekly condom kit “packing parties,” the Centaur MC, the Washington Scandals Rugby Club, and the Green Lantern’s annual Employee Turnabout Show fea- turing employees in drag performances to raise money for HIV/AIDS organiza- tions. Zehnacker’s drag personality, Miss Tokyo Rose, made a farewell appearance in the 2006 show. Zehnacker also volun- teered his space for meetings of the DC Bear Club (DCBC), of which he was a founding member. Tom Huster, a member of DCBC, met Zehnacker a month after the club launched, in January 1995. Zehnacker was active in the club, taking charge of its “Friends in Need” fund, supporting local LGBT- or AIDS-related organizations. Zehnacker also sat on the DCBC commit- tee for Bear Invasion, the club’s annual charity-fundraising weekend. “He was a generous person,” Huster says of Zehnacker. “He would host bar nights at the Green Lantern to help us

raise money. He was always helpful, out- going, the kind of person who you’d like to be around.” Chris Wilkins, another DCBC col- league, remembers Zehnacker as an instrumental part of DCBC from the start. He also fondly remembers spend- ing time at Zehnacker’s house in Lewes, Del., with other DCBC members. “Greg was always full of energy, a very nice guy,” says Wilkins. “He had a quick wit about him, he was person- able, and accommodating to anything we wanted to do for the club. He was very always smiling, friendly, and well-liked by everyone who met him.” Employees and party promoters who worked with Zehnacker point particu- larly to his friendliness and willingness to help so many in need. “Greg did as many things as he possibly could for the [LGBT] community,” says Jeramy Scovell, manager of the Green Lantern. “He will be missed. He was one of the nicest bosses we’ve worked for. That’s why our turnover here has been so low compared to other bars.” Mikey Adolphson, a DJ and party pro- moter who worked with Zehnacker on multiple events, posted a moving tribute to Zehnacker on his Facebook wall.

“Greg was a tremendous colleague, wonderful person and a truly integral part of my success in D.C. nightlife,” wrote Adolphson wrote, who has since relocated to Chicago. “Mostly, though, he was a phenomenal friend to catch up with every time I visited. Always wise, upbeat and unwavering. … To everyone at the Green Lantern, his partner and those in the D.C. nightlife scene – a wonderful light just went out.” Zehnacker was 55 years old. He is sur- vived by his partner of 18 years, Thomas Tarantino; his parents, Raymond and Charlotte; his brother Mike; and sister- in-law Carol. Details for a memorial and funeral service should be released soon. “Greg loved bringing together people from all walks of life and ensuring they had a good time under Green Lantern’s roof,” reads the tribute to Zehnacker on the Green Lantern’s Facebook page. “In that spirit, and as a way of honoring Greg, we will be open during this difficult time and encourage all to come in, raise a glass to Greg, and share your favorite memo- ries of our friend and colleague.”

[Editor’s note: Staff writer John Riley was employed by the Green Lantern between 2009 and 2011.] l

Catania’s Campaign Coup

As yet undeclared, gay councilmember wins Victory Fund mayoral endorsement

by John Riley

  • D .C . C OUNCILMEM B ER David Catania (I-At Large) has gotten a big-name endorsement, even before he

officially announcing any candidacy. The Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund, the nation’s largest resource for out LGBT individuals in politics, announced Tues- day it is endorsing Catania, who has only so far begun an exploratory committee, for his possible campaign to become the

District’s first out gay mayor.

As an independent, Catania faces no

primary and therefore does not have to announce his intentions until after the District’s four major parties hold their primaries. But while Catania has said he’ll run if incumbent Mayor Vincent Gray (D) wins the Democratic primary, he has declined to say whether he will run if another Democrat wins. ‘’David Catania brings an incredible amount of passion and commitment to his job,’’ says Torey Carter, chief operat- ing officer at the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund. ‘’He has helped guide Washing-

WARD MORRISON LGBT News nothing into what it is today.” Zehnacker used his position as co-

ton through an unprecedented period of growth and revitalization. He is ideally positioned to lead a city with such diverse and dynamic people.’’ The Victory Fund also cited Catania’s legislative record since he was first elect- ed to the D.C. Council in 1997, citing his work on school reform, linking District residents with health insurance, and pass- ing marriage equality. The organization, which supports electing and appointing qualified LGBT people to different levels of political office, is expected to endorse nearly 200 candidates throughout the country for the 2014 cycle. l

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COURTESY OF THE CHAMBER

Business Chamber Connections LGBT
Business Chamber
Connections
LGBT

The Culture of Cash

Career and money coach to speak about the real impact of money mindsets

COURTESY OF THE CHAMBER Business Chamber Connections LGBT The Culture of Cash Career and money coach

by John F. Stanton

I T’S NOT YOUR IMAGINATION.

In a 2010 study by the American

Psychological Association, 73 per-

cent of respondents indicated that

money was the chief cause of stress in their lives. “When we don’t stop to examine where this stress is coming from, we deny access to a wealth of knowledge, well-being and financial security,” observes Cindy Morgan-Jaffe, a career and money coach. On Friday, Feb. 28, Morgan-Jaffe will speak at the monthly Business Matters Luncheon of the Capital Area Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (aka The Chamber). Her focus will be on “Money, Work, How Our Money Mindset Drives Results,” an exploration of how our rela- tionship to money creates our financial reality. “The relationships individuals and companies have with money and work can influence outcomes,” Morgan-Jaffe explains. “A scarcity mindset tends to push wealth away, while an abundant mindset attracts wealth. The saying ‘penny wise and pound foolish’ is classic for good reason.” Our relationship to money begins in childhood when we absorb ideas and behaviors from our families, commu- nities and culture. In many cases, we

learn more about what having or not

having money means than how to actu-

ally manage it. We learn that it can be used for power and influence – that our self-worth may be directly linked to our net worth. Morgan-Jaffe will talk about common money “scripts,” or beliefs that drive our behavior, as well as how we act these out in our lives and how we can remove the roadblocks to living a more peaceful and prosperous life. Some of these scripts include:

Being rich is selfish and not in sync with my values

If I make a lot of money it will cause tension in my family

I could never be wealthy

Money and doing good in the world don’t mix

“Very often, we don’t realize that our beliefs about money are causing us so much pain or holding us back,” says Mor- gan-Jaffe. “We find ourselves in relation- ships where we don’t talk about money, try to buy happiness, are afraid to ask for what we’re worth, or avoid thinking about money altogether. “I know this from my own experience. Taking a hard look at my relationship to money has transformed my life, and I

want to pay it forward.” Morgan-Jaffe works as a nationally certified counselor, and holds a master’s degree in education and human devel- opment from the George Washington University. She has worked in both the nonprofit and for-profit sectors, and has more than 25 years’ experience in mar- keting and communications. She offers talks, presents seminars and works with individuals and organizations on how to foster abundant thinking at home and at work. For more information on creating a positive mindset regarding money, Mor- gan-Jaffe offers a free e-book on her website, morganjaffe.com.

The Chamber’s Business Matters Lunch, “Money, Work, How Our Money Mindset Drives Results,” is Friday, Feb. 28, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at 1101 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 300. The event is free for mem- bers, $25 for non-members. To register, visit caglcc.org.

The Chamber Means Business. For more information visit caglcc.org or facebook.com/CAGLCC. On Twitter, follow @DCLGBTBIZ.

John F. Stanton, a CAGLCC member, is the president of SRP & Associates Inc., a strategic marketing and public relations firm in Northern Virginia. l

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LGBTCommunityCalendar

Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at 202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.

LGBT CommunityCalendar Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative
LGBT CommunityCalendar Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative

Leadership and National Portrait Gallery. Free. Lunch between sites. Meet 11 a.m. inside Ford’s Center, 514 10th St. NW. Craig, 202-462-0535.

craighowell1@verizon.net.

WEEKLY EVENTS

LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL

EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30 a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW. 202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.

DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St. Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All welcome. Sign interpreted. dignitynova.org.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27

WEEKLY EVENTS

ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH

offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square- dancing group features mainstream through advanced square dancing at the National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m. Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The

Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,

  • 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301

MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745- 7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.

IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours, call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,

301-422-2398.

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young

LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28

WEEKLY EVENTS

ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH

offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,

andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30 p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.

HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health, Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,

  • 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-walker.org.

PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.

SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social

atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,

featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.

SATURDAY, MARCH 1

ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 8 strenuous miles, 2,200 feet elevation gain, on Catoctin Mountain. Bring beverages, lunch, sturdy boots, about $12/fees. Carpool 8:30 a.m., Grosvenor- Strathmore Metro. Devon, 202-368-3379. adventuring.org.

  • DC SCANDALS GLBT rugby team holds “Scandalous

Mardi Gras Recruitment Party.” 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cobalt, 1639 R St. NW. dcscandals@gmail.com.

BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer

organization helps at Food & Friends and at Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation at Falls Church

PetSmart. burgundycrescent.org.

WEEKLY EVENTS

FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for

worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker House Living Room (next to Meeting House on Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.

INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT,

God-centered new age church & learning center. Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier Place NW. isd-dc.org.

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites

all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people for

25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE. reformationdc.org

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF

NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11 a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930, mccnova.com.

NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive

church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,

8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas

Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.

ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH

offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or andromedatransculturalhealth.org.

BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others

interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/ time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.

  • DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at

Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.

NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.

  • DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social

club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and supportive environment, socializing afterward. Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or 10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.

SUNDAY, MARCH 2

ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 11 strenuous miles, Scotts Run Nature Preserve to Roosevelt Island, via Potomac Heritage Trail. Bring beverages,

lunch, sturdy boots, a few dollars/fees. Carpool 9:15 a.m., Roosevelt Island parking lot. Devon, 202-368-

3379. adventuring.org.

CHRYSALIS arts & culture group visits exhibits at Ford’s Theater Center for Education and

ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an

“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community” offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202- 232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF

SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and

individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.

MONDAY, MARCH 3

WEEKLY EVENTS

The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000

14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.

KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,

3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.

WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team

practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299- 0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.

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Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.

Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT

GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.

TUESDAY, MARCH 4

WEEKLY EVENTS

Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH

AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,

1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis. No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available for fee. whitman-walker.org.

Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.

THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER

hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.

SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21

meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.

US HELPING US hosts a support group for black gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.

NW. 202-446-1100.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5

THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB

meets for Social Bridge. No reservations or partner needed. All welcome. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. For more information, 301-345-1571.

BOOKMEN DC, informal men’s gay-literature group, discusses Too Much Flesh and Jabez by Coleman Dowell. 7:30 p.m. Tenleytown Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. All welcome.

bookmendc.blogspot.com.

WEEKLY EVENTS

AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647 20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.

PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m., Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637 17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill, 703-671-2454. l

FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM

Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
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16 FEBRUARY 27, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM

LGBTOpinion

Taking the Cake

Arizona’s archaic attempt to enshrine discrimination against gays is the last-gasp measure of a secessionist mindset

by Sean Bugg

LGBT Opinion Taking the Cake Arizona’s archaic attempt to enshrine discrimination against gays is the last-gasp

BACK IN EARLY

2007

I found

myself

sitting

in

the

fondant-

bedecked

office

of

a

professional

w e d d i n g - c a k e

baker in search of

the

perfect

(yet

still

affordable)

three-tier cake for my upcoming wed- ding. Early in the interview process, after providing the wedding date but before tasting samples, I gestured at Cavin and said, “This is going to be our gay wedding. Is that going to be a problem?” A month or so later when I saw the same baker on Food Network compet- ing to create the most elaborate “prin- cess cake,” it was obvious my ques- tion was superfluous. But my wedding was an important event for my life and I wanted to make sure no surprises popped up later. This is one of the ways I’m lucky to live in an urban, largely progressive and exceptionally competitive location where the vast majority of businesses want my money, regardless whom my wallet shares a home with. The most effective way of dealing with assholes is to simply decline to deal with them at all. That’s not the case for everyone, as seen with the current brouhaha over the Arizona GOP’s attempt to pass a law giv- ing religious believers the right to dis- criminate against gays and lesbians. As I write this, Gov. Jan Brewer (R) has yet to announce whether she’ll veto the leg- islation, which even some of the Repub- licans who voted for it have asked her to do now that they’ve seen the sheer size of the shit show they’ve unleashed on their state and its businesses. It can be easy from the comfort of an enclave to say that there should be some

level of exception for the religious,

which actually only means “Christians”

because the moment a Muslim brings religion into a business the far right starts screaming “Sharia!” because they are supremely lacking in irony. But while some have tried to claim that the Arizona legislation (and the earlier, failed Kansas attempt to do the same) is only about protecting “Christians” from having to participate in rites they consider sinful, this is actually the lat- est in a series of attempts to carve out a separate enclaves for certain religions. Don’t forget that these are the same people who have tried to exempt phar- macists from dispensing medications they consider immoral, such as “morn- ing after” medication to prevent preg- nancy. As with the current Arizona proposal, supporters claim it’s about one thing but write it so broadly that it can easily become about many. Rather than just marriage, Arizona’s Legisla- ture proposed a law that would give any business, from a hairdresser to a theater to a restaurant, the right to refuse ser- vice to gays for some vaguely defined religious dissent. In essence, they want to secede from secular society and the rule of law. While the Arizona legislation is doomed by either a veto or a court rul- ing, it’s worth remembering that not everyone has the luxury of choice in the business of their lives. I grew up in homogenous, rural America where the response to discrimination isn’t as sim- ple as finding the next florist or baker or reception hall. None of us want to work with businesses and professionals who regard us with disdain and hostility, but some of us have few options. The blowback on Arizona should be a heartening sign for a changing America. But it also should serve as a reminder that the people who support it are determined to reserve the right to treat other Americans as less than. We have a lot of work left to make sure we are all considered equal in the world. l

LGBT Opinion Taking the Cake Arizona’s archaic attempt to enshrine discrimination against gays is the last-gasp

FEBRUARY 27, 2014 VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 43

 

PUBLISHER

Randy Shulman

 

EDITORIAL

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Randy Shulman

ART DIRECTOR

 

Todd Franson

MANAGING EDITOR

 

Will O’Bryan

POLITICAL EDITOR

 

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LGBTOpinion

Twice as Good

America is at a cultural, social crossroads demanding a re-examination of privilege

by Richard J. Rosendall

LGBT Opinion Twice as Good America is at a cultural, social crossroads demanding a re-examination of

FEB. 5 WOULD HAVE BEEN TRAY- von Martin’s 19th birthday. Jordan Davis would have turned 19 on Feb. 16. There are too many other cases like theirs, and they are not restricted to Florida. To be young and black in America is to be the target of an astonishing degree of savage, unearned hostility. Unlike George Zimmerman, who was acquitted after killing Martin, Michael Dunn at least was con- victed for shooting up an SUV full of black teens. But saying he saw Davis with a gun was apparently enough to dodge the murder one count, though Davis had no gun. Does anyone think jurors would have bought the story had the races been reversed?

