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Jay Greenspans

art on display
at Tenafly JCC
JSTANDARD.COM
2014 83
REMEMBERING PROJECT EZRAHS RABBI STERN page 7
DANCING QUEENS page 8
ISRAELS ABORTION DEBATE page 40
GARAGES LEGACY page 55
J e w i s h S t a n d a r d
1 0 8 6 T e a n e c k R o a d
T e a n e c k , N J 0 7 6 6 6
C H A N G E S E R V I C E R E Q U E S T E D
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FEBRUARY 28, 2014
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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 3
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NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ...............................................20
COVER STORY .................................... 24
TORAH COMMENTARY ...................44
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 45
ARTS & CULTURE ..............................46
CALENDAR .......................................... 48
OBITUARIES ........................................ 52
CLASSIFIEDS ...................................... 54
GALLERY .............................................. 56
REAL ESTATE ...................................... 57
CONTENTS
COVER PHOTO BY JERRY SZUBIN
Candlelighting: Friday, February 28, 5:27 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, March 1, 6:27 p.m.
Vegans advance in Knesset, Tel Aviv
lIsraeli carnivores are hardly on
the run, but the Israeli parliament
celebrated Animal Rights Day on
Tuesday with vegetarian and vegan
dishes in the Knesset members caf-
eteria.
The day began with a meeting of
the Lobby for the Protection of Ani-
mals, headed by Knesset Members
Eitan Cabel (Israel Labor Party) and
Rabbi Dov Lipman (Yesh Atid), with
the participation of Knesset Speaker
Yuli-Yoel Edelstein and representa-
tives of the Interior Ministry and
Agriculture Ministry, as well as animal
right activists.
In the early Jewish texts we see
mentions of the need to care for
animals and treat them with com-
passion, Speaker Edelstein said.
I welcome this important day and
suggest, also from experience, that
everyone find their way to adopt an
animal and love animals. I also rec-
ommend that those who decide to
buy this or that animal consider the
option of adopting an abandoned
animal from one of the organizations
that deal with the issue.
Rabbi Lipman said the Knesset
should continue to promote animal
rights laws and become a world
leader in this field.
Next week, more than 600 people
are expected at Israels first-ever
Vegan Congress in Tel Aviv.
The concept is to take all the
activities and projects that different
organizations are doing and connect
them to people out there looking to
be more active, and talk about the
situation in Israel so that every year
we can meet and talk about changes
that have taken place and what we
can do in the future, said organizer
Omri Paz, founder of Vegan-Friendly
Israel.
Vegan-Friendly members also plan
to drive a Vegan-Mobile from Kiryat
Shmona to Eilat for a month. Parking
in major cities, theyll screen videos
about veganism and offer activi-
ties for the public to learn about the
health, environmental, and animal-
welfare benefits of a plant-based
diet.
After that, we will do a veg-
an mangal [barbecue] on Yom
Haatzmaut [Israel Independence
Day], then a Shavuot festival without
cheese, and then our second annual
vegan festival. About 10,000 people
came to our first one, four months
ago, Mr. Paz said.
The Vegan Friendly mission is to
publicize the positive side of vegan-
ism, so we avoid anything bloody
or negative. Thats how we got into
the mainstream so easily, he added.
Mr. Paz is the man responsible for
Israels Dominos Pizza chain becom-
ing the first in the world to offer a
soy-cheese option. Hes since helped
persuade several Israeli restaurant
and caf chains to devise vegan
dishes.
A 31-year-old law student at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mr.
Paz stopped eating animal products
two years ago after seeing a popular
video by vegan activist Gary Yourof-
sky. He took a week off and stayed
home reading articles and watch-
ing videos on the issue, and quickly
realized that he couldnt change the
world if he simply stopped eating
animal products.
So I started doing small projects,
and because the truth is with me,
everything was successful, he says.
He arranged for mass screenings of
Mr. Yourofskys lecture with Hebrew
subtitles, and began building a foun-
dation to make it easier for people
to stay vegan, with menu options,
recipes, resources, and events for the
Hebrew-speaking public.
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN / ISRAEL21C.ORG
Creation dreams
lTheres never been a better time
to be a patron of the Jewish arts.
Where once it took millions to
endow a symphony or a museum,
now, through the wonders of crowd-
funding, you can support a Jewish
movie or book project for as little as
one dollar.
Among the projects that have
caught our attention and are looking
for your help to make their creators
dreams come true:
Anna Olswanger of Fair Lawn is
trying to raise $3,000 to adapt her
book Greenhorn into a film.
Greenhorn is a Holocaust novel
for young readers. Its based on a
true story about a young survivor
who arrived at a Brooklyn yeshiva in
the 1940s with only a small box that
he wouldnt let out of his sight.
She has a filmmaker lined up, and
hopes to begin filming in April. Do-
nors can receive DVDs of the film and
tickets to the premiere. Learn more at
indiegogo.com.
Working from Canada, Steven Berg-
son is raising money for the ambitious
Jewish Comix Anthology, featuring
47 short stories, both classic and com-
missioned especially for it. They range
from reprints of little-known Jewish
work by popular cartoonists such as
Robert Crumb, Will Eisner, Joe Kubert,
and Art Spiegleman to new illustrated
adaptations of Jewish folk tales and
talmudic legends by up-and-coming
new artists. Rewards range from cop-
ies of the finished book to original art
appearing in the anthology.
Finally, the chief rabbi of Uruguay,
Ben-Tzion Spitz, is raising money
to publish a book he describes like
this: Bible meets Tolkien as 10-year-
old Boaz joins the Israelite battle for
Canaan and discovers he has powers
that may save the nation.
He says the book, Joshua: Con-
queror, is the first full length bibli-
cal fiction novel to remain true to the
biblical text while adding elements
of fantasy and adventure for a young
adult audience.
Information on both the Jewish
Comix Anthology and Joshua: Con-
queror are on kickstarter.com
LARRY YUDELSON
FLASHBACK 1926
Brooklyn Jew beats presidents son
l(February 26, 1926) John
Coolidge, son of the president, was
defeated by Matt Silverman in the
annual boxing tournament at Am-
herst College.
Mr. Silverman, known at Amherst
as Little Benny Leonard, the son
of a dress goods manufacturer of
1977 East Ninth St., Brooklyn, was
declared the victor by M. J. Ken-
nedy, the referee.
Matty was too fast for me, John
Coolidge declared. JTA
Is it fair that the life of an animal is reduced to a barcode? ask this graphic
on the Vegan-Friendly Facebook page.
Colorful bookmarks for backers of the
Jewish Comix Anthology
4 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
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Noshes
JS-5*
Maybe the only way of writing about Jews these days
is writing about Koreans and Indians.
Novelist Gary Shteyngart in an interview with Jewcy, after noting that It would be
wonderful to try my hand on something that doesnt focus entirely on Russian Jews.
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 5
Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard
is the third best director
nomination for Russell,
who is the secular son of
a Jewish father and an
Italian Catholic mother.
Hustle was co-written
by first-time nominee
ERIC WARREN SINGER,
46. Hes a native of Bev-
erly Hills, and his grand-
parents helped found
the first synagogue in
Beverly Hills.
Competing with Sing-
er/Russell for the best
original screenplay Oscar
is WOODY ALLEN, 78.
He wrote Blue Jasmine.
This is Allens 24th Oscar
nomination. He has won
four times (three for
screenplay; once as a di-
rector). Also competing
in this category is SPIKE
JONZE, who wrote and
directed the very inter-
esting Her, about the
relationship between a
computer voice/person-
ality and a real human.
Jonze, 44, was born
Adam Spiegel. The
secular son of a Jewish
father and a non-Jewish
mother, Jonze also is
nominated for best origi-
nal song a tune he co-
wrote for Her. Jonzes
critically acclaimed films
include Being John
Malkovich, Adaptation,
and Where the Wild
Things Are.
BILLY RAY, 39, is nomi-
nated for best adapted
screenplay for Cap-
tain Phillips, about the
true-life capture of an
American merchant ship
by Somali pirates. His
well-reviewed films in-
clude Shattered Glass,
Breach, and The Hun-
ger Games.
EMMANUEL LUBEZKI,
50, long has been one of
the top cinematographers
in Hollywood, and this
Bette Midler
June Squibb
Idina Menzel
Spike Jonze
OSCAR TIME:
The kosher
connections
Pink
Eric Warren Singer
Jonah Hill
Emmanuel Lubezki
Ellen DeGe-
neres will
host. BETTE
MIDLER, 68,
and PINK, 34, both will
sing, and IDINA MEN-
ZEL, 42, will perform the
Oscar-nominated tune
Let it Go from the Dis-
ney animated film Fro-
zen. (Go has become a
mega-popular hit.)
The following are the
confirmed Jewish
nominees in all but the
technical categories.
JONAH HILL, 29, is
up for a best support-
ing actor Oscar for his
performance as Donny
Azoff, the main assistant
to real-life (Jewish) Wall
St. swindler JORDAN
BELFORT in The Wolf of
Wall Street. (Leonardo
DiCaprio, who isnt Jew-
ish, played Belfort, and
he is nominated for best
actor.)
Unlike Belfort, Azoff
is a made-up character
name. Some plot details
about the fictional Azoff
track a real-life (Jewish)
Belfort associate and
others do not.
Christian Bale is nomi-
nated for best actor for
playing a character mod-
eled after another real-
life Jewish con man in
American Hustle. Bale
isnt Jewish. However,
famous Jewish feminist
GLORIA STEINEM, now
79, was married to Bales
father (her only hus-
band) from 2000 until
his death in 2003.
Hustle is loosely
based on the 1970s FBI
sting operation called
ABSCAM. For ABSCAM,
the FBI recruited a
real-life Jewish con man,
MELVIN WEINBERG,
now 89, who had the
skills to be convincing to
bribe-prone members
of Congress. In Hustle,
Weinberg (called Irving
Rosenfeld in the film) en-
snares local New Jersey
politicians.
The other Jewish act-
ing nominee is JUNE
SQUIBB, 84, a veteran
character actress who
is nominated for best
supporting actress for
playing the ornery, plain-
spoken wife of (best
actor nominee) Bruce
Dern in Nebraska. The
Jewish Journal of Los
Angeles reported last
week: Squibb converted
to Judaism before mar-
rying her first husband
in the 1950s; she said she
fell in love with the reli-
gion, was fascinated by
the laws of kashrut and
forged a strong friend-
ship with the Reform
rabbi who supervised her
conversion. Even though
that marriage ended
in divorce some years
later, Squibb continues
to identify as Jewish
and celebrates many of
the holidays with Jewish
friends.
American Hustle
director DAVID O. RUS-
SELL, 55, is nominated
for best director and
co-nominated for best
original screenplay. This
California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at
Middleoftheroad1@aol.com
year hes nominated for
his work on Gravity. Hes
been nominated six times
for his great camera skills,
and Ive got a feeling this
is his year. Lubezki was
born and raised in Mexico
City, and his work on the
hit Mexican film Like Wa-
ter for Chocolate (1992),
got him Hollywood job
offers.
Facing Fear earned
filmmaker JASON CO-
HEN, 40, a nomination
for best documentary
short subject. Its about
a recent real-life meeting
between a gay man and
the former white su-
premacist who assaulted
him many years before.
Also nominated in this
category: The Lady in
Number 6, about pianist
ALICE HERZ-SOMMER,
who died last week at
110. (She had been the
oldest living Holocaust
survivor she lead an
amazing life.)
The best picture Os-
car goes to the films
producers, who are
often hard to run down.
Here are the best pic
nominees with a known
strong Jewish connec-
tion (director, writer,
verified producer):
American Hustle (Rus-
sell/Singer); Captain
Phillips (SCOTT RUDIN,
55, producer, Ray, writer);
Her (Jonze, director,
writer, verified producer);
Philomena (directed by
Brit STEPHEN FREARS,
72); Gravity (DAVID
HEYMAN, 52, producer);
and Dallas Buyers Club
(RACHEL WINTER and
ROBBIE BRENNER, both
42, producers. Winters
non-Jewish husband,
Terence Winter, is nomi-
nated for writing Wolf
of Wall St.) N.B.
Special 1.99%
Financing
Now thru February 28th
Discover.
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31706 CPOevent Jewish Standard StripAd_ThruFeb28_Rev5.indd 1 1/16/14 3:10 PM
Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-6*
FIRST PERSON
Our man in Kiev
Ukrainian protests are not anti-Semitic, local student says
JEREMY BOROVITZ
JERUSALEM I wanted to throw the paper
in the garbage as soon as my friend showed
it to me.
Come home, Ukrainian Jews, read the
editorial in the Jerusalem Post. I think what
bothered me most (other than misappropri-
ating the timing of certain quotes and fail-
ing to give backgrounds on a few of the key
players) was that I felt that the newspapers
editorial writers, like everyone else, were
simplifying the conflict.
I first arrived in Ukraine as a Peace Corps
volunteer in March 2010, and it killed me to
watch others ignore the complexities of the
conflict: they say that it is East versus West,
and they are all a bunch of anti-Semites, and
it is a coup detat committed by a bunch of
ragtag neo-Nazis. Amen, sela.
It is about East vs. West, they say. The
country is split. The western half of Ukraine,
they tell you, strives to be a part of Europe.
It is full of Ukrainian nationalists who dis-
dain other nationalities. Meanwhile, the
industrial East, they claim, is Russian at
heart, with not a Ukraino-
phile to be found.
But this narrative didnt
really fit Serhiy Nihoyan, a
20-year-old ethnic Armenian
who was from Dnieperpetro-
vsk, one of the largest cities
in the East. Serhiy was one
of the earliest protestors to
come to the square and
he also was one of its first
fatalities. His face became
a symbol of the movement.
His image was plastered on pamphlets and
across Facebook, a dark and bearded face
that became an emblem of a Ukrainian
revolution.
Its run by the anti-Semites. Thats the
mantra theyve been giving us. A pogrom
is just around the corner. Or, as one of
the chief rabbis of Ukraine said recently,
all Jews should leave. But how does that
explain the religious zealot and lover of
Jabotinsky, who has been clad in camouflage
and a bulletproof vest for a month, fighting
for a free country, standing next to Ukraini-
ans, with his tzitzit out and his kippah on,
there for all to see?
And what about the Jewish professor and
intellectual, staunch defender of Israel to
all naysayers, who has risen to become one
of the philosophical pillars of the protest
movement?
Or the young Jewish girl whose beautiful
poetry and prose has helped keep the fires in
their souls alive?
Or the young Jewish
professional who has been
volunteering at medical
clinics on back-to-back-to-
back nights?
How do I explain that the attacks against
Jews have been terrible, but that these are
isolated instances in a swarm of violence?
How do I convey that the recent firebombing
of the synagogue in Zaporyzhya is a drop in
the despicable bucket that also has left Kievs
city center blanketed in ashes?
For a hundred have died and thousands
have been injured and dozens of buildings
already have been burned. The country
mourns its dead and supports its injured and
the vast majority abhor the violence, yet we
see it as a plot against our people.
Its a mess, they report, a bunch of mili-
tiamen flailing their guns wildly. But Euro-
Maidan is the best run Ukrainian operation
Ive ever seen. Named after the square in
which it takes place (Maidan means square
in Ukrainian), on my first visit there last
December I was shocked by how orderly
everything seemed. There were places for
meals and places for warm clothes and
places to sleep and places to heal. And last
week, when the call went out over social net-
working that the square was under attack,
the people of Kiev and of Ukraine came
out in droves. All religions, all peoples, all
ages, all political affiliations and languages
descended on the square, with medicine
and food and blankets and cameras and
sometimes with clubs and shields.
When the dust settled after the dark-
est Thursday most of them will ever see,
they continued fighting, organizing, build-
ing barricades, and mourning their fallen
friends.
Saturday was bittersweet, because the cost
of throwing off the yolks of tyrannical rule
was so high. And as the terrible truths of the
past few years were uncovered, the mansions
with golden yachts displayed, and the empti-
ness of the countrys coffers became a real-
ity, the momentary ecstasy disappeared. And
so, on the square and in the Parliament and
at the cemeteries Ukrainians and Armenians
and Jews and Russians will continue to build,
and create, and mourn.
These people have bled beside each other
the last few months, and it is up to them to
stay or to go.
And it is likely that they will stay. They will
stay to build a stronger Ukraine, a better Jew-
ish community, and a peaceful square.
Please pray for the people of Ukraine.
Jeremy Borovitz, who grew up in Bergen
County, spent three and a half years in Ukraine
as a Peace Corps volunteer and working with
the Jewish community in Kiev. He is studying at
the Pardes Institute in Jerusalem.
Jeremy Borovitz, left, is a close observer of events in Ukraine. Above, demonstrators throng Maidan
Square in Kiev.
All religions, all
peoples, all ages,
all political
afliations and
languages
descended on
the square.
Local
JS-7*
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Location: 500 West 185th Street | Furst Hall, 5th Floor
Remembering Rabbi Stern
Project Ezrah founder eulogized in Teaneck
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
Rabbi Yosef Yossie Stern, founder and exec-
utive director of Project Ezrah, died on Feb-
ruary 21 after a short illness. He was eulogized
at Congregation Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck,
where he was a longtime daily worshipper,
and buried in Israel. Rabbi Stern would have
been 65 on May 3.
Bnai Yeshuruns spiritual leader, Rabbi Ste-
ven Pruzansky, his voice cracking with emo-
tion, described Rabbi Stern as caring and lov-
ing. A great person has left us, he said in his
eulogy. A fixture is removed from us, a pillar
is no longer.
Its a time of mourning for Jews in our
shul, our community, and beyond.
Rabbi Stern was a Brooklyn native who
lived in Teaneck for about 40 years. Aside
from rabbinical ordination, he earned a
degree from New York Universitys Stern
School of Business. He taught at the Moriah
School in Englewood and served as principal
of Torah Academy of Bergen County in its
early years.
Later he went into the jewelry business,
although, as his son Shai said at the funeral,
My father never stopped teaching. He had
a patience to learn with people that was
unparalleled.
In 2001, on the eve of the High Holidays, a
distraught man at Bnai Yeshurun confided in
Rabbi Stern that he was out of work and did
not have health insurance. Rabbi Stern went
to Rabbi Pruzansky and told him he wanted
to start an organization to help local people
find jobs.
That was how Rabbi Stern came to dedi-
cate the last 12 1/2 years of his life to the
Englewood-based Project Ezrah (ezrah is
Hebrew for assistance). The original focus
was on critical support for personalized job
search assistance, health care, and basic liv-
ing expenses. Services have grown to include
fiscal planning, budget management, job
placement, resume building, and interview
preparation as well as Ezrahs Closet sec-
ondhand boutique for Jewish families in
need. Similar organizations were started in
other parts of the country based on the Proj-
ect Ezrah model.
The goals, objective and protocols came
from within him, and I had
implicit trust in him from
the day he started, Rabbi
Pruzansky said. The idea
was to help for the short
term, so families could get
back on their feet and be
self-sufficient at the end of
the process.
And it worked.
It was emotionally, psy-
chologically, and physically taxing, but Yossie
never wavered from his objective.
Susan Alpert, director of fundraising and
development for Project Ezrah and a long-
time family friend of Rabbi Stern and his wife,
Rifka, said the organization has helped thou-
sands of people in one way or another. Some
clients literally owe their lives to Rabbi Stern,
she said.
Part of him is in every person whose life
he saved, Mrs. Alpert said.
She added that the Project Ezrah staff
has resolved to continue what Rabbi Stern
began. This is his legacy, and we helped
create it. Now, as far as we can, we will
continue in his memory to serve the cli-
ents who depend on us for their basic
needs. In our hearts, we
know if we are to honor
him this is how to do it.
Mrs. Al pert recal l ed
Rabbi Stern once saying
that if people would be
aware that God is watching
them at every moment,
they would do only good.
Thats the way he lived his
life, she said.
Rabbi Pruzansky echoed
that observation.
He lived such a per-
fectly Jewish Torah life. From early morn-
ing and until late at night, his life was
bounded by Torah, avodah [service]
and gemilus chasadim [kind deeds], the
rabbi said in his eulogy on Saturday night.
When difficult times arose, he would say
Its all good. The effect [of his death] on
all of us is staggering, but even now he
would say its all good.
In addition to his wife, Rabbi Stern is
survived by his daughters Devora Marcus
and Nava Schreiber of Israel and sons Shai
Stern and Effie Stern of Los Angeles.
When asked how many grandchildren
he had, Rabbi Stern always said that we
dont count people, Mrs. Alpert said. He
was blessed with many grandchildren.
Rabbi Yossie Stern
Local
8 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-8*
Between Vashti and Esther
Jersey City dancers look at women in the Purim story
JOANNE PALMER
W
hat exactly is the relation-
ship between Vashti and
Esther?
According to the Book
of Esther, the relationship is simply that
of predecessor and successor. Vashti is
the queen who refused to dance naked
before the king and his guests; Esther is
the carefully chosen young woman who
took her place.
But midrash exists to create new rela-
tionships and tease new understandings
out of classic texts and who says that
midrash always has to use words?
Choreographer and artistic direc-
tor Ariel Grossman and her husband,
composer and executive director David
Homan, have performers dance it.
Ms. Grossman and Mr. Homan, who
live in Jersey City, have taken a fresh look
at Vashti and Esther in a two-part work
called The Book of Esther: The Journey
of Queen Vashti and Queen Esther. In
doing so, they have taken on quite a few
challenges the dance-world problem of
how to go from an emotion-based style
to a story-based one, and the larger one
of how to take a very specific, culture-
bound story and make it universal, with-
out losing its specificity.
Although neither had tackled a Jewish
subject before, both Ms. Grossman and
Mr. Homan live deeply inside the Jewish
world. They hold dual citizenship, with
strong roots in the art world as well.
Mr. Homan, who comes from Florida,
is the son of an arts administrator and
a Shakespearean scholar. He also is the
executive director of the America-Israel
Cultural Foundation. He went to Bard
College, where he majored in music and
drama, and then on to NYUs Steinhardt
School of Education, where he earned a
masters degree in music composition.
Ms. Grossman, who grew up on Man-
hattans far east side, went to Skidmore
College, where she majored in dance,
and then to Bank Street, where she got
a masters in early childhood education.
She now teaches in the early childhood
center at the Jewish Community Project
in Tribeca.
Much of her fathers Orthodox fam-
ily lives in Jerusalem, and her mother
is the daughter of Holocaust survivors.
She was born in a DP camp in Ger-
many, Ms. Grossman said. Ive always
thought about how my mother is one of
the smartest people I know, but she can
never be president. Her grandfather
who is even smarter than her mother,
Mr. Homan added, still lives in Manhat-
tan. Ariels whole life has been in that
shadow, Mr. Homan said.
The first half of the dance that Ms.
Grossman choreographed and Mr.
Homan scored is about Vashti. Originally,
it was meant to stand alone. David
wanted to do a 25-minute work that he
would compose and have live music
and he wanted it to be narrative, Ms.
Grossman said.
That was hard for Ariel because she
grew up in a ballet structure, Mr. Homan
said. Her initial choreography had been
based on raw emotion, and here she had
to impose a structure on it.
Once they decided that they wanted
a narrative structure, they had to find
a story. We were thinking of Greek
mythology, Ms Grossman said. Maybe
Eurydice. And then my dad said, Why
dont you do something Jewish? He
said either Esther or Vashti. And I said,
Thats the best idea Ive ever heard.
To prepare, Ms. Grossman did some
research. Vashti, she learned, is disposed
of in the first chapter of the Book of Esther;
her name is brought up twice in the begin-
ning of chapter 2, and thats that for her.
In the straightforward text, she is
said to be very fair; the king, Ahasuerus,
wants to show her off to his drunken
friends, but Vashti, who was entertain-
ing their wives, refused the demand. She
then was told that she was no longer wel-
come, and that she would be replaced.
Ahasuerus decrees that all the wives
will give to their husbands honor, both
to great and small, we are told in chap-
ter 1, verse 20, and the hunt for Vashtis
replacement is on.
Although there is not much in the text
to encourage such an interpretation, Jew-
ish midrash and folklore generally see
Vashti as bad. When you think of Vashti,
you think of someone with pimples
and a tail, Ms. Grossman said; indeed,
midrash does give her those characteris-
tics. But the head of the nursery school
at Brotherhood thats the Gramercy
Square synagogue to which the couple
used to go before they moved to New Jer-
sey said no; really, she was the first
feminist in the Bible.
That was the inspiration for the story.
I decided not to decide if she was the
most pious person in the world, or if she
was evil, she added. We explore the
choices she had to make, and the choices
of the women she was involved with.
This year, the couple added the story
of Esther. But lets not make it just about
pretty little Esther, Ms. Grossman said.
Lets make it an interesting story.
The same dancers perform in both
halves of the work, and each has her
own arc, Mr. Homan said.
The first half has Vashti and four
other dancers. Her group of women,
Ms. Grossman said. And of that group,
one becomes Esther, one becomes
Ariel Grossman and David Homan are
expecting their rst child in April.
Dancers perfrom as Vashti and her group of women in a scene from The Book of Esther: The Journey of Queen
Vashti and Queen Eshter.
Mordechai, and one becomes Haman.
There are moments in Vashti where Esther that
is, the dancer who would become Esther in the per-
formances second half almost took the lead, as if
she would be chosen queen, Mr. Homan said.
Even more strikingly, the second part begins
with what we call two old friends Mordechai and
Haman. Then they have a falling out, because of the
lure of power.
Haman goes through what I call a Darth Vader
transformation. He goes over to the dark side. Its
also like the lure of the crown, which Mr. Homan
compared to the Lord of the Rings. Its as if Haman
is Gollum, and the ring is his precioussss.
All the dancers are women. The only male pres-
ence in the show is the king. He is represented by
a bright light. We call it the king light, Ms. Gross-
man said.
The women are always being watched, Mr.
Homan said, They are being subjugated. They are
being challenged, but you never see their challenger.
When the two dances are combined, it becomes
a complete work about power, womens empower-
ment, and the choices that each of these women
make in support of each other, to actually stand up
for their principles, their morals, and their dignity,
Mr. Homan said.
Vashti is a mirror for Esther, Ms. Grossman added.
We have Vashti come back. She is one of the women
who nobody recognizes, but she reveals herself to
Vashti [Esther?] at the beginning of the piece. She is
there to support Esther, and to mirror her.
There is a beautiful duet between Vashti and
Esther, where Vashti shows Esther the path.
The couple hope that the work will appeal to non-
Jewish audiences as well as Jewish ones. They also
hope that it is accessible enough to appeal to people
who do not know a great deal about dance.
We want people to enjoy it, Ms. Grossman said.
I attempt to end every work I write with a moment
of joy, Mr. Homan said. Of resolution. Of epiphany.
The ending of this dance is not pure joy that
would be too kitschy, Ms. Grossman said but the
story is resolved. It does not end with a massacre,
as the Book of Esther does, or even with Hamans
death; instead, he is exiled, she said.
And the audience, she added, gets a real sense of
empowerment.
Local
JS-9
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Who: Ariel Grossman and David Homans
Ariel Rivka Dance present
What: A contemporary dance work, The
Book of Esther: The Journey of Queen Vashti
and Queen Esther
When: Saturday, February 28, at 7:30 p.m.,
and Sunday, March 1, at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Where: Alvin Ailey Citigroup Theater: 405
West 55th St. in Manhattan
How: To buy tickets, go to www.
arielrivkadance.com or call 917-204-4922
For more information: Email David Homan
at david@homanmusic.com
Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-10*
Saving the kings daughters
Shelter in Israel shields religious victims of domestic abuse
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
N
oach Korman is one of those
rare men who sees a societal
problem and cannot turn the
other way.
The problem was battered women among
Israels religious population. His response,
the organization Bat Melech (Daughter of
the King), has grown to include emergency
shelters in Jerusalem and Beit Shemesh
that serve the whole country, as well as a
24-hour hotline, psychological and legal
counseling, parenting classes, and preven-
tion programs.
In March, Mr. Korman will speak at two
North Jersey parlor meetings. He will be
accompanied by Leonia native Amy Beth
Oppenheimer, Bat Melechs director for
North America and overseas relations.
We feel now is the time to share what we
do with all the Jewish women and men who
believe in what we are doing, Mr. Korman
said. Bat Melech is not our private busi-
ness; it belongs to the community.
In fact, over the years Bat Melech has seen
its share of American migrs or temporary
residents needing emergency refuge.
We have a very strong vision of how to
expand services and awareness and edu-
cation, Mr. Korman said. We are at the
beginning of a long path to bring what we
do to Israelis and people around the world
and ask them to be our partners.
Sixteen years ago, Mr. Korman, an attor-
ney, was approached by a woman escaping
her abusive husband. She slept in the lobby
of a Jerusalem hotel for two weeks because
she felt she had nowhere else to go. Though
Israel runs 14 battered-woman shelters,
none provided a Sabbath-observant, strictly
kosher environment.
I started speaking with organizations
and rabbis and rebbetzins about what can
be done for her and others like her, Mr.
Korman said. Everybody knows there is a
huge problem, but nobody can offer a solu-
tion because they feel very ashamed to talk
about this issue.
Mr. Korman set up a safe apartment, and
then he set up another one. Within a year,
he opened the first Bat Melech shelter. The
Israeli government now provides 60 per-
cent of the $1.5 million annual operating
budget. Another 20 percent comes from
Israeli donors.
One reason for the overseas appeal is
a new regulation requiring government-
funded shelters to offer at least 12 bed-
rooms. The six-room Jerusalem Bat Melech
shelter must expand by the June deadline
to be in compliance with the law. Half the
required funds have been raised in Israel,
and renovations have begun.
The information sessions are scheduled
for March 25 at the home of Becky Katz in
Teaneck, and the following evening at the
home of Joyce Straus in Englewood.
Were also looking for more hosts, Ms.
Oppenheimer said. We want to form an
event committee that can plan future meet-
ings and programs.
Sari Meir, a Hebrew teacher at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for Girls in Teaneck,
was a social worker in Bat Melechs Jerusa-
lem shelter for six years and directed the
Beit Shemesh shelter for another six years.
The Beit Shemesh branch already has
been expanded to 12 rooms. But both shel-
ters have waiting lists. Ms. Meir said that
usually each of the rooms can accommo-
date either one woman with one or two chil-
dren or two women. But Orthodox mothers
frequently arrive with four or more children
and require several rooms, although fund-
ing is allocated only according to the num-
ber of mothers.
On a hopeful note, Mr. Korman observes
that women are starting to seek refuge at
younger ages and with fewer children than
they used to.
Ms. Meir related the story of a 19-year-old
American woman who came to the shelter
with her three-month-old baby. She was
married to an Israeli she had met in Jerusa-
lem, and he took all the household money
to buy alcohol. When she didnt want to
give him more, he beat her. Her family was
in the States, and wrapped up in their own
problems. One family she
knew in Israel called us, and
she came to get advice from
our lawyer.
This teenage mother
stayed in the shelter for a
year and finally received a
divorce. She went through
a significant process of
healing with the help of an
English-speaking psycholo-
gist, and we got a volunteer
from the community who
became like a mother to
her, Ms. Meir said. Our lawyers arranged
for her to take her child to the United States,
where she could manage better. If not for
Bat Melech, I dont know if she could have
survived.
Women are referred from all over Israel
by welfare agencies, rabbis, police, hospi-
tals, and word of mouth. Its so important
to us to raise awareness so they know there
is a solution, Ms. Meir said.
And women here in New Jersey
need to know that if they know women
who need help, they can call us. I got many
calls from America about daughters or
friends with problems in Israel. After they
leave the shelter we continue to be in touch
because although the welfare agency will
take care of them, we are like family.
These women are generally very poor.
The abuser took their
money, their strength, and
their self-esteem.
Ms. Oppenheimer hopes
to inspire people to help by
endowing the expansion
of the shelter or allocat-
ing money to preventative
programming on healthy
dating and relationships.
Those programs would be
aimed at religious commu-
nities both in Israel and in
the United States.
We have the content and we have
endorsements from rabbinic leaders, but
are not able to implement programs with-
out funding, she said.
Among the area rebbetzins she has so far
recruited to support the educational effort
are Shevi Yudin of Fair Lawns Congrega-
tion Shomrei Torah; Debbie Baum from
Teanecks Congregation Keter Torah, Chana
Reichman from Englewoods East Hill Syna-
gogue, and Chaviva Rothwachs of Teanecks
Congregation Beth Aaron.
But this is not only a womens issue, Ms.
Oppenheimer stressed. Men like Noach
should step up and get involved, too. The
idea is men and women standing together
for those whose voices are silent.
For information, email Ms. Oppenheimer
at amy.oppenheimer@gmail.com.
A woman looks through a barred window at a Bat Melech shelter. PHOTOS COURTESY BAT MELECH
Noach Korman is the
organizations founder.
JS-11
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 11
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Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-12*
Fulbright scholar works on climate change
Fresh from Arctic,
Gates Cambridge
scholarship now sends
Paramus woman
to England
LOIS GOLDRICH
L
ast year, Victoria Herrmann of
Paramus set off for Canada to
study how indigenous commu-
nities in the Arctic have been
affected by climate change, and how they
are using the human rights implications of
climate change to create a voice for them-
selves in the international community.
While the topic is complex, Ms. Her-
rmanns motivation is not. A member of
Temple Avodat Shalom in River Edge, she
always has been very interested in human
rights. Indeed, she said, she was inspired
to care about others by her grandfather,
the late Sigfried Herrmann of Fair Lawn.
My grandfather was an Auschwitz sur-
vivor, the only one from his family to
survive, she said. He came here with
nothing, but despite it all he
taught me less from his expe-
riences in Germany and more
from the person he became
after that.
He still cared for human-
ity. He taught me that it was
important to volunteer in the
community and to make a dif-
ference in the world.
The 23-year-old scholar,
who was awarded a Fulbright
grant last year, has split her
time between Ottawa and Iqa-
luit, meeting with local com-
munities and studying the
Inuktitut dialect. She has accomplished
much over the past year, and now, having
been awarded a Gates Cambridge scholar-
ship which will take her to England in
October she hopes to do even more.
The scholarship program was founded
by the Bill and Melinda Gates Founda-
tion in 2000, and recipients pursue their
research at Cambridge University. Accord-
ing to its website, the goal of the initiative
is to build a global network of future
leaders committed to improving the lives
of others.
Ms. Herrmann, who learned just last
week that she had won this award, said
that 40 American students have won
scholarships for the coming year, and 55
international students will be selected by
May.
Over the past year, Ms. Herrmann has
narrowed her initial focus somewhat,
now focusing primarily on the visual nar-
rative generated by indigenous groups
and presented at international negotia-
tions. Theyve played a more significant
role, she said of the
pictures, videos, and
other forms of art used
to illustrate the con-
sequences of climate
change.
Mi nori t y groups
bring a lot of different images to climate
negotiations, she said, citing, for exam-
ple, a photo of a polar bear on a piece of
floating ice. She has been blessed to
go twice to the Arctic to work with some
of these groups, she added, and that has
given her opportunity to see the kinds of
images they brought out of their commu-
nities to conferences in Copenhagen and
South Africa.
As a Fulbright scholar, Ms. Herrmann
has presented at a number of conferences,
from Halifax to Montreal, and now she is
planning one in British Columbia. Some,
she said, are science-focused; others con-
centrate on policy.
They dont know much about the visu-
als in terms of the people who live in the
Arctic, she said of the groups she reaches.
They dont know how important these
pictures are to the people who live there.
Im bringing the stories of these communi-
ties to larger audiences.
At Cambridge, where she will work
towards her Ph.D., Ill be pursuing the
same work, but on a larger scale. While
shell still look at visual narratives of Arc-
tic communities, her work will take in the
entire Arctic council region, which encom-
passes Russia, Greenland, Iceland, and the
Nordic countries.
I will look at governance issues as well,
she said, touching on subjects such as oil
drilling and the rights given to indigenous
groups. A lot of these countries are not
very friendly to indigenous rights. She
noted, though, that many Arctic council
countries have become much more active
and are now much more open to talking
with the affected groups. Theres a lot to
be done but theres also a lot of positive
signs, she said.
Ms. Herrmann will work with an adviser
at the Scott Polar Institute who will focus
on narratives in the Arctic. She will con-
tinue to focus on the visuals.
Theres not anyone working on this at