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FEBRUARY 27, 2014
METROWEEKLY.COM

Another example of “fear goggles,” as Jessica Williams of

The Daily Show dubs the racial lens of “chronically terrified

white people,” was the reaction when Richard Sherman of the

Seattle Seahawks offered up some adrenaline-fueled trash talk to Fox’s Erin Andrews after the NFC championship game. As Mark Thompson noted on Sirius/XM Progress talk radio, you’d have thought Sherman were King Kong and Andrews were Fay Wray. When an All-Pro cornerback from the NFL’s best defensive squad needs to have his 3.9 GPA from Stanford cited to stop white people’s quivering, we have a problem. Though not fatal for Sherman as it was for Martin and Davis, it showed the same instant demonization, the same culturally assigned otherness. Why is this an LGBT issue? For one thing, African-Amer- icans have been among the most prominent out gay people in pro sports: Brittney Griner in the WNBA, Jason Collins in the NBA (who just signed with the Brooklyn Nets), Michael Sam before the NFL draft. All lacked the privilege taken for granted by white heterosexual men. Facing greater bias, they summoned greater strength. As the Scandal character Olivia Pope is told by her father in the TV drama, “You have to be twice as good as them to get half of what they have.” Many black overachievers grew up hearing this. But it is not just that black and gay overlap. We must work together to defeat those who exploit fear and hatred to gain power. This requires refuting their lies repeatedly over time. The images of Sam’s athletic prowess are a powerful antidote and promise a historic moment come May. For the past few years I have mentored a black gay youth from a troubled home who is now in college. Seeing his progress renews my hope in the difference that teaching and guidance can make. But there are many more like him. We nurture the next generation one life and one mind at a time. As in a Paul Laurence Dunbar poem about a father playing with his baby, we know we cannot always protect our young from the world. My mentee once told me, “I’m tougher than I look.” Thank good- ness. He wants to succeed so he can help others. If we only speak out when it’s our turn in the crosshairs, we do the haters’ prep work. To defeat them, we must recognize our proper coalition partners, learn patience, and overcome our mutual resentments. We have to make a leap of trust. The alter- native is to lose our country. A youth stands before us who is no longer a child but not yet a man, armed with loud music or with Skittles and tea, wrapped despite himself in the garb of other people’s bogey- men. He started out, in Dunbar’s words, as a little brown baby with sparkling eyes. There is no greater treasure for parent or nation. His welfare is our mutual concern. We must reach past our differences to help him survive and thrive, lest that light and all its futures go out.

Richard J. Rosendall is a writer and activist. He can be reached at rrosendall@starpower.net. l

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The Fantastic Mr. Fox

As one of its most popular filmmakers, Eytan Fox has

helped turn Israel into a remarkably gay-friendly country

INTE RVIEW B Y DOUG RU LE

A FEW YEARS AGO FILMMAKER EYTAN Fox was flipping TV channels in his Berlin hotel room when he stumbled on the Euro- vision Song Contest. “Suddenly, I realized that I didn’t even know who was represent-

ing Israel that year,” he says. A lot had changed in the four decades since organizers of the annual music competition had first invited the small Middle Eastern democracy to join its pop parade. Back then, in 1973, as a kid growing up in Jerusalem, Fox’s parents “had invited all of our neighbors over to our apartment to watch the contest.” Six years later, as a 14-year-old reporter on an Israeli TV show run by kids, Fox was sent to cover that year’s Eurovision contest. “I was very proud of myself that I was part of this supposedly very glamorous world of Eurovision,” he says. In the decades since, Fox had mostly forgotten all about Eurovision, with notable exceptions, such as in 1998 when trans- gender singer Dana International won representing Israel. Also in that time Fox, who is gay, has become one of Israel’s most popular filmmakers, responsible for several hit series on Israeli TV. His feature films constantly travel the international festival circuit, particularly hitting LGBT and Jewish film festivals. In 2006 the Washington Jewish Film Festival (WJFF) presented Fox with an award for his contributions to the field of Jewish cinema. Fox’s films, which include 2002’s Yossi & Jagger, 2004’s Walk on Water and 2006’s The Bubble, chiefly focus on contem- porary Israeli life, always present gay and straight characters as close friends, colleagues or neighbors — often all three. Most notably, these gay-inclusive films are always made with funds from the Israeli government. “The country has been supporting my films since the mid-’90s,” says the 49-year-old. “Films that always have gay characters, gay themes, gay love stories, gay sex scenes.” Fox’s latest, the sweet and uplifting Cupcakes, which closes the WJFF Saturday, March 9, was inspired by Eurovision. The focus is on a group of Israelis — three straight women, one lesbian and one gay man — who compete at a Eurovision-style competition. The group’s leading competitor is a Russian hus- band-and-wife duo, as fake and manufactured — among other things the husband is a closet case — as this ragtag Israeli group is authentic, even innocent.

The Israeli group competes by performing a song originally written by Scott Hoffman, otherwise known as Babydaddy from the Scissor Sisters. “Scott is a friend of mine and my family,” Fox explains. “At some point I said to him, ‘Do you have a Eurovi- sion-like song that you maybe wrote once and never published or anything?’ And he said, ‘You know what? A few years ago we sat together, we had some drinks, we were kind of tipsy, and we decided to write an ABBA-style song.’” For Cupcakes, Fox made this song, originally called “Right Back,“ “sweeter, more sentimental, more kitsch.” And “Song for Anat” is sung in Hebrew, a nod to what Fox said the competition used to be. “It used to be, you came from Spain, you sang in Spanish. You came from Germany, you sang in German,” he explains about Eurovision. “And now, everyone sings this funny, bad English. Bad accents and bad lyrics. So it’s become more and more of a joke.”

METRO WEEKLY: How would you describe Cupcakes? EYTAN FOX: Well, it is, more than anything, your classic, feel-good movie. It’s a film about friendship. How a group with a sense of community can do a lot for each other. And it’s about the journey that a group of neighbors take together. It’s a very sweet, but complicated, story. I have films of mine that I consider more serious, more relationship stories. That are usually more politically oriented, have to do a lot with Israel’s situation in the Middle East, and its relationship with its neighbors. And masculinity in Israel. Gay identity in Israel. And then I have the lighter side of my filmmaking. Audi- ences at the WJFF saw Mary Lou four years ago — my television miniseries, which was called in Washington an Israeli Glee. So I have the sides in me that are more fun and games, music, danc- ing, happy, colorful gay and straight characters. Cupcakes defi- nitely falls under that section of my filmmaking. It’s somewhat of a musical. I grew up to parents who came from the states and moved to Israel when I was a kid. And my mom loved American musicals, so a lot of my influences come from there. Classic MGM musicals from the ’50s. And a lot of other influences, like The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, a group of French musicals by a director called Jacques Demy. MW: Cupcakes focuses on a Eurovision-style contest. Explain the

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METROWEEKLY.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF ZIV SADE & WASHINGTON JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

Eytan Fox with Cupcakes cast

significance of that annual competition to you.

FOX: The Eurovision Song Contest has been something very sig- nificant in a strange way in my life. It used to be an amazing song competition or contest, where wonderful songs and singers from

all over Europe would come together and perform. When I was a kid there was ABBA and Cliff Richard, Olivia Newton-John and Celine Dion — all these wonderful artists who started their careers in this competition, with beautiful pop songs. I grew up in a very nationalistic country, where any competition outside of Israel where Israel took part, everyone was so into it. It didn’t

matter if it was the Olympics or Eurovision or the Nobel Prize. As long as Israel was competing, everyone was really into it. I remember the first year of Eurovision where Israel participated. And it was all of us together. All the neighbors came together and watched the competition and really cared about Israel and the Eurovision Song Contest. MW: I remember the transgender singer Dana International win- ning Eurovision for Israel in 1998.

FOX: That was an amazing experience. Israel, again, it’s a very nationalistic place, so in the beginning when we chose Dana International to represent us in the Eurovision Song Contest, so many people were criticizing that: “How can you send a trans- sexual to represent our holy land of Israel?” That was what they were saying. And they were demonstrating in the streets against her going to Eurovision. Then she won! That was such a big thing. After she won and came back to Israel, she went to the Parliament, to the Knesset. And all these members of Parliament who were against her shook her hand. Because who cares? She won. It doesn’t matter if she’s transsexual, or this or that — she won for Israel. That was a big thing. A lot of people in Tel Aviv were sitting watching this competition, being very proud of the fact that Israel sent a transsexual to this competition, which was very unusual at the time. And she was so good, and she won. And all of us went down to the square in the center of the city – with rainbow flags. And we danced and sang. And it was an amazing experience. And the funny thing was, the same night, the most macho, even homophobic, soccer team in Israel won the cham- pionship of Israel. The same night! And they went to the same square. Guys with their soccer team flags. And we’re all dancing together for the first time in our lives. It was really a wonderful, kind of communal experience.

MW: In preparing for this interview, I noticed that Dana Interna- tional went back and competed again for Eurovision in 2011.

FOX: Yeah, for some strange reason. This competi - tion is really changing in ways that I don’t know how to explain. But for some reason she didn’t do that well. MW: Has she had a successful career otherwise? FOX: After Eurovision, Sony/BMG signed her up and tried to create a career for her in Europe and internationally. It didn’t really work. Her people didn’t know what to do with this sudden

success. She does tour Europe, in gay nightclubs and that whole dance scene. She still has a career here in Israel. She’s had a few hits since “Diva,” her big Eurovision hit. She had a talk show, and now she has this game show where she’s looking for the next girl band in Israel, like an Israeli Idol/X Factor show. MW: Has she ever played a part in your movies? Or have you thought of including her?

FOX: The song “Diva” does appear as a musical number in Mary Lou, and all of [“Diva” songwriter] Svika Pick’s songs. But work- ing with her specifically? You know, she’s a friend. I love her. I don’t know. You never know. We paid homage to her in Mary Lou. I think even in Walk on Water, the characters refer to her and to her success. So I don’t know, we’ll see. Maybe.

MW: One thing I find notable about your films is that music is always a factor. Sometimes it’s a small part, but always a signifi- cant part.

FOX: Yeah, it always is significant. Music is important and sig- nificant in everyone’s life — almost everyone that I know. And I use it in order to describe or characterize a character. Sometimes different musical tastes define different people, different worlds, different psyches. In Walk on Water, I really have two characters — one very macho, straight, Mossad [Israeli security force]; the other is a gay, young German. And they really have a fight about their musical tastes. They have a constant argument about their different musical tastes.

MW: Do you have a musical background? FOX: I studied piano when I was a kid, but I was never really a musician. I was actually a dancer. I thought I’d be a dancer when I was young. But then I had to join the Israeli Army at 18 for four years, and realized I won’t be a dancer. And chose to be a film director, which is probably for the best. MW: You were born in New York, grew up in Jerusalem, then moved to Tel Aviv for college, came out and never looked back? You’re still living there to this day?

FOX: Tel Aviv is the city that all the young people – and all the modern, secular, normal people – flee to. It’s our big, modern, vibrant city. It’s a wonderful city. But you know what? Israel has changed in amazing ways, really. I mean, growing up in Jerusalem, the word “gay” did not exist. We didn’t even have the word. It was a very unknown concept, homosexuality. But today, the world has become such a small place. People who live in Jerusalem, young people, they saw my films and television work. They know that gays exist. They’re exposed to cable television and satellite and Internet. And they watch all the television shows that come from all over the world that have gay characters. And they’re exposed to gay

websites from all over the world. So, it’s not as much fun as it is in Tel Aviv, I think, but there are gay people in Jerusalem. MW: That’s one thing you capture in Yossi & Jagger, from 2002, and the sequel Yossi from two years ago: the remarkable change in only one decade in attitudes toward the LGBT community in Israel. FOX: Israel has changed in amazing ways. And I’m really proud to say that I think that I’ve been part of that change. My films and television work — I’ve worked very hard at making these changes happen. And Tel Aviv has become really a mecca, a par- adise, for gay men and women from all over the world. It’s really amazing. It’s so gay-friendly. It’s full of options for gay people. There are hundreds of gay couples with their kids roaming down the streets of Tel Aviv. And there are parties and nightlife, and so many things. MW: How long have you and your partner Gal Uchovsky been together? And are you one of those couples with kids roaming the streets of Tel Aviv?

FOX: No. We don’t have kids. We met 26 years ago, when I was a young film student. I was directing the Israeli Academy Awards ceremony, something like that. I had just finished film school and they kind of took me to direct this big ceremony, and Gal was a journalist at the time, writing about that ceremony. That’s how we met. MW: What’s the secret to your relationship? It’s not only personal but also professional, since you often co-write your films together. FOX: First of all, we don’t really make films together anymore. We realized that’s too much. To live together, maintain this relationship and family, and work together…. We try not to work together as much anymore. What is the secret? You know,

the answers always sound like clichés. Friendship is the most important thing. MW: When did you come out? FOX: When I was about 24. I finished my army service, I moved to Tel Aviv, I started studying film. And then I met Gal. I think after I had Gal in my life, I was brave enough and strong enough

to go to my parents and say, “I’m gay, and this is my life, this is my partner.” MW: I understand your parents passed away in recent years. Did they ever come around to accepting you and Gal? Are you close to your remaining family?

FOX: Yeah. My mother became very close to Gal immediately. And my father went through a very interesting process, starting with my coming out. He started going to therapy, which he never did before, and really became a much better person. And he became friends with Gal. It was a very nice journey that he took, and I was there to see it happen. I think the last thing he said to me before he died was something very nice about my relation- ship with Gal. He said something about how he realizes that Gal is so wonderful for me. Both my brothers have gone back to the states. So it’s only me and then all my alternative family, my close friends, and Gal’s family is here. He has a relatively big family in Israel. MW: You were closeted when you were in the army. FOX: Of course. This was 1982, the world was a different place. Isra- el was certainly a different place. It was war, so no one could know. MW: I know it’s mandatory for every young Israeli to enlist, but, for example, the openly gay character Tom in Yossi talks about the possibility of leaving the army before completing his term, in order to stay with his lover Yossi. How common is that?

FOX: That’s still a very radical, radical statement that he gives there: That he will leave the army. It’s kind of extreme. But Isra- el has changed, and there’s not only one option for young people. The Israel I grew up in had only one option for every man who grew up in it: You had to be straight, you had to be a soldier, you

had to be a certain kind of man, who does certain kinds of things. And options have opened and changed. MW: How much do you identify with the character of Yossi? FOX: Yossi is probably the character I most identify with from all my characters. I find Yossi my most personal film, and I feel closest to it. It deals with all kinds of issues that I guess I’m deal- ing with — like getting older, and asking questions about who you are and what you’ve accomplished. And your past and your traumas. And what you’ve managed to deal with, and what you haven’t dealt with, and should be dealing with. All kinds of ques- tions like that. MW: It’s a really touching film. And it takes a turn I didn’t see com- ing. Because it starts so stark, and kind of lonely, and then it ends

on a hopeful note. And sweet. FOX: I was accused a few times in the past of being not as hopeful as people wanted me to be. So I guess I’m becoming more hope- ful as years go by.

MW: Did you know you were going to do a sequel to Yossi & Jagger years ago? Why did it take so long? FOX: Not at all. Why did it take a decade? I don’t really know. It takes time to go back and reflect on things that happen. You don’t do that after a year or two. You can, but you don’t really have the perspective and the time. MW: Have you ever made an American film, ever thought of “going Hollywood”?

FOX: All my films were and are Israeli. Walk on Water had a lot of English in it. But no, most of the films are in Hebrew — small Israeli films. I’ve had my relationship with Hollywood throughout the years. Somehow I never felt at home enough there. And it’s very important to me, when I make films, to really feel part of a family that works together and makes films together. But my next film is going to be a very big film that I’m doing with a producer who works and lives now out of L.A. So it will be a bigger kind of film that might involve Hollywood, in some way,

Fox

Films

BY R HU AR ID H M A RR

E YTAN FOX, THE GAY NEW YORK-BORN ISRAELI FILM DIRECTOR,

has a relatively short filmography. Directing his first official piece in

1994, he has gone on to helm just 11 projects in his 49 years. For-

tunately for Fox, however, of the few pieces he has helped craft, several have become staples of foreign-language gay cinema. Fox doesn’t shy from acknowledging and celebrating his Israeli roots, and the challenges and ad- versities that presents. His films tackle a variety of issues: homophobia, rac- ism, Arab-Israeli tensions, lost love, self-discovery. One even handles Jewish attitudes toward Germany in the aftermath of World War II. Fox doesn’t shy from presenting the bleak aspects of life, but he also celebrates its beauty. It also doesn’t hurt that he has a penchant for musical numbers, regardless of the film’s tone. We revisited four of Fox’s most famous films, as well as his latest, Cupcakes, to get a firm grasp on the director’s canon.

Yossi & Jagger

2002

HHHHH It’s important to remember that Israel has allowed openly gay servicemem- bers in its armed forces since 1993. It’s also important to remember that being out is still an incredibly hard thing to do. That’s the basis for Yossi & Jagger, a short, emotional drama that finds its setting in a group of sol- diers on the Israel-Lebanon border. The film follows troop commander Yossi, and his relationship with his second- in-command officer Lior, nicknamed Jagger for his handsome looks and lip-syncing to Mick Jagger. They keep their love a secret from the other sol- diers, using regular patrols to exercise their need for one another — having sex, talking, enjoying the privacy, as they roll around in the snow together. At just 67 minutes and shot on a shoe- string budget, it won’t blow you away

manner or form. But I like doing my thing. I like doing my small, independent, Israeli films, where I can do whatever I want to do. And where I work with people I love. And with budgets that allow me to do whatever I want to do. MW: What is the focus of that film? FOX: It’s a biopic about a wonderful, beautiful Israeli singer in the ’70s, called Mike Brant. Grew up in Israel. Was actually a son of Holocaust survivors. A very poor family. Disturbed parents. Brant never wanted to be a singer, never made it in Israel. Left Israel, became a giant, giant superstar in France. And then at some point became very depressed, and killed himself at the age of 27. But it’s full of music that I love. And it has a lot of Israeli history, Jewish history. Sex, drugs and rock and roll — or more pop music than rock and roll. It has France in the ’70s, and that whole music scene of France in the ’70s. It’s a wonderful story, I’m really happy about it. We’re going to shoot it towards the end of 2014. MW: Earlier you were talking about Tel Aviv being a mecca for young people and gay people in particular. Is there anti-gay vio-

lence there of late? FOX: There always is to some extent. But I have to tell you that I think Tel Aviv is such a nice, gay-friendly city and environment.

We had this terrible story a few years back where a shooter went into a gay youth community center and shot a kid. And two kids were killed, and a lot of them were injured and crippled. Just a year ago the police found the guilty person. And it’s a big ordeal. So that was very bad, but after that, the whole country got together to fight homophobia, and anti-gay violence. So it’s really part of our awareness here in Israel. MW: It often takes something tragic to bring people together or open their eyes. FOX: Yeah, sadly enough. But also you could say that the fact that the country has been supporting my films since the mid-’90s, constantly supporting my films. These films are made only with film funds. You can’t really make these films without the support

of Israeli film funds. And these are government funds: money the country is putting into films, that always have gay characters, gay themes, gay love stories, gay sex scenes. I remember traveling the world, especially gay and lesbian film festivals and Jewish film festivals, with the television series I made in the ’90s called Florentine. And this was before Queer as Folk, before that whole Showtime television series, before you had all these gay charac- ters and representations in American cinema and television, or on European television. And people were shocked! “How is it, the holy land of Israel allows you to show these things — gay love story and scenes — on primetime Israeli network television?” MW: What’s the answer to that? Why did Israel support that so early? FOX: It’s interesting. Israel is very full of contradictions. A very strange place. A lot of humanity and love and acceptance and inclusion. And then again a lot of fear, a lot of hatred, a lot of survival issues. Traumas. Inability to really see today, our situ- ation, and to be able to reach peace with our neighbors. And to understand that there are certain things that we have to do in order to solve the occupation problem, and the war problems, and so on and so on. So it’s really such a mix. How do you explain the fact that Israel has become one of the most gay friendly, and accepting of gay people, cultures in the world? But then again it’s so problematic and difficult as far as accepting the Arab other or Palestinian other? There are really very different views — religious on the one hand and very anti-religious/secular/progressive on the other hand. It’s a very interesting, crazy mix. MW: Sort-of on that topic, 2006’s The Bubble is about the so-called “bubble” that is Tel Aviv. Residents live in peace while surrounded by the broader Middle East region that is perpetually in a state of conflict. One of the film’s storylines involves a young gay Israeli who falls in love with a Palestinian. Was that inspired by a real-life experience? Was it your own? FOX: Partly. I never really had a serious love story with a Pales-

with production values. What it will do is reduce you to an emotional mess. Jagger wants to be open about their love, to plan for the future. Yossi, deftly portrayed by Ohad Knoller, is closeted, apprehensive, scared. An impromptu visit from an army colonel, announc- ing a nighttime ambush, moves the story along, bringing with it a base full of soldiers who are exhausted and weary, unwilling to risk their lives for what they deem to be a pointless ex- cursion. Fox maneuvers through the base, and later the raid scenario, like a fly-on-the-wall. We eavesdrop on nu- merous conversations, catch glimpses of different personalities, and in such a short space of time the entire cast manages to create an authentic, be- lievable atmosphere. It’s what makes the film’s ending all the more devastat- ing. We have come to care for these soldiers, in particular Yossi and Jagger, championing their love, their friend- ships, their bonds. Yossi’s emotional outburst, when he finally stops car- ing what the other soldiers think, is incredible. It may only be an hour, but

Yossi & Jagger explores a deeper, and rawer, love story than most films twice its length.

Walk on Water

— his homophobia when he discovers that Axel is gay; the flirtatious nature of his time spent with Pia (Caroline Pe- ters), Axel’s sister; a torrent of barely concealed anger when Axel sleeps

  • 2004 with a Palestinian man. It’s in the re- lationship between Eyal and Axel that Walk on Water truly succeeds — a scene at the Dead Sea strips away the emotional layers holding Eyal back and he opens up to Axel as if he were a true friend. It’s beautifully handled by Fox, Ashkenazi, and Knut Berger as Axel. By the film’s end, both men are changed. Their effect on each other is obvious, producing a work notable for its focus on homosexuality being part of a much larger fabric of events and social issues. Dealing with homopho- bia, transphobia, the Israel-Palestine conflict, anti-German sentiment, the emotional cost of killing for a career, lost love and new love, Walk on Wa- ter threatens to drown itself under its own ambitions, but the core story, the friendship between its two lead- ing men, keeps it afloat and makes it something of a marvel.

HHHHH Fox’s film about a Mossad agent hired to be a guide for a German tourist may not sound like much, but you’d be wrong. Eyal is a trained killer, ad- ept at removing terrorist threats with- out causing a scene. When he returns home from a mission to discover his wife has committed suicide, it sets into motion a narrative that deals with so many issues it’s almost too much for Fox to handle — yet it all some- how works, and works well. Tasked with monitoring Axel and Pia, German grandchildren of a Nazi war criminal long considered dead but discovered alive in South America, Eyal poses as a tour guide to shadow them in an at- tempt to discover if they know of their grandfather’s whereabouts. Lior Ashkenazi handles the various complexities of Eyal’s personality well

tinian. I grew up in Jerusalem, and therefore the whole story of living between Israel and Palestine — the Jewish parts of Jeru- salem and the Arab/Palestinian parts of Jerusalem — are really part of my biography. But having a love story with a Palestinian

is just my fantasy I guess. [Laughs.] I know a lot of people who have had these kind of relationships, these very difficult, some- times even tragic relationships. And I was trying to say some- thing about our situation through this tragic love story. MW: Are there many gay Palestinians around you today? Is Tel Aviv a mecca for them too?

FOX: I don’t know if there are many. But I think a lot of young, gay Palestinians escape Palestine and come try to live in Tel Aviv. A lot of them do encounter all the difficulties that the main char- acter, the Palestinian character in The Bubble, does. And a lot of them decide to leave Israel, and leave the region, because they can’t live in Palestine openly gay, and they can’t live in Israel because they’re not accepted here as Palestinians. So a lot of them do leave the whole Middle East and go live in Europe and try to rebuild their lives someplace that is more normal for them. MW: Do you have hope for a more peaceful Israel and Middle East? FOX: Different things have to happen, but it’s clear that eventu- ally we’ll have to have two states here, Palestine and Israel. And we’ll have to find ways to live together peacefully. We’ll have to give up a lot of things that people are very afraid about. We have to overcome fear, that’s the most important thing, and go for the right thing — which is concessions and understanding that we can’t continue this way. The world is becoming so anti-Israeli policies and occupation. And rightly so. MW: What sense of obligation do you feel in commenting on politics and current events in your work? FOX: I always try to. I’m working on this television series now. Again, there are relationships between Israelis and Palestinians, and trying to solve problems between them on a more human level of relationships.

MW: What is the television series? FOX: It’s a new television series that I’m shooting as we speak. What would the American idiom be? “Good Family.” You say in Hebrew, “It’s okay, he comes from a good family.” And it’s about parents, a family in Jerusalem, whose kids all escape Jerusalem — we were talking about this before — and move to Tel Aviv. And the parents are starting to get divorced, and the whole fam- ily kind of reacts to that. And there’s a nice gay character who is part of this wonderful dance company in Tel Aviv, so we’ll have a lot of dance. MW: So there are a lot of reflections of you in there? FOX: Yeah. That’s part of staying in Israel, making films in Israel. Because, really, I make films about myself. I am a one-trick pony. [Laughs.] I make films about myself and things that I really know, and know about and care about. Me, my friends, my fam- ily, my loved ones. MW: But you don’t always write your screenplays. Are you co- writing that TV series?

FOX: Yeah. I wrote the stories and the characters for all my films. But for different reasons I didn’t take the credit for the screen- plays. Lately I have decided to do that, kind of put my name on

the screenplays as well. Because I always did come up with the story and the characters and what I was trying to say there. And then always brought in a collaborator who wrote the screenplay with me or for me. MW: So you were a closeted writer before? FOX: Yeah, exactly. I’m working very hard at coming out of my writer’s closet.

Eytan Fox’s Cupcakes closes the WJFF on Saturday, March 9, at 7:30 p.m., at the Washington, D.C., Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $12. The festival runs from Thursday, Feb. 27, through March 9, and a full festival pass is $85. Call 888- 718-4253 or visit wjff.org. l

The Bubble

the Jewish name Shimi.

  • 2006 It’s from this point that the film de- scends into somewhat soap-worthy fare, with Noam’s roommates Yali, who’s also gay, and Lulu intertwining with the story. Lulu’s boyfriend discov- ers that Ashraf is not Jewish and he flees to Palestine. The Bubble is intent on contrasting the very different lives of the two men — the majority of it deals with Noam trying to get Ashraf back, and Ashraf’s very conservative family conspiring to keep him clos- eted. There’s a forced marriage to Ashraf’s cousin, a Jihad bombing in Tel Aviv that directly impacts a character, an Israeli response in Palestine which affects Ashraf’s family, and the whole film culminates, through emotional scene after emotional scene, in Ashraf taking his brother-in-law’s place as a suicide bomber. The ending of the film is arguably its most powerful moment, and I won’t spoil it, but it’s a slog to get there. Fox seems intent on prodding every issue — Jihadists, bombs, mili- tary attacks, the contrasting of life in Palestine with life in Israel, not just for

HHHHH It’s easy to see why Fox wanted to call The Bubble “Romeo and Julio.” This story of love between two people who live on either side of a conflict is very similar to Shakespeare’s tragedy. Once again tackling the Israel-Palestine con- flict, Fox presents a tale of Noam (Ohad Knoller), a Jewish man living in Tel Aviv, who falls in love with Ashraf (Yousef Sweid), a Palestinian man. The title of the film references the city of Tel Aviv, a relatively peaceful part of Is- rael where residents are said to live in a bubble, separated from the conflict and trouble on Israel’s borders. Noam spots Ashraf while working at a mili- tary checkpoint, but has to return to Tel Aviv as his military service has con- cluded. Ashraf follows Noam to return a passport that Noam dropped at the checkpoint. The two meet and, natu- rally, fall in love. Determined to keep Ashraf in Tel Aviv where he can live openly as a gay man, Noam conspires to have him work in a restaurant under

gay men but for everyone. The soapy, schlocky nature of certain portions of the film drag down what is otherwise a very touching, heartfelt relationship between two people who society and culture won’t let be together.

Yossi

2012

HHHHH

Fox’s fifth feature, a sequel to Yossi & Jagger that takes place a decade after that film’s events, is also his best. It strips away a lot of the social-issues baggage Fox puts into other works and presents a very raw, powerful tale of one man trying to rediscover himself. Ohad Knoller reprises his role as Yossi, and delivers a standout performance. As a closeted cardiologist, the film opens on a depressingly lonely per- son. Yossi lives his life through his job, taking night shifts and working himself to the ragged edge. His eyes are con- stantly surrounded by bags, there’s a permanent 10-day beard and he never

continues on page 37

COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’
COURTESY TEAM PEACHES Compiled by Doug Rule FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014 O SCAR ’

COURTESY TEAM PEACHES

Compiled by Doug Rule

FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 6, 2014

OSCARS GLAMOROUS NIGHT

The DC Center’s Glamour, Glitter & Gold Oscar-watch party teams up with talent
The DC Center’s Glamour, Glitter & Gold Oscar-watch party teams up with talent

I T’S NOT YOUR REGULAR OLD OSCAR PARTY,”

Michael Fowler says of Glamour, Glitter & Gold. “It’s

The DC Center’s Oscar party – but on hyper-drive.”