Cambridge but I hope that by doing such
a comprehensive project instead of a nar-
row Ph.D., future researchers will pick up
on parts of this to work on, she said, add-
ing that after she published a few articles
on the topic, she got a good response from
other researchers, particularly in Nordic
countries.
The job of new leaders should be to
work to challenge the status quo, Ms.
Herrmann said. For a while, particularly
in the previous generation, leaders were
looked upon to continue American pros-
perity in a variety of fields. Now we look
to them to push beyond what we already
have and find innovative solutions to push
us forward.
It may not equate to prosperity, but it
will push humanity forward for genera-
tions beyond ourselves particularly with
things like climate change.
When she finishes her work at Cam-
bridge, Ms. Herrmann would like to do
something with the research shes com-
pleted, perhaps a publication or some
kind of exhibit.
I have some background in that, she
said, pointing out that she had studied
both international relations and art his-
tory at Lehigh and had internships at
the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New
York and at the Smithsonian Institution in
Washington, D.C.
I would like to go back to curating, at
least with this project, she said, though
down the road, I want to get back into
policy and work on climate issues in the
Arctic.
The U.S. is known as the reluctant Arc-
tic power, but last week the State Depart-
ment said it would create an Arctic ambas-
sadors office. Things are changing.
Victoria Hermann, clearly not in the Arctic in the photo at left, warms up, above, after a traditional Inuit
dinner on a cold Canadian night in January. VICTORIA HERRMANN
JS-13
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 13
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their ears.
These are not frivolous
exercises.
Education is key, Ms.
Nahary said, pointing out
that experts will be on
hand at all four Tuesday
sessions to talk about the
implications of demen-
tia, both behavioral and
medical.
A urinary tract infec-
tion may show up in a
dementia patient as loss
of memory or a volatile
personality change, she
said. They dont inter-
pret pain the same way.
A UTI can turn septic
instantly, and you have
to get them tested imme-
diately. Well arm care-
givers with this type of
information.
If they know the signs
of certain conditions, she
said, caregivers can take the appropriate
action. In this case that would mean get-
ting antibiotics.
The difficulty of providing 24/7 care for
a parent or spouse cannot be minimized,
Ms. Nahary said, noting issues of hygiene,
transportation, recalcitrant behavior, and
the need to make the house safe. Caregiv-
ers also need specific information pass-
words for important accounts, phone
numbers, medications.
They dont think to get that informa-
tion in the beginning, Ms. Ceragno said.
She knows about it personally as well as
professionally she was a primary care-
giver for an elderly aunt. To make their
lives easier, we will create a plan together.
Theyll leave here with knowledge of
the disease, how to deal with the behav-
ior, and how to move forward.
Theyll also leave with a workbook.
Well ask them to write down all the med-
ications, where the will is, where impor-
tant things are. Theyll have their own
personal book along with information
about resources in the community.
Theyll also be able to share their expe-
riences with each other, Ms. Nahary said.
When caregivers are together, they
give each other a lot of input. That alone is
huge, to have someone validate your feel-
ings. Its therapeutic and cathartic.
The J CC has been runni ng an
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Easing
the journey
Program arms dementia caregivers
with information, resources
LOIS GOLDRICH
We all know whether
we have seen it firsthand
or not that dementia
causes people to do things
less well, less gracefully.
That it may lead to frus-
tration and sometimes to
anger.
But do caregivers
even the most loving and
well-intentioned really
know what their par-
ents or spouses are going
through? How it really
feels to lose control over
seemingly simple tasks?
A new program at the
Kaplen JCC on the Pali-
sades in Tenafly will use
innovative means to show
caregivers what it means
to face these obstacles.
Among other things,
the family caregiver train-
ing program coordi-
nated by Judi Nahary, the
JCC director of senior adult services, and
Marlene Ceragno, its senior activity cen-
ter recreational therapist and caregiver
support coordinator will offer a series
of simulation exercises.
For example, Ms. Ceragno said, Well
put something in [the caregivers] shoes to
make it harder to walk and to make them
aware of how frustrating it is, so they will
look at it with more compassion.
When someone has dementia, he or
she cant verbalize all their new ailments,
she said. Maybe the caregiver wants to
leave the house quickly, but the person
with dementia cant remember how to
button a shirt. At the training program,
participants will be asked to perform
tactile functions with gloves on, to wear
blinders that impair vision, and to put on
earbuds that feed continuous noise into
What: Family caregiver
training program
Where: Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly
When: Four Tuesdays - March
15, 18; April 1, 8; 11 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
Fee: $80/members;
$100 non-members
For information: call
Judi, (201) 408-1450, or Marlene,
(201) 569-7900, ext. 439.
Judi Nahary
Marlene Ceragno
Local
JS-15
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 15
Alzheimers caregiver support group for
several years, holding three meetings a
month, two during the day and one in
the evening. Participants include both
men and women, children and spouses.
Attendees at the day groups generally
are between the ages of 60 and 80. In
the evening, most of the caregivers,
there for their parents, are between 40
and 60.
Most care for loved ones with dementia
or Alzheimers, but we have gotten others,
general caregivers, just looking for some-
one to talk to, Ms. Ceragno said.
Ms. Nahary said she often hears
attendees talk about their guilt for feel-
ing the way they do becoming impa-
tient, frustrated, even yelling some-
times. At first thats what we hear; then it
turns into a lot of regret that this is their
life. They had saved up for retirement,
hoping to travel. Now all their money
will go toward caring for this person.
Also, Ms. Ceragno said, children are
strongly affected by the role reversal.
Thats huge.
All of a sudden theyre not asking what
to do, but telling.
While the support group will continue
both women pointed out that the number
of participants is growing Ms. Nahary
said that one of the things she wants to
accomplish is to increase offerings for
caregivers.
Marlene had tremendous resources,
she said. She jumped on the idea. So
we sat down and talked about what we
thought was missing. So much informa-
tion and resources exist that they dont
know about, that could make their life
easier.
Were not reaching everyone out
there, she added. We want to inform
them of medical pieces that could be so
helpful.
The training program was designed
with this in mind and the planners
have given careful thought to overcoming
obstacles.
This is our test run, Ms. Nahary said.
We want to offer it several times a year.
The caregiving population is growing.
We dont want anyone to be concerned
about cost. If they cant afford the fee, we
can work with them.
Nor do they have to worry about leaving
their loved ones at home unattended, she
said, noting that the latter can be incorpo-
rated into adult day care programs at the
JCC during training sessions.
Sessions will be run by experts, includ-
ing a medical doctor, nurse, eldercare law
practitioner, and dementia care specialist.
We are going to try to arm our caregiv-
ers with tools that will make their journey
a bit easier, Ms. Ceragno said.
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Local
16 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-16*
Eshel sponsoring retreat
for Orthodox parents of gays
LARRY YUDELSON
I
ts not easy being gay in the Orthodox
community.
And its not much easier being
a parent whose child is gay in that
community.
Next weekend, Eshel, an organization for
Orthodox gays, is holding its second annual
retreat for Orthodox parents with lesbian,
gay, bisexual, or transgender children.
It was amazing, said Zahava, the pseud-
onym for an Orthodox woman from Teaneck,
who attended last years conference. One of
her daughters, now in her 20s, is lesbian.
Even though she is out and therefore I am
out, my closest friends all know, but theres
still kind of an awkwardness, she said. This
was an entire group of people who all shared
this in common. I didnt have to explain
anything.
It was also a very good feeling to know
that maybe I could model for people a little
bit what its like to be accepting of the situa-
tion, of having a gay child. There were a lot
of people who were fighting it, who were
angry or upset or sad and just didnt know
how to deal with it. For some of these people,
who were just really struggling with the idea,
hopefully it helped them to realize other peo-
ple had been in the same situation, she said.
Some of these families felt really really
alone, because no one in their community
would talk about it.
Within parts of the Orthodox community,
attitudes toward homosexuality have been
changing in recent years.
From year to year you see the difference,
Zahava said.
In 2001, the film Trembling Before G-d
brought the stories of gay Orthodox Jews to a
wide audience. In 2004, Rabbi Steven Green-
berg published his book Wrestling with God
& Men: Homosexuality in the Jewish Tra-
dition. Rabbi Greenberg is one of Eshels
co-directors.
Zahava says that the 2010 release of the
Statement of Principles on the Place of Jews
with a Homosexual Orientation in Our Com-
munity was significant.
The statement, initiated by Rabbi Nathan-
iel Helfgott of Congregation Netivot Shalom
in Teaneck, mandated an obligation to treat
human beings with same-sex attractions and
orientations with dignity and respect.
That was tremendous, Zahava said.
While not departing
from the traditional hala-
chic view that sees all male
and female same-sex sexual
interactions as prohibited,
the statement called for gay
Jews and their children to
be welcomed by Orthodox
synagogues.
Rabbi Yosef Adler of
Teanecks Congregation
Rinat Yisrael is the only
other local congregational
rabbi to sign the statement.
Earlier this month, an unexpectedly large
crowd turned out at Rinat Yisrael to see and
discuss two short films. Both were on contro-
versial topics; one was about a gay yeshiva
student. The rabbi and a social worker led the
discussion that followed the screening.
Zahava said her daughter always knew she
was gay, but she wasnt out when she was
a student at Frisch Yeshiva High School in
Paramus.
I think she felt completely comfortable
with herself. I dont think she felt embar-
rassed or ashamed. On the other hand
I think she felt she had a secret. It was not
something most people she
knew would feel comfort-
able with, particularly the
extended family.
Now, shes out to all of
her friends and they com-
pletely accept her. She
doesnt live in close walk-
ing distance to a shul. Most
Shabboses she spends with
this chevre group of
six or seven observant
lesbians.
And her Orthodox siblings accept her too.
Im really happy about that, Zahava said.
I just think this generation is not as homo-
phobic as previous generations. They just get
it. None of them imagine that this is a choice
on her part. They just get that this is how she
was born, and given that fact, her choices are
hopefully understandable.
Im in Teaneck, a community with mod-
ern sensibilities. I cant speak for Monsey or
Brooklyn.
In Teaneck, people really get this is not
a choice anyone is making, that people
who are gay deserve happiness too, and
that its better to have them within our
Shaar organizes new group
for moms and dads of LGBTQ kids
JOANNE PALMER
S
haar Communities, the Bergen
County-based post-denomina-
tional community led by Rabbi
Adina Lewittes, now is offering
a group for parents of lesbian, gay, bisex-
ual, transgender, and queer children. Very
soon, it will offer a group for those par-
ents teenage children as well.
There is no formal Jewish communal
space here in northern New Jersey or
anywhere else in New Jersey for families
raising Jewish LBGTQ teens, where they
can enjoy a sense of fellowship and have the
opportunity to talk together, to support one
another, or just to be present to each other,
Rabbi Lewittes said.
Times have changed, and societal
assumptions about the LBGTQ community
have changed too, she said. Although it used
to be mortifying and guilt-inducing to realize
that you were born gay, that those stirrings
you felt were not the ones you were expected
to feel, that is no longer true. Although it is
still complicated, certainly, public acceptance
of same-sex relationships, as evidenced by
the legislation allowing same-sex marriage
across most of the country, is on the rise.
Still, parents feel the need to learn how to
navigate this new terrain, and Jewish parents
wants to know how to do it Jewishly.
One of our top goals is to communicate
that the Jewish community is big enough,
diverse enough, and inclusive enough
for LBGTQ families to feel at home; for
them to feel the affirmative embrace of the
community, Rabbi Lewittes said.
And t here has been a l ot of
misunderstanding, even on the part of some
of these families. A lot of them arent aware
of the fact that there has been so much
movement in the Jewish community.
We feel very strongly that we have nothing
to hide, or even to wrestle with, from a Jewish
point of view.
There are issues that parents obviously
have to negotiate. They had assumptions
about what their childs future would
look like; we help families process what
the future might be within the Jewish
community and within the Jewish family,
working with our set of Jewish values and
traditions.
So far, the group, which has met twice
since it first began in January, has drawn
people from five families. I think that it will
grow as more people hear about it and they
get a sense of the street cred
of the people involved,
Rabbi Lewittes said. We
keep hearing about lots of
kids who are out in Jewish
families. The need will only
grow.
Jewish Family Service of
Bergen County provides the
group with a social worker,
in case anything comes up
that is beyond the scope of
our training and that has
happened, Rabbi Lewittes said. And its also
a nice expression of collaboration from our
local agencies.
Still, the group is more an affinity than a
support group, she said. Right from the
outset, we made it clear that we are not here
to wring our hands or beat our breasts over
the identities that our children have claimed,
she said. We are here to offer an affirming,
positive, inclusive message.
Having said that, it is also true that
there are real challenges that families with
LBGTQ teens face. We want to be there
to share experiences with them best
practices, if you will things that have
worked in some families.
The parents in the support
group so far have chosen to
remain anonymous the
understanding they find
in the group is not always
mirrored in the outside
world. One mother, who
has two straight daughters,
a lesbian daughter, and a
gay son, talked about how
she has to come out as a
parent whenever she talks
honestly about her children.
It is very challenging, she said. Sometimes
were afraid to say it, because we dont know
what the reaction will be.
And sometimes I dont want to say it
because its really my childs business, not
mine. Its not mine to share. Its hard to know
where that line is.
Even at the support group, the ease that
parents feel with their childrens identities
runs a gamut. There are varying degrees of
comfort, Rabbi Lewittes said. Some parents
struggle more.
Even though our message is clear and
consistent this is an effort by one Jewish
community to reach out and offer a loving
embrace to parents who are walking this
Rabbi Steven Greenberg
Rabbi Adina Lewittes
Local
JS-17
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 17
Hunting Elephants
www. j f nnj . or g/ f i l mf es t i v al
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
March 22 - Apri l 10, 2014
16th Annual
Israel Film &
Cultural
Festival
Opening Night
Saturday, March 22 8:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Kapl en JCC on the Pal i sades, Tenafl y
Sunday, March 23 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit
Opening night art exhibit and reception
Kapl en JCC on the Pal i sades, Tenafl y
Partnership2Gether Community Task Force
cordially invites you to a traveling international art exhibit
Water: The Essence of Our Lives
Kosher wine and cheese will be served.
Sunday, March 23 7:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Kapl en JCC on the Pal i sades, Tenafl y
Tuesday, March 25 7:30 PM
THE PRIME MINISTERS
Congregati on Ri nat Yi srael , Teaneck
Wednesday, March 26 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
The Wayne Y
Thursday, March 27 7:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Ramsey Ci nema, Ramsey
Sunday, March 30 6:30 PM
THE ATTACK
Teaneck Ci nemas
SPECIAL - ONE NIGHT ONLY!
Monday, March 31 8:00 PM
THE WONDERS
Kapl en JCC on the Pal i sades, Tenafl y
Discussion with Adir Miller, acclaimed actor and comedian
Tuesday, Apri l 1 7:30 PM
BEFORE THE REVOLUTION
Fai rl ei gh Di cki nson Uni versi ty, Hackensack
Wednesday, Apri l 2 7:30 PM
ZAYTOUN
Bergen County Y, a JCC, Twp. of Washi ngton
Wednesday, Apri l 2 8:00 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Uni ted Synagogue of Hoboken
Saturday, Apri l 5 8:15 PM
UNDER THE SAME SUN
Barnert Templ e, Frankl i n Lakes
Sunday, Apri l 6 7:00 PM
HUNTING ELEPHANTS
JCC of Paramus/Cong. Beth Ti kvah, Paramus
Thursday, Apri l 10 6:00 PM
Art Exhibit
Bel ski e Museum of Art & Sci ence, Cl oster
Partnership2Gether Community Task Force
cordially invites you to a traveling international art exhibit
Water: The Essence of Our Lives
Kosher wine and cheese will be served.
Leslie Billet, Chair, Israel Programs Center
Liran Kapoano Director, Center for Israel Engagement
LiranK@jfnnj.org | 201.820.3909
www. j f nnj . or g/f i l mf est i val
Coming Soon to Theaters Near You!
community than to push them out, she said.
I know a couple of people in my generation who are
gay. One came out and left the community and is now
not observant at all. The other one is closeted. Thats the
choice most people felt they had to make until 10 years
ago or so.
I really think that when people talk about halachic
problems with homosexuality, theres a lot of homopho-
bia there. Theyre treating it so differently than any other
violation. Theyre not willing to entertain the thought that
there are ways around things. There are people who eat
dairy in non-kosher restaurants. There are people who
when their pet is sick on Shabbos they drive to the vet.
People make their own choices on individual things and
we dont say Oh my God! Whats wrong with you?
People are way more judgmental about homosexual-
ity, and its way out of proportion. But its less than it used
to be, as society in general moves toward acceptance, she
said.
Hanna also a pseudonym is the daughter of an
Orthodox rabbi in Teaneck. She is very involved with
Eshel, which has retreats for the gay community as well
as for their parents.
Its been a really meaningful source of support and
community for me, she said.
She didnt invite her parents to attend the parents
retreat.
I dont think it would be something that would be good
at this time, she said. Hes incredibly loving and accepting
towards me in ways I didnt anticipate. Hes been a really
wonderful support for me.
Hannah is in her early 30s, and went through the stan-
dard Orthodox education of yeshiva day school, high
school, and a year in Israel.
road this is not to say that there is no diversity in the
perspective of each family, and in the parents feelings.
One thing that unites the families, though, is that all
are Jewish, even though there is a range in their levels
of observance. I went to a PFLAG meeting, the mother
said. (PFLAG the initials stand for Parents, Families
and Friends of Lesbians and Gays is a nationwide
nonsectarian support group.) There was something
missing there something that is very present in a room
filled with parents with shared cultural assumptions,
language, and references. Its just very different.
We had a very interesting conversation last time one
of the parents said that the fact that my child is gay doesnt
mean that I have any lower expectations about Jewish
continuity, Rabbi Lewittes said.
The worry is how do you balance Honey, I just
want you to be happy with When you find someone,
hed better be Jewish. The parents struggles are not as
different as those of other Jewish parents, but the pool of
potential partners is smaller.
We talk about how important it is to maintain your
expectations of your child; to give the message that their
continued Jewish presence is vital to the community.
Rabbi Lewittes also teaches the group about the Jewish
texts that have led to the communitys historic aversion
to homosexuality, and how they have been negotiated.
There are several contemporary teshuvot that argue
that the sexual relationships that were prevalent in
those times the times the foundational texts were
written were very different from the long-term
loving relationships we see people aspire to today. Those
relationships were characterized as being more about sex
and power than about love. As halachah on other issues
It was in Israel that she realized she was attracted to women.
I thought I was still attracted to men, so I dated men for a
long time, she said. I thought if I could choose to be with a
man, why make myself miserable? Once I allowed myself to date
women, I realized this is who I am. This feels right for me.
For Hannah, accepting herself as gay hasnt met abandoning
Orthodoxy.
I take my observance very seriously, she said. I definitely
feel most comfortable in Orthodox environments. I think Ive
been able to develop more flexibility in my thinking, just by
way of growing older and stronger and wiser. I would rather
be accepted as gay in the Orthodox community than be strug-
gling to find my religious identity in a gay community thats not
observant.
The best of all worlds is Eshel, but Eshel only meets a few
times a year.
Hanna lives in Boston, where she found a nice community
of frum people I can be myself around, a nice circle of friends I
can be out to. I didnt anticipate that.
SEE RETREAT PAGE 58
SEE LGBTQ KIDS PAGE 58
Local
18 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-18*
An adventure on land and sea
Royals Kosher Food and Wine Experience draws record numbers and a yacht
JOSH LIPOWSKY
M
ordy Herzog wanted some-
thing bigger for this years
Kosher Food and Wine
Experience.
At the end of last years show, Mr. Her-
zog, a partner in Bayonne-based Royal
Wine, KFWEs sponsor, watched a boat
pass through the harbor near the Statue
of Liberty. The result of that inspiration
was a yacht docked outside Manhattans
Chelsea Piers with two levels of dessert
wines, mixed drinks, and desserts. Darker
mood lighting and tables created a differ-
ent atmosphere for attendees, and allowed
Royal Wine to add another 400 people to
the event.
We try to add something new and excit-
ing and this year we went really big, Jay
Buchsbaum, Royal Wines vice president
of marketing, said. The first year we did
KFWE, it was an intimate wine tasting
event with some food. We never imagined
how big it would become.
More than 1,600 people attended KFWE
on Monday night, making it the biggest
show in KFWEs eight-year history. In
addition to the dessert yacht, KFWE show-
cased more than 200 wines from around
the world that are distributed by Royal
Wine, as well as 22 restaurants, caterers,
and food companies.
Joe Hurliman of Herzog Wine Cellars in
California brought with him a 2011 single
vineyard cabernet sauvignon from Napa
Valley for its first public appearance. In
addition to showcasing a variety of flavors,
KFWE is an opportunity for Mr. Hurliman
to connect with consumers and wine
purchasers.
Its an energizing thing to talk about
wine for me, he said. Its what I love.
Israel always has new stories in the
world of wine, Mr. Herzog said, and, sur-
prisingly, one of the great stories in Israel
now is the boycott Israel story. The Israeli
wine industry has felt the impact of the
Boycott Divestment and Sanctions move-
ment targeting Israeli businesses, but not
in the way the movement had hoped. West
Bank-based winemaker Psagot, for exam-
ple, has seen a growth in business, accord-
ing to Mr. Herzog.
Shiloh Winery, also based in the West
Bank, has not experienced any loss in
sales, according to its CEO, Mayer Chamer.
They just miss the opportunity to drink
amazing wine, he said. Wine for us is cul-
ture. Let the people talk about politics. We
dont talk about that.
For Mr. Chamer, the stigma now
attached to kosher wine is that the kosher
wine consumer drinks only carbernet.
Kosher consumers are looking for dif-
ferent things, he said. They love good
cabernets. They love good
shiraz. I think theyre
starting to love again good
merlot. The more they get
to be educated, the more
they look for different
things.
The kosher market is
a relatively young mar-
ket, and what people tend
to do is if they like some-
thing they stick to it, Mr.
Herzog said. It used to be
on high end it was always
about cabernets. Now
were finding people are
more open minded.
White wines are really starting to take
off, he said, pointing to a new Cabernet
Franc from Psagot and a Sauvignon Blanc
from Goosebay, which smells like jalapeno.
Five years ago, Royal Wine approached
the Drappier Winery in Champagne,
France, about making a kosher Cham-
pagne. Owner Michel Drappier at first
refused, thinking kosher wine would be
too complicated and affect the quality.
Royal Wine convinced him to give it a try,
though, and the first run was a success.
Two years ago Mr. Drappier moved the
Champagne to market, he said.
The quality was there, he said. Before
producing kosher wine, we were already
organic. So the way we do it is very ortho-
dox in the wine-making way, so it was
very easy for us to make kosher wine. The
result is the non-kosher and kosher are
similar. For me, its a great success.
Its hard to walk around wine stores in
New York these days, though, without see-
ing an ad for Bartenura Moscato. In the
last three years the moscato category in
the non-kosher wine world has grown tre-
mendously; while last year it showed only
14 percent growth, Royal still saw 30 per-
cent growth for its brand, according to Mr.
Herzog.
We were making a good kosher
moscato, and then the entire category
took off and we were really poised as the
category grew, he said. We dont see that
slowing down. We believe moscato may be
a trend, but Bartenura Moscato will outlive
that trend. We believe it will be that one
wine that defines the moscato category.
Kosher wines in general are becom-
ing more mainstream, he said. And while
some articles still start off with how kosher
wine isnt your grandmothers sweet wine
anymore, that is an old story at this point.
Its no longer news, Mr. Herzog said.
The only people that still remember the
grandma stigmas are the grandmas. As the
new generation comes in, theyre already
exposed to great kosher wines, and the
stigma of kosher wines is disappearing by
the generation.
While Mr. Herzog says kosher wine is
no longer sweet, a large wine bottle near
the entrance to the dock is pure sugar
literally. It is a six-tiered cake sculpted in
the shape of a wine bottle and covered
in fondant. Krystina Gianaris, founder of
Teanecks Cake & Co., which made the
bottle cake, pointed to small indentations
left from people poking to see if it really
was a cake.
You have to be like an architect to know
how to construct it, she said. We were
inspired by the Herzog bottle, and just made
something fabulous to celebrate the event,
Winemakers werent the only ones
showing off new products. KFWE gave
some chefs the chance to unveil new cre-
ations as well.
You eat with your eyes, said David
Heisler of Silverleaf Caterers. It has to
sound interesting. Theyre not looking for
a stuffed cabbage anymore, as much as I
love stuffed cabbage.
Ben and Shifra Miller brought their Long
Island-based catering company, JEWmai-
can Cuizine, to introduce kosher consum-
ers to something they likely had never had
before: authentic Jamaican food.
Everybodys had steak and everybodys
had sushi, but anybody whos
kosher hasnt tried jerk chicken
and real beef patties, Shifra
Miller said. This is authentic.
Some people throw a little bit
of jerk seasoning on and think
thats jerk chicken. Its a whole
process of cooking and marinat-
ing and putting it on the grill.
JEWmaican Cuizines menu
includes traditional Jamaican
dishes such as braised oxtail,
beef patties, and, of course, jerk
chicken. A hallmark of Jamaican
food is fresh herbs and spices,
like the very hot Scotch bonnet
pepper used in the jerk sauce,
Ms. Miller said.
This was the first time at KFWE for
Hillside-based Abeles & Heymann, which
used the opportunity to unveil a new line
of hors douvres, including spinach and
potato puffs, spicy beef turnovers, and
cocktail franks in puff pastry. A&H has
been making hot dogs since 1954, but
never got into the hors doeuvre market.
Weve been receiving letters, how
come you guys dont make hot dogs in a
blanket? said Seth Leavitt of Englewood,
a partner in A&H. The line will hit shelves
after Pesach, he said.
As the hall began to fill with people
early in the evening, announcements
encouraging attendees to head to the
boat began coming every 10 minutes as
organizers worried that it wasnt enticing
people. By 9 oclock, however, security
was turning people away from the at-
capacity yacht.
So I guess worrying will continue to
be in our DNA, and next year well worry
about something else, Mr. Herzog said.
As for how Royal Wine will top this
years show, Herzog hasnt had an inspira-
tion yet, but knows theres an expectation.
The expectation of the consumer con-
tinues to grow, he said. They want bigger
and better, and well have to continue to
live up to that expectation.
The food and wine tasting attracted a crowd of 1,600 to the Chelsea Piers event.
Mordy Herzog Joe Hurliman
Local
JS-19*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 19
Opening
Night
Gala
Benefit
Reception
Thursday,
March 13, 2014
6:30 PM
Honoring
Enrico Macias
Legendary Singer
and Musician
March 13-20, 2014
American
Sephardi
Federation
at the Center for
Jewish History
15 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011
Tel: 212-294-8350
to purchase tickets
to the Opening Night Reception
and Film Festival
visit
www.sephardicfilmfest.org
17th NY
Sephardic
Jewish
Film
Festival
The Jewish Standard 5wide x 6.5deep _Layout 1 2/11/14 9:31 AM Page 1
Congregation Arzei Darom
hosts motivational speaker
Rabbi Paysach J. Krohn is the scholar-
in-residence for Shabbat Shekalim at
Teanecks Congregation Arzei Darom.
Rabbi Krohn is a fifth generation
mohel affiliated with North Shore Uni-
versity and Long Island Jewish hospitals.
He has written 12 books published by
Artscroll/Mesorah; eight of them com-
prise the Maggid series of inspiring short
stories. He also is a motivational speaker.
At tonights Oneg Shabbat at 8:15 p.m.,
he will ask Menschlechkeit: Where
Have Manners Gone? During Shabbat
morning services at 11:15 a.m., he will
discuss Tefillah a Way of Connect-
ing; at seudat shlishit at 5:20 p.m., the
topic will be Becoming a Person of Bro-
cha, and at 7:15, during a special Avot
UBanim, he will talk about From Gen-
eration to Generation.
The modern Orthodox synagogue is at
725 Queen Anne Road in Teaneck. For
information, call (201) 836-1035 or go to
www.arzeidarom.org.
Interfaith sanctuary committee
to host annual benefit dinner
The Bergen County Sanctuary Commit-
tee will hold its annual benefit dinner on
Saturday, March 8 at 6 p.m., at the Ethi-
cal Culture Society in Teaneck. Member
organizations include Temple Emeth
in Teaneck and Congregation Agudath
Israel in Caldwell. The committee is an
interfaith coalition that provides a range
of humanitarian services for political
asylum seekers, including housing, med-
ical care, and education, enabling them
eventually to achieve independence.
Lawyer Jamie Gottlieb, an associate of
Lowenstein Sandler LLP, is the keynote
speaker. She will discuss The Moral
Commitment of a Major Law Firm:
Defending Asylum Seekers and Other
Causes. Music will be by local artists
Jaymie and Geb Zurburg. Current and
recent clients in the Sanctuary program
come from Sudan, Sierra Leone, Syria,
and other countries where violence and
political persecution are common.
There is no charge for the dinner,
though a donation will be requested. For
information, call (201) 836-5187.
Poles and Jews during WWII
Seton Hall Universitys Jewish-
Christian studies graduate pro-
gram is sponsoring a professional
study day that will examine the
heroic witness of Jan Karski,
named by Yad Vashem as among
the Righteous of the Nations,
and the tragedy of the Jedwabne
pogrom. All New Jersey educators
and the general public are wel-
come to Poles and Jews During
World War II on Thursday, March
13, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the
Beck Rooms at Seton Hall Universitys
Walsh Library. The Rev. Dennis McMa-
nus and Monika Rice will present The
Holocaust: Its Destructive Past and Its
Dangerous Future and Poles and Jews
during the War. Applications of lessons
from this dark period of European his-
tory will also include two workshops,
Jan Karski: A Catholic in the Holo-
caust and How to Approach Jed-
wabne, led by the Rev. McManus and
Ms. Rice respectively.
For information, call Rev. Lawrence
Frizzell at (973) 761-9751, email law-
rence.frizzell@shu.edu, or go to http://
bit.ly/StudyDay2014. Registration is due
by March 10. The professional develop-
ment study day and program, a New
Jersey-accredited service provider, will
offer five professional development
credit hours to educators and is spon-
sored by the Jewish-Christian studies
graduate program with financial assis-
tance from Chris Liu of Palo Alto, Calif.
RIETS to celebrate largest class
of ordained Orthodox rabbis
The Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary (RIETS) and the Yeshiva Uni-
versity community will celebrate the
ordination of its largest class of musmak-
him (ordained rabbis) at its Chag HaSe-
mikhah convocation on Sunday, March
23, in the Nathan Lamport Auditorium,
Zysman Hall, 2540 Amsterdam Ave.,
New York City.
This year, more than 205 musmakhim
from the classes of 2011 to 2014 will join
more than 3,000 men who have passed
through the batei midrashim (study
halls) of RIETS to become distinguished
Orthodox rabbis, scholars, educators,
and leaders.
RIETS will also honor philanthropist
Jay Schottenstein with the Eitz Chaim
award, and Rabbi Gedalia Dov Schwartz
46YC, 49R, Av Beit Din of the Beth Din
of America and of the Chicago Rabbini-
cal Council Beit Din, with the Harav Yosef
Dov Soloveitchik ztl Aluf Torah award.
For information or to place an ad in
the Scroll of Honor, call (646) 592-4027
or email chag5774@yu.edu. The celebra-
tion will stream live at webcast at www.
yu.edu/chag.
Adult bar/bat mitzvah class in Wyckoff
Anyone interested in participating in
Temple Beth Rishons adult bar/bat mitz-
vah class is invited to an orientation ses-
sion at the temple on Tuesday, March 11
at 6 p.m.
The class meets regularly for 15 to
18 months, culminating in a joint bnei
mitzvah ceremony where the students
lead and chant the service and deliver
individual presentations focused on
their journeys.
Cantor Ilan Mamber directs the
program, teaches Judaic studies, and
familiarizes the students with the reli-
gious service. The students also study
with Rabbi Ken Emert in his adult edu-
cation classes and work with Judy Ack-
erman, TBRs long time bnei mitzvah
tutor, in preparing for the service. A
beginning Hebrew reading class also is
offered.
For information, call Cantor Mamber
at (201) 891-4466 or email him at can-
tor@bethrison.org.
Monika Rice The Rev. Dennis
McManus
Editorial
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Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
Standing with Ukraines Jews
W
orld Jewry has every
reason to show con-
cern over the security
of the Ukrainian Jew-
ish community, which numbers as
many as 400,000.
The nations civil unrest over Pres-
ident Viktor Yanukovychs refusal
to tighten ties with the European
Union, opting instead to favor Rus-
sia, led to his fleeing Kiev, Ukraines
capital, over the weekend. Hes
wanted as a criminal for mass kill-
ings of civilians.
There has been violence that has
affected the Jewish community no
less than others.
And there have been organized
anti-Semitic extremists within the
protests that began in November,
even as many Jews were among
those who took to the streets to pro-
test Mr. Yanukovychs corruption.
The situation is highly fluid and
unpredictable.
The Ukrainian Jewish community
has reported an increase in scattered
acts of anti-Semitism. Local Jews
have been careful not to wear kip-
pot in public, and security at Jewish
institutions has increased.
Firebombs hit at least one Ukrai-
nian synagogue Sunday night. The
Giymat Rosa Synagogue in Zapor-
izhia, about 250 miles southeast of
Kiev, reported no injuries from the
attack.
The American Joint Distribution
Committee reported giving imme-
diate assistance to Jews living in
or around Kiev. Natan Sharansky,
chairman of the Jewish Agency for
Israel, also said that assistance for
Ukrainian Jews would come from the
Emergency Assistance Fund for Jew-
ish Communities, which was estab-
lished after the 2012 terror attack on
a Jewish school in Toulouse, France.
This fund helps global communities
work through security concerns.
(As a reminder: The Joint Distri-
bution Committee and the Jewish
Agency are only able to look out for
the global needs of Jews around the
world because of the support they
receive from the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey and other
federations across America.)
As the world watches an uncertain
future for the Ukraine, as a flash-
point in the developing cold war
between the west and Russia, the
Jewish Agencys Sharansky said, We
have a moral responsibility to ensure
the safety and security of Ukraines
Jews.
We agree with Mr. Sharansky
and note that the we who share
that responsibility includes us in
New Jersey as much as Sharansky in
Jerusalem.
Local student acts as Our man in
Kiev. Page 6.
-LY & PJ
KEEPING THE FAITH
Of oxen,
open pits,
and falling snow
W
hen a man opens a pit, or digs a pit and
does not cover it, and an ox or a she-
donkey falls into it, the one responsible
for the pit must make restitution.
Ive never seen an ox in my life, except in movies.
Or a donkey, for that matter, he or she. Face it, rabbi.
The Torah is full of such useless pronouncements.
Too many people make that argument. To them, I
offer one word: Snow.
Yes, snow. With all the snow we have had of late,
a friend asked whether the Torah has anything to
say about clearing away the snow from walkways and
sidewalks. And what if a person is not home during a
winter snowstorm?
My answer to the first part is to quote the very same
open pit law from Exodus 21:33-34. My answer to the
second part is to cite a verse oft quoted here in differ-
ent contexts the Law of the Parapet.
Let us deal with the open pit first. It has less to do
with whether an animal falls into an open hole, and
more to do with whether
we create an obstruction
of some kind that creates a
public hazard.
To dig into this pit a bit
more deeply, we turn to a
discussion in the Babylo-
nian Talmud tractate Bava
Kama 52a:
According to the Mish-
nah, If [the owner of a pit]
covered it properly and an
ox or a she-donkey [never-
theless] fell into it and was
killed, he would be exempt from penalty. The pit
owner, after all, took all the necessary precautions.
Except for one thing: To the rabbis of the Gemara,
the Mishnah has a huge open pit of its own. But if he
covered it properly, how did an animal fall [into the
pit]? the Gemara asks. Said Rabbi Yitzchak bar Bar
Chana: [The cover] rotted on its underside [and thus