The “hyper” speed, it turns out, comes courtesy of local drag act Team Peaches. “It’s going to be the fi rst year that we actually have a live performance,” says Fowler, new chair of the board of directors for The DC Center, Washington’s LGBT community center. “The Team Peaches performance during the show is going to be out of this world.” Fowler is working with Ian Smith on this year’s Glam- our, Glitter & Gold, the Oscar-watch party taking place Sunday, March 2, at Town Danceboutique. Besides Team Peaches, Metro Weekly’s editor-in-chief Randy Shulman and local standup comedian Paul Tupper host the segment between the live broadcast of the 86th Annual Academy Awards. Glamour, Glitter & Gold sponsors have also con- tributed prizes to be awarded throughout the night in a silent auction and a raffl e, including tickets to Rufus Wain- wright at The Lincoln Theatre and to Sideshow, this sum-

Team Peaches

mer at the Kennedy Center. “This has always been one of our marquee events to raise funds for The DC Center,” Fowler says. The money will cover general programming funds at the center, as well as provide a cushion for future growth. “We have had very robust usage of the current space,” Fowler says of The DC Center’s new offi ces in the Reeves Center at 14th and U Streets NW. The DC Center settled into the space last fall, but already “we are getting to the point where we are fi nd- ing ourselves without space sometimes.” A move to a new location is from two-to-fi ve years away, Fowler says, adding: “We want to make sure we have strong reserves so that we can sustain the center into the future.”

Glamour Glitter & Gold is Sunday, March 2, starting at 7 p.m. at Town Danceboutique, 2009 8th NW. Tickets are $15 general admission, or $45 for VIP, which includes special seating, hors d’oeuvres and a swag bag. Call 202-234-TOWN or visit towndc.com or thedccenter.org.

SPOTLIGHT

AMY SCHUMER

Only two years ago she was just a blip on even a comedy connoisseur’s radar, as a fi nalist on Last Comic Standing. But now there’s Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer, which is apparently popular enough to allow her to perform her standup beyond the small comedy club circuit. Saturday, March 8, at 8 p.m. D.A.R. Constitution Hall, 1776 D St. NW. Call 202-628-1776 or visit dar.org/conthall.

ATLAS’S INTERSECTIONS:

A NEW AMERICA ARTS FESTIVAL

Every year, the Atlas Performing Arts Center, the H Street Corridor’s hub, creates a true hubbub in the neighborhood, attracting upwards of 9,000

people over three weekends to its “Intersections:

A New America Arts Festival.” Now in its fi fth

year, Intersections features hundreds of artists, most participating in multidisciplinary, curated events – intersections among different art forms, such as fi lmmakers with musicians, or spoken-word artists with dancers. Weekends to March 10. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Ticket prices and passes vary. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts. org and intersectionsdc.org.

BOB MOULD

Twenty-fi ve years ago, the lead singer and guitarist of the pioneering alt-rock band Hüsker Dü and also the pioneering power-pop band Sugar released his debut solo album, Workbook. Bob Mould, of course, is now best known in gay circles as one-half of the pioneering gay-bear-dance-party and DJ duo

Blowoff. Less than two months after hosting the last Blowoff of an 11-year-run, the 9:30 Club welcomes back Mould as part of a small national tour celebrating his solo career’s silver anniversary. Longtime bassist Jason Narducy joins Mould to perform songs from Mould’s oeuvre, but chiefl y Workbook, which has been credited as partly infl uencing Dave Grohl and Ben Gibbard, among others. Wednesday, March 5. Doors at 7 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $25. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com. Also visit 930.com/friends to sign up for the club’s Friends With Benefi ts rewards program offering exclusive deals and discounts on tickets, drinks and merchandise.

CHELSEA HANDLER

The edgy, racy and über -gay-friendly Chelsea Handler tours in support of Uganda Be Kidding Me

METROWEEKLY.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Victoria F. Gaitán, Blue Nude, Part 2, 2013

CREATIVE CAPITAL

WPA’s Select 2014 at Artisphere focuses on contemporary art

I T’S A GREAT PLACE FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN STARTING TO BUILD A COLLECTION,” LISA

Gold sayS of Select 2014. “Or people who are just interested in seeing what’s happening in the region.”

At least 75 percent of the works on display at this Washington Project for the Arts event, held this year at Arti-

sphere, comes from artists in the D.C. region, more than 100 strong. Nine curators, also mostly local, were tapped to select the works for the show, a fundraiser for WPA. “It’s all contemporary work and it’s in a variety of media,” Gold, WPA’s executive director, says — including video, sculpture, photographs and paintings. “We have work in a variety of price ranges too,” she adds, noting that proceeds from the art auction will be shared by her organization and the artists equally. “I came from New York where a lot of organizations would just solicit donations from the artists, and then they would keep all the sale proceeds. But since we are an artist service organization, we don’t feel like that’s the right thing to do. So we help the artists by sharing 50/50.” Started 40 years ago, WPA represents about 800 local artists, helping them with professional development opportuni- ties and showcasing them through a variety of events. WPA organizes some of these from its home base at Southwest’s Capitol Skyline Hotel, including an event every summer in the hotel pool called “Sink or Swim,” which Gold describes as “a synchronized swimming performance art competition.” From now until March 28 in the hotel’s lobby WPA offers a video/ performance series by New York-based Jacolby Satterwhite. But Artisphere is this year’s home for Select 2014, which opens with a reception Thursday, Feb. 27. The works are on view for three weeks, culminating in an Art Auction Gala Saturday, March 22, where people can purchase the works — as well as eat dinner, and even take a swing at some artist-designed piñatas. – Doug Rule

Select 2014 opens with a free reception Thursday, Feb. 27, from 7 to 10 p.m., and runs to March 21, with the Art Auction Gala Saturday, March 22, from 7 to 11 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. Tickets to the gala are $35. Call 703-875-1100 or visit artisphere.com.

— a book that has very little direct connection to the African country, other than to riff on its terrible anti-gay policies. Instead, the focus as always is on Handler’s crazy life and wild adventures, beyond what she shares on a daily basis with her hilarious hit E! network talk show Chelsea Lately. Wednesday,

March 5, at 8 p.m. D.A.R. Constitution Hall, 1776 D St. NW. Call 202-628-1776 or visit dar.org/conthall. Handler also signs books Wednesday, March 8, at 2 p.m. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. Call 202-364-1919 or visit politics-prose.com.

COMPAGNIE KAFIG/CCN CRETEIL ET VAL-DE-MARNE

This France-based “street art” dance company makes its debut at the Kennedy Center with Agwaand Correria. Written and choreographed by the company’s Mourad Merzouki, this work features an all-male Brazilian cast performing celebrated works

METROWEEKLY.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2014

inspired by hip-hop, bossa nova and capoeira, all centered on the theme of water, both as a vital human component and natural resource and a symbol of renewal. Friday, Feb. 28, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, March 1, at 2:30 and 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $22 to $60. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

DEMI LOVATO

X Factor judge and mentor Demi Lovato, who has also appeared as a guest star on Glee, is now on her The Neon Lights Tour, supporting her new album Demi and its hit singles “Heart Attack” and “Neon Lights.” British girl group Little Mix marks its first U.S. tour as one opening act. The other at the Patriot Center is Fifth Harmony, X Factor finalists turned girl group. Sunday, March 2. Patriot Center at George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax. Tickets are $29.50 to $65. Call 703-993-3000 or visit patriotcenter.com.

JO KOY

The Chelsea Lately weekly regular is not gay, despite what Chelsea Handler insists. But he sure is funny. Variety has even named him one of “10 Comics to Watch.” He’s certainly become popular: His annual run of stand-up shows at the DC Improv usually sells out. So, you know, get tickets now if you want to go. Thursday, Feb. 27, through March 1. DC Improv, 1140 Connecticut Ave. NW. Tickets are $30. Call 202-296-7008 or visit dcimprov.com.

KATHY MATTEA

The Grammy-winning Nashville hit-maker from the ’80s and ’90s has since gone in a more folk and roots- driven direction, including covering classic coal- mining songs with the recent Coal. Mattea returns to the area for a concert presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society. Saturday, March 1, at 8 p.m. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $35. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.

MASHA GESSEN

Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot

is a journalistic chronicle of the Russian feminist punk/performance art group that you may have heard of or even seen by now. Members of the collective have been persecuted criticizing loudly and widely Vladimir Putin and his anti-democracy and of course anti-LGBT policies and practices. The Russian investigative reporter Gessen, whose earlier work includes The Man without a Face, a critical biography of Putin, will discuss Pussy Riot and today’s Russia, which she has called despairing and only getting worse. As a lesbian, Gessen recently made the tough but understandable decision to leave her homeland and take up residence in New York. Saturday, March 8, at 6 p.m. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. Call 202-364-1919 or visit politics-prose.com.

THE WASHINGTON CHORUS

Julian Wachner leads the Washington Chorus in its celebration of Giuseppe Verdi in honor of the 200th anniversary of his birth. Sopranos Corinne Winters and Othalie Graham, mezzo-soprano Ola Rafalo, tenor Issachah Savage and bass Peter Volpe are featured soloists in “The Essential Verdi,” featuring favorites from his operas, choruses and choral masterworks, including highlights from Aida, La Traviata and Il Trovatore. Sunday, March 2, at 5 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 to $70. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

STAGE

BEACHES: A MUSICAL

Yes, it’s true: Signature Theatre presents a world premiere musical adapted from the 1985 novel, best remembered as the 1988 weepy film starring Bette Midler and Barbara Hershey. Signature’s Eric Schaeffer directs Mara Davi (Broadway’s A Chorus Line and The Drowsy Chaperone) and Alysha Umphress (Broadway’s American Idiot) in this musical adaptation by original author Iris Rainer Dart, with assistance from book writer Thom Thomas and composer David Austin. To March 23. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.

ELLA FITZGERALD: FIRST LADY OF SONG

HHHHH

Freda Payne has absolutely no trouble channeling

the big voice of Ella Fitzgerald, and it’s actually quite remarkable. Payne, who had a pop hit in

  • 1970 with “Band of Gold,” hits all the right notes

singing, scatting, even occasionally ad libbing in

MetroStage’s latest bio-musical, Ella Fitzgerald: First

Lady of Song. But she isn’t much of an actor. The enthusiasm Payne has performing as Fitzgerald is often lacking when merely portraying her, delivering lines from Lee Summers’s book as if unsure of their veracity or her memory, or both. MetroStage’s relatively barebones production doesn’t give Payne much wiggle room either. To March 16. MetroStage,

  • 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria. Tickets are $55

to $60. Call 800-494-8497 or visit metrostage.org.

(Doug Rule)

HIGH

A month after presenting a pre-New York run of Steven Fales’s Mormon Boy Trilogy plays, Virginia’s LGBT-focused theater company Richmond Triangle Players offers a production of Matthew Lombardo’s drama High, about a nun’s test of her faith as she tries to help a 19-year-old meth-addicted hustler get clean. George Boyd directs this production featuring Jonathan Hardison, Melissa Johnston Price and Kyle Cornell. As with Fales’s plays, Lombardo’s High is presented as part of the Richmond-wide The Acts of Faith Festival, putting spirituality onstage. To March 15. Richmond Triangle Players, 1300 Altamont Ave., Richmond. Tickets are $30. Call 804- 346-8113 or visit rtriangle.org.

HOW

TO

SUCCEED

IN

BUSINESS

WITHOUT

REALLY TRYING

 
inspired by hip-hop, bossa nova and capoeira, all centered on the theme of water, both as

This 1961 musical just hasn’t aged well. The satirical story about office politics is not simply old-fashioned, it is seriously out of date. In fact, I found it offensive in its retrograde portrayal of a large company’s thoroughly sexist culture. Of course, it’s all meant to be tongue-in-cheek, yet somehow the show’s gleeful attitude about a ruthless corporate culture really got under my skin. I just couldn’t bring myself to care for many of the show’s characters — and Frank Loesser’s music never really grabbed me. It never offers a momentary escape of critical relief. Extended to March 2. Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md. Tickets are $32.50 to $65. Call 301-924-3400 or visit olneytheatre.org. (Doug Rule)

MISS NELSON IS MISSING

Jennifer Nelson directs an Adventure Theatre MTC production of a musical based on the popular children’s books by Harry Allard, with book, music and lyrics by Joan Cushing. To March 9. Adventure Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo, Md. Tickets are $19. Call 301-634-2270 or visit adventuretheatre-mtc.org.

30

FEBRUARY 27, 2014

METROWEEKLY.COM

ORLANDO

WSC Avant Bard presents Sarah Ruhl’s new

adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s most imaginative novel, a wild and wonderful romp through centuries and across genders and based in part on the life of Woolf’s lover Vita Sackville-West. Amber Jackson directs this regional premiere of Orlando featuring company members Sara Barker and Jay Hardee. To March 24. Theatre on the Run, 3700 South Four Mile Run Drive, Arlington. Tickets are $25 to $35. Call 703-418-4808 or visit wscavantbard.org.

ROCK OF AGES

Yes, this is a jukebox musical with cheesy rock and noisy hair metal from the ’80s, which just two years ago was turned into a bad film starring Tom Cruise. Certainly, if you didn’t grow up with Whitesnake songs — or those by REO Speedwagon, Foreigner, Poison and the like — Rock of Ages probably isn’t for you. But as Doug Rule wrote in a 2011 review of the show’s national tour: “If can let go of your theatrical pretensions and can stomach the cheese, the noise

and the poop jokes, you’re likely to have nothin’ but a

good time, as they say. … Rock of Ages, which debuted on Broadway two years ago, isn’t just a straight man’s Priscilla, Queen of the Desert — or, for that matter, Glee. Though the general story and selected music is hetero-centric, there are a couple gay twists to the story that will leave any queer theatergoer amused.” Sunday, March 2, at 3 and 7:30 p.m. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St. NW. Tickets are $42.50 to $67.50. Call 202-783-4000 or visit warnertheatredc.com.

SEMINAR

Round House Theatre presents a new work by Broadway’s most-produced female playwright Theresa Rebeck. Seminar focuses on four aspiring young novelists who sign up for private classes with Leonard, an international literary figure who teaches them lessons in survival as well as writing in this comedy, directed by a Round House founder and former artistic director Jerry Whiddon and starring Marty Lodge, Tom Story and Alexander Strain. To March 2. Round House Theatre, 4545 East-West Highway, Bethesda. Tickets are $50 to $60. Call 240- 644-1100 or visit roundhousetheatre.org.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

HHHHH

A late-Victorian romp filled with Oscar Wilde’s relentless wit and merciless jabs at high society, the Shakespeare Theater Company’s The Importance of Being Earnest may be just the ticket for a bitterly cold winter’s evening. With wordplay that tickles the brain, creampuff costumes, an all-around insuppressible cheerfulness, and the kind of elocution that borders on the hypnotic, it’s easy to forget about things like snow, ice and unscheduled leave — as long as one doesn’t also fall into a long winter’s nap. Which is to say that despite its confectionary- like pleasures (including some fine sets) and its exuberant good-naturedness, this isn’t the most riveting of productions. Though it’s hard to put a finger on it, suffice to say it’s something to do with a slight lag in rhythm, a slight lack of chemistry and a slight imbalance between the smug and the sardonic tones that must drive the play. Extended to March 16. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $115. Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.org. (Kate Wingfield)

THE SCARLET LETTER

Focused on creating one-hour audio plays of classics, Lean & Hungry Theater presents its first non-Shakespearean audio play with Nathaniel Hawthorne’s American classic. In this version, Hester Prynne’s story of being socially ostracized for getting pregnant is seen through the eyes of Hawthorne himself. The author questions Ruby,

Hester’s great-granddaughter, about the events that took place in colonial Massachusetts. Renana Fox directs the acting ensemble playing multiple roles, with original music composed by Roc Lee and audio design by R. Mehdi Raoufi. The performance will be broadcast live on WAMU 88.5 FM. Friday, Feb. 28, at 8 p.m. The Dome Theatre at Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. Tickets are $15. Call 703-875-1100 or visit artisphere.com.