wasnt visible to the owner]. In other words, since he
20 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-20*
Rabbi Yosef Stern, zl
B
ergen County is a thriv-
ing Jewish community.
Because so many people
live here, there are hap-
pily very many births, and there
are also sadly, terribly, at times
tragically very many deaths.
We seldom hear such sadness,
coming from so many directions, as
we have heard about the death of
Rabbi Yossie Stern, the founder and
executive director of Project Ezra.
Among the tributes was an anony-
mous letter that we feel compelled to
share with the community.
It is obvious that he was an excep-
tional human being, the letter began.
His drive to start an organization like
Project Ezra was clearly based on a
key essence of his personality, which
was a deep love and concern for his
fellow human beings. I also believe
that his deep concern for his fellow
man was not limited to Jews, but
extended to all people.
The writer knew Rabbi Stern
only in the context of Project Ezra
meaning, as he made clear, that he
knew him only when he, the writer,
was a suppliant, needy, looking for
help. That is not an easy way to meet
someone. To be completely hon-
est, I hated going to Project Ezra, he
wrote. Once you enter their office,
the issue that you are presently inca-
pable of providing for yourself or
your family becomes a stark reality.
That, of course, is despite everyones
best intentions, but it is an inevitable,
unavoidable truth.
Despite that, he could see Rabbi
Stern clearly.
He was kind and he was charitable
over time I came to realize that he
was absolutely brilliant, the letter
continued. He was not there to just
throw money at a problem, believ-
ing it would repair the situation.
He assessed the entire person. He
looked deep into your soul to make
a human assessment of how best you
needed to be helped.
He basically looked for the good in
everyone, and his keen insight into
understanding the human condition
helped him better meet the needs of
the families he was trying to help.
He did not just learn Torah, he
lived and practiced it.
The world could use many more
such people.
May his memory be a blessing.
-JP
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in
Cliffside Park and Temple Beth El of North Bergen.
Shammai
Engelmayer
Op-Ed
took every precaution and could not see that anything
was wrong, he is exempt.
Wood, however, rots. A reasonable person has to
inspect a cover made out of wood every now and
then to be certain it is still in good condition. So the
Gemara must find another reason for the apparent
contradiction.
An anonymous someone therefore asks, What if he
had covered it in such a way that it was able to hold
[the weight of ] oxen, but not of camels, and camels
came by first and weakened the cover, and oxen then
came and fell into it, then what?
Comes the answer: It all depends on whether cam-
els are normally found in the area. If camels used to
pass from time to time, he was certainly careless.
Obviously, then, if camels are rarely seen in the area,
or are never seen there, he probably was not careless.
In other words, it is a matter of anticipation.
That brings us to Maimonides (the Rambam). In his
Mishneh Torah, The Laws of the Murderer and the
Saving of Lives 6:4 and 6, he puts it this way:
There is a person who kills unintentionally, whose
acts resemble those willfully perpetrated. Specifically,
these acts involve negligence, or that care should have
been taken [with regard to a certain factor] and it was
not.... We will return to this in a moment.
The laws about the goring ox that immediately pre-
cede the open pit (Exodus 22:28-32) make clear the
need to anticipate hazards. If a person knows his ox
is prone to harming people or property but does not
take preventive measures, he is as responsible as the
ox for any damage, and even must pay with his life if
life was taken.
In other words, if you know that a problem is likely
to occur, you have to take precautions.
Which brings us to the parapet. If a person decided
to leave the snow zone and winter in Florida, that per-
son nevertheless must arrange for snow removal back
home.
Torah law requires that when building a house, a
person must build a parapet around the roof, that
you should not bring any blood upon your house, if
any man falls from there (Deuteronomy 22:8).
Rabbinic decisions make clear that this law is sub-
ject to the broadest interpretation possible. Thus, we
are told in BT Bava Kama 15b that you may not keep a
damaged ladder in your home because of it.
In addition to the Rambam cited earlier that care
should have been taken, other commentators also
note, as does Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, that this
Torah law even requires local civil authorities to inter-
vene to have anything at all which might be dangerous
removed from a persons home.
Finally, there is the question my friend did not ask:
What if the snow falls on Shabbat?
There is a complicated road that leads to a simple
answer: Snow may not be removed on Shabbat from
any areas around the home where it does not create
a safety hazard for anyone. If the snow (or ice) does
pose a safety hazard, Preservation of life takes pre-
cedence even over Shabbat. (See the discussion at BT
Shabbat 132a.)
There is nothing anachronistic about the Torahs
laws, but there is much wrong in thinking that there is.
JS-21*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 21
KEEPING THE FAITH
Of oxen,
open pits,
and falling snow
W
hen a man opens a pit, or digs a pit and
does not cover it, and an ox or a she-
donkey falls into it, the one responsible
for the pit must make restitution.
Ive never seen an ox in my life, except in movies.
Or a donkey, for that matter, he or she. Face it, rabbi.
The Torah is full of such useless pronouncements.
Too many people make that argument. To them, I
offer one word: Snow.
Yes, snow. With all the snow we have had of late,
a friend asked whether the Torah has anything to
say about clearing away the snow from walkways and
sidewalks. And what if a person is not home during a
winter snowstorm?
My answer to the first part is to quote the very same
open pit law from Exodus 21:33-34. My answer to the
second part is to cite a verse oft quoted here in differ-
ent contexts the Law of the Parapet.
Let us deal with the open pit first. It has less to do
with whether an animal falls into an open hole, and
more to do with whether
we create an obstruction
of some kind that creates a
public hazard.
To dig into this pit a bit
more deeply, we turn to a
discussion in the Babylo-
nian Talmud tractate Bava
Kama 52a:
According to the Mish-
nah, If [the owner of a pit]
covered it properly and an
ox or a she-donkey [never-
theless] fell into it and was
killed, he would be exempt from penalty. The pit
owner, after all, took all the necessary precautions.
Except for one thing: To the rabbis of the Gemara,
the Mishnah has a huge open pit of its own. But if he
covered it properly, how did an animal fall [into the
pit]? the Gemara asks. Said Rabbi Yitzchak bar Bar
Chana: [The cover] rotted on its underside [and thus
wasnt visible to the owner]. In other words, since he
Holy water
Israel puts the fizz in reclamation and SodaStream
T
wo weeks ago I visited a place in Israel that I had
never seen before.
Shafdan, as the place is called, is a high-tech
water reclamation plant just a few kilometers
outside of Rishon Letzion. It looked a little like Area 51 in
Nevada and it smelled a bit like the New Jersey Meadow-
lands. But what is happening there is amazing.
In the simplest of terms, Shafdan takes more than 90
percent of waste water thats water from kitchen and
bathroom sinks, showers, drains, and toilets from a large
region in northwestern Israel. Shafdan repurifies the water,
and then it can be reused.
Israel has tremendous export trade in agriculture, stem-
ming from earlier Israeli innovations in hydroponics, and
the overwhelming majority of the water Shafdan reclaims
is used for agronomic purposes.
The possibility of running out of water has always been a
huge threat to Israel, second only to military dangers. This
year, after record snowfalls in December, Israel has had
an alarmingly dry January and February. With the Sea of
Galilee drying up and water in limited supply, Israel has
been forced to dial up its not-so-
secret weapon ingenuity.
Just a short while ago, Israel
became the leader in desalini-
zation, which took sea water,
removed the salt, kept essential
minerals, and made it usable
for drinking and agriculture. In
reclaiming wastewater, Shafdan
came up with a structure that
capitalizes on reusing and recy-
cling. Most would agree that this
not only solves a serious issue
for Israel but does so in a way
that is environmentally healthy.
I also was heartened to learn that Israel is sharing this
technology with other similarly parched countries that
could benefit from this level of invention. Israel now recap-
tures 75 percent of its wastewater. Contrast that with Spain
at 12 percent, and Australia at 9 percent. Israel drowns out
the competition.
Imagine if other African countries or even areas of the
United States, like the drought-stricken, recycling-friendly
state of California, benefited from these advances? Wouldnt
that be a very good idea? Isnt saving water and helping our
ecosystem working toward making the world a better place?
Some might argue that the SodaStream discussion has
lost its fizz. I would add one more note before we put a cap
on the discussion. A little more than a year ago, Temple
Emanu-El said goodbye to Coke and Pepsi and introduced
SodaStream as our exclusive source of cold drinks at kiddu-
shes. Through the help of a few generous benefactors, we
bought 50 machines and 100 reusable bottles. We trained
all of our leadership and Shabbat regulars on how to add
the bubbles to the water and easily create the flavors of our
choice. Today, our kiddush is known to all not only for hot
rugelach and delicious whitefish but, also for the Soda-
Stream. Even our weekly youth meetings all have kids pining
to make the fizz!
We introduced SodaSteam for three compelling reasons:
1. SodaStream is a model of what a working relationship
between the Palestinians and Israelis could and should look
like. There is a place for prayer for members of all religions
represented there at the factory in Maale Adumim and
there also is a communal dining hall. Isnt that the ideal of
pluralism?
2. SodaStream is a healthier product than prebottled
sodas, with lower concentrated fructose in its colas and
syrups.
3. Temple Emanu-El alone would go through close to
6,000 bottles of soda per year. While we do recycle, saving
all that plastic is critical to helping the environment. SodaS-
tream reuses its bottles, which helps the environment and
that is a value fundamental to Judaism.
I share these two fluid examples with you because at their
core and in their routine functions these things make the
world a better place. Both address a problem in our world
recycling and reusing and tackle an issue that betters
Israel and the our planet.
Post Super Bowl, the SodaStream controversy might have
gone flat, but the BDS movement is bubbling over. It is the
latest form of warfare that our Jewish nation state faces.
Most people argue that BDS is anti-Semitism in disguise. I
agree. But for this fight, all lovers of Israel will need to be
soldiers.
This war will not be won in tanks or F-16 jets. The battle-
field will be around the water coolers, where we must be
armed with the facts and figures and strong data that sup-
port the unquestionable truth that Israel makes the world a
better place. Whether with flushed toilets or flavored seltzer,
Israel makes serious contributions to our environment and
makes our earth stronger
BDS will be defeated when the Israel-haters will pivot
from what is broken to what works, from what divides to
what unites. Otherwise, we are just watering down the
entire situation.
David-Seth Kirshner is the rabbi of Temple Emanu-El of
Closter.
Rabbi David-
Seth Kirshner
Correction
In our article last week on a halachic ruling about women wearing tefillin, we
accidentally ran a photograph of the late Rabbi Herschel Schacter, the chaplain
and former president of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, who has a c in his first name, instead of Rabbi Hershel Schachter,
who has no cs in his first name and two in his last name, is a talmudist at Yeshiva
University and a halachic advisor for the Orthodox Union, and who wrote the
responsum opposing women wearing tefillin. We regret the error.
Rabbi Hershel Schachter
Op-Ed
22 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-22*
Tzitzit, tefillin and the halachic process
R
ecent weeks have seen much
discussion about the permissi-
bility of women wearing tefillin.
Although I do not question
the sincerity of the parties involved, and
maintain high regard for the individuals
involved, I see this as an opportunity to
reflect on the unique mitzvah of tefillin
and on maintaining the integrity of the
halachic process. In addition to the spe-
cific halachic question involved, this con-
troversy also raises the broader question
of how halachah functions, and I would
like to provide some perspective on both
of these issues.
In this weeks Torah reading, we read of
the high priest and his vestments, included
in which are the tzitzit, the golden head
plate on which Gods name is written, and
the choshen, the breastplate containing
the names of the 12 tribes. These two items,
which as the Torah specifies are worn on
the head and the heart, symbolize the devo-
tion to God accomplished both through
ones intellect and ones emotions. In this
respect, the high priests garments parallel
the tefillin shel rosh, worn on the head, and
tefillin shel yad, worn on the arm opposite
ones heart, which likewise correspond to
the intellectual and emotional aspects of
our relationship with God.
We find another parallel between
the tefillin and the tzitzit in the Talmud,
which derives the prohibition of neglect-
ing to remain constantly focused on tefil-
lin from the tzitzitfor if the tzitzit, which
contains only one men-
tion of Gods name, never-
theless requires constant
focus, certainly tefillin,
which contain many more
mentions of Gods name,
require this special level
of attention. Maimonides
codified this law as fol-
lows: One is obligated to
constantly touch his tefil-
lin, as long as he is wear-
ing them, so that he does
not lose his focus on them
for even one moment for their sanctity
is greater than the sanctity of the tzitzit,
because whereas the tzitzit contains only
one divine name, the tefillin contain 21
The unique status of tefillin, and the
obligation to maintain their sanctity,
explains the puzzling position of the Jeru-
salem Talmud, which requires that one
make a blessing upon removing ones
tefillin although in general one does not
make a blessing when ceasing to perform
a mitzvah. In this case, the act of remov-
ing tefillin before nightfall, when wearing
them is prohibited, constitutes a means of
protecting their sanctity, and thus is con-
sidered a positive mitzvah performance.
This unique level of sanctity distin-
guishes tefillin from other objects used to
perform a mitzvah, and Jewish tradition
reflects this by discouraging all but rare
individuals, such as the Vilna Gaon, from
wearing tefillin for longer than obligated.
For this reason, halachah as
codified by Rabbi Moses Isser-
les (Rema, 1525 or 15301572),
the leading figure in the Ashke-
nazic halachic tradition, does
not allow minors to wear tefil-
lin. This is in seeming contrast
to the Talmudic law in this
case, the consideration of pro-
tecting the sanctity of the tefil-
lin overrides the obligation of
training ones children to per-
form mitzvot. This position is
based on the halachic view that
when there are countervailing factors, we
must recognize our limitations compared
to our predecessors in the biblical or Tal-
mudic eras.
This is likewise the rationale behind the
Remas ruling prohibiting women from
wearing tefillin. In contrast to other mitz-
vot, with regard to tefillin, one who is not
obligated may not voluntarily perform
the mitzvah. For one who is not obligated
to wear tefillin, the prohibition against
violating the sanctity of tefillin overrides
the option to perform the mitzvah. Far
from reflecting a negative attitude toward
women Rema is the authority who rules
that women can perform and recite bless-
ings even on those mitzvot from which
they are exempt this instead reflects the
heightened status of tefillin, a lesson from
which men no less than women can cer-
tainly benefit.
Additionally, I would like to emphasize
the importance of considering the role of
the halachic process in this question. As
noted, Rema is the foremost authority for
Ashkenazic halachah. Although the hala-
chic system allows for flexibility, it also
maintains a strong respect for precedent.
When an authority of the stature of Rema
rules on an issue, and this ruling has been
accepted by subsequent generations, this
is something that cannot be overturned
lightly.
As recently as the generation preced-
ing ours, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik
addressed the question of women wear-
ing tefillin, and affirmed that the halachah
follows the position of Rema. The consid-
eration of respect for the halachic process
transcends the boundaries of this specific
issue, because tradition and precedent
form the cornerstones of the halachic sys-
tem as a whole.
It is the tefillin themselves that have rep-
resented, through the millennia, that we
are bound heart and mind, as one people,
to the Torah and its universal message,
and to the integrity of the halachah.
As we say when we don the tefillin, I
will betroth you to Me forever; I will
betroth you to Me in righteousness and
justice, kindness and mercy; I will betroth
you to Me in faithfulness; and you shall
know the Lord (Hosea 2).
Menachen Genack is rabbi of Congregation
Shomrei Emunah in Englewood and CEO of
the Orthodox Unions kosher division.
Rabbi
Menachem
Genack
Robert Malleys unsettling return
T
hat there is widespread anxiety
over the Obama administrations
Middle East policies is hardly a
secret.
If we have learned anything over the
past six years it is that contrary to the con-
spiratorial theory that the so-called Israel
Lobby is the ultimate authority when
it comes to Washingtons stance in the
region, the opposite is true. It is presidents
and their appointees who make policies,
based on their assessment of the strate-
gic interests of the United States at a given
moment. In that framework, the Lobby
enjoys success only when it pushes for out-
comes that are in sync with the administra-
tions thinking.
Under Obama, the United States has
pushed policies that clash directly with
the long-established positions of pro-
Israel groups. Pressuring Israel in the
context of the stop-again, start-again
negotiations with the Pal-
estinians for example,
by publicly and vocally
warning that continuing
settlement of the West
Bank will fuel anti-Israel
boycotts has become
integral to the administra-
tions discourse. Engaging
the Iranian regime over its
nuclear program, through
a process that does little to
prevent Tehran technically from pursuing
the goal of weaponization, has emerged
as the centerpiece of Obamas approach
to the Middle East.
When it comes to personnel selection,
the not-so-powerful Israel Lobby has
had no choice about swallowing the bitter
pill of appointments that it regards with
suspicion. Most famously, that was the
case with the appointment of Chuck Hagel,
who in the past expressed near-
virulent criticisms of Israel, as
secretary of defense. And it
is similarly the case with the
new appointment of Robert
Malley, a former Middle East
peace negotiator from the
Clinton administration, as a
senior director at the National
Security Council, where he will
manage relations with the Per-
sian Gulf states. Given the enor-
mous tensions between Iran and Saudi
Arabia, its tempting to think that working
on the Israeli-Palestinian track is a cake-
walk by comparison.
Among pro-Israel advocates, Malley is
distrusted because he broke with the con-
sensus shared by President Bill Clinton
himself, among others that the failure
of the 2000 Camp David summit was the
fault of the late PLO leader, Yasser Arafat.
In an August 2001 article for the New York
Review of Books, Malley and co-author
Hussein Agha wrote sympathetically of
Arafats conviction that the Israelis were
setting a trap at Camp David.
The Camp David proposals were viewed
as inadequate: they were silent on the
question of refugees, the land exchange
was unbalanced, and both the Haram
and much of Arab East Jerusalem were
to remain under Israeli sovereignty, they
wrote. From the standpoint of Israels own
security interests, those observations were
uncomfortably aligned with the Palestin-
ian refusal, exemplified by the insistence
on the so-called right of return, to recog-
nize Israel as a Jewish state a refusal that
persists in our own day.
Then there was Malleys meeting in
2008 when he worked for the Inter-
national Crisis Group, a high-level NGO
with representatives of Hamas. At the
time, that led to a break with the Obama
presidential campaign, which Malley was
advising informally. Though Hamas is
blacklisted by the United States as a ter-
rorist organization, Malley defended his
interaction by saying, If you want to
have movement between Israel and the
Ben Cohen
Ben Cohen, JNS.orgs Shillman analyst, writes on Jewish affairs and Middle Eastern politics.
His work has been published in Commentary, the New York Post, Haaretz, Jewish Ideas
Daily, and many other publications. SEE ROBERT MALLEY PAGE 39
Letters
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Tefillin as straw men
In Chasing Shadows (February 24) Eli-
ana Aaron misconstrues feminist tenets.
The touchstones of feminism are oppor-
tunities, choice, and balance. By opening
opportunities for both men and women,
feminism, in its ideal form, enables
everyone to engage in that for which they
are best suited and most inclined.
The hope sometimes unattained is
that society as a whole benefits. There
are difficult trade-offs for everyone, and
the innate individualism of this approach
is very challenging. That said, I question
how Ms. Aaron can use a feminist point
of view as a vehicle for suggesting that
opportunities should be closed off. For
better or worse, feminism asks both men
and women to juggle all sorts of activi-
ties and responsibilities, religious and
otherwise.
Feminism should not be a straw man
for Ms. Aarons discomfort with women
wearing tefillin. Lets keep the conversa-
tion in terms of how halachah evolves
when confronted with new realities
and, as a corollary, how to distinguish
between halachic dictates and halachic
sensibilities.
Sharon R. Siegel
Teaneck
Find your own path
Eliana Aarons opinion piece, Chasing
shadows: Why wearing tefillin is bad for
feminism, is just that: an opinion. How-
ever in many areas, I feel shes grossly
underestimating many womens desire
to wear tefillin.
Aaron first states correctly that women
can perform time-dependent command-
ments though they are not obligated. She
then continues to state reasons why she
believes this mitzvah is unacceptable.
Didnt she just agree that within tradi-
tional halachah ( Jewish law) women
may take on this obligation? If, as Aaron
claims, men find that it is belligerent,
inappropriate, and distracting, then the
onus is on the men. Not on women. Ques-
tioning someones religious motivations
is arrogant. If tefillin-wearing women are
distracting, its not incumbent upon
women to make men comfortable.
Aaron writes, Women are considered
to be more spiritual than men, hence we
do not need male religious garb. Aaron
may not feel she needs external remind-
ers of time-dependent things, but other
women do feel closer to God when a tallit
and tefillin are used. So what is Aarons
point of telling others how they must
find their spiritual fulfillment? Aaron
asks, why add more obligations on what
women already have to do. My response:
Again, thats telling someone else what
they ought to do and how to feel. If there
is something we want to do, we find a
way to fit it into our lives. If a woman has
a deep desire to connect to God through
Jewish religious ritual items, isnt that a
good thing? Leave her be.
Aaron also feels that some women who
want to wear tefillin are making a politi-
cal feminist statement. In the same issue
of the Jewish Standard we read about
women who have taken on the tefil-
lin obligation with great commitment,
love, and devotion. No ones discarding
the tefillin when the cameras are not
around, or at home. I wonder if Aaron
ever has taken the opportunity to speak
to observant committed women who
have dug deep to take this obligation
upon themselves. If so, she can ask them
if they feel theres any truth to her state-
ment that Tefillin does not help women
feel good about being women.
Women who have been donning tefil-
lin for years, privately, in their homes,
and in their synagogues, are doing so for
spiritual fulfillment; if not, no one would
keep up the ruse that long.
Lastly, tefillin may have recently sur-
faced as an issue, but in my opinion, the
seemingly irresolvable problem is our
communitys poor relationship with one
another.
Sadly, we shame each other if we dont
agree. We are quick to judge, and most
tragically, we have lost our ability for
compassion, opting instead to put our
need to be right above all else. Im so
very tired of all the in-fighting. Our com-
munity asks for respect from outsiders.
Are we practicing it enough within?
Im happy Aaron is satisfied with her
path. Lets allow others to find theirs.
Susan Berger
Teaneck
Tefillingate?
As a coda to your Tefillingate issue,
your gallery page featured a large picture
of the sixth- and seventh- graders at Tem-
ple Emanuel of Closter, proudly show-
ing off tefillin that they had made
themselves.
Id be interested in knowing, though
I highly doubt, if their tefillin actually
contained the kosher parchment that
actually make tefillin acceptable for use
in tefilla. Which is just as well, because
painted in rainbow colors as they were,
and worn incorrectly, these youngsters
did not as much observe a mitzvah as
much as they made a mockery of one.
Marsha Greenberg Motzen
Englewood
On Rabbi Sacks
To discover Rabbi Jonathan Sacks
opinions and activities on the issue of
anti-Semitism, Rabbi Shmuley Bote-
ach should have read his book Future
Tense (Why America has no chief
rabbi, February 7). In Chapter 5, Rabbi
Sacks concluded that as victims of anti-
Semitism, Jews do not have the capabil-
ity to fight it on their own. In 2002 Rabbi
Sacks helped form the Coexist Foundation,
an organization of Jews and Muslims fighting
anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. Then Rabbi
Sacks and the leaders of British Jewry strove
for interfaith cooperation by working closely
with leaders of all other faiths. In 2005, they
took their case to Parliament, which set up
a committee of inquiry and promulgated a
report in 2006. As a result, an all-party par-
liamentary committee was established to
fight all forms of anti-Semitism. The leaders
of all British parties also took a stand, with
Prime Minister Gordon Brown providing gov-
ernment funding of trips sending teachers
and students to Auschwitz to learn about the
Holocaust. In 2007, they took their concerns
to the presidents of the European Parliament
and the European Commission.
Rabbi Sacks concluded that anti-Semitism
begins with Jews but never ends with them.
This must be considered in any strategy to
fight anti-Semitism. The differences between
Jews and others must be respected. That is
the essence of human dignity.
Sam Heller
Fair Lawn
Chabad is welcoming
Regarding Yet More Pew (February 14,)
and Rabbi Shmuel Goldins thought-provok-
ing comment, Its clear that one day God is
going to turn to the affiliated Jews and ask
them, Why didnt you work harder to stop
this?:
If the big question is: How do we motivate
Jews to live as Jews, think like Jews, and love
being Jewish, and what will ensure our con-
tinued success, the answer is to take a look
at what works. Chabad has figured out a
way to bring Jews back where we belong by
being warm and welcoming, and genuinely
viewing each Jewish person as a precious
diamond. Thousands of Chabad centers
around the world have successfully lit a
spark within many Jews, causing the desire
to strengthen the connection between one-
self and the sacred; thus bringing light to the
world. Attending an authentic Shabbos din-
ner with the sweet smells and melodies of
Shabbos, or doing a mitzvah for the first time
such as lighting Shabbos candles, putting on
tefillin, or giving friendship to a child with
special needs, naturally attracts and stirs
the Jewish soul. Taking classes on the most
basic precepts in Judaism or on deep Kaba-
listic insights awakens us; excites us. Jews
just need an opportunity, and Chabad pro-
vides it. Once a Jews spark becomes a flame,
he/she is able to light up a spark in another.
Chabad started this revolution, through
the genius and foresight of the Lubavitcher
Rebbeobm, who sent young couples out
to the four corners of the earth to light the
sparks of fellow Jews, and bring light to the
darkness.
The answer to the big question is right in
front of us. It is at the core of what Judaism
is about: Torah and mitzvos. We just have to
find our way there.
Marci Spiro
Woodcliff Lake
24 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-24
JOANNE PALMER
S
ometimes things that dont
make much sense at the time
become obvious in retrospect.
Say, for example, that you
were a teacher, and one of your stu-
dents was an easily bored little boy.
Instead of paying attention to you,
this kid obsessively drew letters. Rows
and rows, column after column of let-
ters, marching along the bottom of his
notebooks. Not looking up. Not paying
attention. Just drawing letters.
What would become of such a child?
Although his teachers at the Arie
Crown Hebrew Day School in Chicago
could not have predicted it, it is not
entirely surprising that now, some 60
years later, Jay Greenspan is a scribe.
Mr. Greenspan, who now lives and
works in Teaneck, is also an illumina-
tor, a sofer stam someone trained
and qualified to set quill to parchment
to create copies of sacred texts and a
prime storyteller.
He grew up in Chicagos then heavily
Jewish Humboldt Park (the neighbor-
hood thats as intimately connected to
the work of Saul Bellow as, closer to
home, Newarks Weequahic is to Philip
Roth). His parents, Philip and Sylvia
Haberman Greenspan, were immi-
grants, and they both had stories.
Philip Greenspan was born in Wlo-
clawek, Poland, 35 miles from Warsaw.
His own father, a housepainter, had
come to America in 1928, planning to
send for his wife and children when he
could afford it. By 1934 he was able to
bring them over, and they managed to
procure a visa, but the immigration
official who examined my grandmother
decided that she had traucoma, Mr.
Greenspan said. Although glaucoma
is a recognized condition, traucoma is
not. She had been crying all night, Mr.
Greenspan said. Her eyes were puffy
and red. But they told her she couldnt
come to America because she had a
made-up eye disease. The family went
to Palestine instead.
They stayed there for two years; Mr.
Greenspans great uncle joined the
Irgun, and as it seemed likely that the
British would arrest him, his mother
decided it was time to move on. They
went next to England, and then, finally,
to the United States.
My father, at 16, was enrolled in
Telling
stories,
letter
by letter
Sofer Jay Greenspans work
on display at the Tenafly JCC
Cover Story
At top, Jay Greenspan stands by High Holy Day cards he created; below, one of
his ketubot. PHOTOS BY JERRY SZUBIN
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 25
JS-25
Telling
stories,
letter
by letter
Sofer Jay Greenspans work
on display at the Tenafly JCC
first grade, Mr. Greenspan said. He didnt
speak any English. It must have been
horrendous. He learned quickly, though,
and graduated from high school two years
later, when he was 18.
Next, Philip Greenspan was drafted,
found himself in the Signal Corps, and
fought in New Guinea and the Philippines.
Once he was out, at wars end, he put him-
self through the University of Illinois at
Champagne with the GI Bill.
Jay Greenspans mother, Sylvia Haber-
man, was born to Polish parents in Vienna
in 1920. Her father was arrested in 1938,
during the Anschluss, and her mother
subjected to the random humiliations in
which the Germans specialized. His grand-
mother, the familys brains, realized that
it was time to get out. Fortunately, hers
was a middle-class family, and she had the
means to get the process started.
My mother pretended to be a nurse,
Mr. Greenspan said, recounting family
lore. They got an ambulance. Her parents
were the patients. They drove through
Germany to the Belgian border. Three
times they made the trip but were turned
back at the final border; the fourth time
was the lucky one. It was 1939, he said.
She was 19.
Mr. Greenspan at work on a
copy of the Megillat Esther;
the inset shows some detail.
Cover Story
26 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
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She and a brother were given $200 and put on the
last boat from Antwerp. They were told not to tell any-
one that they had such a large sum of money, because
it would be stolen from them; they did not keep quiet,
and indeed they were robbed. As a result, they had to
spend a week at Ellis Island, waiting to be rescued by a
family friend.
All the immediate family got out. One of my fathers
great uncles decided that it wasnt religious enough in
America, so he went back, Mr. Greenspan said. He was
murdered by the Nazis. We lost dozens of family mem-
bers, he added.
In Chicago, though, the family prospered. My father
was an athlete, Mr. Greenspan said. He played soccer,
and he was an incredible dancer. This was the heyday of
the swing era, and he loved to dance.
He was a semi-pro in Latin dancing.
Mr. Greenspan remembers a family friend he was
not Jewish, but instead half Russian and half Armenian
who had the wonderful name of Yasha Nikogosoff. Mr.
Nikogosoff was a saber dancer, Mr. Greenspan said.
Yasha was a fabulous dancer; elegant, charming,
with a cigarette holder and a cravat. He and my father
would go to clubs, and everyone would want to dance
with them. Thats where his parents met. She was not
as great a dancer as he was, but she was a great cook,
her son said. She made chicken soup; her brisket was
famous, and she made great gefilte fish.
Whoops, though. My father hated the smell of gefilte
fish.
Jay, their first child, was born in 1947. I was the old-
est grandchild on my fathers side, and my grandfather
owned the building we lived in, he said. He grew up
surrounded by family the building had six apartments,
and relatives lived in three of them. Because I was the
oldest, I was the one who was sent to day school, he
said. Everyone else went to public school. His grand-
parents must have paid his tuition, he said.
The school was not close to his home, so at a pretty
early age I took two buses by myself to get to school,
Mr. Greenspan said.
The family belonged to an Orthodox shul called Ateres
Zion; it is now a Hispanic church, he reports.
Since I was the firstborn, every Friday night I would
go down to my zaydes for Shabbat dinner. They didnt
speak much English, and it was very quiet. But my
grandmother made wonderful tollhouse chocolate chip
cookies.
And then, on Saturday mornings, I would walk with
my zayde to shul. I was the only one under 60, and usu-
ally there were only about 16 people there. My grand-
father was president of the shul, and I was bar mitzvah
there.
Mr. Greenspan stayed in Arie Crown until high
school, and then he went to Lane Technical High
School on Chicagos North Side. Like New York Citys
An elaborate and unusual ketubah.
Mr. Greenspans
Cricket Silver
Moon ketubah.
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 27
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Bronx High School of Science, it is aimed at students
who are gifted in the sciences, and they have to pass a
test to be admitted. Unlike its New York counterpart,
it also heavily stressed the skilled trades. It offered
wood shop, print shop, forge, and foundry, as well as
demanding four years of English and at least two of a
foreign language.
I had to take architectural drawing, and I loved it,
Mr. Greenspan said. Thats where I learned to work
with a T-square, a rule, and a triangle square.
Thats where I learned to love architectural lettering.
I didnt know about lettering before; I just knew that I
loved to print. I didnt know anything about calligraphy.
Mr. Greenspans parents moved north of Chicago to
Skokie when he was a senior in high school, so he stayed
with his grandparents. In the middle of my senior year,
my grandfather died, he said. I lived with my grand-
mother for six months. She was a wreck.
She would cry all night, and every morning her eyes
would be bright red.
Breakfast always was silent. Shed make me eggs.
She died on my grandfathers first yarzheit. I woke
up one morning and there was no breakfast. I called
her, and she didnt answer. I called my parents, and they
came.
He had been accepted to the University of Chicago but
had planned on living with his grandparents; he could
not afford it otherwise. With his grandparents dead, he
went instead to the public University of Illinois at Chi-
cago Circle; he was in the first graduating class there.
I had a great time there, he said.
Mr. Greenspan commuted to school from his parents
house in Skokie. There, he and his family joined and
grew active in a Conservative synagogue, Congregation
Bnai Emunah, and became, as he put it, a disciple of its
rabbi, Harold Stern. There were five young men who
found themselves drawn to Rabbi Stern. All five entered
the Jewish Theological Seminary; of them, only Mr.
Greenspan dropped out.
Thats because he had found his true calling.
That is when I discovered calligraphy, he said.
Mr. Greenspans roommate was Mark Loeb, who later
became a Reform rabbi; he spent his career in Baltimore
and died in 2009. Mark was a calligrapher, Mr. Greens-
pan said. He had studied English calligraphy with a
man named Lloyd Reynolds, a premier calligrapher,
who studied with Edward Johnston, who had revived
calligraphy in England.
Its interesting, listening to Mr. Greenspan talk about
calligraphy. Rabbi Loebs work was in Hebrew as well
as English, but his teachers none of whom were Jew-
ish worked in English. Still, Mr. Greenspan puts artis-
tic education in the context of a chain of transmission
that is familiar to Jews. Mr. Greenspan learned upward,
through that chain, from his teachers teachers teacher.
(Its also the traditional apprenticeship path, he pointed
out.)
Mr. Greenspans roommate at JTS was David Moss,
who also went on to be a great and greatly in-demand
Jewish artist. He claims that he taught me everything
I know and I claim I taught him everything he knows,
Mr. Greenspan said.
It was during that time that Mr. Greenspan started
being asked to make things for friends. I did, and even-
tually someone asked me to do something for money.
He spent a year in Israel as part of the rabbinical pro-
gram, and by the end of that year I was asked to do my
first ketubah on parchment, he said.
And guess who was the mesader kedushin? Saul
Lieberman!
Rabbi Lieberman, who officiated at that wedding,
a great scholar and looming presence at JTS, was the
author of the Lieberman clause, an addition to the tradi-
tional marriage contract that specified when a husband
would be actively obligated to give his wife a get a
Who: Jay Greenspan of Teaneck, who is a
calligrapher, illuminator, papercut artist, and
sofer stam (among many other things)
What: Will be at a reception to mark the
opening of his new show, Letter by Letter:
Beautifying the Universe.
Where: At the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades,
411 East Clinton Ave., Tenafly
When: The reception is from 6 to 8 p.m. on
Monday, March 3; the art will be on display
from March 1 to March 28.
How: For more information, call the JCC at
201-408-1426 or go to www.jccotp.org.
A poster for Jewish Book Month
and another ketubah.
Cover Story
28 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-28