THE WEDDING DRESS

Spooky Action Theatre presents what is billed as a visual feast filled with movement, by famous Brazilian playwright Nelson Rodrigues. A blend of a film noir murder mystery, love story and portrait of madness — and presented in the forms of memory, hallucination and reality — The Wedding Dress focuses on the effects of a repressive society. Specifically, a woman and her family in the 1930s and a Madam and her brothel and her lover 30 years prior. Rebecca Holderness directs the production. To March 9. Universalist National Memorial Church, 1810 16th St. NW. Tickets are $25 to $35. Call 202-248-0301 or visit spookyaction.org.

THE YOUNG LADY FROM TACNA

Jose Carrasquillo from Puerto Rico directs the latest show at GALA Theatre, La señorita de Tacna, written by Peruvian 2010 Nobel Prize Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa. This memory play, performed in Spanish with English surtitles, is a moving and humorous portrait of a family and its secrets, focused on a 100-year-old spinster aunt and her canceled engagement to a Chilean captain when she was young. Carlos Castillo and Luz Nicolas star. To March 9. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th St. NW. Tickets are $38 to $42. Call 202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.

Hester’s great-granddaughter, about the events that took place in colonial Massachusetts. Renana Fox directs the acting
Hester’s great-granddaughter, about the events that took place in colonial Massachusetts. Renana Fox directs the acting

DAVID J. MARTIN

DAVID J. MARTIN B IG A PPLE ’ S L ATE -B LOOMER Kenneth Walsh shares

BIG APPLES LATE-BLOOMER

Kenneth Walsh shares adventures in realizing a dream deferred

S OMETIME S PEOPLE G ET T HIS I DEA IN T H EIR HE AD ,” blogger and journalist Kenneth Walsh says. “Oh, if I get a nose job, my life will be so much better.”

Almost immediately, naysayers chime in: “Don’t put so much focus on this one thing that you think you want.” Walsh’s advice? Ignore them. “It’s everything I dreamed it would be, and everything I wanted to have happen in my career,” he says about his life now, at age 46.

No, Walsh didn’t get a nose job. His life-enhancing target was moving to New York. “From the time I was 6 years old that’s what I wanted to do,” he explains. But Walsh, who grew up in suburban Detroit, and then Phoenix as a teenager, curbed his Big Apple cravings once he graduated from Arizona State University. After a stint in Los Angeles, Walsh moved to D.C., where his mother had grown up and his parents had married. He might have stayed longer than five years, but after a “bad breakup” he needed to flee D.C. Already geographically closer than ever to his dream deferred, why not finally go for it? Sixteen years later, Walsh chronicles his adventures in Wasn’t Tomorrow Wonderful?, which Magnus Books will publish next week. The title comes from a song by the new-wave band The Waitresses, and the subtitle — A Memoir — is a bit mis- leading. “I consider it a book of essays,” Walsh says, “because it’s not really chronologically put together like a traditional memoir.” Two of the essays previously appeared as shorter pieces in Instinct magazine, and a few others were expanded from posts to Walsh’s personal blog, Kenneth in the (212). “There were some rough years of bad dates and [unfortunate] online hookups,” Walsh concedes, though he’s been with his partner Michael for 12 years. And after seven years, he got laid off in 2010 from his “dream job” at The New York Times. Now an editor for the Wall Street Journal’s website WSJ.com, Walsh also hopes to write a second book at some point, another work of personal nonfiction. “I just find truth is so much more interesting than anything anyone could dream up.” You could say he’s living proof. – Doug Rule

Kenneth Walsh appears Sunday, March, at 3 p.m., at Number Nine, 1435 P St. NW. Call 202-986-0999 or visit NumberNineDC.com or kennethinthe212.com.

TRIBES

DAVID J. MARTIN B IG A PPLE ’ S L ATE -B LOOMER Kenneth Walsh shares

Nina Raine’s Tribes covers a lot of ground and conveys much about the strengths and weaknesses of a tribe of any kind, be it a family or a community or a culture. Far more than a play about the experience of being deaf or an examination of deaf culture, though, Raine’s play ultimately pivots on the twin issues of language and communication. Even the most minor subplots relate to these fundamental human expressions. Studio’s interpretive production, helmed by the company’s artistic director David Muse, only enhances Raine’s points. Closes this Sunday, March 2. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. Tickets are $39 to $75. Call 202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org. (Doug Rule)

WE ARE PROUD TO PRESENT…

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company offers Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present…, billed as a fast-paced, funny and wholly unique take on race and empathy. The story revolves around a group of idealistic actors — half black and half white — who tell a little-known story of a centuries-old conflict in South West Africa.

But the actorsÐ own stories, subjectivities and ingrained prejudices rise to the surface. Michael John Garcés directs the production that includes Dawn Ursula, Andreu Honeycutt, Joe Isenberg and Holly Twyford. To March 9. Woolly Mammoth, 641 D St. NW. Tickets range from $35 to $72.50. Call 202-393-3939 or visit woollymammoth.net.

MUSIC

BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Marin Alsop leads the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in a program focused on two Russian romantic composers: Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff. Violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg joins to perform the centerpiece, Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No. 1, on a bill that also includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances and Vocalise. Thursday, March 6, at 8 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Also Friday, March 7, and Saturday, March 8, at 8 p.m. Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., Baltimore. Tickets are $29 to $94. Call 410-783-8000 or visit bsomusic.org.

BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA

Every Monday night the 17-piece jazz orchestra performs a variety of music from the big band repertoire — including pieces by Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Billy Strayhorn and Maria Schneider, plus originals from band members — at its namesake venue. Founded by baritone saxophonist Brad Linde and club owner Omrao Brown, features some of D.C.’s best jazz musicians, including Linde and trumpeter Joe Herrera, who co-direct. Performances

at 8 and 10 p.m. every Monday night. Bohemian

Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202- 299-0800 or visit bohemiancaverns.com.

BRIAN D’ARCY JAMES

This Tony-nominated actor (Shrek, Next to Normal) is the latest to get Barbara Cook’s Spotlight for a night of cabaret at the Kennedy Center. Friday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $45. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center. org or washingtonballet.org.

GEMS

The 9:30 Club and Brightest Young Things present this concert of the D.C. dream-pop duo of Lindsay Pitts and Clifford Johns. As Gems, the two weave a dark, cinematic web of intimate male and female vocals, hazy guitars and lush synthesizers. Saturday, March 1, at 7 p.m. U Street Music Hall, 1115A U St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-588-1880 or visit ustreetmusichall.com.

HABIB KOITÉ

Rolling Stone calls Habib Koité “Mali’s biggest pop star,” and he’s one with his own distinctive guitar style, strumming tunes that fuse West African traditions with global rock sounds. Having recorded with Bonnie Raitt among others, Koité stops at Wolf Trap on a tour specifically in support of his just- released set Soô. Wednesday, March 5, at 8 p.m. The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $35. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.

HOOSHIR A CAPPELLA, POTOMAC FEVER

HooShir, Indiana University’s premier co-ed a cappella group, with Jewish roots, joins Potomac

Fever, the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington’s select a cappella pop ensemble, in a special program at the Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia. Saturday, March 8, at 8 p.m. Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia, 8900 Little River Turnpike, Fairfax. Tickets are $29. Call 703-323-

  • 0880 or visit jccnv.org.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Christoph Eschenbach conducts the NSO in a performance of Beethoven’s First and Second Symphonies. Violinist Christian Tetzlaff joins to perform the U.S. premiere of Widmann’s Violin Concerto. Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m.; and Friday,

Feb. 28, and March 1, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 to $85. Call 202-467-

  • 4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK

Strathmore presents a 40th anniversary celebration of the Grammy-winning, D.C.-based, all-woman gospel a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock, founded by Bernice Johnson Reagon, mother of lesbian blues singer Toshi. And they’ve proven their mettle as a gay-friendly group: A few years ago they sang “My Family,” which they penned for the gay- inclusive HBO documentary A Family Is a Family Is a Family: A Rosie O’Donnell Celebration. Saturday, March 1, at 8 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $29 to $70. Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org.

WASHINGTON NATIONAL OPERA

Herman Melville’s classic Moby-Dick is now a triumphant opera with music by Jake Heggie and a libretto by Gene Scheer, featuring massive nautical sets, dazzling visual effects, a beautiful score and a talented cast. The Washington National Opera offers the East Coast premiere of this English-language opera about Captain Ahab and the whale, originally commissioned by the Dallas Opera Company and conducted by Evan Rogister. Carl Tanner and Stephen Costello lead the cast. To March 8. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $25 to $305. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.

DANCE

THE WASHINGTON BALLET

If you’ve grown a little weary of the latest anniversary-pegged Beatlesmania in America, at least the Washington Ballet broadens the focus. British Invasion: The Beatles & The Rolling Stones features two rock ballets: Trey McIntyre’s Beatles- set A Day in the Life and Christopher Bruce’s

GEMS The 9:30 Club and Brightest Young Things present this concert of the D.C. dream-pop duo

Rolling Stones-set Rooster — plus, out of left field, Christopher Wheeldon’s There Where She Loved, set to the music of Kurt Weill and Frederic Chopin. Opens in previews Wednesday, March 5, at 7:30 p.m. To March 9. Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $25 to $125. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org or washingtonballet.org.

8 p.m. D.A.R. Constitution Hall, 1776 D St. NW. Call 202-628-1776 or visit dar.org/conthall.

READINGS

ERIC SCHMIDT, JARED COHEN

Now out in paperback, The New Digital Age:

COMEDY

AMY SCHUMER

Only two years ago she was just a blip on even a comedy connoisseur’s radar, as a finalist on Last Comic Standing. But now there’s Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer, which is apparently popular enough to allow her to perform her standup beyond the small comedy club circuit. Saturday, March 8, at

Transforming Nations, Business and Our Lives, tackles

the multifaceted topic of technology as seen from

Google Mountain. After all, Eric Schmidt is the executive chairman and former CEO of Google and Jared Cohen is director of Google Ideas. Thursday, Feb. 27, at 7 p.m. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $18 including one book, or $28 including two. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.

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GALLERIES

A NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION:

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC AT 125

As part of an organization-wide toast to the first 125 years, the National Geographic Museum offers a visual and interactive exhibition celebrating modern exploration by featuring some of the most iconic moments from the institution and its bedrock magazine. Entered through an archway made of hundreds of issues of National Geographic magazine, the exhibition in the complex’s 17th Street gallery features the work of National Geographic explorers, photographers, scientists and journalists — everyone from Jacques Cousteau to James Cameron — and is sponsored by GEICO, with the North Face a sponsor of giveaways and events throughout its run. Through June. National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th St. NW. Tickets are $11. Call 202-857-7588 or visit ngmuseum.org.

ASCAP: ONE HUNDRED YEARS AND BEYOND

The Library of Congress offers an exhibition featuring 45 objects celebrating the work of the leading organization advocating on behalf of musical artists. Included in this centennial toast to the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers is the original manuscript of Henry Mancini’s The Pink Panther theme, Paul Williams’s lyrics for “The Rainbow Connection,” and the original lyrics, including the many drafts and revisions, to the Barbra Streisand staple “The Way We Were,” written by Alan and Marilyn Bergman. There’s also interactive, audio and video stations, and the screening of a film featuring artists explaining ASCAP’s work. Through July 26. Performing Arts Reading Room Gallery, the Library of Congress’s James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Call 202-707- 8000 or visit loc.gov/concerts.

CREATING THE IDEAL HOME, 1800-1939

Housed in the same building as Constitution Hall, the D.A.R. Museum offers a new exhibit exploring the evolution of household comfort and conveniences, and how American inventors patented all sorts of laborsaving and leisure-providing home devices, from the vacuum and the washing machine to the telephone and television. Through Aug. 30. D.A.R. Museum, 1776 D St. NW. Admission is free. Call 202- 879-3241 or visit dar.org/museum.

GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE

Thanks to the work of the decade-long, $3 billion Human Genome Project, human society has gained much greater insight into our bodies and our health. Scientists have identified genes that contribute to disease, stoking hope for ways to treat or eradicate cancer among many other ailments. This new Smithsonian exhibition, which will travel the country later next year, explores the work and growth in sequencing technology that helped spark this medical and scientific revolution. Through September. National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Call 202- 633-1000 or visit mnh.si.edu.

HOMOCATS: FIGHT THE POWER

Transformer presents New York-based artist J. Morrison’s playful large-scale installation, featuring drawings and prints exploring both the abundance of cat culture on the Internet and the intersection of art and activism. This Valentine’s Day-pegged exhibition questions the state of modern love. Through March 15. Transformer, 1404 P St. NW. Call 202-483-1102 or visit transformerdc.org.

HUMAN, SOUL & MACHINE:

THE COMING SINGULARITY!

Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum opens its 19th original thematic yearlong exhibition this weekend. Human, Soul & Machine is a playful examination of the serious impact of technology on our lives, as seen through the eyes of more than 40 artists, futurists and inventors in a hot-

wired blend of art, science, humor and imagination. Through August. American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway, Baltimore. Call 410-244-1900 or visit avam.org.

MAKE SOME NOISE: STUDENTS AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Pegged to the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and just one of several exhibitions at the Newseum marking the occasion, Make Some Noise:

Students and the Civil Rights Movement explores the new generation of student leaders that emerged in the 1960s to fight segregation and fight for civil rights. John Lewis, now a U.S. representative from Georgia, and Julian Bond, a former chair of the NAACP, are among the leaders highlighted here. Through 2015. Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Tickets are $21.95 for general admission. Call 888-NEWSEUM or visit newseum.org.

MICHELLE PETERSON-ALBANDOZ’S REWOOD

Long View Gallery offers another show from Michelle Peterson-Albandoz, a Chicago-based artist whose large, hanging-wood sculptures are made from reclaimed wood, often found in “dumpsters and back alleys,” she told Metro Weekly a couple years ago. Through March 16. Long View Gallery, 1234 9th St. NW. Call 202-232-4788 or visit longviewgallery.com.

MIKE WEBER’S SYNCHRONICITY

Former D.C.-based gay artist returns for a show at Long View Gallery with Synchronicity, which starts with photographs of tame animals as seen on sustainable farms or within rescue centers. Weber then layers additional materials to create both a sense of chaos and harmony simultaneously. Through March 13. Long View Gallery, 1234 9th St. NW. Call 202-232-4788 or visit longviewgallery.com.