Fifth Avenue Synagogue invites you to a Full Morning of Learning
Yo m I y u n
Sunday Morning, March 9, 2014
An opportunity to study and learn with distinguished rabbis and scholars
Saturday night we change the clocks and lose an hour. How
do you make up that lost hour? Join us at Fifth Avenue
Synagogue and make every minute mean something. This
year we have speakers flying in from Israel, Miami, Toronto
and Baltimore. You won't want to miss this exciting program.
Daf Yomi; 7:30 a.m., Shacharit: 8:30 a.m., Breakfast and
Welcoming Remarks: 9:15 a.m. Sessions:10:00 a.m.1:00
p.m. Early Mincha:1:15 p.m.

Admission is free Complimentary breakfast Families, singles &
children welcome RSVP to (212) 838-2122 or melanie@5as.org Great
Childrens Program, lunch included, ages 3-11, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Rabbi Yaakov Kermaier, Rabbi Dr. Sol Roth, Cantor Joseph Malovany, Rabbi Eli Babich, Rabbi Shmuel
Fishelis, Rabbi Seth Grauer, Rabbi Yissocher Frand, Rabbi Eli Mansour, Rabbi Ephraim Shapiro
Lisa Babich, Rivkah Rothschild, Esq., Sharon Mintz, Rabbi Mark Wildes, Rebbetzin Ruthie Karlinsky,
Rabbi Shaya Karlinsky, Rabbi Anthony Manning, Rabbi Yitzchak Shurin (pictured left to right)
Fifth Avenue Synagogue 5 East 62 St, NYC 10065 (212) 838-2122 www.5as.org Fax (212) 319-6119
Questions? Contact Yom Iyun Chairman and President Jacob D. Gold Jacob@jacobdgold.com
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Jewish writ of divorce.
Mr. Greenspan was nervous when he
showed his ketubah to Rabbi Lieber-
man for approval, but Rabbi Lieber-
man accepted it.
The Israel year over, Mr. Greenspan
went back to New York. Two years
before he would have been ordained,
he decided that he did not want the
life of a rabbi. He supported himself by
teaching in synagogue schools, and by
doing more and more calligraphy.
Just before he dropped out of the
seminary, Mr. Greenspan decided to
become a sofer stam; he wanted to
write such sacred documents as Torah
scrolls, tefillin, and mezzuzot.
The only way to become a sofer
stam is through apprenticeship, and
Mr. Greenspan endured some misad-
ventures as he bumbled his way toward
finding one. Eventually, after going to
the Lower East Side to check out every
sofer there and it was long enough
ago that there still were many he
found one. He was kind and nonjudg-
mental, and I am pretty good at being
an autodidact, Mr. Greenspan said.
He found another teacher in Israel,
and eventually he found his services
in demand in the Conservative and
Reform world, although not among the
Orthodox.
This was a time of great ferment in the
Jewish world, particularly in liberal New
York circles. Mr. Greenspan, who lived
on the Upper West Side for 25 years, was
part of it. He wrote the article about cal-
ligraphy for the bible of do-it-yourself
tie-dyed hippie Judaism, the Jewish Cata-
logue, and soon after he wrote Hebrew
Calligraphy: A Step by Step Guide for
Schocken Books. He taught at the 92nd
Street Y and took courses at the marvel-
ously named Society of Scribes.
He cobbled together an artists life.
Mr. Greenspan also was part of the
New York Chavurah, another one of the
exuberant outgrowths of Jewish culture
that sprang from the prewar buildings
and very postwar worldviews of the
Upper West Side. The chavurah which
included such people as John Ruskay,
Peter Geffen, David Ellenson, Bill Aaron,
and Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, began
in about 1970, and he was asked to join
in 1972. More than 40 years later, many
of the friendships begun there are still
strong.
It was supposed to be an alternative
seminary, he said. It was a great egali-
tarian institution.
It grew to maybe 40 or 50 people.
It was incredible. We would go on a
retreat once a month. We got it down to
a science. We would study all weekend.
And on Shabbat wed all take turns lead-
ing the davening.
We would have Friday night dinner
once a month; wed arrange it with a dif-
ferent coordinator for each event. We
had a meeting once a week. It was way
before cellphones; you did everything by
telephone.
People who didnt have kids would
babysit.
It was just amazing.
In 1988, Mr. Greenspan and B.J. Gluck-
stern got married. (Her parents really
liked the name B.J., but they lived in Cal-
ifornia and werent allowed to do that,
so they named her Barbara Joy, but her
name really is B.J.)
Her father was a brilliant physicist,
Mr. Greenspan said. He graduated from
college at 19, did some work on the Man-
hattan Project, was provost at the Uni-
versity of Maryland in College Park, and
then taught physics there.
Her mother, also a very bright
woman, was the warden of Patuxent, a
mens prison in Maryland.
In fact, the weekend we got married,
Thanksgiving 1988, she was asked to go
on Nightline that Friday night because
Willie Horton had just escaped. Patux-
ent was supposed to be a model prison
for rehabilitation.
It was a whirlwind romance; the cou-
ple married about five months after their
first real date. A year later, they moved
to Teaneck, where both their daughters,
Rachel and Sophie, were born.
The family belongs to Congregation
Beth Sholom.
Mr. Greenspan estimates that he
has created more than 4,000 ketu-
bot, as well as invitations, awards,
plaques, diplomas, and papercuts. He
has restored hundreds of Torah scrolls
and is now at work on creating a Purim
megillah.
He works in a studio in the base-
ment of his house, surrounded by glow-
ingly beautiful pieces of art, gold leaf in
glassine envelopes, bottles and jars and
brushes and rulers, photographs of his
family and his wifes family.
And he has so very many stories; they
are almost as visible in the air around
him as the physical art that he has
created.
This is an illuminated version of
Eishet Chayil.
Jewish World
JS-29*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 29
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Classes and Support Groups.
This year,
dare to go bare.