NANCY AGATI, ROSA SPINA AND RADIO SEBASTIAN

Hillyer Art Space presents three solo exhibitions in the month of February, including two contemporary fiber artists, Nancy Agati and Rosa Spina, each presenting a new body of work that uses sewing as an alternative approach to drawing. The third exhibition is from Radio Sebastian, presenting a series of mixed-media pieces — using layered ink, paint and pencil — depicting their personal interpretation of the “void,” or a space that’s not exactly empty but filled with possibilities and occurrences. To March 1. Hillyer Art Space at International Arts & Artists, 9 Hillyer Court NW. Call 202-338-0680 or visit artsandartists.org.

ONE LIFE: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

One Life: Martin Luther King Jr. features historic photographs, prints, paintings and memorabilia, mostly drawn from the National Portrait Gallery’s extensive collection, tracing the trajectory of King’s

career. Through June 1. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F Streets NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit npg.si.edu.

OUR AMERICA:

THE LATINO PRESENCE IN AMERICAN ART

Drawn entirely from the museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art, most of which was acquired in the past few years, this exhibition features works

HUMAN, SOUL & MACHINE: THE COMING SINGULARITY! Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum opens its 19th original
HUMAN, SOUL & MACHINE: THE COMING SINGULARITY! Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum opens its 19th original

in all media by 72 leading modern and contemporary artists. Through March 2. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F Streets NW. Call 202-633-1000 or visit americanart.si.edu.

OVERDRIVE:

L.A. CONSTRUCTS THE FUTURE, 1940-1990

Organized by L.A.’s J. Paul Getty Museum, this exhibition traces the city’s transformation into an internationally recognized destination with its own design vocabulary, canonized landmarks and coveted way of life. Through March 10. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Tickets are $8. Call 202-272-2448 or visit nbm.org.

PASSION OF THE EMPRESS:

CATHERINE THE GREAT’S ART PATRONAGE

In the 18th century Catherine the Great reigned over a golden age of Russian culture, founding what would become the State Hermitage Museum and transforming St. Petersburg into one of Europe’s cultural centers. Hillwood Museum presents Passion of the Empress, which presents a selection of dazzling, finely crafted decorative art pieces in gold, silver, porcelain and enamel — from Hillwood’s collection as well as other pieces from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum, Dumbarton Oaks, the Birmingham Museum of Art and private collections. To June 8. Hillwood Estate, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. Suggested donation is $12. Call 202-686-5807 or visit HillwoodMuseum.org.

POST-OIL CITY

Originating in Germany, the Goethe-Institut presents this international planning and landscape architecture exhibition — subtitled “The History of the City’s Future” — focused on innovative projects around the world tackling an urgent question: How will the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy affect the process of urban planning and the city? Through March 1. University of the District of Columbia, Architectural Research Institute, 4200 Connecticut Ave. NW. Call 202-274-7124 or visit goethe.de/washington.

WHAT’S UP: NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN ART

Strathmore presents an exhibit focused on how technology innovation is revolutionizing the art world, with displays featuring some of the most provocative new media. Among these is software artist Scott Draves’s “Electric Sheep,” a collaborative, crowd-sourced abstract art project that shows how technology is changing the way art is made — challenging standard concepts of ownership and control in the process. Through March 2. The Mansion at Strathmore, 10701 Rockville Pike, North Bethesda. Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org.

WPA’S ANNUAL ART AUCTION: SELECT 2014

“Select 2014” from the Washington Project for the Arts is touted as the highlight of D.C.’s contemporary art world season. Featuring works by more than 100 established and emerging artists from around the region and beyond, as selected by local curators and the WPA’s board of directors, the

three-week exhibition and auction offers something for collectors both seasoned and aspiring. Through March 21. Gala is Saturday, March 22, from 7 to 11 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd., Arlington. Call 703-875-1100 or visit artisphere.com.

WINDOW TO WASHINGTON

“Window to Washington: The Kiplinger Collection at HSW” is an exhibition at Washington’s Carnegie Library that traces the development of the nation’s capital from a sleepy Southern town to a modern metropolis, as documented through the works of artists. The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., exhibition was made possible by a donation from the Kiplinger family. It’s also an early step in a reorganization effort by the society, which has struggled to revive ever since its short-lived effort a decade ago to run a City Museum of Washington proved too ambitious. Open Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., at the Carnegie Library, 801 K St. NW. Call 202-393-1420 or visit historydc.org. l

FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS PLEASE VISIT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM

in all media by 72 leading modern and contemporary artists. Through March 2. Smithsonian American Art

FOX FILMS

continued from page 25

looks like he’s had more than a couple hours asleep. A female co-worker pines for him, a male co-worker is desperate to take him to a bar and get him laid – to a woman, of course. Yossi’s scenes at home are in a dimly lit apartment, eating takeout and masturbating to scenes of youthful gay men having sex on sandy beaches. That Knoller has gained weight between the two films adds literal and metaphorical depth to his character. He doesn’t care about himself. He’s de- pressed, alone, and is still trying to rec- oncile a love lost 10 years ago. What follows, after a series of events that lead him to head out into the desert on an impromptu vacation, is a character study in a man trying to find meaning in his life. Knoller’s ability to convey a com- plex range of emotions adds greatly to Yossi’s character. He can move between bemusement, joy and isolated depres- sion in just a few subtle facial expres- sions. After meeting a group of soldiers on his way to Eliat, one of whom is gay, Yossi’s transformation slowly occurs. We see him struggle with his confidence, his sexuality, his body issues. His lust for the handsome soldier is constantly tem- pered by his own self-loathing and feel- ings of inadequacy. A later scene, where he finally comes to terms with his own looks, and that someone could find him attractive, is devastating and uplifting at the same time. A somewhat trite end- ing can’t spoil a film that takes great joy in its raw approach to romance and self- discovery. It’s a big-budget film without any of the entrapments that brings.

Cupcakes

2013

HHHHH Forgive the pun, but Cupcakes, Fox’s latest feature film, is incredibly sweet. Entirely inconsequential, but nonethe- less very endearing. It follows a group of normal people, who all share an apart- ment block, as they find themselves representing Israel at the “Universong” contest — a global singing competition that takes liberal inspiration from Eurovi- sion. It offers clichés and tropes aplenty, but its saccharine nature won’t have you reaching for your dentist’s phone number. It’s well-acted, colorful, and is guaranteed to put a smile on your face. Watch it with a glass of wine and low ex- pectations, and you’ll likely come away happy, unless you’re a complete miser. It does have some emotional depth. Ofer has a closeted boyfriend whose family sponsors the Universong com- petition; Anat’s husband leaves her be- cause she doesn’t pay enough attention to him; Keren is an awkward blogger who writes about things she would

Yossi and Jagger
Yossi and Jagger
Yossi
Yossi
Cupcakes
Cupcakes

never actually do in the real world; Efrat is a lesbian songwriter who wrote the song that is taking them to Universong but who can’t get anyone to watch her perform live; Dana is smothered by her conservative father; and Yael is trapped in a job and life that constantly refer- ences her former modeling career. Each one of these stories helps carry the film through its short length, and all are re-

solved with happy endings as the credits roll. Cupcakes is a film you watch when you just want to sit back, smile and not really think about things. Its main cast is a very likeable, watchable group. It’s not Fox’s deepest work — and it’s cer- tainly not his best — but it’s a fun little ditty that adds a burst of welcome joy to a canon otherwise marked by mature, emotionally resonant offerings. l

OPERA KATE WINGFIELD SCOTT SUCHMAN
OPERA
KATE WINGFIELD
SCOTT SUCHMAN

Matthew Worth as Starbuck (top), Carl Tanner as Captain Ahab (bottom)

Whale Song

Spectacular projections, a score that swells, and a familiar tale make Moby Dick a highly theatrical and watchable opera

T HERE IS A SPECIAL HELL FOR SERIOUS

music-lovers, and in one molten corner

resides a certain kind of contemporary

classical that puts more emphasis on

atonality and stridency than any actual reason for it. Anyone who has felt those particular flames licking at their heels will be forgiven for thinking twice before allowing themselves to be sealed into the red cocoon of the Opera House with modern fare on the menu. Thus it is with much relief that one finds that with his hot-off-the-presses Moby Dick, composer Jake Heggie is never different for difference’s sake. He is, quite to the contrary, working hard and exploring sensitively within many of the traditions of classical opera. And why not? Who says new

MOBY DICK

HHHHH

To March 8

WNO

Kennedy Center

Opera House

$30-$305

202-467-4600

kennedy-center.org

opera has to be weird? And if Heggie may not quite (yet) transcend the derivative feel that comes from this embrace of his classical ancestors, and his Moby will inevitably be compared to Benjamin Britten’s masterworks of Billy Budd or Peter Grimes, there is nevertheless a big idea here. And its name is Accessibility. With Elaine J. McCarthy’s vast and spectacular projections, a score that swells lyrically and cin- ematically on waves of emotion, conflict and danger- ous seas, and a familiar tale of man against beast (and himself), this is a highly theatrical and watchable opera. It benefits tremendously from Gene Scheer’s libretto, which not only pares Melville’s dense novel into a tight and dramatically potent story, but also serves to anchor the emotional intensity of Heg-

continues on page 42

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Steely eyed stealer: Thief

Stolen Opportunity

In Thief, half-baked ideas and shoddy programming rub shoulders in the shadows with moments of sheer genius

T HEY SAY HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY, SO let me preface this by saying I’ve never played a Thief game. The original trilogy, which spanned six years and two developers, is beloved by many as a classic

standard for the stealth genre of video games. It dropped players into a steampunk world and gave them the tools to strip their var- ious locations to the bones, collecting any and all loot they came across. What that means is that this reboot, from Canadian devel- oper Eidos Montreal, has a lot of expectation and nostalgia riding on its shoulders. It has to carry the franchise into the modern era of video games, offering enough to placate fans worried that the company will ruin the Thief name while simultaneously giving new gamers to the series — like myself — sufficient reason to stay and explore master thief Garrett’s world. It’s such a shame, then, that Thief ultimately straddles a confused middle ground where half-baked ideas and shoddy programming rub shoulders in the shadows with moments of sheer genius. Of course, it’d be remiss of me not to mention Thief’s big- gest problem: Dishonored. One of the surprising hits of 2012, the worlds of Dishonored and Thief offer many similarities. Both are played from a first-person perspective. Both feature stealth-based gameplay. Both offer a story rich with super- natural elements, power-hungry tyrants, underground move- ments and cities rife with poverty and pestilence. Dishonored undoubtedly draws inspiration from the original Thief trilogy, but that’s also this new reboot’s biggest problem. In a post-

Dishonored world, it was always going to draw comparisons. The fact that the games have so many similarities, despite as- surances that it’s entirely coincidental, guaranteed this. While Dishonored may not be as good a stealth game, and certainly doesn’t offer the masterful thievery of Thief, it was inherently a good game. Thief just isn’t. If first impressions count, then Thief was already off to a poor start. The opening scenes of the game were plagued by bugs and issues: framerate drops during cut scenes, lip-syncing that was anything but synced, shoddy sound mixing and a plot set up with all the hallmarks of something we’ve seen many times before. The first act did Thief no favors. However, once it was out of the way and I was dropped into the city proper, it began to open up to me. It helps that Thief can be a truly beautiful game. In one scene, I found myself running across rooftops in the midst of a thunderstorm. The lightning crashed around me, thick, billow- ing clouds raced overhead, rain poured from the sky and ran in rivers across the tiles and chimneys, dripping down from win- dows and doorways, illuminating with every flash of lightning. Candlelight flickered through stained-glass windows, shadows moved across the scenery and any plant life jostled and rustled as the wind caught it. Whether traversing buildings, sneaking through cobbled, narrow streets, clambering up the side of a tower or deftly swooping between shadows in a dimly lit man- sion, Thief’s world has the raw power to truly dazzle you. Char-

acter models in cutscenes are occasionally filled with details, dust clings to the air in darkened

acter models in cutscenes are occasionally filled with details, dust clings to the air in darkened hallways, ash falls like snow in a level set in a crematorium. Thief’s develop - ers have put a lot of effort into crafting its world, and it shows. But it’s evident that thoroughly testing that world wasn’t high on the list of priorities. For every beautiful moment in Thief, there’s an out-of-place texture, a noticeable drop in framerate or a character lip-sync that is so out of time or nonexistent it’s laughable. It doesn’t completely pull you from the setting, but little bugs like these mar the experience. Sound design, too, is a hit-or-miss pack- age. All too often I’d be carefully picking a lock or sneaking through a room, when I’d be loudly interrupted by abrupt conversa- tion or heavy footsteps. Panicking, I’d hide in the nearest shadow and wait for the guard or individual to walk past me. They never would. Instead, they would more than likely be outside the building I was in, simply walking on the other side of the wall. Thief’s sound-mixing is incredibly inconsistent in this manner. Location- based noises can occasionally work beau- tifully, such as a muffled conversation be- tween disgruntled locals becoming fully audible as you slide beneath their window, but this was the exception, not the rule. What Thief does get right is its music, which eschews a purely classical score, adding some incredible electronic lay- ers that really pump up the atmosphere when they kick in. Accidentally crunch- ing over some broken glass I hadn’t spot- ted, I ran to a darkened corner as a near- by guard was alerted to my presence. The in-game music dropped a heavy bass, punctuating the silence like an audible heartbeat, as I sat, concealed, waiting for the threat to dissipate and the guard to resume his patrol. Played with a good set of headphones, Thief can be an aural pleasure at times. Of course, what most people will be coming to Thief for is the gameplay, its classic mix of stealth-’em-up and rob-

everything-and-anyone that the originals did so well. Played in a certain way, Thief can be a masterful experience. Certain scenarios offer a variety of options. Do I sneak up the side of the building, drop underground and work my way through tunnels? Or dash between shadows avoid- ing the numerous guards who patrol each locale? This is where an individual’s per- sonal style is allowed to flourish. Favor the brute approach? Equip a fire arrow and cause a gas pipe to explode, incapacitat- ing your enemies. Spot a chandelier with a rather weak chain? Grab a blunt arrow and send it crashing onto any poor souls below. Prefer to sit further back from the action? Pick a spot on the edge of a rooftop and send arrows hurtling into the skulls of any sod stupid enough to enter your cross- hair. Prefer to remain in the shadows? Use water arrows to extinguish flames, envel- oping your surroundings in darkness. Use Garrett’s swoop ability to quickly dash between hiding spots. Send arrows filled with knock-out gas into a group of enemies and run away. Catch someone sleeping or wandering away from you with their back exposed? Silently run up and knock them out with one hit. Of course, it’s also possible to com- plete every level without directly interact- ing with anyone else – and that’s where Thief’s true challenge lies. Sitting patient- ly, watching the movements of patrols, plotting out your next move – this is what fans of the stealth genre will love. Eidos deliberately made combat a punishing ex- ercise; you can be quickly overwhelmed by just one or two guards. Accidentally drop from the rafters into a room with an ene- my wandering past, and it’ll be a desperate escape to try and evade them, particularly on the higher difficulty levels. Of course, should you want the ulti- mate, Thief offers customizable challeng- es. Complete a level and it opens up to al- low for replaying later on, with selectable options to enhance your playthrough. You can turn off navigation hints and rely sole-