Shaar Communities
Choose Your Gate. Open Your Soul. Find Your Community.

Upcoming Events: Check our Website for more details.
www.shaarcommunities.org

Drink & Think, Rosh Chodesh Learning Series
Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 8:0010:00 pm

Purim Megillah Reading
Saturday, March 15, 7:45 pm

The Unmasquerade Ball
Saturday, March 15, 9:30 pm 12:30 am
A Purim Party for LGBTQ Teens and their Friends!
Co-Sponsored by BCHSJS

Parents of LGBTQ Teens
Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 7:30 pm
New Jerseys first Jewish LGBTQ teen initiative, parents gather to discuss issues
relevant to their children and families.

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE!
March 28, 2014, 6:30pm
Enjoy music-filled, spiritual Shabbat services followed by a delicious dinner.

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Jewish Remembrance and Renewal
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For more information or to RSVP contact joanne@shaarcommunities.org.
Jewish camp trend-spotting
10 ways a summer ritual is changing
JULIE WIENER
N
ostalgia about summer tradi-
tions notwithstanding, Jewish
camps have changed dramati-
cally from a generation ago.
Camps value for Jewish education and
identity-building is now a major focus of
communal attention. Major Jewish foun-
dations, federations, and organizations are
investing heavily in the sector.
Many camps have become more inten-
tional about incorporating Jewish learning,
Shabbat and Israel into their programming.
Theyve also evolved to meet families
changing expectations and demands: offer-
ing a wider range of choices of all kinds,
from food to activity to session length;
providing more frequent updates and com-
munications to parents; accommodating
many medical requirements and allergies,
and placing greater emphasis on safety
and security.
At the same time, the Jewish camping
field is becoming more professionalized.
The job of camp director has been shifting
from a seasonal gig to year-round career,
and counselors are receiving more inten-
sive training.
With all this change in the Jewish camp
world, here are 10 specific trends we have
noticed:
1) Shorter sessions: Once upon a time,
summer camp meant the entire summer,
with the majority of campers attending for
seven, eight, or even 10 weeks. Now it is
the rare child or teen who spends the full
summer at camp (or at one camp), and
most programs offer many sessions, rang-
ing in length from just six days to seven
weeks. Our three-week session has always
sold out more quickly than the four-week,
and our new two-week session has been a
quick hit as well, said Vivian Stadlin, co-
director of Eden Village Camp in Putnam
Valley, N.Y.
2) Specialized programs: Whether a
childs passion is sports, the environment,
outdoor adventure, or science and tech-
nology, theres a Jewish camp for that. An
incubator under the aus-
pices of the Foundation for
Jewish Camp spurred the
creation of five specialty
camps in 2010 (includ-
ing Eden Village, which is
focused on the environ-
ment) and another four
will open this summer.
The idea is to attract kids
who might not otherwise
consider a Jewish camp,
and to show them they
can combine their pas-
sion with Judaism. Increas-
ingly, established general-
interest Jewish camps are adding specialty
tracks and electives. For example, the New
Jersey Y camps offer a science program
and various sports programs, while Ramah
in the Poconos has run basketball clinics
and a tennis academy.
3) Healthier food: Serving healthy,
locally sourced food is a part of the mis-
sion of some specialty camps, like the new
health-and-wellness-focused Camp Zeke,
and it has been a component of Ramah
Outdoor Adventure from its beginnings in
2010. In addition, many established Jew-
ish camps have been redoing their menus
to make them more nutritious and envi-
ronmentally friendly: adding salad bars,
replacing bug juice with water, offering
These campers seem to define the ideal of a happy
summer experience. FOUNDATION FOR JEWISH CAMP
SEE JEWISH CAMP PAGE 30
Jewish World
30 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-30
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more vegetarian fare, and even planting
their own organic vegetable gardens.
4) More affordable options: The Foun-
dation for Jewish Camp recently intro-
duced a new program called BunkCon-
nect, which helps first-time campers
from middle- and lower-income fami-
lies to search for a variety of discounted
Jewish summer camp options. While
BunkConnect is now available only in
the Northeast, New England, and Mid-
Atlantic regions, the foundation hopes
to expand it in future years. (For an in-
depth look at the program, see Paying
for Camp in last weeks Jewish Stan-
dard.) In addition, most Jewish over-
night camps offer financial aid, and
the One Happy Camper Program, initi-
ated in 2006, offers grants for all first-
time campers regardless of need. So
far 50,000 children have received One
Happy Camper grants.
5) Broadening definition of camp:
While rural settings and rustic accommo-
dations are still the norm, two specialty
camps the Union for Reform Judaisms
Six Points Sports Academy and Six Points
Science & Technology are set on board-
ing school campuses, and another, the
92nd Street Ys Passport NYC, is in the
middle of Manhattan. Passport NYC, in
which participants choose among tracks
in culinary arts, film, fashion, musical
theater and music industry, and live in
air-conditioned dorms. Six Points Sci-
ence blurs the boundary between camp
and summer program, and programs
like USY on Wheels and Adamah Adven-
tures, which operate under the Founda-
tion for Jewish Camps umbrella, blur the
boundary between camp and teen
travel.
6) Day camps brought into the tent:
While the Conservative movements
Camp Ramah has operated both day and
overnight camps for many years, other
Jewish day camps generally havent inter-
acted much with overnight camps, nor
have they received the same level of atten-
tion from Jewish communal leaders or
philanthropists as their sleepaway coun-
terparts. That is changing as this year, for
the first time, leaders of Jewish day camps
are being included in the biannual Lead-
ers Assembly of the Foundation for Jewish
Camp. The foundation is finalizing plans
with UJA-Federation of New York to estab-
lish an incubator developing six specialty
day camps in the region. In addition, the
Union for Reform Judaism is opening
its first day camp this summer. Mean-
while, the philanthropic group Areivim
is funding Hebrew-immersion day camps
throughout the United States.
7) Inclusion of children with disabili-
ties: An estimated 13 percent of children
have some sort of disability, but only 2
percent of Jewish campers do, accord-
ing to research conducted last year by
the Foundation for Jewish Camp. The
Jewish camping world is looking to make
the camping experience accessible to
more children with disabilities, includ-
ing them at regular camps wherever
possible, rather than segregating them
at separate facilities. The foundation
now is working to raise $31 million for a
multipronged effort to serve more such
children by offering relevant staff train-
ing, revamping physical facilities to make
them accessible, and creating vocational
education and life-skills training pro-
grams at many camps.
8) Year-round programming: Grow-
ing numbers of camps are offering
educational programming during the
school year, through partnerships with
such institutions as synagogues and
day schools. These partnerships often
involve sharing staff members, under the
auspices of new programs like Ramah
Service Corps and the Foundation for
Jewish Camps Nadiv initiative. In addi-
tion, camps within easy commuting dis-
tance of major metropolitan areas and
those in temperate regions or with win-
terized facilities increasingly are hosting
a range of family/community programs
in the offseasons: Eden Village, just 50
miles north of Manhattan, runs a home-
school program and weekend family/
community programs throughout the
year, while nearby Surprise Lake Camp,
in Cold Spring, N.Y., even runs High Holi-
day services and Passover Seders. Camp
Ramah Darom in Georgia runs a week-
long Passover retreat.
9) Family camp: Family camps have
been around for decades, but now virtu-
ally every Jewish overnight camp offers
at least one family-camp session, usu-
ally a three-day weekend, each year. A
number of camps got into the business
just trying to use the facility more, but it
wound up being a great recruiting tool,
said the Foundation for Jewish Camps
CEO, Jeremy Fingerman. Several camps
also host sessions specifically for fami-
lies of children with disabilities. While
the camps traditionally have been mar-
keted to camp-age kids and their parents,
Rabbi Mitchell Cohen, national director
of the Conservative movements Camp
Ramah network, said that several Ramah
camps are considering adding sessions
for Ramah alumni with younger children.
Its a relatively inexpensive family vaca-
tion, he noted.
10) Pew-fueled camp enthusiasm: In
response to last years much-discussed
Pew Research Center survey of Ameri-
can Jews, a wide range of Jewish commu-
nal leaders have offered their prescrip-
tions for engaging more youth. While
these leaders may differ on many issues,
almost all have cited Jewish summer
camp as something that works and is a
worthy investment. Jewish camps are
already popular with funders, but all the
pro-camp buzz will likely generate even
more dollars for the field.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Jewish camp
FROM PAGE 29
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Catering
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PHIL JACOBS
O
ne man started his business from his
bedroom in his parents Hackensack
house.
Another had the vision to see
potential in an empty 26,000-square-foot
warehouse that had no plumbing or air con-
ditioning.
Still another got her start assisting her
photographer husband at weddings and bnai
and bnot mitzvah parties, and the fourth just
got tired of seeing people buy music, light-
ing, catering, furnishings, owers, and pretty
much everything else a la cart, when he knew
he could provide everything they needed,
including a hall, all at once.
These are the creative people who take
on the job of planning everything from a 70th
birthday party to a bat mitzvah celebration to
a retirement party, from toasting in the new
year to providing space and atmosphere for a
companys annual conference.
Each one of these events is special to the
family or business that hosts it. The event
planner brings in the appropriate furnishings,
colors the walls with shimmering bright light,
provides surround-sound equipment for a
DJ or a band, helps pick out sleekly designed
furnishings and matching linens, and in some
instances builds 20-foot walls out of colorful
balloons.
Mark Zettler began his company, Life O
The Party, 34 years ago. He started by wear-
ing a gorilla suit while delivering singing
telegrams. He soon hired a belly dancer and
added a Pink Panther and other costumes to
his repertoire.
Then he decided to bring balloons into
the business; eventually that became a party
decorating business called Balloonacy. Now,
many in the party business say his operation
is the gold standard of balloon decorating.
If its your big 60th birthday, hell build
your age out of balloons. Want rooms made
out of balloons? He can do that too. A meno-
rah? No sweat. Word spread, and his client list
grew. His balloons have decorated the White
House Easter egg hunt, the Macys Thanksgiv-
ing parade, the David Letterman Show, such
corporate customers as
AT&T, and even movies,
including Youve Got Mail.
Somewhere along the way, Mr. Zettler
saw that the balloons offered a connection to
other parts of event planning.
After 34 years, you know people, and
people know you, he said. I learned to wear
many different hats, offering different services
to different people and companies.
So the singing gorilla became a full-
service party and event planner. He han-
dles everything, from the lighting to the
tablecloths, centerpieces, furniture, flower
arrangements, music, and food.
Any kind of color for any event can be
accomplished and striking, he said. There
are a lot of cool products in lighting and fab-
ric we can offer. And you cant cook for 100
people as well as we can.
Weve always done the landmark event
in peoples lives, he continued. If theyre
turning 30, 40, or 60, weve done them.
Mr. Zettler said that event planners have
to stay ahead of the game when it comes to
changes in linen and types of tables, chairs,
and sofas. People want surround sound. In
business, people go to elaborate conferences,
and they expect to see elaborate lighting and
balloon drops.
Kathy Goldstein of Kathy Goldstein
Events agrees with Mr. Zettler. (In fact, all the
planners talked about lighting, and about the
ways in which integrating the lighting with
sound, fabric texture, and even the shape of
the furniture adds to the party.)
When someone hires us and has no idea
what they are going to do, I rst talk to them
about their budget and then their theme, Ms.
Goldstein said. We let the customers know
that they have a choice when it comes to
incorporating lighting, sound, entertainment,
furniture, and even food. We can work with
any sort of entertainment, a DJ or a band, and
any illusions they might want.
She said that while the bar mitzvah boy
might have chosen a sports or music theme
Event
planners
The people who
put it all together
SEE PLANNERS PAGE 4
Balloon walls from Life O The Party
201 Supper Club
Balloon arches from Life O The Party
S-4 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
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for his party, a corporate party is com-
pletely different. There, she works with
companies to help them with team
building.
Sometimes everyone lets their hair
down in a spirit of camaraderie to get
their message out, she said.
She planned an event for a corpora-
tion that wanted its employees to get
the message that the skys the limit.
Ms. Goldstein used helium balloons
designed like hot air balloons. The com-
pany logo was on the gondolas hang-
ing from them. Ms. Goldstein placed
poster-like images of Mount Everest on
the convention room walls, showing the
way to climb toward success.
Ms. Goldstein has a strong feeling
that the party or event should be fur-
nished appropriately. Indeed, on her
website, KathyGoldsteinEvents.com,
she offers a full range of choices.
That also holds true for Michel Bit-
tan of the 201 Supper Club in Engle-
wood. He told the Jewish Standard that
different furniture options are neces-
sary. Some guests want to lounge in a
large sofa, while others want to sit only
for short periods of time, spending most
of their evenings visiting different tables
or dancing.
Those elements, in addition to
more than 100 video games, non-paint
paintball, laser tag, and a bowling alley
all are under the same roof at Elvira
Graus SPACE in Englewood.
Ms. Grau adds to Ms. Goldsteins
idea of actually producing a successful
party or event with plenty of elements.
In production, you have two hours
to be blown away at the theater, she
said. At SPACE, we have four hours to
blow away our clients, and we work
hard and aim high to do so.
With an in-house chef, SPACE will
take care of the catering. Its not kosher,
but if its kashrut you need, she will
bring it in.
She is a big believer in dcor for
every space in SPACE.
Most venues will sell you space,
she said. We customize the creative
aspect of the space for you.
Im not offering just space, she
said. I am presenting a vision, some-
thing you want to see when you walk
in. Its not just going to be couches with
pillows, but its going to be different
kinds of couches with different colors
of pillows.
We can transform a room to any
color you want, she added. You want
a cool party, we do blue. We paint with
LED lights, setting the tone. The light-
ing is crucial. Were not in a dentists
ofce, were in a nightclub with enter-
tainment. We bring the elements of a
country club with a night club and a
million dollars worth of video together
under one roof.
Mr. Bittan of the 201 Supper Club
calls this sort of planned lighting intel-
ligent lighting.
Shooting light beams against the
walls adds a different atmosphere, he
said.
Ms. Grau doesnt want her partyers
to come to a sit-down dinner. She sets
up what she calls interactive stations
where people can lean against a high
table or sit in high chairs, eat some-
thing, walk around, and dance.
Decorations are personalized for
the bar mitzvah boy or bat mitzvah girl,
milestone birthday party, or any other
event, she said.
She gives an example of how a boy
named Alex loves rock n roll music, and
so rock n roll was his bar mitzvah theme.
Planners
FROM PAGE 3
SEE PLANNERS PAGE 6
Space, Englewood
Kathy
Goldstein
Events
www.jstandard.com
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-5
We ofer complete in-house planning of your
event; Personalized selection of table linens,
centerpieces, & all dcor.
VISION
SPACE IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT!
ALLOW US TO BRING YOUR FANTASIES ALIVE!
SPACE IS A ONE-STOP SHOP THAT TAKES AWAY ALL THE STRESS & ANXIETY.
ALLOW US TO DO ALL THE WORK SO THAT YOU CAN SIMPLY SHOW UP & ENJOY!
201-567-3810 491 South Dean Street Englewood, NJ 07631
www.spaceodysseyusa.com
Kathy
Goldstein
Events
S-6 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
Where special events are right on track
PHIL JACOBS
Meadowlands Racing and Entertainment can bring
your party or conference to the wow level.
It opened just last November, but it is quickly
becoming the place for events ranging from inti-
mate parties there are small rooms for them to
conferences for thousands of attendees.
Its got 180,000 square feet of space over three
oors, plus another 100,000 outside.
Amy Rosenbloom, the director of event plan-
ning, wants to bring you and your bar mitzvah party
or business conference to this supersite.
The Meadowlands is reaching out to the Jewish
community. It wants to introduce its amenities to
soon-to-be proud parents of a bat mitzvah girl or a
bride or groom.
We have the vendors for any size bar or bat
mitzvah that families want to have, Ms. Rosen-
bloom said.
A quick tour?
Well, theres the Lounge, with 240 second-oor
seats offering prime views of the racetrack itself.
The Gallery, a private space, can accommodate
200 guests comfortably.
Pink is a tiered prix-xe dining room that seats
300. It will be open on race days and will offer food
and cocktail service on bright pink wool chairs.
Tables are equipped with TVs and betting terminals,
and all of them have racetrack views.
The outdoor spaces, set to open in April,
include Victory Terrace, a sprawling rooftop with
a lounge feel, table service, and city views, and the
Outeld, which will be spread across 2/ acres. Both
areas will offer dining and entertaining spaces to
accommodate 10,000 people.
The Outfield includes seasonal restaurants
as well as three private party tents. The area also
includes a musical stage and the Playscape, a fami-
ly-friendly space with beer-garden-style food, along
with bocce ball, ping-pong, and other activities.
Meadowlands Racing and Entertainment will
offer a variety of options perfect for a bar or bat
mitzvah celebration.
What comes with a bar or bat mitzvah book-
ing at the Meadowlands is a staff of event planners.
They will construct what Ms. Rosenbloom called
the most unforgettable and amazing event of your
dreams.
Face it, the place is huge, and offers many
options. Ms. Rosenbloom and her planning team
can offer many different room sizes, but she knocks
the ball out of the park when she talks about the
view of the Manhattan skyline rooftop parties will
see.
We can do a meeting for breakfast, lunch, or
dinner, she said. We can host 10 people to a few
thousand.
And of course dont forget the racing, which
happens on Friday and Saturday nights, from April
through the end of October.
We have a magnicent place called the Victory
Room, with 11 screens, she said. Its in that room
that a bar mitzvah or bat mitzvah can use the visual
technology for a personal montage.
A racetrack for a bar mitzvah? Ms. Rosenbloom
urges people to consider it. Its more than a race-
track, she said; its a complete package, with light-
ing, sound, food, color, and atmosphere that will
become a wonderful memory after any celebration.
For more information, email ARosenbloom@playmeadow-
land.com
Meadowlands Racing and Entertainment
Ms. Grau hung vinyl records and album covers around
the room. Each table had a small musical instrument
on it, with the name of a band of the bar mitzvah boy
loved. The entire staff wore Rock of Alex t-shirts.
She produces well over 100 bnai and bnot mitz-
vah parties a year.
I wanted to have a fun, interactive space and
thats what we offer with high tech entertainment, she
said. In this business, you cant be content, Im always
pushing myself. Our clients want their party to be dif-
ferent. Were not a cookie cutter business.
Ditto for the 201 Supper Club. Mr. Bittan wasnt
looking to build what he observed as a guest at many
an event. Like Mr. Zettler, he saw that instead of hav-
ing parents or corporate event planners looking for
lighting, and then decorations, and then food, owers,
entertainment, he knew he could provide it all under
one roof.
We made it convenient so that a person just has
to make one stop, Mr. Bittan said.
Mr. Bittan is from Morocco, and so he can add a
bit of Middle Eastern taste. He can put a tent a room,
with low seats and tables with beautiful red and gold
pillows.
The club is open for birthday parties, bar and bat
mitzvah parties, anniversaries, and even political or
corporate events.
Hes got more than 10,000 square feet of danc-
ing space, a lounge area, and even a full video game
arcade.
The challenge, he said, is to stay on top of the
ever-changing technological advances, from light-
ing to music. Each of the event planners interviewed
agreed with him. DJs and bands in particular want to
plug in and get started.
But this work is so much more than high tech and
gadgetry, Ms. Grau said, Space is what you make of
it. From a rst birthday party to a 50th, we can do it,
design it, and transform it.
Or, as Ms. Goldstein said, I know Im successful
when everyone says wow!
Websites:
SPACE www.spaceodysseyusa.net
201 Supper Club www.201club.com
Life O The Party www.Lotparty.com
Kathy Goldstein Events
www.kathygoldsteinevents.com
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-7
S-8 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
Visit Our New
Location
139 Oakland Ave.
Closter , NJ
201-768-7770
www.bobbisgoldenhanger.com
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BRIDESMAID, AND PROM DRESSES
If you are a guy looking for that gift for
your wife, girlfriend, mother, sister, aunt,
grandmother, or daughter, you better know
these two names.
Alex and Ani.
Say it to yourself like a mantra. Com-
mit it to memory. Bring these bangles
and charms home it will turn you into
a hero.
Unlike many other pieces of jewelry,
they are something both a teenager and
her mom will wear. They will even bor-
row each others pieces.
Alex and Ani, based in Rhode
Island, prides itself on using sustainable
materials, and meticulously selecting
stores in real neighborhoods, not only
in malls.
Kim Lanzana, the manager of
Haworth Apothecary, has had customers
buy the bracelets off her wrist.
Linda Del Santo and Sharon Aach
Alex and Ani bracelets with meaning
PHIL JACOBS
have seen the very same demand at their
Westwood store, Youre So Invited. So has
Sue Bahng in her store, Ginger N Cream,
also in Westwood, and so has Patrice
Turkell of Portage & the Jewelry Box in
Englewood.
For now, though, lets get back to Ms.
Lanzana at Haworth Apothecary.
We were getting this boutique kind
of feel for the last three or four years, she
said. Womens accessory sales have real-
ly taken off. Plus, we are in a town with
a lot of money. The ladies wear jewelry,
trendy costume jewelry, and weve found
our niche. Its not expensive name brands.
Good quality is whats hot right now. Thats
Alex and Ani.
The meaning behind these symbols
and the charities they donate to and they
are involved in attracts buyers. You can
pretty much nd something for anyones
interest.
Ms. Lanzana said the store was so
lucky to get the opportunity to sell Alex
and Ani jewelry. It was so hard getting in,
she said. Its been quite a blessing for the
store.
Patrice Turkell, president of Portage
& the Jewelry Box, said that Alex and Ani
is one of our biggest sellers. People can
express themselves at a reasonable price.
Its about positive energy, and costs from
$24 to $68 so its affordable.
Shes carried the line for seven years;
she started soon after she was introduced
to it at an accessory show.
I loved it, she said. I loved that they
use recycled materials.
We started carrying them before any-
one knew about it.
Ms. Turkell said she sells Alex and Ani
to customers whose ages range from 12 to
82.
There are other products she also loves
to sell. Personalized jewelry is huge, she
said. Whether its a monogrammed neck-
lace to a mini nameplate, it is very trendy.
I like very bold pieces, she contin-
ued. I do a lot of stacking and layering. Im
wearing about ve bracelets, multilayered,
right now.
Sometimes we sell these bracelets
right off of us and sometimes I dont
want to part with it.
Ms. Del Santo and Ms. Aach of Youre
So Invited say that when customers come
in looking for one Alex and Ani bracelet
as a gift, they always seem to buy one for
themselves.
They also said that often newcomers
to the product would start with a birth-
stone on their initial bracelet. That can
be followed by initials and then maybe a
zodiac sign.
Each piece comes with inspirational
words, Ms. Aach said. Some people will
overlap bracelets of love, health, and ser-
vice.
Alex and Anis website says that the
products are infused with positive ener-
gy. Ancients referred to this precious
energy as chi and prana, whereas
modern science refers to it as a vital
force. It is the natural energy that sup-
ports life.
The site also says that the compa-
ny embraces the force of positive ener-
gy as a core company belief. The prod-
ucts are manufactured with positive
intention in carefully selected Ameri-
can factories. The symbols carry their
own energy and are accompanied by
thoughtfully crafted and meticulously
researched meaning. Some of the piec-
es are talismans of protection, power or
intention.
Ms. Bahng of Westwoods Ginger
N Cream says that for many custom-
ers, Alex and Ani is popular because
its affordable.
And thats why people dont have
just one. They collect them. They might
have 14. You can get it for yourself or
for your grandma. It can be a simple
bracelet or a few bracelets. Its an easy
gift.
Ms. Lanzana has seen products get
trendy and then fade. She doesnt think
that will happen any time soon with
Alex and Ani.
We are riding a wave, she said.
They have given us glimpses of what
the future holds. She added that can-
dles and fragrances are part of Alex and
Ani, and furniture might come next.
Her store also sells womens acces-
sories, including scarves, wraps, hats,
gloves, and clothing.
What about men and gifts?
Guys are tough, she said. We
have expanded with gloves and scarves
and we just got into shaving kits. Thats
something fairly new. Desk games,
some travel bags. Yes, men are tough.
And yes, there is a Star of David
charm.
Alex and Ani is a process, she
said. These bracelets are meaningful
and hand chosen. We take our time
with our customers.
Every bracelet comes with a
meaning card. It could be a half an
hour process to get the right bracelet
that ts.
Alex and Ani bracelets
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-9
Alex and Ani bracelets with meaning
PHIL JACOBS
500 Veterans Memorial Drive
Pearl River, NY 10965
845.735.9000
hiltonpearlriver.com/weddings
Specially-priced mid-week and winter functions
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Our lavish Grand Ballroom,
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and our 17 picturesque acres of
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the scenic Hudson River Valley
offer the perfect setting to
create magnificent memories.
Just minutes from Bergen County,
Westchester, and Manhattan via the
George Washington Bridge.
The Chateau in The Country near The City.
HILTON PEARL RIVER
S-10 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
TO INQUIRIE ABOUT PLANNING YOUR SIMCHA OR CORPORATE EVENT,
CONTACT RACHEL HEUMANN
646.437.4206 | RHEUMANN@MJHNYC.ORG
EDMOND J. SAFRA PLAZA
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TOP LEFT PHOTO BY DAVID PALER; BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO BY SARI REISMAN;
ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY MELANIE EINZIG
Jewish wedding gift dos and donts
JACOB KAMARAS
N
ot another challah board! Thats
the collective cry heard round
the Jewish world when newly-
weds receive a Judaica gift they
already possess. Dont be that friend
follow my simple dos and donts for
Jewish wedding gifts.
DO
BE CREATIVE
There are inventive spins on Judaica
items that are sure to leave a more last-
ing impression than their traditional
counterparts. Kiddush cup? How about
a Kiddush cup fountain instead? It
includes a center cup as well as 8-12
matching small cups, and when the
reciter of Kiddush pours the wine from
the center cup into the base of the foun-
tain, the wine trickles down into the
small cups. This avoids the clumsiness
of pouring Kiddush wine for each per-
son at a large Shabbat meal, and per-
haps more importantly, the streamlined
process routinely elicits oohs and
aahs from guests. Challah board? How
about a challah board breadbasket? This
challah board transforms itself into a
basket for distributing challah to guests
after it is cut, keeping the Shabbat table
uncluttered.
THINK PRACTICALLY
Mull over this question: What Judaica
does the couple really need around the
house? More specically, what does the
couple need more than one of? A mezu-
zah (with a decorative case) immedi-
ately comes to mind, given the multiple
doorposts in Jewish homes calling for
one. Even more practicaland more
memorableis providing the glass cup
that the groom will break with his foot
under the chuppah, along with a broken
wedding glass mezuzah, whose case
includes room for those sentimental
shards.
GIVE CASH
Are you thinking that cash isnt senti-
mental enough, and that the couple
wont remember you if you dont give
a unique gift? Dont talk yourself into
that myth. Youll be remembered quite
fondly for your cash gift, with which
the newlyweds can buy anything they
desire.
1) Youre getting the couple some-
thing they dont need, because someone
more compliant than you will (wisely)
buy the dishes requested on the registry.
2) The couple wont be able to
exchange your redundant gift for some-
thing they do need because it came
from a store unbeknownst to them.
3) Your gift will enter the notorious
re-gift closet. This creates a vicious
cycle. By re-gifting your gift, the couple
repeats your error of gifting an unregis-
tered standard household item. The gift
proceeds to be re-gifted for perpetuity.
Heres a dirty little secret: For
couples, the point of making a regis-
try is not just to get all the household
items they need, but also to create the
potential to exchange a string of regis-
try items for more expensive items that
you wouldnt have the gall to put on the
registry like a couch. Why should your
unwanted gift that cannot be returned
spoil the couples efforts to implement
this wonderful strategy?
Honestly, these are all just point-
ers. Any gift is deeply appreciated, and
its the thought that counts. At the end
of the day, it isnt the presents, but your
presenceat the wedding, if you can
be there, or through your continued
friendshipthat matters.
JNS.org
DONT
BE A COPYCAT
The couple will likely get multiple chal-
lah boards, challah covers, menorahs,
seder plates, and the like. Dont join the
fray. Be original. Now, I admit, it would
be quite unfortunate if everyone fol-
lowed my advice and the couple ended
up with none of these hallowed Judaica
xtures.
COMPETE WITH CLOSE RELATIVES
The couples parents or other close rela-
tives may purchase them silver Shabbat
candlesticks or a Kiddush cup, or the
bride and groom may have had these
items passed down in their family over
time. Dont even think for a second that
you can compete with bubbe and zaidy!
DUPLICATE THE REGISTRY
This goes for non-Judaica items, and was
a major pet peeve for me when I got mar-
ried in 2013. Duplicating the couples
registryfor instance, getting dishes or
silverware not listed on the registry
ensures three infuriating outcomes:
Were dedicated to bringing you a great selection of traditional
kosher and non-kosher foods for your special occasion.
From quick business meetings to birthdays, anniversaries,
Bat or Bar Mitzvahs - we will provide the perfect combination
of gourmet foods from start to fnish.
Contact Jim Mohan at jmohan@kingssm.com or 201.541.4906
Please visit kingsfoodmarkets.com to download a copy of catering
menu, holiday menu offerings and listing of our store locations.

Be Inspired With Kings Catering
www.kingsfoodmarkets.com
Connect with us.
Cresskill, 70 Union Avenue
201-541-4900
Midland Park, 85 Godwin Avenue
201-251-4808
Hillsdale, 381 Washington Avenue
201-722-4690
Ridgewood, 112 North Maple Avenue
201-493-4924
Were dedicated to bringing you a great selection of traditional
kosher and non-kosher foods for your special occasion.
From quick business meetings to birthdays, anniversaries,
Bat or Bar Mitzvahs - we will provide the perfect combination
of gourmet foods from start to fnish.
Contact Jim Mohan at jmohan@kingssm.com or 201.541.4906
Please visit kingsfoodmarkets.com to download a copy of catering
menu, holiday menu offerings and listing of our store locations.

Be Inspired With Kings Catering
www.kingsfoodmarkets.com
Connect with us.
Cresskill, 70 Union Avenue
201-541-4900
Midland Park, 85 Godwin Avenue
201-251-4808
Hillsdale, 381 Washington Avenue
201-722-4690
Ridgewood, 112 North Maple Avenue
201-493-4924
S-12 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
R
aising funds can involve parlor
meetings, special events, ban-
quets, and journals. For Sam Fish-
man, though, its about telling a
story.
Mr. Fishman, the managing direc-
tor of Sinai Schools, knows many stories
about children and their families over-
coming difficult obstacles, and he tells
them as often as he can.
A video Mr. Fishman produced,
which was premiered at a recent Sinai
banquet, told the story of how two sis-
ters worked hard at their schools with the
Sinai program, overcoming both physical
and learning disabilities to achieve and
thrive. But Mr. Fishman knows that the
special attention and education his 500
students receive costs in the neighbor-
hood of $60,000 per student per year.
Sharing their stories helps raise the
funds the program needs so that the stu-
dents and their parents can be successful.
Mr. Fishman said that Sinai is unique
in the tristate area for the range of chil-
dren we serve and the level of support we
provide. Sinais special needs students
are educated in one of ve mainstream
local schools. The results are wonderful
for our children and for the children of
the partnering school.
We are blessed with a community
Finding new ways and reasons to raise funds
PHIL JACOBS
that cares about children, he con-
tinued. Whether its a dinner or a
boutique we hold, the key thing is to
try your best to help the communi-
ty understand Sinais excellence and
how it is so vital for the community. If
we tell the story correctly, people will
understand what were doing.
Mr. Fishman said that when Sinai
tells its stories, people hear us, and as
a result they give.
Its hard work, he added. We
put a lot of effort into putting out
one new video a year. We tell stories
through the eyes of our parents and
our children. They are all heroes.
The recent video already has got-
ten thousands of online views. Last
years video generated more than
10,000 views.
The video tells the story of our
children, he said. Their parents talk
about the transformation theyve
seen.
Every year, when a video is shown
at the banquet, you could hear a pin
drop, Mr. Fishman said. He added that
few of the people in attendance have
to be there; the overwhelming major-
ity of the 800 dinner participants are
there because they want to be.
Sinai adds at least three yearly
sales boutiques to its fund-raising
efforts; it also raises money through
Purim card donations, parlor meet-
ings, and more. Its goal is to raise at
least 40 percent of its revenue through
fund raising.
For Amy Silna Shafron, director
of institutional advancement at the
school formerly known as the Ger-
rard Berman Day School, Solomon
Schechter of North Jersey, the fund-
raising challenge has a new, uplift-
ing aspect. The school was rebranded
Academies at GBDS in November. The
Oakland-based school offers an excit-
ing array of science classes and lead-
ership classes to its students.
Ms. Shafron said that while events
such as family fun days are important
and successful, events are not just the
only way to raise money.
The events weve done are awe-
some, but even then its about the
advocacy of people who attend the
event. We have successful board
members who care about the school.
And ultimately, no matter what the
song and dance is, our goal is to suc-
cessfully connect to people.
You dont want to be a wedding
planner. You want people to feel part
of our family. And it becomes incum-
bent upon us to show them a good
time, and have them believe in our
mission.
Last year was a complete celebra-
tion of Israel. What connects all of
us as Jews is Israel, Ms. Shafron said.
We had an event at a private home
where the cuisine reflected Israel so
much you felt like you were in an
Israeli kitchen. We added a phenome-
nal lecture about Israel. We had Lexus
sponsor our valet parking.
Dunkin Donuts and Ramsey Auto
Group were among the sponsors at a
family fun day.
We found we could enliven
the day with people who wanted to
get their message across, she said.
We brought in Ben and Jerrys. They
brought their ice cream truck with
a guy dressed up in a cow costume.
Health Barn USA brought in its farm-
to-fork program.
Two family fun days allowed us
to be part of the larger community,
she added. We spread our message to
people we otherwise might not have
met. We want to be exciting to peo-
ple. We want people to see us as fresh,
savvy, and interesting.
The school also does an event at
Neiman Marcus every year.
You want to align yourself with
other prestigious organizations, Ms.
Shafron said.
The big news is the schools
rebranding as it builds its science and
leadership curriculums.
Were bringing in chemis-
try, medicine, leadership and envi-
ronmental biology, she said. This
is adding to our Judaic studies. Were
upping the academy by bringing in
experts to teach our children.
Ms. Shafron said that the school
is more like a magnet school and a
day school combined. Were talking
about being marketable for the future
for our students.
A capital campaign is in the
works to help raise funds for a geode-
sic dome for a weather station. The
school also would like a video con-
ferencing center. To raise this money,
the school has embarked on a Brick
by Brick campaign, selling bricks for
future building.
You just cant send a letter any-
more, Ms. Shafron said. You have to
make the school shine.
What we do has to send a mes-
sage that we are thriving, not just sur-
viving. I think the world is changing
and evolving, and we have to evolve
with it. We have to send a message of
excellence.
When it comes to the bottom line,
There are a lot of things that weve
done that have brought in money,
she said. When people see you are
doing an amazing thing, they want
to get behind it. They need to be sure
you are doing what is best with their
dollars.
People want to know were head-
ing somewhere great.
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-13
Make Your Party a Splash!
Spacious Gym Supervised Activities & Games
Basketball, Soccer, & Floor Hockey
Two beautifully appointed ballrooms with a capacity of 50 to 500 people,
serviced by your choice of a wide variety of the fnest kosher caterers.
For something different, theres also a gym and pool. All amenities you
would expect from a fne catering establishment, but in a synagogue.
Make summer all year long!
A Fun Filled Active Way to Celebrate a Birthday,
Special Occasion or Time with Friends
Non-Competitive Games
Refreshing Heated Pool
Experienced Lifeguards
Refreshment Designated
Party Room
Have your special event at the
Jewish Center of Teaneck where families
have celebrated for over 80 years.
Conveniently located just 3 miles west of the George Washington Bridge
Rabbi Lawrence S. Zierler Sandy Hausler, President Rose Sigler, Administrator
The Jewish Center of Teaneck
Teanecks frst and most comprehensive,
full service Synagogue Center
70 Sterling Place, Teaneck, NJ
(201) 833-0515 www.jcot.org email: info@jcot.org
Affordable Elegance
Jeff Nadler, the chief development
ofcer for the Kaplen JCC on the Pali-
sades in Tenay, has been at his posi-
tion for three months. But already he
can see what he called a generational
shift in giving. The generation that
grew up during and right after World
War II knew that America offered nan-
cial stability and safety. Jews became
part of the American town square, Mr.
Nadler said. Part of Jewish American
culture was to send money to Israel and
Jewish causes and agencies.
Now theres a shift, he said. I see
it tied to the Internet.
Now you can see where your
money goes when you give to specic
organizations. The challenge for Jewish
nonprots is to show that a donors gift
has a measurable impact. Their dona-
tions are helping peoples lives.
When you can tell those stories of
how donations make a difference, thats
whats going to touch donors and build
those relationships.
Mr. Nadler said hes heard people
say that asking for money is difcult. He
said that that the real need is to build a
relationship, not to ask for a one-time
gift.
The JCC has life-long relationships
with families, he said, and it is a magnet
for families because they feel at home
there.
When parents have young kids,
they want their children to have that
attachment to Judaism, Mr. Nadler
said. Kids who come here can go
through the nursery school, and get
involved with Shabbat in the classroom.
There are adult activities, and programs
for seniors and Holocaust survivors.
The JCC is one of the few places
where Jews of every denomination can
nd a place, he said.
Like Mr. Fishman of Sinai Schools,
Mr. Nadler talks about the incredible
stories that unfold at his institution.
We have one little girl who started
out with some severe limitations who
has grown and ourished and now just
had her bat mitzvah, he said. She was
trained and coached by someone at the
JCC.
Theres the Rubin Run, a health and
fitness day that raises money for the
JCCs special needs program. There is a
camp for children living through pedi-
atric cancer.
There are stories out there that will
tug on peoples heartstrings, he said.
But Mr. Nadlers bottom line is
looking ahead to future growth as the
JCC continues to serve the community.
Its time for newer generations to
step forward, he said. Previous gener-
ations have built this magnicent facil-
ity. Through capital funding, we need to
maintain it as a beacon.
The programs and services offered
by the JCC are the lifeblood of this com-
munity. Its the forever funding, the
bequests and more. We have to make
sure that the JCC is here for the next
generation, and with continuity for
future generations.
Powerhouse Studios, East Hanover, updates party venue
With so many bar/bat Mitzvahs each
year in Bergen County, Powerhouse
Studios and Entertainment in East
Hanover continues to assist in planning
the celebrations.
Owners Sam and Melanie Pel-
legrino are constantly updating their
studio to keep it fresh and exciting.
The studio in East Hanover, has been
completely remodeled and offers
guests two unique environments in
one space.
The Pellegrinos just recently
opened a new event space in Ran-
dolph called Vegas, NJ.
Also, theres the Paramus loca-
tion, which is the largest of all three
facilities. This Hollywood themed
space is a one-of-a-kind experience.
Call Sam and Melanie anytime for
more information or to set up a tour
of any of their three locations or look
them up online at www.powerhous-
estudios.tv or call 1-800-287-4613.
Sinai Unique Inspirations Art Show
S-14 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
BAR & BAT MITZVAH
Lessons in your home
Learn to read Hebrew
Cantor Barbra
201-818-4088
Off iciant for Baby Namings
Certified Cantor with 12+ years
of pulpit experience
MAGAZINE AD
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Ofciant at Bar/Bat Mitzvah Ceremonies,
Baby Namings and Weddings
201-818-4088 Cell: 201-788-6653
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Certied Cantor with
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Private or Small
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Lessons in
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Learn to
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Convenient Morning, Evening & Sunday Hours
Richard S. Gertler, DMD, FAGD
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100 State Street Teaneck, NJ
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F
or so many years, brides embarked upon the
challenging task of nding a style of dress that
would look good on all of their bridesmaids and
inevitably zeroed in on solid-colored dresses in
shades of pink and springtime yellow or wintry bur-
gundy and black. That was all they saw in bridal gown
shops, on designers websites and in blogs.
But slowly, bridesmaid dresses in patterns began
appearing in collections. They may have raised some
eyebrows at first (Floral?), but now bridesmaids are
thrilled to consider fashion-forward patterned dresses
(Floral!). Todays oral-patterned cocktail dresses, so
pretty in banners topping bridal blogs, are ever more
wearable than a full-length peach gown.
Bridesmaids, after all, have two goals for their
$150-plus gowns: They want to look terric, and they
want to wear that dress again - and again. The Wed-
ding Report, a bridal industry survey company, says
that most bridesmaids wear their dresses an average of
two to ve times after the wedding, and a oral or pat-
terned dress is perfect for repeat use as-is or cut down
from full length to a irty cocktail or mini dress.
Investment maximizing aside, patterned dresses
can be very attering. In its Tip of the Day column
Bridesmaids can wear patterned dresses again and again after the
big day. CREATORS.COM PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DESSY GROUP
STEP ASIDE, SOLIDS
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SHARON NAYLOR
SEE PATTERNS PAGE 16
www.jstandard.com
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-15
S-16 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
Spanish & Portuguese Restaurant
Specializing in Seafood and Steaks
Private Room Available For All Occasions
Birthdays, Anniversaries, Corporate Functions
Shower Packages From $20 Per Person
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Call For Reservations
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Formerly Roman Cafe
12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
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JoAnn Carr
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Formerly Roman Cafe
12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
Tel. 201-767-4245 www.Dinoshp.com
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Party Room Seats 30-60 Guests
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Wed, Mar 18, 2009
2 cols, 4.67 x 3.34"
Process
JoAnn Carr
SUB
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RESTAURANT
Formerly Roman Cafe
12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
Tel. 201-767-4245 www.Dinoshp.com
Catering (See Website for Menu)
Party Room Seats 30-60 Guests
Dine in or take-out
Warm, Relaxing Atmosphere
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ROMAN CAFE
Wed, Mar 18, 2009
2 cols, 4.67 x 3.34"
Process
JoAnn Carr
SUB
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_X__ E-Proof
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RESTAURANT
Formerly Roman Cafe
12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
Tel. 201-767-4245 www.Dinoshp.com
Catering (See Website for Menu)
Party Room Seats 30-60 Guests
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Formerly Roman Cafe
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JoAnn Carr
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Formerly Roman Cafe
12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
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2 cols, 4.67 x 3.34"
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Formerly Roman Cafe
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Dinos Restaurant
When looking for a restaurant that has a menu
offering a wide selection of both traditional and
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fortable, casual atmosphere in which to enjoy a deli-
cious meal, DINOS RESTAURANT in Harrington
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The welcoming atmosphere is the first thing to be
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If just in the mood for drinks or wine selected
from an extensive list, take a seat at the cozy bar and
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But food is the main draw and guests get to
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12 Tappan Road, Harrington Park
(201) 767-4245 www.dinoshp.com
2771106-Dinos
Carr
201 MAG
AMY
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Group and may not be reproduced in any
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12 Tappan Road Harrington Park, NJ
201-767-4245 www.Dinoshp.com
(written by yours truly), Bridal Guide magazine recent-
ly posted on its website the following beneath a photo
of bridesmaids in stylish, vertical-lined soft green, gray
and ivory cobra prints: Allowing bridesmaids to wear
ultra-trendy patterned dresses can deliver an added
benefit: Vertical patterns are slimming! So look for
longer pattern lines that your bridesmaids will love
wearing.
Here are some of the top looks in patterned
bridesmaid dresses:
Florals: These bridesmaid gowns in white and
pastels showcase hundreds of small owers such as
roses, lilies, or irises along with greenery tendrils and
leaves. In a bolder trend, oral patterns feature over-
size blooms such as hibiscus owers that are 1 foot
or more in height and width. There may be several of
these big blossoms around the skirt, with the top of
the dress left a solid color to avoid being too much.
And for island-based destination weddings, tropical
ower motifs are a hit.
Hummingbirds: For a garden wedding, pat-
terned bridesmaid dresses include flowers and the
pretty little creatures who inhabit gardens, such as
hummingbirds, which is a top motif for the coming
year.
Polka dots: Preppy polka dots also have a place
in the patterned bridesmaid dress realm, with tiny
white dots on a dress of any color. And a unique twist
on the black-and-white wedding brings white dresses
with little black polka dots. This is an immensely re-
wearable style, especially in cocktail length. And for
nautical weddings, navy, and white dotted dresses are
pure class.
Stripes: Speaking of nautical themes, bridesmaid
dresses in wide light-blue and white vertical stripes say
nautical chic. Blues are best for this pattern because
pinks can look a bit too girly and costumey. One bride
looked at a pink-striped dress for her bridesmaids, and
their response was, Do we work in a candy store?
Ikat: Ikat designs with their detailed patterns add
exotic air to bridesmaid dresses, and the look is as
trendy for these gowns as it is for your invitations and
linens.
Lace cutouts: Picture a dress in a beautiful,
bright solid color with an overlay of black lace allow-
ing that color to peek through, creating an elegant,
chic pattern. The Dessy Collection offers this new
ultra-trendy, ultra-popular look in more than 80 colors
from burgundy to white to hot pink, citrus orange, and
more. Its pattern, but its also lace, which is the No. 1
look in bridal fashion.
Ombre: Ombre involves graduated shades of
color from light to dark and is very trendy for 2014
weddings. Neutrals such as ivory to champagne to a
darker tan and white to gray to black are especially
popular. Island weddings could highlight bridesmaids
in ombre dresses of coral to pink to fuchsia, and pur-
ple is also a top shade for the ombre look.
Patterned skirts: Angelica Bragg, blog maven at
The Bridal Detective, says, It doesnt get any more
stylish than well-dressed bridesmaids in skirts with
prints. Skirts patterned with swirls, orals, stripes, or
other motifs and paired with a solid-color top create a
best-of-both-worlds look.
Of course, on reality shows youll see bridesmaids
in camouflage and leopard-skin patterns, which is
ne if the group loves the look. The dramatic element
of those choices simply supports the good news for
bridesmaids: Patterned dresses are in.
Sharon Naylor is the author of The Brides Guide
to Freebies and three dozen additional wedding
books.
Creators.com
Patterns
FROM PAGE 14
Party Rooms & Catering
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a 501(c)(3) non-proft organization
Meson Madrid in Palisades Park is well
known for its authentic cuisine from Spain,
serving only the freshest lobsters and seafood
as well as its large menu selections, tapas and
daily specials.
Considered by many to be a staple in Bergen
County, it remains a landmark for being one
of the areas finest Spanish restaurants and the
only one in New Jersey to have received
4 Stars from the New York Times.
Some of the famous dishes served are:
Steak Meson a 3lb original, Twin 1 lb.
lobsters, Shrimp Plancha as well as many
other delicious entrees.
343 Bergen Blvd., Palisades Park, NJ 201.947.1038 www.MesonMadrid.com
Going to New York City (VISIT OUR SISTER RESTAURANT
MESON SEVILLA IN NYC www.mesonsevilla.com 212-262-5890)
The Next
Best Thing to
Dining in Spain
Open for
Lunch & Dinner
Located 1/2 Mile
from GW Bridge
Large Private
Parking Lot
We have Private Party
Rooms (25-150 guests)
10% OFF Lunch & Dinner valid
Monday-Thursday for May.
Must bring ad in. Valid for table check of $50 for dinner or
$30 for lunch. Discount for cash payment only, not valid
with credit cards. Offer is only one per table and
cant be used with other offers.
FREE SHOP
AT HOME
SERVICE
Your Local Complete Home Decorating Center
Manganos
1201 ANDERSON AVE.
FORT LEE
Corner of Route 5 & Anderson Ave.
SERVING BERGEN & HUDSON
COUNTIES SINCE 1915
201-224-5111
www.manganos.com
Sales - Service - Installation
Spring Decorating Sale
Visit Our 2 Showrooms. In one location.
CARPETING, WOOD FLOORING
AND WALLPAPER FREE
ESTIMATES
& INSTALL
www.hunterdouglas.com
CELEBRATION
OF LIGHT
spring savings event
FREE
LiteRise

Cordless Lifting
System UPGRADE

with your purchase


of Silhouette
Window
Shadings
Save $100 When You
Buy 2 Silhouette
Window Shadings
PLUS $50 Off Each
Additional Unit
at Manganos Fort Lee
EXPERT
TAILORING
ON PREMISES
HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY 7am-6:30pm
SAT. 9am-5pm CLOSED SUN.
515 MAIN ST.,
FORT LEE, NJ
(NEXT TO AMERICARE PHARMACY)
201-592-0109
OFF
STREET
PARKING
GRAND OPENING
OF OUR
NEW LOCATION
GRAND OPENING
SPECIAL!
$
2.99
Plain
Garments
Long Pieces &
Special Fabrics Extra
(Pre Pay)
Cannot be combined.
Expires 5/31/12.
SHIRTS
(Laundered on Hangers)
$
1.00
With 3 Pieces of Incoming
Dry Cleaning (Pre Pay)
Coupon must be presented
with incoming order.
Not valid with any other
discounts. Expires 5/31/12.
BLANKETS
$
12.00
Incoming
Blankets Cleaned
(Add $4 for Down and
Heavy - Pre Pay)
Coupon must be presented
with incoming order.
Not valid with any other
discounts. Expires 5/31/12.
A great array of tires at even greater prices.
Come to your locally owned and operated tire center today for outstanding service and selection.
419084-1321
ROBBINS & FRANKE TIRE
611 PALISADE AVE. CLIFFSIDE PARK NJ 07010 (201) 943-3036
BETWEEN 7-11 & CLIFFSIDE PARK H.S.
MON-FRI 8:00am - 5:30 / SAT. 8:00-12:00
MICHELIN

Latitude

Tour
* Wear and rolling resistance tests using P265/70R17 on Chevrolet Tahoe
versus Bridgestone Dueler HL Alenza and Goodyear Fortera SA.
** Versus the MICHELIN Cross Terrain sizes replaced by Latitude Tour.
For Crossovers and SUVs, the
MICHELIN Latitude Tour tire
delivers best-in-class fuel
efciency* and improved
safety.**
Greater condence in wet
conditions.**
SUV/Crossover
65,000 Mile Limited Manufacturers Warranty see warranty for details.
FREE ALIGNMENT
CHECK.
SAVE $
WE ALIGN ALL MAKES AND MODELS FROM MINI COOPERS
TO MASON DUMP TRUCKS! SAVE $10 IF ALIGNMENT
NEEDED.
MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS
HUNTER HAWKEYE ELITE
LASER ALIGNMENTS.
Pr i nt ed and di st r i but ed by Newspaper Di r ect
C O P Y R I G H T A N D P R O T E C T E D B Y A P P L I C A B L E L A W
www.newspaperdirect.com Intern.: 800.6364.6364 US/Can: 1.877.980.4040
ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY ORI GI NAL COPY
Mesn Madrid is the perfect place for hosting
large and small events with private rooms
that will accommodate 25-150 guests.
Serving Bergen County from more than 30 years
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-17
THE $59 WEDDING IS BACK!
Same venue, same price, great new menu options! Call for details!
FIVE STAR CATERERS
In-house caterers at Congregation Keter Torah
201.833.0889
WWW.FIVESTARCATERERS.COM
FIVE STAR QUALITY AT EVERY EVENT
very menu is individually tailored to your special event, whether it be a
wedding, sheva brachot, l'chaim, bar/bat mitzvah, corporate function, or
a gathering in the comfort of your home. We believe that ne food, elegant
presentation, and rst class service should be the focus of any catered event,
regardless of budget. Five Star Caterers is committed to helping you plan an event
that oers you and your guests a memorable experience centered around a creative menu of
delicious gourmet food.
S-18 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
RESTAURANT, OYSTER BAR & SEA GRILL
THE RECORD
ZAGATS RATED