ly on your sense of direction. Hate seeing your health and focus meter? Turn them off. Feel like removing the UI completely, with no indicators or help at all? You must be crazy, but it’s all do-able. The game of- fers fantastic amounts of re-playability, with leaderboards letting players chal- lenge their friends to match their skill lev- els or beat their playthrough time. What really characterizes Thief games, though, is the thievery. Obviously. Gar- rett has a kleptomaniacal need to steal everything in sight. Pens, candlestick holders, jewelry, money, ancient artifacts, purses, letter openers. You name it, and if it’s shiny and can be sold, Garrett will take it. Picking locks, slicing paintings from their frames or feeling around their edges for secret switches to open safes, rummaging through drawers and closets, grabbing bags of money from the belts of unsuspecting guards, solving challenging mini-games and intricate puzzles to un- lock an ancient treasure — Thief gets the basics right. With each item stolen, Gar- rett’s money pile increases — money that can then be used to upgrade his arsenal of weapons and gadgets. Stronger arrows, warm clothing to increase health, a more accurate bow, a wrench to access vents or wire cutters to disable machinery, just a few of the things available to purchase. Garrett can also upgrade his Focus ability. It’s gained after a supernatural accident in the game’s opening act, and allows him to study his surroundings, finding objects that can be manipulated, secret switches connected to hidden doors, chests that can be opened, locks to be picked. It also alerts him to guards, en- hances his sneaking ability and overlays a cool, blue effect to the world that singles out points of interest. It’s limited, and doesn’t recharge, relying on scarce flow- ers to be picked and eaten to regenerate its levels, which stops players from abus- ing the system in every area they enter. Unfortunately, while early stages are filled with stealing, exploring, sneaking and delighting in solving the game’s many puzzles, by the later acts, repetition starts to creep in. Every time you enter a build- ing through a closed window, you’re re- quired to mash a button to lever it open. Same goes for sneaking through narrow gaps, where you’re usually confronted by a fallen beam in need of lifting. Prepare to mash! Stealing things can quickly become tiresome, too. When picking the lock on a chest, for instance, Garrett doesn’t auto - matically open it. The same mechanic ap - plies to doors: You can pick the lock then peek through the keyhole to make sure it’s safe to move through. But this is a chest. I want Garrett to pick it and immediately open it. And heaven forbid there’s more than one item inside, as Garrett will slow- ly grab them one-by-one, each requiring its own key press. It’s a small irritant, but

one that gradually grates. Why can’t he simply open the chest after unlocking and grab everything at once? These confusing moments extend elsewhere. Eidos has mapped running and jumping to the same button, which means climbing is entirely contextual — you can only go where they want you to. Often, this leads to frustration. More than once my destination was above me, but I couldn’t climb onto the box immediately beneath it because Eidos wanted me to take a more circuitous route. Same applies for dropping from ledges. Occasionally it’s automatic, sometimes it requires its own button press. Often, when it would be a much quicker route, I’m not allowed to do it. Even the open exploration of areas is limited. Only a few set pieces offer a truly wide variety of entry points. More often than not you’re left to choose between sneaking through a low vent or tunnel or climbing up through an open window. These set pieces are further hampered by incredibly long loading times. If ever Thief felt like one of the original games, it’s in these loading screens. Each section of the map is cordoned off into its own lit- tle hub. Each hub is fairly expansive, and can be traversed at will, but the loading time between them can stretch up to 20 seconds. It may not seem long, but if you need to swiftly move between several ar- eas, it quickly becomes a drag. Thief also suffers from a lot of bugs and inconsistencies. AI would miss me when I stood in front of them, or would see me through a stone wall. I would want Garrett to jump from beam to beam, but he’d tumble to the ground and I’d be sur- rounded by guards. Characters would of- ten talk, but their mouths wouldn’t move. At one point, I was tasked with cracking a safe — except the game didn’t load the button prompt that would allow me to interact with the combination lock. I had to restart the whole area to make it work, as reloading my checkpoint save provided the same result. This is all before tackling Thief’s big- gest problem: its story. It’s terrible. Poorly scripted, awkwardly acted, badly plotted — it’s a series of set-pieces and bombas- tic moments drawn from other games, mashed together in a supernatural plot that just hampers the world Garrett lives in. Several areas completely pull you from the core mechanic — sneaking and stealing — just to force you to run from enemies or make you navigate through a burning house. The plot itself is convo - luted and the ending is weak. None of the characters are particularly inspiring — though Garrett himself comments on his surroundings as you play the game and these often provide a nice little touch or break from the action. If some of Thief’s best moments are to be found in hiding in the shadows, waiting for the perfect mo -

one that gradually grates. Why can’t he simply open the chest after unlocking and grab everything
one that gradually grates. Why can’t he simply open the chest after unlocking and grab everything

ment to strike a guard or steal a necklace, why does the story require so many mo- ments where this master thief becomes an errand boy or a common criminal? Brilliant moments, such as the creepy asylum and beautifully realized brothel — complete with a very risqué sex scene — suggest that Eidos is capable of offering a full game of great areas to explore and interact with. It would just rather have boss battles instead. Ultimately, my time with Thief was one of mixed emotions. The basics of game- play are spot-on. Garrett interacts with his world in incredible ways, from the use of his bow to his penchant for shad- ows. My advice to players would be to complete the game, and then go back and devise challenges for you and your friends to complete in each of the games areas. Who can steal the most stuff in 20 min- utes? Can you navigate that section with no UI and the difficulty at maximum? Is it possible to kill every guard in an area without ever being detected? When using the tools Eidos has given you without the plot they’ve strung around its neck, Thief is a brilliant example of the stealth genre. Where it falls apart is in trying to be

a game for everyone. The story throws a lot of concepts that gamers are enticed by, but none of them particularly work in the context of a Thief game. It uses odd button combinations and awkward repetition to remove a lot of the fun from stealing. It’s littered with small bugs that can be amus- ing at first, but simply annoying at later stages. It teases choice, but then restricts or removes it. Some may love its punishing higher difficulties, its challenge modes. Some may even like the story. As for me, my time with Garrett was one where I felt like I was completing the game simply for the purpose of this review. That’s not what a game should be, at least for me. I slogged through the last acts long after my inter- est had checked out. Worst of all, playing Thief made me want for something else, something more polished, something with a better grasp of its mechanics and plot. Thief made me want to play Dishonored. That I wanted to play a game that took its inspiration from the franchise Thief is at- tempting to reboot pretty much says it all.

Thief (HHHHH, $59.99) is available on PS4 (as tested), Xbox One, PC, PS3 and Xbox 360. l

SCOTT SUCHMAN

SCOTT SUCHMAN (clockwise from top) Alexander Lewis as Flask, Eric Greene as Queequeg, Talise Trevigne as

(clockwise from top) Alexander Lewis as Flask, Eric Greene as Queequeg, Talise Trevigne as Pip, and Christian Bowers as Stubb

SCOTT SUCHMAN (clockwise from top) Alexander Lewis as Flask, Eric Greene as Queequeg, Talise Trevigne as

OPERA

continued from page 38

gie’s musical flights. Add the simple but dramatic rendering of the ship in Robert Brill’s sets and this is a whole that is in many ways bigger than its parts. And as such, it represents a place where a new generation may not fear to tread. And if they tread here, they may find they can also tread backward – to those operas that have so fruitfully and successfully inspired Heggie. Of course, with such larger-than-life theatrics, there is always the danger that the characters themselves will get swal- lowed up, and not just by a whale. Here, Carl Tanner as Captain Ahab, the whal-

ing-boat captain who will stop at nothing

to find and kill the whale that took his leg, has no trouble commanding not just his boat but also his stage. An impressive and rather dashing figure, Tanner has the kind of charisma that makes one forget he’s hiding half a leg somewhere. (Well, almost. He wore an intriguingly designed coat.) His virile baritone sails easily over the Washington National Opera orches- tra (playing with power and exuberance under the baton of Evan Rogister), and yet he brings much tender spirit to Heggie’s more soulful moments. A charismatic and vocal counter - point to Tanner is the superb baritone Eric Greene, who gives his Queequeg an enthralling presence and authenticity that

stops dead any chance that this “noble savage” might become the cliché so often made of such characters. Greene offers a sonorous yet silky sound that matches well the understated power and expres- siveness of Queequeg. Dramatically, he pairs well with Greenhorn, the young seaman who soon sees that there is more to Queequeg than meets the Western eye. Tenor Stephen Costello fills Green- horn’s not overly written character with a thoughtful energy, and by the second act his voice has warmed into expressiveness, even if a duet with Queequeg never quite takes off. Another standout is Talise Trevigne in the trouser role of Pip, the cabin boy. Her strikingly rich and beautiful soprano glides through Heggie’s score like a knife through butter – a sheer joy to the ears. Though she may give Pip a slightly incon- gruous maturity, she captures well his young stride and the theatricality the role requires. As Ahab’s first mate Starbuck, baritone Matthew Worth may get a bit close to a nibble on the scenery, but he sings with expression and holds his own. As shipmates Flask and Stubb, Alex- ander Lewis and Christian Bowers acquit themselves well as they come and go from the crowded deck scenes, which raises an inevitability of this production: crowd control. With a deck for a set (except for a few scenes) the crew-member chorus creates quite a crowd. Though they are pulled together effectively (and sing with unified gusto) for their two tour de force moments, the rhythm of shipboard life otherwise is never quite captured, espe- cially during the interlude in which they dance and sing of the “Spanish ladies.” With the challenge of an oceangoing opera there must come such dilemmas. Here there is room for a tighter, more cohesive feel. Having said that, the fight scenes – generally not a strong point in opera – are here effectively choreographed by Robb Hunter. The less crowed moments also carry well, especially those in which the crew members leave the ship to harpoon the whales in small boats. These scenes balance projections with the athletic use of the set’s curved walls in ways that are imaginative and well executed. Still, even if the crowds within don’t always work, the crowds without are likely to be pleased. With familiar themes simply told, Heggie’s grand and accessible score, and sets and projections that deliv- er an exceptionally atmospheric experi- ence, this production will, no doubt, con- tinue to make waves. (Sorry.) l

gears

BY RHUARIDH MARR

Alfa Romeo 4C

caption

Waiting for Romeo

Fingers are crossed for Fiat to return its sporty celebrity to the U.S. in 2014

gears BY RHUARIDH MARR Alfa Romeo 4C caption Waiting for Romeo Fingers are crossed for Fiat
  • I T’S A WEEK OF BIRTHDAYS, POTENTIAL RETURNS and reincarnations in the car world. As one manufacturer takes its first tentative steps back on American shores and another celebrates a significant milestone for one model

with a rather tepid party, the National Corvette Museum has revealed plans for the eight cars swallowed by a sinkhole that opened up underneath the building. First, let’s start with Alfa Romeo. For many, the Italian brand is one synonymous with true automotive enthusiasts. Top Gear will happily tell you that you can’t call yourself a true car nut un- less you’ve owned an Alfa. Trouble is, for Americans, that’s not really possible as the brand crashed out of the market years ago.

Fiat, which currently owns Alfa, has been promising a return for years. Initially pegged for 2012, it’s been continually shunted back, but now they promise that a launch is definitely, probably, most likely going to happen at some point this summer. Accord- ing to The Detroit News, Alfas will be sold through participating Maserati and Fiat dealers — though only the best-performing ones will be selected for the brand, as there are just 1,000 cars arriving in the first year. The reason is simple: Alfa will only be selling one model, its gorgeous 4C coupe. The 4C eschews the bigger-is-better mentality of most mod- ern cars. Weighing in at just over 2,000 pounds, the 1.8-liter, 240hp, rear-wheel drive coupe will rocket from 0 to 62mph in just 4.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 160mph. The interior is stripped of all but the essentials, the body is lightweight, and the wheels are fat and designed to stick to the road. It’s a car for driving, and a pretty beautiful one at that. Alfa also guarantees exclusivity as there will only be 2,500 produced each year world- wide. Expect it to cost around $50,000 when (if?) it launches in the U.S. this summer.

TOYOTA IS CELEBRATING this week, though I feel someone should perhaps show them the dictionary definition of celebrate. The mid-size 4Runner SUV turns 30 this year, a milestone few car models are lucky enough to achieve, and one surely worth more than what Toyota has cooked up. Forget balloons or stream-

2014 Toyota 4Runner

The National Corvette Museum
The National Corvette Museum

ers, put your party pants back in the closet and throw away the

cake knife. Toyota’s big celebration is

a mild discount. Yay?

... For those in the market for a 4Runner, you can now get $500 off the SR5 and Trail editions, $750 discounted from Premium models and a sweet $1,000 removed from the sticker price of Limited spec. The discounts are available now and will run for the entirety of 2014, so no rush. Still, we can’t help but feel that 30 years warrants a little more than a discount. Seriously, Toyota. No strip-o-gram?

THE NATIONAL CORVETTE Museum has announced its plans for the eight models retrieved from a sinkhole under the Bowl- ing Green, Ky., museum. For those who missed it (‘vette fans may want to turn away now), on Feb. 12, a giant sinkhole opened up beneath the museum’s Skydome area, swallowing eight Cor-

vettes, including a 1962 model, a 1993 ZR-1 Spyder, a 2001 Mallett Hammer Z06 and two models on loan from GM. According to the Detroit Free Press, the museum plans to offer fans wishing to pay their condolences to the damaged cars the opportunity to view them in their damaged state before they’re sent to the GM Heritage Collection in Warren, Mich., for restoration. The museum has yet to start retrieving the cars from the sinkhole, though it says that work should start in the next cou- ple of weeks. In the meantime, if you own a Corvette, it might be prudent to start checking the concrete floor of your garage. Just in case.

Contributing Editor Rhuaridh Marr covers the automotive indus - try for Metro Weekly. Read his daily updates on our auto blog, Gears, at MetroWeekly.com/auto. l

TODD FRANSON

pets

BY WILL O’BRYAN

K-9 Corps members parade their pooches

Pet Cemetery

Congressional Cemetery has gone to the dogs, and things couldn’t be better

TODD FRANSON pets BY WILL O’BRYAN K-9 Corps members parade their pooches Pet Cemetery Congressional Cemetery

W ALKING YOUR DOG IN A CEMETERY MAY

seem a somewhat creepy way to exercise your

canine. Then again, particularly when you

live in a crowded city, what could be better

than acres of fenced-in, rolling lawns? The local folks of the K-9 Corps might argue it’s the perfect spot, as they’ve been organiz- ing a dog-walking program at D.C.’s Congressional Cemetery for years. “They stared in the early ’90s when the cemetery was in bad

shape and in need of help,” explains Paul K. Williams, president of the cemetery. “It’s a really great program, now being copied by other cemeteries around the country.” What’s being copied is the “win-win” nature of the program. Consider what’s asked of those wanting to use the cemetery as a dog run. First, there are the dues and fees. That’s $225 for a household annually — albeit as a tax-deductible donation — plus $50 per dog, up to three. Beyond the dog dollars, there’s the dog duty: 12 hours of labor per year to benefit the cemetery. “It can be as easy as planting bulbs, staffing a check-in table during a function or cleaning headstones,” says Williams. “A lot of people put in a lot more than eight hours.” As Williams explains it, the K-9 Corps brings in roughly $200,000 annually — about 20 percent of the cemetery’s operat- ing revenue — and untold hours of no-cost labor. In return, mem- bers get exclusive access for themselves and their canine com- rades to 35 secure acres of green space along the Anacostia River. Adding to the wins, these dedicated dog walkers also serve as unofficial cemetery sentinels, helping by their mere presence

TODD FRANSON

TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some

to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some way. Then there’s the call of nature. Some might worry that dogs going about their business might somehow desecrate the cemetery’s hallowed grounds. Not so. First, there are designated “poop patrols” responsible for clean sweeps of the cemetery lawns. And should a dog wish to leave a liquid remembrance on a headstone, the granite won’t be bothered. Bird droppings – particularly those of ubiquitous Canadian geese – on the other hand, may cause a problem. “The dogs keep out the Canadian geese,” says Williams, offering yet another pooch plus. “Other cemeteries have problems with huge numbers of geese, and geese can damage the stones.”

As Williams shares the details of the K-9 Corps with other cemeteries, that’s a big selling point, usually after an initial reaction along the lines of, “We don’t even allow dogs.” But the popularity of the program is undeniable. “For the first time, we have more than 600 people on the waitlist,” notes Wil- liams, adding that he’s in a position to be envied by nonprofit presidents every- where. “We have 600 people waiting to give us money.” While the program caps out at about 770 dogs and 550 people, the turnover can be fairly brisk. “People move, dogs pass away. We probably remove about 200 off the list every year,” Williams estimates. Still, for those hoping to join the ranks of the K-9 Corps, Williams advises signing up as soon as possible and settling in for a wait. For those who do make the cut, they’d better be conscientious of the corps’ rules. After all, there are a few hundred others vying for your spot in the cemetery.

For more information about the K-9 Corps at Historic Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E St. SE, call 202-543-0539 or visit cemeterydogs.org. l

TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some
TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some
TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some
TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some
TODD FRANSON to dissuade vandals and other scofflaws who might otherwise damage the grounds in some
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers

Pet

Pet Pix

Pix

Shifra

Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull

“Shifra loves to dress up and try on clothing and costumes. She likes winter and snow, because she has an opportunity to wear one of her many coats or sweaters.”

Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to
Submitted by Metro Weekly readers Pet Pix Shifra Daryl Love’s 2-year-old Pit Bull “Shifra loves to

NIGHT

LIFE

LISTINGS

THURS., 02.27.14
THURS., 02.27.14

9

1/2

Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any

drink, 5-9pm • Multiple TVs showing movies, shows, sports • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S

UPSTAIRS

4@4 Happy Hour,

4pm-7pm • $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella Artois, $4 House Wines, $4 Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Karaoke, 9pm

GREEN LANTERN

Shirtless Men Drink Free,

10-11pm

 

JR.’S

$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close • Top Pop Night

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR

Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15 • Drag Bingo

NUMBER NINE

Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any

drink, 5-9pm • No Cover

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS

All male, nude dancers • Shirtless Thursday • DJ Tim E in Secrets • 9pm • Cover 21+

 

FRI., 02.28.14

9

1/2

Open at 5pm • Happy

Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

5-9pm • Friday Night Videos with resident DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ • Expanded craft beer selection • No cover

▼ NIGHT LIFE LISTINGS THURS., 02.27.14 9 1/2 Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,

METROWEEKLY.COM

49

▼ COVERBOY bartenders EDITION Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim Shot on location

COVERBOY

bartenders

EDITION

Interview by John Riley

//

Photography by Julian Vankim

Shot on location at The Beacon Hotel in Washington. Visit beaconhotelwdc.com.

▼ COVERBOY bartenders EDITION Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim Shot on location
  • V ISITORS TO BEACON BAR & GRILL will get a treat if they’re served a drink by Coverboy Ron, who enjoys creating

cocktails to meet even the most discriminating palate’s preferred tastes. The 31-year-old, who also works at The Fireplace, views himself as an artist behind the bar, always trying to think up new concoctions for his customers. Raised in rural Oregon, Ron spent his high school time as a scholar-athlete before moving to D.C. to work on Capitol Hill. But his love of politics eventually faded, prompting him to change careers and pursue bartending, where he’s been able to interact with and entertain people with his quick wit and subtle yet sexually tinged humor.

ANNIE’S

by Charger Stone • No

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR

PHASE 1

4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •

cover before 9:30pm • 21+

DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,

DJ Styalo • Dancing •

$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella

Dancing • Beat The Clock

$5 cover

Artois, $4 House Wines,

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR

Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),

$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,

Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •

$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •

PW’S SPORTS BAR

$4 Manhattans and Vodka Martinis • Upstairs open

Karaoke, 9pm

Buckets of Beer $15

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

5-11pm

JR.’S

NUMBER NINE

301-498-4840

Buy 1, Get 1,

Open 5pm • Happy Hour:

Drag Show in lounge •

DC BEAR CRUE

11pm-midnight • Happy

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

@Town • Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles • Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted

Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5 Coronas, $8 Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close

• No Cover

Half-price burgers and fries

TOWN

Drag Show starts at 10:30pm • Hosted by Lena Lett and featuring Tatianna, Shi-Queeta- Lee, Jessica Spaulding Deverreoux and Ba’Naka • Doors open at 10pm • For those 21 and over, $5 from 10-11pm and $10 after 11pm • For those 18-20, $10 all night • 18+

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS All male, nude dancers • Ladies of Illusion with host Kristina Kelly, 9pm • Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SAT., 03.01.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
▼ COVERBOY bartenders EDITION Interview by John Riley // Photography by Julian Vankim Shot on location
METROWEEKLY.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2014 51
METROWEEKLY.COM
FEBRUARY 27, 2014
51

What’s on your nightstand?

Two glasses of wine and an empty condom wrapper.

What’s in your nightstand drawer?

Lots more condoms. A couple of cockrings, lube. It’s a storage place for fun.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?

Hands down, teleportation. Can you imagine where you’d go?

Pick three people, living or dead, who you would like to spend the day with. And what would you do? Alexander the Great, because I would want to see how he interacted with troops. Zach Braff — I think he’s hilarious. The other one would be Donald Faison. I would pick those two, and be like, “Let’s re-enact Scrubs.”

9pm • Expanded craft

PHASE 1

beer selection • No cover

Dancing, 9pm-close

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR

PW’S SPORTS BAR

Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm • Crazy Hour, 4-7pm

JR.’S

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

• Karaoke and/or live

301-498-4840

entertainment, 9pm

Karaoke in the lounge • Charity Bingo with Cash Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every

TOWN

$4 Coors, $5 Vodka highballs, $7 Vodka Red Bulls

Month

NELLIE’S

Electric Mardi Gras • Music by DJ Kidd •

Guest DJs • Zing Zang

Performance by The

Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer, House Rail Drinks and Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm • Buckets of Beer, $15

Firm • DJ Wess • Drag Show starts at 10:30pm • Hosted by Lena Lett and featuring Tatianna,

NUMBER NINE

Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica Spaulding Deverreoux and

DILF • 9:30pm • Host

Ba’Naka • For those 21

Michael Hodges • DJ Dean • Doors 5pm •

and over, $8 from 10-11pm and $12 after 11pm • 21+

Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any

drink, 5-9pm • $5 Absolut and Bulleit after 9pm • No Cover

What’s on your nightstand? Two glasses of wine and an empty condom wrapper. What’s in your

You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick?

Let me give you traits: Taller than me. Great arms. Male, obviously. Black. And someone with at least nine-and-a-half

inches.

What annoys you?

Indecisiveness. If you’re coming up to my bar and being bitchy, saying, “Excuse me, I need service,” and then I come up and ask “What do you want?” And you’re like, “I don’t know, what do you have?”

What pleases you?

A sense of intimacy, whether with

friends or a lover.

What’s the worst thing a friend could do to you?

Steal a boyfriend. That’s the worst thing I think a friend could do.

What’s your greatest fear?

To be alone.

What’s your guilty pleasure?

Alcohol. And sex. And chocolate. And all three together.

What turns you on?

That sense of intimacy is a big thing, but when I’m looking at a guy, it’s arms. I like arms, I like chests. I like to grab them, lay on them.

What turns you off?

Arrogance, completely.

Define good in bed.

The bottom controls what happens in bed. So it’s a top that listens to what the bottom wants. If the bottom isn’t enjoying it, the top’s just being selfish. Sex isn’t just about getting one person off, it’s about getting both people enjoying that intimate contact.

Can men fake it?

Men can definitely fake it. It’s the “O” face, the grunting. That’s a lot of it. Maybe men fake it as saying they haven’t come yet, when they want to keep going.

Name two people you don’t ever want to picture having sex.

Madeline Albright. And John Goodman. Together or separately.

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR All nude male dancers, 9pm • Ladies of Illusion with host Ella
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Doors
8pm • Cover • 21+
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
SUN., 03.02.14
JR.’S
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all flavors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
FIREPLACE
Skyy Vodka, $3 • $5 cover
with $1 off coupons
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE FREDDIE’S Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • drink, 5-9pm
NUMBER NINE
FREDDIE’S
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
Karaoke, 9pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
JR.’S
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
MON., 03.03.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
PW’S SPORTS BAR FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR 9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md. Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
PW’S SPORTS BAR
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
TUES., 03.04.14
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
ANNIE’S
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
• No Cover
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? Let me give
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? Let me give
You’re stranded on a desert island with one person. Who do you pick? Let me give

What’s your favorite late-night eats?

Stoney’s. I go to Stoney’s after work. It’s right on P Street. It’s a great

industry place late at night. Their chicken Reuben is amazing.

When you go to a bar, what do you order?

Jameson. Maybe a beer or ginger ale to chase it.

Wine or beer?

Wine.

Mustard, mayo or ketchup?

Ketchup.

Gaga or Britney?

Gaga. Hands down.

What’s your favorite cocktail to make?

If you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?

I look at pictures and say, “Oh, I miss my hair.”

You become master of the world. What’s your first act?

Lower the drinking age in the U.S. It’s

stupid how it is. Most of our alcohol problems are because we don’t start legally drinking until 21.

Gin or vodka?

I like stuff that I’ve invented, and

Vodka.

people enjoy. I have this drink here

What age would you lower it to?

Scotch or bourbon?

at the Beacon called the peppercorn martini. I use a Hendrick’s gin, a little

Eighteen. If you can go into the military, if you can vote, but you can’t drink at

Bourbon.

bit of dry vermouth, and a black-pepper simple syrup. It’s delicious. You get the sweetness of the gin at first, and the heat of the black pepper on the end.

18, how is that a world that makes sense? You can get shot, but you can’t legally drink?

WED., 03.05.14 JR.’S 9 1/2 Open at 5pm • Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
WED., 03.05.14
JR.’S
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Half-Price Burger Night
• Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
• No Cover
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
PW’S SPORTS BAR ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S 9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md. UPSTAIRS 4@4 Happy Hour, 301-498-4840 4pm-7pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
301-498-4840
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
THURS., 03.06.14
GREEN LANTERN
9 1/2
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
10-11pm
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR ANNIE’S Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
ANNIE’S
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
NUMBER NINE
5-11pm
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
DC BEAR CRUE
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
FRI., 03.07.14
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
What’s your favorite late-night eats? Stoney’s. I go to Stoney’s after work. It’s right on P

What are you most grateful for?

I love my friends. But I’m most grateful

for being able to do what I want.

What would you die for?

My parents, my family. I’m not in a

relationship right now, but I would hope I would die for my partner.

What’s your motto?

“Be me.” Don’t be anything you’re not.

Watch Ron’s video interview at MetroWeekly.com/nightlife/coverboy. l

JR.’S

PW’S SPORTS BAR

Buy 1, Get 1, 11pm-midnight • Happy

9855 Washington Blvd. N Laurel, Md.

Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5

301-498-4840

Coronas, $8 Vodka Red Bulls, 9pm-close

Drag Show in lounge • Half-price burgers and fries

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR

DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,

NUMBER NINE

TOWN

Dancing • Beat The Clock Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of Beer $15

Drag Show starts at 10:30pm • Hosted by Lena Lett and featuring Tatianna, Shi-Queeta- Lee, Jessica Spaulding Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •

Open 5pm • Happy Hour:

Doors open at 10pm • For

2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm

those 21 and over, $5 from

• No Cover

10-11pm and $10 after

PHASE 1

11pm • For those 18-20, $10 all night • 18+

DJ Styalo • Dancing •

$5 cover

ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS

All male, nude dancers • Ladies of Illusion with host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •

Cover 21+ l

What are you most grateful for? I love my friends. But I’m most grateful for being
What are you most grateful for? I love my friends. But I’m most grateful for being
scene JR.’s Sunday, February 23 scan this tag with your smartphone for bonus scene pics online!
scene
JR.’s
Sunday, February 23
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
56
SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
METROWEEKLY.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2014 57
METROWEEKLY.COM FEBRUARY 27, 2014 57
scene Scruffed Up Saturday, February 22 Town scan this tag with your smartphone for bonus scene
scene
Scruffed Up
Saturday, February 22
Town
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
58
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PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
59
scene Ziegfeld’s/Secrets 5th Anniversary Friday, February 21 scan this tag with your smartphone for bonus scene
scene
Ziegfeld’s/Secrets
5th Anniversary
Friday, February 21
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
60
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PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/ 61
PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
61
I didn’t know who I was, but I certainly knew what I wasn’t. And I

I didn’t know who I was, but I certainly knew what I wasn’t. And I knew I wasn’t a heterosexual male. The whole idea of

being gay absolutely terrified me.”

Fashion consultant and television personality TIM GUNN discussing his struggle with accepting his sexuality and coming out. Gunn grew up in D.C. and attempted suicide at 17 after years of bullying and changing schools.

(Huffington Post).

“Make no mistake, this is the new segregation,

yours is a Jim Crow law, and you are about to make yourself ground zero.

Actor GEORGE TAKEI, in an open letter entitled “Razing Arizona” posted to his blog. Takei is specifically mentioning Senate Bill 1062, passed by the Arizona Senate last week, which permits business to deny service to any customer based on an owners’ religious beliefs. Takei is calling for a boycott of the state should the law be enacted.

(Allegiance Musical)

Now that this law has been enacted,

we are beginning an internal review of our relationship with the Government of Uganda.”

Secretary of State JOHN KERRY, in a statement, discussing the United State’s relationship with Uganda in the wake of the passing of Uganda’s anti-gay law, which increases the punishment for homosexuality to life in prison.

(Reuters)

There are many businesses that are thriving providing this kind of commodification of human flesh so that they can follow the trend and have two men try to raise a baby. What a travesty.

What a collective sense of child abuse it is.”

RICHARD LAND, former president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, in a speech at Truett-McConnell College in Georgia, in which he lambasted same-sex couples using surrogates in order to have children.

(Right Wing Watch)

“We don’t accept homosexuality here.

God made men and women so they can bear children.

Zimbabwe President ROBERT MUGABE, in part of a speech at his 90th birthday celebration. Mugabe has frequently shown support for the persecution of homosexuality, and later in his speech called sex between two men “unnatural acts”. (BBC)