L
U
N
C
H & DIN
N
E
R
NEW YORK STYLE
ATMOSPHERE
LARGEST VARIETY OF FRESH SEAFOOD
FOR SEAFOOD LOVERS
PRIME SELECT BLACK ANGUS BEEF
PRIVATE PARTIES AVAILABLE
TEL. 201-796-0546
INFO@OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM
2-27 SADDLE RIVER ROAD
FAIR LAWN, NJ
WWW.OCEANOSRESTAURANT.COM
Park West
Diner Cafe
Rt. 45 West Little Falls, NJ
973-256-2767
Park Wayne
Diner Cafe Bar
721 Hamburg Turnpike Wayne, NJ
973-595-7600
2 GREAT
LOCATIONS
TO SERVE
YOU!
TAVERNA
Authentic
Greek Cuisine
201-703-9200
238 Broadway Rt. 4 East -
Elmwood Park, NJ 07407
www.tavernamykonos.com
LUNCH & DINNER
TAVERNA
Authentic
Greek Cuisine
201-703-9200
238 Broadway Rt. 4 East -
Elmwood Park, NJ 07407
www.tavernamykonos.com
LUNCH & DINNER
TAVERNA
Authentic
Greek Cuisine
201-703-9200
238 Broadway Rt. 4 East -
Elmwood Park, NJ 07407
www.tavernamykonos.com
LUNCH & DINNER
PINK AND MINT STEALING THE SHOW
Top spring/summer 2014 wedding color scheme
SHARON NAYLOR
T
he candy colors of pink and
mint will be a top duo for wed-
dings in spring and summer
of 2014, with pink a perennial
favorite of brides and mint sticking
around for another season of growing
popularity. The soft shades of pink
and mint evoke a sense of sweetness,
and the two shades complement
each other extremely well.
Pink and mint are not an exclusive
duo, after all; they do love to blend
with cream, gray, and/or silver in this
seasons sweet color motifs, so do keep
these additional shades in mind, as
advised by the editors of a top wed-
ding site called Wedding Chicks.
Here are some ways that pink
and mint are showing up, softening
and sweetening weddings in spring
and summer of 2014:
As invitation colors. Far from being too feminine,
the pairing of mint and pink creates an expectation
of a very colorful celebration. And its also a trend to
color-match personal wedding websites to the colors
of the invitations; a great many brides and grooms are
customizing their wedding websites in the pink and
mint color motif. One design idea is to choose an all-
mint background and place just a few pink, cream and
gray owers around each pages design.
Create bouquets in pink and mint. The pink may
be your primary shade, with tiny touch-
es of mint and cream or white flowers
throughout. In bouquets, its always best
to use one color for the majority of the
design and the other colors as accents -
take your pick as to which shade, pink or
mint, youd like to star in your bouquet
- rather than have your bouquet look
supermarket-bought with a 50-50 split of
shades.
Design an aisle runner in pink and
mint. Again, one color gets to be the
overall shade and the other color in a
lighter or darker shade can be the accent
hue for your personalization choices,
whether it be your names, wedding date,
or simply a oral or patterned motif. Julie
Goldman of The Original Runner Co.
suggests then turning your aisle runner
into a keepsake by framing the portion
of it that bears your personalized mes-
sage design. And they lived happily ever after as the
framed portion of your aisle runner will surely become
a treasured home decor item.
Create escort or guest placecards. Alternate pink
and mint cards for a prettier arrangement of those
where are we sitting? cards that guests look through
to nd their names.
Swag your setting. Fabrics draped in a dramatic
fashion add a glam touch to your wedding venue, so
create your colorful fabric drapings in pink and mint
Pink and mint combine for a sweet
wedding color scheme. CREATORS.COM
PHOTO COURTESY OF SWEET SUGARBOY ED
or save the fabric swag concept as stage curtains
around your candy buffet.
Set your tables. Choose one color, pink or mint,
as your tablecloth shade, and then add a table runner
in the other shade along the center of your table.
Create centerpieces. Pink and mint flowers,
blending with other coordinating shades, will be cause
for a renewed interest in which each guest gets to take
home the centerpiece. And since a trend in rustic wed-
dings is to set out bud vases in groupings on the table,
display a variety of bud vase colors and alternate the
color of the ower in each.
Frost your cake. An all-pink cake dotted with tiny
mint and cream frosting pearls couldnt be prettier, or
choose a mint-shade cake accented by just a few pink
oral sugar roses per tier.
Create a photo booth backdrop. In wide pink
and mint-colored stripes, a photo booth backdrop is
a big design trend for weddings. Done well, with wide
stripes instead of narrow ones, it doesnt create a wel-
come-to-the-circus look. Its purely wedding.
Design your candy buffet. Jackie Sorkin, owner
and candy bar creator of Hollywood Candy Girls, says
to play with color in your candy buffet. While you
could display pink and mint candies in all clear glass
vases, why not put pink candies on a mint-colored
tray, and mint candies on a pink tiered tray? Add in a
color-matched tablecloth. Go with a pattern to make a
smaller collection of candies look more dramatic or a
solid-colored one to make a large collection of candies
grab all the attention.
Give out favors. Tulle baggies of pink and mint
candies or frosted cookies are always a favorite of
guests.
Do you love pink and mint, just not for your wed-
ding color scheme? This is a top color scheme for
bridal showers as well. And dont forget to look at pink
and mint bridesmaid dress looks, pairing a pink dress
with mint-colored jewelry or shoes for a sweet look
that suits your wedding day design.
Party Rooms & Catering
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,Well Design the Best Program Just for You.
Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
Plus Free babysitting services & childrens indoor
tumble room
Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
Were There When You Need Us!
Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
i
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&&
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&&
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Best Of The Best 2011
Brunch - The Backyard at Sole East
Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
smalllargeintimatecorporateweddingbirthday
simple barbeque

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe Sign of the Dove
Bolivar Tapas Lounge Eros
Casa La Femme Camino Sur
Kenneys Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now hes available
for your next affair.
The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint.
William Grimes, New York Times
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,Well Design the Best Program Just for You.
Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
Plus Free babysitting services & childrens indoor
tumble room
Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
Were There When You Need Us!
Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
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646.389.1099
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&&
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&&
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(J215&(2&-<1&M35B/&H8-15I2O &
I2;3U32-<1;35B/+@3L &
Best Of The Best 2011
Brunch - The Backyard at Sole East
Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
smalllargeintimatecorporateweddingbirthday
simple barbeque

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe Sign of the Dove
Bolivar Tapas Lounge Eros
Casa La Femme Camino Sur
Kenneys Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now hes available
for your next affair.
The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint.
William Grimes, New York Times
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,Well Design the Best Program Just for You.
Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
Plus Free babysitting services & childrens indoor
tumble room
Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
Were There When You Need Us!
Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
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646.389.1099
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&&
&&
R855C&%3785 &
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(J215&(2&-<1&M35B/&H8-15I2O &
I2;3U32-<1;35B/+@3L &
Best Of The Best 2011
Brunch - The Backyard at Sole East
Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
smalllargeintimatecorporateweddingbirthday
simple barbeque

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe Sign of the Dove
Bolivar Tapas Lounge Eros
Casa La Femme Camino Sur
Kenneys Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now hes available
for your next affair.
The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint.
William Grimes, New York Times
A party to remember.
INFO@ONTHEFORKS.COM
Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard S-19
or save the fabric swag concept as stage curtains
around your candy buffet.
Set your tables. Choose one color, pink or mint,
as your tablecloth shade, and then add a table runner
in the other shade along the center of your table.
Create centerpieces. Pink and mint flowers,
blending with other coordinating shades, will be cause
for a renewed interest in which each guest gets to take
home the centerpiece. And since a trend in rustic wed-
dings is to set out bud vases in groupings on the table,
display a variety of bud vase colors and alternate the
color of the ower in each.
Frost your cake. An all-pink cake dotted with tiny
mint and cream frosting pearls couldnt be prettier, or
choose a mint-shade cake accented by just a few pink
oral sugar roses per tier.
Create a photo booth backdrop. In wide pink
and mint-colored stripes, a photo booth backdrop is
a big design trend for weddings. Done well, with wide
stripes instead of narrow ones, it doesnt create a wel-
come-to-the-circus look. Its purely wedding.
Design your candy buffet. Jackie Sorkin, owner
and candy bar creator of Hollywood Candy Girls, says
to play with color in your candy buffet. While you
could display pink and mint candies in all clear glass
vases, why not put pink candies on a mint-colored
tray, and mint candies on a pink tiered tray? Add in a
color-matched tablecloth. Go with a pattern to make a
smaller collection of candies look more dramatic or a
solid-colored one to make a large collection of candies
grab all the attention.
Give out favors. Tulle baggies of pink and mint
candies or frosted cookies are always a favorite of
guests.
Do you love pink and mint, just not for your wed-
ding color scheme? This is a top color scheme for
bridal showers as well. And dont forget to look at pink
and mint bridesmaid dress looks, pairing a pink dress
with mint-colored jewelry or shoes for a sweet look
that suits your wedding day design.
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,Well Design the Best Program Just for You.
Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
Plus Free babysitting services & childrens indoor
tumble room
Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
Were There When You Need Us!
Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
join@jccotp.org
www.jccotp.org
Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
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646.389.1099
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catering for every occasion and event
smalllargeintimatecorporateweddingbirthday
simple barbeque

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe Sign of the Dove
Bolivar Tapas Lounge Eros
Casa La Femme Camino Sur
Kenneys Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now hes available
for your next affair.
The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint.
William Grimes, New York Times
411 E. Clinton Avenue, Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Start Your New Married Life Right...
Make Wellness a Priority!
Join Today,Well Design the Best Program Just for You.
Year-round indoor, outdoor pools, CPR-trained
swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Free! Wellness assessment & orientation
Free! 70 free group exercise classes per week
including spin & mat pilates
Full range of personal training options for
all ages & levels of fitness
New! Spa Center offering revitalizing services
Plus Free babysitting services & childrens indoor
tumble room
Indoor running track & two air-conditioned gyms
Were There When You Need Us!
Day Care, Nursery School & Kindergarten
with remodeled classrooms, child friendly
kitchen, indoor playrooms & tumble room
Parenting Center offering classes for newborn
to 2+ years
Full range of afterschool enrichment, youth
& teen programs including new teen lounge
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Adult programs Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure
JCC Thurnauer School of Music NJSCA designated
JCC School of Performing Arts
201.408.1448
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Continental Cuisine - The Backyard at Sole East
ON THE FORKS CATERING
owned and operated by
Larry Kolar Executive Chef / The Backyard at Sole East.
catering for every occasion and event
smalllargeintimatecorporateweddingbirthday
simple barbeque

Larry Kolar
Executive Chef Sole East
Owner On the Forks Catering
info@ontheforks.com
646-389-1099
Quilted Giraffe Sign of the Dove
Bolivar Tapas Lounge Eros
Casa La Femme Camino Sur
Kenneys Commune and Commissary
Executive Chef
LARRY KOLAR
has worked at them all...
Now hes available
for your next affair.
The cooking here is very assured with a fine
sense of balance and admirable restraint.
William Grimes, New York Times
A party to remember.
INFO@ONTHEFORKS.COM
S-20 Jewish Standard, Jewish Community News, Rockland Jewish Standard SPRING 2014 EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS
Jewish World
JS-31*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 31
I ammy brothers keeper!
Please join us
for a celebratory evening
as we honor
Rabbi Avi and Toby Weiss
and Family
Sunday, March 23, 2014
21 Adar Bet 5774
5:30 PM - Exhibit and Cocktail Hour
6:30 PM - Dinner and Program
The Roosevelt Hotel
45 East 45th Street
New York City
3700 Henry Hudson Parkway, Second Floor
Riverdale, NY 10463
212-666-0036 info@yctorah.org
wwwyctorah.org
Tragedy as catalyst
Devorah Halberstams path from bereaved
mother to counterterrorism authority
URIEL HEILMAN
W
hen a 16-year-
old Lubavitcher
named Ari Hal-
berst am was
gunned down on the Brooklyn
Bridge on March 1, 1994, by a
Lebanese livery cab driver, the
killing seemed to be a cut-and-
dried case.
The shooter, Rashid Baz,
was captured the follow-
ing day, and he confessed to
police. After a trial several
months later, he was sen-
tenced to 141 years in prison.
But a murder conviction
was not enough for Aris
mother, Devorah Halberstam.
She saw a terrorist conspiracy
behind the shooting and criti-
cized authorities for treating it
as an ordinary homicide.
For years she obsessively campaigned
for further investigation, clamoring to be
taken seriously by authorities. She waited
on receiving lines to buttonhole senators
and congressmen, knocked on doors at
City Hall, and traveled back and forth to
Washington.
Twenty years after her sons killing, Ms.
Halberstam is now an authority on ter-
rorism with close ties to law enforcement
officials a highly unusual role for a cha-
sidic woman.
In the beginning I was only a hysteri-
cal mother, without a doubt, Ms. Halber-
stam said in an interview at her Brook-
lyn home. Today I am included by law
enforcement. I am part of them.
She regularly helps train security offi-
cials on terrorism-related issues, giving
seminars to police and FBI agents, flying
to Army bases to lecture soldiers, teach-
ing Border Patrol agents, and meeting
with security officials from overseas.
Last week, a man who tried to build
a pipe bomb for use in New York, Jose
Pimentel, was sentenced to 16 years in
prison on terrorism charges under laws
that Halberstam helped to draft.
If I had to use one word to describe
Devorah, I would use the word relentless,
Raymond Kelly, who served as the com-
missioner of the New York Police Depart-
ment from 1992 to 1994 and again from
2000 to 2013, said. Shes a major force
in the political world, and certainly those
people who focus on the issues of coun-
terterrorism know that well.
Ms. Halberstam acknowledges that she
never could have imagined this life for
herself two decades ago. Back then it was
all about achieving a measure of justice
for her son.
Ms. Halberstams campaign, which
focused on having her sons shooting rec-
ognized as a terrorist act, wasnt merely
semantic. To her, the issue cut to the heart
of what she saw as the authorities failure
to fully pursue other avenues of investiga-
tion: Who helped inspire the attack, plan
it, abet it and conspire to shelter Baz in
the hours after the shooting?
On the surface, the attack appeared to
be an Arab gunmans angry response to
the massacre in Hebron several days ear-
lier, when 29 Palestinians were gunned
down by Baruch Goldstein, a West Bank
settler.
Ari Halberstam had been a passenger in
a van full of chasidic boys that was trailing
the motorcade of the Lubavitcher rebbe,
Menachem Mendel Schneerson, on a trip
home from the hospital for eye surgery.
Ms. Halberstam believes the van became
a Jewish target of convenience once the
rebbes vehicle disappeared into a tunnel.
In the condolence letter that President
Clinton wrote to the family, he pledged
his commitment to deal with the hatred
and criminality that caused your sons
death.
But the lawyer for Baz, who had an
arsenal of weapons with him that day,
maintained the shooting was the result
of a traffic dispute carried out by a lone
assailant without assistance. No official
motive was determined at the trial.
Ms. Halberstam wanted more. She
worked to collect letters of support
from powerful politicians, got a Brook-
lyn Bridge ramp named for her son, and
raised millions of dollars for the construc-
tion of a Jewish childrens museum in the
Devorah Halberstam honored Raymond Kelly,
the former commissioner of the New York Po-
lice Department, at a gala dinner at the Jewish
Childrens Museum in Brooklyn last May.
JEWISH CHILDRENS MUSEUM
SEE TRAGEDY PAGE 32
Jewish World
32 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-32
Hit the Nail
on the
H
e
a
d
Immediate openings for projects starting
THIS Sunday!
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey
needs experienced and novice volunteers
to perform critical repairs and renovations
for those less fortunate in our community.
Our Bonim Builders program volunteers repair
homes and lives.
Whether youre an expert carpenter or an
amateur painter, your neighbors need your
help, register online at www.jfnnj.org/bonim
to experience how rewarding a hands-on
project can be. Bonim Builders volunteers hit
the nail on the head when it
comes to performing critical
repairs and renovations.
You can repair the worldone home at a time.
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Stacey Orden | 201-820-3903 | www.jfnnj.org/bonim
Crown Heights section of Brooklyn dedi-
cated to Aris memory. She sued the compa-
nies that manufactured the guns used in her
sons killing (and lost). She pushed the state
to pass Aris Law, which requires a license
to possess a gun kit and is meant to curtail
interstate gun trafficking.
All the while, her sons case remained
closed.
The turning point came in 1999, when
media reports about the case sparked
renewed calls for a reassessment by New
Yorks governor, U.S. senators, and con-
gressmen. The FBI finally responded,
describing the shooting as an act of road
rage.
The imprudence of the designation ulti-
mately led to Ms. Halberstams triumph:
Under public pressure, in May 1999 the FBI
assigned an agent to review the case, and in
December 2000 the agency officially con-
ceded that the shooting indeed had been an
act of terrorism.
But Ms. Halberstams campaign was not
over.
She kept pushing for the investigation
of unfollowed leads, arguing that counter-
terrorism required a different approach to
law enforcement. In June 2000, New Yorks
then governor, George Pataki, appointed
her to serve on the states first Commis-
sion on Terrorism. For Ms. Halberstam, the
idea wasnt just to make sure that those
who aided Baz were punished though it
was that, too. Hers was a campaign to have
authorities deal differently with terrorist
crimes, to scrutinize the milieu from which
terrorists came, to map their networks and
monitor their associates.
Now we can clearly see that it was part
of a whole pattern of terrorist activity that
keeps repeating itself, former New York
City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said of the Hal-
berstam shooting in 2009.
After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, that
kind of aggressive, holistic approach to ter-
rorist crimes suddenly didnt seem like a
paranoid overreaction. In the ensuing years,
close, ongoing scrutiny became de rigueur,
as the trove of revelations from Edward
Snowden has made clear.
In a way, the attacks of 9/11 have really
validated her position and given her
increased credibility, Mr. Kelly said of Ms.
Halberstam. Her stressing this issue before
9/11 was important, but clearly the horrific
events of 9/11 really galvanized the law
enforcement community, and shes been a
player in it.
Ms. Halberstams own public profile
changed in tandem with the new prioritiza-
tion of counterterrorism. In 2009, in a sign
of how dramatically she had gone from vic-
tim to authority, she received a community
leadership award from the office of the FBI
director, which hailed her as a vital asset in
our fight against terrorism.
She has become an expert on the topic of
terrorism, and is well versed as to the vari-
ous terrorist entities such as Hamas, Hezbol-
lah and al-Qaida, to name just a few, Joseph
Demarest, assistant director of the FBIs
Cyber Division, said. She has truly taken,
one could argue, the most horrific event
losing a child and used it as a catalyst for
good.
Over the years, Ms. Halberstam also
found validation of some of her suspicions
in Aris case.
In a 2007confession, Baz corroborated
Ms. Halberstams longtime contention that
his real target had been the Lubavitcher
rebbe. Last year, the Palestinian uncle who
Ms. Halberstam long had claimed provided
Baz with the weapons he used in the shoot-
ing was arrested for allegedly being part of a
multistate cigarette-smuggling ring that had
terrorist ties.
Today, Ms. Halberstam isnt concerned
only with terrorism. She organizes meet-
ings in Crown Heights to help tamp down
tensions between blacks and Jews, includ-
ing after the spate of knockout attacks in
Brooklyn last fall. She continues to raise
money for the Jewish Childrens Museum,
where many of her community encoun-
ter programs take place; the museum sits
across the street from Lubavitch world
headquarters at 770 Eastern Parkway.
Lately, shes also been trying to organize
a conference on protecting the homeland
in the age of terrorism. And she spends
time, when she can, with her grandchildren,
three of whom are named for Ari.
What drives her to do all this, Ms. Halber-
stam says, isnt just justice. Its about trying
to make sure other mothers dont have to
endure the loss and pain that was thrust
upon her 20 years ago and remains with
her every day, still.
I feel like I have an obligation to my
child, she said. Somebody else stole
his life. And I dont think just somebody
else; its a system that was in place. And I
believe no matter how long it will take, I
will not stop.
Its like breaking up a gang, and we have
to fight this. I dont know if Ill see it in my
lifetime, but I sure as hell am going to con-
tinue doing it until the day I die, as long as I
live on this earth.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Tragedy
FROM PAGE 31
Jewish World
JS-33*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 33
Jews with disabilities
Communal awareness is growing
but advocates still see barriers
JULIE WIENER
I
n the coming months, six young
Jews with disabilities will start paid
internships at major Jewish federa-
tions through a pilot program. If it
is successful, the program will expand to
communities throughout North America.
In the fall, Manhattans first Jewish day
school for children with special needs
will open.
Meanwhile, the Foundation for Jewish
Camp is seeking to raise $31 million for a
multipronged effort to more than double
the number of children with disabilities
attending Jewish overnight camps.
As the sixth annual Jewish Disabilities
Awareness Month draws to a close
events nationwide included an advocacy
day in Washington the issue of disabili-
ties is enjoying greater prominence than
ever in the Jewish communal world.
I feel like were really riding a wave
of care and interest on this issue, said
Ilana Ruskay-Kidd, founder and head of
Manhattans Shefa School, which will
serve children with speech and language
delays when it opens in September.
William Daroff, vice president for pub-
lic policy of the Jewish Federations of
North America, a sponsor of Jewish Dis-
abilities Awareness Month and co-chair
of the Jewish Disabilities Advocacy Net-
work, said, Within the Jewish commu-
nity, recognizing that every part of our
community should be included in our
communal activities has become more
apparent and is being fulfilled more and
more. To not include individuals with
disabilities and their family members in
an open Jewish community is really seen
as being treif in other words, as not
being kosher.
Nonetheless, advocates say the Jewish
community still has a long way to go when
it comes to opening doors for Jews with dis-
abilities, a diverse group estimated to make
up 15 to 20 percent of the total Jewish popu-
lation. Its a group that encompasses every-
one from those with language and develop-
mental delays to the autistic, to people with
physical and psychiatric disabilities.
In part, advocates say, the process of
change has been slowed because Ameri-
can Jewish communal institutions like all
religious organizations are exempt from
the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.
In particular, many synagogue schools and
Jewish day schools turn away children with
disabilities whom they feel unable to serve.
Physical accessibility also is limited in many
Jewish institutional buildings.
At the moment, we [the Jewish com-
munity] hold ourselves to a lower standard
than the broader public is held to, said
Ari Neeman, founder and president of the
Autistic Self-Advocacy Network, a nonprofit
run by and for autistic people.
There is unfortunately a perception
that in some ways this is justified or that
because the law does not require religious
institutions to comply with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, that all thats neces-
sary is a certain standard of good will, Mr.
Neeman said. But the purpose of the ADA
is that this is not a matter of charity but a
matter of rights.
Its not a matter of doing this if its con-
venient or accepting people with disabili-
ties if it represents a funder priority or any
number of other things. It should be the
Children with disabilities and their peers kayaking at the Conservative
movements Camp Ramah Wisconsin. COURTESY NATIONAL RAMAH COMMISSION
SEE DISABILITIES PAGE 34
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bare minimum necessary to conduct a pro-
gram. Doing something in an accessible
way should be part of the cost of doing
anything at all.
Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi, CEO and presi-
dent of RespectAbility USA, a group that
focuses on disability issues in the faith-
based sector, says the inclusion of people
with disabilities is not just a moral or civil
rights issue but important for Jewish
survival.
Ms. Laszlo Mizrahi, who was the founder
and longtime director of the Israel Proj-
ect, a group shaping public perceptions of
Israel, says that certain genetic risks and
the tendency of American Jews to have
children later in life means Jews likely have
more disabilities per capita than the Ameri-
can population at large.
By not doing more to include and wel-
come this segment of the Jewish popula-
tion, the Jewish community risks driving
away not only individuals with disabilities
but also their families and friends, says Ms.
Laszlo Mizrahi, herself the mother of two
children with disabilities.
A RespectAbility USA poll of 3,800 Amer-
icans in the disability community last fall
found that Jews with disabilities are far
less engaged in their faith than their coun-
terparts who are Catholic, mainline Protes-
tant, or Evangelical.
Fewer than half of the Jews surveyed
answered that religion was fairly or
very important in their lives, and nearly
40 percent hardly ever or never attend
synagogue.
Jews with disabilities are not the only
Jews to be less religiously engaged than
Christians. The 2008 Pew Forum Ameri-
can Religious Landscape Survey found that
only 31 percent of Jews say religion is very
important to their lives, and only 16 per-
cent attend religious services at least once
a week.
However, Ms. Laszlo Mizrahi says Jews
with disabilities are far more alienated
from Jewish life than Jews in general
because many have been turned away
from, or not had their needs met by, Jewish
institutions.
If you have a disability and, say, want
to attend a day school or camp, youre
frequently told no, she said, adding that
many Jewish day schools counsel you to
leave if they dont think youre successful
enough.
Jay Ruderman, president of the Ruder-
man Family Foundation, echoes Ms. Laszlo
Mizrahis assessment that greater inclusion
is good for Jewish continuity and that far
more work needs to be done.
Jewish organizations run after people
who are well educated, upwardly mobile
and not engaged, but at the same time they
are really bad at connecting all these parts
of the Jewish community that want in, Mr.
Ruderman said. There are all sorts of parts
of the Jewish community that want in that
are kept out, whether because of ignorance
or people saying it is too costly, which is not
the case.
At the end of the day, its really about
a discriminatory attitude that the future of
our community looks a certain way, he
said, adding that if American Jewish insti-
tutions do not become more inclusive,
Were going to become a community thats
unattractive to the very young people were
trying to attract because they are used to
living in a pluralistic, inclusive society and
will think the Jewish community looks like
a country club.
Mr. Rudermans foundation arguably has
become the leading advocate for Jews with
disabilities, both in the United States and in
Israel.
Since 2002, the foundation, which spent
$2.7 million in 2011, the last year for which
tax forms are available, has focused most
of its efforts on promoting inclusion in the
Jewish community. Initially it concentrated
on Boston, where it partnered with the
local federation to help area day schools
better serve children with disabilities and
helped launch a job-training program for
Jews with disabilities. In recent years it has
sought to have a more national impact by
partnering with or convening other funders
and national Jewish groups.
For example, in December the foun-
dation launched a partnership with the
Union for Reform Judaism to improve
attitudes about inclusion and disabilities
among Reform community leaders and
clergy, Jewish professionals, organiza-
tional leaders, and congregants, and to
ensure full inclusion and participation of
people with disabilities and their fami-
lies in Reform Jewish life. The founda-
tion is now in discussions with Chabad
about developing a joint effort, Mr. Rud-
erman said.
The foundation also is working with the
Jewish Federations of North America to cre-
ate federation-based internships for people
with disabilities.
JFNAs Mr. Daroff says the project is
about individuals getting training and
experience, but its also to help expand
the horizons of the federations themselves
and give federation employees experience
working with people with disabilities.
Dori Frumin Kirshner of Closter, execu-
tive director of Matan, an organization that
advocates for Jewish students with special
needs, says the federation internships are
significant because federations are the
umbrella for many other organizations in
a community, so if this is something they
are deeming important, then its going to
impact many other agencies as well.
While she is pleased by the rising pro-
file of disability issues, Ms. Kirshner says
it leads to another challenge: the need to
train more professionals who are capable
of helping Jewish communities support all
kinds of learners.
The demand is going to outweigh the
supply of well-trained educators unless
theres real push to plan for it, she said.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Disabilities
FROM PAGE 33
Jewish World
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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 35
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Affected by Auschwitz
After Poland trip, Cantor warns against dangers of isolationism by the GOP
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON When Rep. Eric Can-
tor took the stage last week at the Virginia
Military Institute to deliver a wide-ranging
foreign policy address, Auschwitz was on
the House majority leaders mind and
so, observers suggest, was the state of his
party.
In his speech, the Virginia Republican
cited his recent visit his first to the Nazi
death camp, connecting past horrors to
the present-day danger of retreating into
isolationism.
Standing there as the frigid wind swept
through the eerily quiet ruins of the camp,
I could not help but regret that American
action in World War II came too late to
save countless millions of innocent lives,
Mr. Cantor said.
While the bulk of his February 17 speech
was a critique of the Obama adminis-
trations foreign policy, Mr. Cantor also
seemed to take aim at anti-interventionists
within the GOP.
Many Americans, and politicians from
both parties, want to believe the tide of
war has receded, he said. As was the case
in the wake of World War I, many want to
believe the costly foreign interventions of
recent years can simply be put behind us.
An influential Republican congres-
sional staffer suggested that the speech
was a rejoinder to anti-interventionists
in Congress, and to those who allowed
military spending to be cut as a result of
sequestration.
This is Cantor trying to reorient the
party, said the staffer, who was not autho-
rized to speak on the record.
Frank Luntz, a top Republican political
consultant, said that Mr. Cantor was mak-
ing a statement that the isolationists in the
GOP are acting in a destructive way, that
theres one thing that unites both those on
the right and those in the center a strong
America and a peaceful America.
The GOP is heading into this midterm
election year in a state of turmoil, deeply
SEE AUSCHWITZ PAGE 36
Rep. Eric Cantor, the House majority leader, speaks at the Virginia Military
Institute on February 17. COURTESY OF HOUSE MAJORITY LEADER
Jewish World
36 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-36
D
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A
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1
4
ARTISTS
TELL A STORY ABOUT WATER THROUGH YOUR ART
Prize: Four artists will WIN A TRIP TO ISRAEL to participate in our
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Artists from northern New Jersey and Nahariya, Israel will partner in a joint exhibition
Work will be exhibited at two receptions
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Sunday, March 23 | 6-7:30 pm
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
411 East Clinton Avenue, Tenafly
Water:
The Essence of our Lives
Work will be exhibited at the JCC until April 7 and at the Belskie Museum until May 4
Juried Show | Deadline for all submissions: March 10, 2014
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divided between Tea Party-aligned right-wingers and estab-
lishment Republicans. Those on the right who advocate
shifting toward an anti-interventionist foreign policy a
small minority among congressional Republicans have
grown louder, with Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) featured prom-
inently among the partys presumed 2016 presidential
contenders.
The Virginia Military Institute speech is one of the ways
in which Mr. Cantor sometimes mentioned as a future
House speaker or possible vice-presidential pick has tried
in recent weeks to shape his partys agenda on both foreign
and domestic policy. Earlier this month he wrote an article
for the venerable conservative magazine National Review
outlining the House Republicans vision for economic and
jobs growth.
But while Mr. Cantor is asserting his leadership within
the party more broadly, sources who have spoken to
him suggest his foreign policy address was shaped
specifically by profound feelings aroused by his visit
to Auschwitz.
Mr. Cantor, the only Jewish Republican in Congress,
had visited Auschwitz with other members of Con-
gress to mark International Holocaust Remembrance
Day, which commemorates the anniversary of the
camps liberation. He was there at the same time as a
historic delegation that included nearly half the mem-
bers of the Israeli Knesset.
I saw him after he returned from his visit to Aus-
chwitz, and he came over to me and he was still
stunned 36 hours after he had been there, Mr. Luntz
said. I could feel his emotional reaction five feet from
him.
William Daroff, a former Republican operative who
now directs the Washington office of Jewish Federa-
tions of North America, said he had a similar conversa-
tion with Mr. Cantor a day after his return.
He was profoundly impacted by what he had seen,
Mr. Daroff said of their phone conversation. Hed
never been to Auschwitz before. It really brings home
the impact of inaction in the world scene.
Mr. Cantors office did not reply to requests for an
interview.
In his VMI speech, Mr. Cantor invoked his Jewish
identity in discussing his pride in Americas role in
defeating Hitler and ending the Holocaust, as well as
his regret that America had not acted sooner because
of the strength of isolationism. He referred to this his-
tory in calling for reasserting American leadership in
the world, which he argued had been undermined by
President Obama.
This isolationist sentiment lasted years, until the
bombing of Pearl Harbor woke the American people
from their slumber, he said. We must not repeat the
same mistake by reducing our preparedness, accept-
ing the notion that we are one of many or ceding
global leadership to others.
In 45 minutes, Mr. Cantor swept through what he
described as an Obama administration foreign policy
characterized by hollow rhetoric, unwise or elastic
timelines, and unenforced red lines vis-a-vis repres-
sive regimes in Iran, North Korea and Syria, as well as
failings in dealing with Russia, China and extremism in
post-Gadhafi Libya.
Iran was a major focus of the speech, with Mr. Can-
tor alluding to calls by past Iranian leaders for Israels
disappearance and saying that the interim nuclear
deal that set the stage for talks now underway between
the major powers and Iran had given away too much
for too little.
Like all Americans, I hope to see Iran abandon its
nuclear aspirations through peaceful negotiations, but
hope is not a strategy, he said.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Auschwitz
FROM PAGE 35
I saw him after he
returned from his visit
to Auschwitz, and he
came over to me and
he was still stunned
36 hours after he had
been there.
FRANK LUNTZ
JS-37
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 37
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Jewish World
38 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-38*
Hosting
Israel critics?
Jewish institutions damned if
they do, damned if they dont
URIEL HEILMAN
Just how open should Jewish institutions be when it
comes to talking about Israel?
Thats the question at the center of a flurry of contro-
versies over the last few days involving Jewish museums,
an Orthodox high school, and Hillel chapters on college
campuses.
For years, Jewish institutions have been grappling
with where to draw red lines when it comes to criti-
cism of Israel. Should they open their doors to groups
like Jewish Voice for Peace, which is allied with the BDS
movement and takes no position on whether or not
Israel has a right to exist? Should they host speakers who
espouse positions some might consider anti-Israel, or
close themselves off to these viewpoints to send a clear
message that such positions are inappropriate, even if
that means never hosting Palestinians? Is a call for boy-
cotting West Bank settlements out of bounds?
The recent cases underscore just how much shifting
ground there is on the Israel debate and how much
Jewish institutions are looking over their shoulders.
The quandary for Jewish establishments was captured
by a statement issued last week by the head of Ramaz,
an Orthodox high school in Manhattan, after he nixed an
invitation by the schools student political club to Arab-
American academic Rashid Khalidi.
We are working with [the students] to navigate a deli-
cate political situation, respecting their wish for open
exchange of ideas, but also being mindful of multiple
sensitivities within our varied school constituencies,
the school leader, Paul Shaviv, wrote.
Following the cancellation of the event with Mr. Kha-
lidi, a Columbia University professor who has argued
that Palestinians living under Israeli occupation have a
legal right to resistance and that supporters of Israel use
McCarthyite tactics to silence debate in America, some
Ramaz students launched an online petition to reinstate
the invitation.
I believe it is critical that Ramaz students are exposed
to different perspectives and that open dialogue be
encouraged at Ramaz not limited, the petition reads.
At Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., students at
the Hillel-affiliated Jewish student union announced
their decision last week to embrace unfettered dialogue
on Israel, saying they would not abide by Hillel Interna-
tionals rules limiting Israel-related speech.
The Hillel rules prohibit partnering with or hosting
groups or speakers who deny Israels right to exist as a
Jewish or democratic state; delegitimize, demonize, or
apply a double standard to Israel; or support the boy-
cott, divestment, sanctions movement against Israel.
The decision by the Vassar Jewish Union follows a sim-
ilar move last December by students at Swarthmore Col-
lege in suburban Philadelphia, who declared an open
Hillel in contravention of Hillels policy on Israel.
We believe that this policy censors and delegitimizes
the diverse range of personal and political opinions held
by Jewish students, Vassar Jewish Unions website says.
We believe that fostering a pluralistic community and
supporting all Jewish life on campus cannot be achieved
with Hillel Internationals Israel Guidelines in place.
Hillels President Eric Fingerhut declined a JTA request
to be interviewed on the subject. Responding to the Vas-
sar announcement, Mr. Fingerhuts office released a
statement reiterating the rules of his organization.
We agree that Hillel should and will always provide
students with an open and pluralistic forum where they
can explore issues and opinions related to their Jewish
identity, Mr. Fingerhut said in the statement. Hillel will
not, however, give a platform to groups or individuals
to attack the Jewish people, Jewish values or the Jewish
states right to exist. This includes groups or individu-
als that support and advance the BDS movement, which
represents a vicious attack on the State of Israel and the
Jewish people.
On the museum front, literary theorist Judith Butler
pulled out of a talk she was scheduled to give on Franz
Kafka in March at New Yorks Jewish Museum amid pro-
tests over her support for boycotting Israel.
While her political views were not a factor in her par-
ticipation, the debates about her politics have become a
distraction making it impossible to present the conver-
sation about Kafka as intended, the museum said in a
statement.
Downtown, the citys Museum of Jewish Heritage A
Living Memorial to the Holocaust rescinded an invita-
tion to the author of a controversial new book on Presi-
dent Truman and Israel before reinstating the invitation
on Sunday.
Its not clear whether or not these controversies,
which seem to be growing in number, are signs of a
crumbling of the American Jewish consensus on sup-
porting Israel.
Theres a real dispute in the scholarly world about
whether what were hearing is a small, noisy minority
or whether what were seeing is a harbinger of change,
said Jonathan Sarna, a professor of American Jewish his-
tory from Brandeis University. It certainly is the case
that we are seeing more of these issues at the moment.
A Jewish Voice for Peace activist outside New
York Citys 14th Street Y in May 2012 after the Jew-
ish institution canceled a Go and Learn event
organized by the groups youth arm that was
scheduled for a rented room in the building.
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Jewish World
JS-39*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 39
For a long time, the communal consensus on Israel
has covered most but not all of American Jewry. A sig-
nificant number of chasidim notably members of the
Satmar sect are firmly anti-Zionist, and some voices
on the Jewish left long have been fiercely critical of
Israel. In both cases, the volume of their opposition to
Zionism has waxed and waned depending on events
in Israel. During the height of the second intifada, for
example, charedi Orthodox voices critical of Zionism
mostly were muted.
But in recent years, criticism of Israel has made
deeper inroads into the Jewish community, com-
ing during a lack of apparent progress in Israeli-Pal-
estinian negotiations, a dearth of Palestinian terror-
ist attacks, and Israels stewardship by a right-wing
government.
The question facing American Jewish institutions is
what kind of criticism of Israel they should allow.
Concern for donors wishes may be the guiding
principle, says journalist Peter Beinart, who advocates
boycotting West Bank settlements but rejects boycotts
against Israel. Mr. Beinart was disinvited to present a
talk about Israel at the Atlanta JCC in the fall of 2012.
Their perception is theres this sea of anti-Israel
hostility out there and they want these institutions to
be sanctuaries from that and places where you incu-
bate people to fight the Zionist fight, he said.
The sociological reality is that so many Jewish
institutions are reliant on a small group of very large
donors, and they dont have a large donor base any-
more, he continued. Just one or two of them can
strike terror into the hearts of a Jewish organization.
When staffers at the Museum of Jewish Heritage
said last week that they had rescinded the invitation
to John Judis, author of Genesis: Truman, American
Jews, and the Origins of the Arab/Israeli Conflict,
they cited concerns that the controversy would over-
shadow the content. Mr. Judis book suggests that Mr.
Truman didnt really want the establishment of a Jew-
ish state but was strong-armed into accepting it by a
powerful American Zionist movement.
Apparently the museums director, David Mar-
well, made the decision not to hold the Judis event,
unaware that an invitation already had been extended
by his staff. Once Mr. Marwell realized that, he called
Mr. Judis to reinstate the invitation.
I have worked very hard over the years to avoid
precisely the kind of mess that we found ourselves in,
Mr. Marwell wrote on the museums website. Because
canceling the talk would have raised the ugly spec-
ter of succumbing to pressure and giving in to outside
influence, he wrote, the museum would go ahead
with the Judis event.
It is now scheduled for June 1.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Their perception is
theres this sea of
anti-Israel hostility
out there and
they want these
institutions to be
sanctuaries from that.
PETER BEINART
Palestinian Authority youre going to have to find some
way of neutralizing Hamass spoiling capacity, and that
means to some extent, to some extent, engaging with it.
Interestingly, Malley also has strongly criticized the man
who now employs him about the Middle East. An admin-
istration that never tires of saying it cannot want peace
more than the parties routinely belies that claim by the
desperation it exhibits in pursuing that goal, he wrote
of Obama in 2011. Today, there is little trust, no direct
talks, no settlement freeze, and, one at times suspects,
not much of a U.S. policy. Nor does he apparently sub-
scribe to the view that the primary requirement for peace
in the region is a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian con-
flict, whereas the Obama administration frequently gives
the impression that this is in fact the case. The recent
focus on Arab-Israeli relations has helped foster the belief
that Middle East diplomacy can be reduced to that single
dimension, Malley wrote in a 2001 book review for For-
eign Affairs. It cannot.
If there was, in Malleys words, not much of a U.S.
policy in 2011, there is one now. Critics have called it
leading from behind. Supporters term it engagement.
Semantics aside, during the Obama years, the key strate-
gic transformation in the region has been the strengthen-
ing of Iran. Hence, it is easy to understand why the idea
of someone running Iran policy who is a keen advocate
of engagement, and who believes that Iranian ally Hamas
should not be isolated, is so disconcerting.
The nature of Malleys new job, however, should reas-
sure pro-Israel groups that they wont be grappling with
him privately at every turn. That role will fall to the Saudis,
who are furious with Obamas overtures to Iran. As this
story unfolds, watch for the possibility that Malley, sup-
posedly the bte noire of the Israel Lobby, will arouse
the venom of the well-paid and influential Saudi lobbyists
in Washington.
JNS.ORG
President Obama and Secretary of Defense Chuck
Hagel place their hands over their hearts as the
National Anthem is played in Washington, D.C., on
July 27, 2013.
DOD PHOTO BY GLENN FAWCETT
Robert Malley
FROM PAGE 22
Jewish World
40 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-40*
Abortion in Israel
Pro-choice seems to be the only choice there
BEN SALES
JERUSALEM A billboard in central Tel Aviv features a
black-and-white photo of a distressed woman above a cap-
tion in bold red letters that reads, The pain and remorse
from my abortion accompany me every day.
The billboard is an advertisement for Efrat, an anti-
abortion outfit that dubs itself The Committee to Rescue
Israels Babies and offers financial support to pregnant
women in an effort to persuade them not to terminate
their pregnancies.
Efrat has never protested outside a obstetrics clinic, nor
has it sought to restrict Israels fairly liberal abortion laws.
Last month, the organization supported a proposal to
allow women to undergo abortions without first appear-
ing before a state committee, as the law now requires.
Efrats president, Eli Schussheim, describes himself as
pro-choice, a position he adopts more from pragmatism
rather than principle.
If I tell a woman she has no right to abort, shell tell
me to get out of here, Mr. Schussheim said. I said Ill be
pro-choice. Its important to give counseling to women. I
think laws dont educate.
From the Western Wall to the West Bank, religious
issues dominate Israels political discourse. Orthodox
parties make up a quarter of the Knesset and have sat in
nearly every governing coalition since the states found-
ing, using their political might to push for widely despised
privileges that benefit Israels religious minority.
But while religion looms large in Israel, its abortion laws
are, in practice, among the worlds most liberal. Though
any woman who wants to terminate a pregnancy must
demonstrate to a three-person committee that having the
baby will cause her emotional or physical harm, or that
the pregnancy is a result of rape or incest, more than 99
percent of requests are approved.
Since Israel legalized abortions in 1977 just four years
after the U.S. Supreme Courts Roe v. Wade decision gal-
vanized conservative Christian opposition to abortion in
the United States there has been no significant move-
ment to outlaw abortion. In January, the Knesset passed a
law allowing government funding for nearly all abortions,
some 40,000 of which are performed each year in the
Jewish state.
Experts say Israels secular foundations, along with Jew-
ish laws relative ambiguity on abortion, have kept reli-
gious political parties mostly silent on the issue, and led
groups like Efrat to focus on preventing abortions rather
than outlawing them. Aliza Lavie, a lawmaker who pro-
posed abolishing abortion committees at a recent Knes-
set conference, said Israelis are pro-choice because they
understand women dont approach abortion flippantly.
I think theres an understanding here that we love chil-
dren in Israel, she said. When a woman already gets to
that point [of wanting an abortion], she has just reasons.
Israeli culture is very pro-kids.
Traditional Jewish law doesnt regard life as beginning
at conception, and even mandates abortion if a mothers
life is in danger, so opposing abortion isnt as high a pri-
ority for Israeli religious activists as it is for some of their
American counterparts. In the past, charedi Orthodox
parties have tried to outlaw late-term abortions, but the
bills failed early and no religious party has made abortion
a signature issue.
In the world of the Catholic Church, an abor-
tion is thought of as murder even in the early stages of
pregnancy, but in Judaism its not so clear, said Orthodox
Rabbi Benny Lau, who attended the Knesset conference.
Absent a powerful anti-abortion movement, Israels
abortion debate centers on technical policy questions,
such as who should say what to women seeking abortion
or which abortions should be funded by the state.
Skeptical that it could ever get abortion outlawed, Efrat
has focused instead on removing incentives for women
to abort. According to Mr. Schussheim, 60 percent of
Israeli abortions stem from financial concerns. So Efrat
has mobilized a national network of 3,000 women volun-
teers who provide counseling during the pregnancy and,
for those who need it, material support for the babys first
two years anything from a crib and stroller to monthly
packages of diapers and wipes.
Efrats chief social worker, Ruth Tidhar, says the organi-
zation supports eliminating abortion committees for simi-
larly practical reasons. Ms. Tidhar believes they dont ade-
quately inform women of the risks of abortion. Instead,
she would like doctors to provide information about the
medical risks and a required 72-hour waiting period to
enable women to consider the information.
Its supposed to be a stopgap [to say] Think about
this, its a serious decision, its going to influence the rest
of your life, Ms. Tidhar said. I dont believe that any
woman goes to have an abortion without some degree of
ambivalence and bad feelings.
In supporting the abolition of the committees, Efrat has
made common cause with the Israeli feminist organiza-
tion Isha LIsha, which opposes the panels on principle as
an impediment to a womans right to choose. Isha LIsha
also would like to see women receive more information
about the procedure, as well as medical advice.
According to New Family, an Israeli organization that
fights religious coercion in marriage, divorce and child
care, half of Israels 40,000 annual abortions take place
illegally, as women prefer to bypass the committees. Abol-
ishing the committees, Ms. Lavie said, would remove the
incentive to undergo an illegal abortion.
Only the woman can say whats best for her, said
Ronit Piso, Isha LIshas women and medical technology
coordinator. Only she can make the judgment if its eco-
nomic or anything else. We do think its important that
women get advice and counseling on the medical implica-
tions and counseling on the process itself.
JTA WIRE SERVICE
Eli Schussheim, president of the anti-abortion
group Efrat, describes himself as pro-choice.
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Jewish World
JS-41*
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 41




100 State Street, Teaneck 201.837.3000
www.teaneckdentist.com
Richard S. Gertler, DMD, FAGD
Michelle Bloch, DDS Ari Frolich, DMD
Jewish filmmaker
Harold Ramis
dies at 69
CINDY SHER
CHICAGO Actor, director, and writer
Harold Ramis died Monday morning at
his Glencoe, Ill., home.
Mr. Ramis, 69, died of complications
from vasculitis, an autoimmune dis-
order that leads to inflammation and
damage to blood vessels, according to
the Associated Press.
Mr. Ramiss filmography reads like
an encyclopedia of great comic movies
of the last 30 years. He was the brains
either as writer, as director or as
both behind some of the most often
quoted and referred-to film comedies
of recent decades, including Animal
House, Meatballs, Caddyshack,
Stripes, National Lampoons Vaca-
tion, Ghostbusters, Groundhog
Day and Analyze This. A Chicago
native and a Chicago Second City
alum, Mr. Ramis returned to Chicago
from Hollywood many years ago to be
closer to his parents.
In the spring of 2009, JUF News inter-
viewed Mr. Ramis. Here are excerpts
from the interview:
JUF News: Your movies are constant
pop culture references. How does it
make you feel to know that so many
of your films have made it into the cul-
tural fabric of society?
Harold Ramis: Everyone starts out
with big dreams, particularly people
who want to be artists or have careers
in entertainment. Then, when it hap-
pens, you dream about it, you picture
it, you imagine what its going to be like,
and then its so weird when it actually
happens. You learn that its great on
so many levels and in such a big way,
it doesnt change anything. Youre still
who you are, you still have the same
problems and issues and same insecuri-
ties, and the same responsibilities. Im
really glad people like these films and
that a couple of them have lasted so
long and I love doing what Im doing,
but I try not to be grandiose about it or
be even more narcissistic than I already
am.
JUF: You dont sound too narcissistic
to me. Why did you choose a life in Chi-
cago instead of Hollywood?
HR: My wife grew up there:, and her
father was a film director. We liked it
out there. We werent really refugees
to Chicago from there. I came back
to Chicago to be near my parents,
who were getting too old to travel. My
mother passed away and my father is
still around. He lives in Northbrook
and is 94 years old. I wanted them to
know my second family. Id been mar-
ried before and had been away all those
years and thought this was a chance to
reunite my family.
JUF: Your movies have so much
heart. Is there a common thread that
all your movies share?
HR: Ive looked at the first few films
I did and thought we were working off
a kind of late 60s anti-establishment
posture that came out of being in col-
lege, a kind of us versus them, the hip-
sters against the squares, the rebels
against the institution. That was Ani-
mal House, Stripes and Meatballs.
Having worked through that, I
started looking at other concerns I
have. The movie Vacation was about
what it was to be a good father and a
good husband, two very difficult things
to do in life.
Then I made three films Ground-
hog Day, Multiplicity, and Bedaz-
zled about what it really is to be a
good person in general. Groundhog
Day is about how we use our time and
priorities, losing our narcissism and
vanity, taking a good look at others, and
being in the moment. Then Multiplic-
ity is about the divided self, the things
that pull us in different directions and
how can we integrate ourselves and be
one person. Bedazzled is about the
things we wish for that we think will
make us happy, like money, fame, suc-
cess, power, sex, good looks all those
things that we think are the keys to
happiness. And of course the film ends
up saying thats not where happiness
comes from. Theyre all about navigat-
ing in the midst of this great existential
despair were all born into.
JUF: Groundhog Day is probably
referred to in conversation by my peers
about once a week. I read that you said
that that was the movie that got you to
make comedies that meant something.
Did you go on to follow that path?
HR: I was always looking for meaning
in the things I was doing, no matter how
broad or silly or gross or crude they seem.
To me, the [movies] meant something.
Groundhog Day was the first film that
was overtly about life and how we live it,
and the response was so great. It was such
a satisfying thing to invest a comedy with
your real feelings about the most impor-
tant issues in life. It made me want to do
that again.
JUF: How does your Jewish identity
Harold Ramis on his feelings of obligation: As an example to Jewish kids, I dont
push religion, but I push integrity.
SEE RAMIS PAGE 42
I love doing
what Im doing,
but I try not to
be grandiose
about it or be
even more
narcissistic than
I already am.
Jewish World
42 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-42
influence your work?
HR: I use Passover as the central story of Judaism
because, for me, it results in two concepts driving it. One
is the concept of freedom, personal liberation, and politi-
cal liberation. The other is the concept of justice Moses
receiving the law. For me, this fits perfectly with my own
political liberalism and my yearning for social justice in the
world. Thats where my Judaism connects with all my work
and with this film in particular. I also wanted to say in this
film that regardless of what anyone believes creation,
myths, or what God is or isnt the burden is still on us to
act responsibly in the world.
JUF: Do you feel a responsibility as a Jewish role model?
HR: Yes, I feel that every Jew represents all Jews in the
world. I have associations in Winnetka and Wilmette,
not traditional Jewish territory. Sometimes I find myself
in country clubs that were restricted or in settings where
very few Jews are or have been. In places like that, I get even
more Jewish than I am. I start speaking Yiddish and I just
feel the need to represent. As an example to Jewish kids, I
dont push religion but I push integrity. I have incorporated
a lot of Buddhism into my Jewish thinking too, which a lot
of Jews have done. That kind of works for me because the
[two religions] are similar. As a Jew and a Buddhist, I try
to express a creed that is inclusive and focuses on personal
responsibility.
JUF: Is life as funny as your movies portray it to be, or are
your movies an escape from a world that isnt really funny?
HR: Someone once said that when we recognize that the
world is insane, we have choices we can see it as tragedy
or we can see it as comedy. Everything can be funny, but not
everything is funny. There are horrors and tragedies in life
that I would not want to joke about or hear anyone else joke
about it. Yet, conceptually, everything seems like fair game.
I mourn any persons death, but death as a concept is valid
territory for comedy.
JUF: Whats the secret to writing good comedy?
HR: Its all point of view. What fails in most comedy is
not that the writers arent smart, but that [a lot of comedy]
is like other things weve seen. To be funny, you need to
be original. Its like the kid who wants to play peek-a-boo.
The first couple times its funny; the 400th time its not that
funnythe kind of comedy that really scores is where you
reveal or expose something that is deeply embarrassing or
deeply shocking or deeply offensive in some way and put it
out there in a clever, original way and allow people to pro-
cess something that they havent been able to deal with or
express in another way. Thats why theres so much comedy
about sexuality, because the funniest stuff is the stuff were
most afraid of.
JUF: I know you have been asked this a thousand times,
but whats your favorite film and why?
HR: I never answer that question because I just love mak-
ing films and every film Ive made has been a great experi-
ence and I find it almost impossible to separate the results
from the process. I love them all.
Harold Ramis is survived by his wife, Erica Ramos;
his sons, Julian and Daniel; his daughter, Violet, and two
grandchildren.
JTA WIRE SERVICE/JUF NEWS
Ramis
FROM PAGE 41
Sometimes I nd myself in
country clubs that were
restricted or in settings
where very few Jews are
or have been. In places
like that, I get even more
Jewish than I am.
BRIEFS
German chancellor visits
Israel, receives honor
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and a 16-mem-
ber delegation of ministers arrived in Israel Monday
for a two-day meeting with Israel Cabinet members.
Israeli President Shimon Peres awarded Merkel the
Presidential Medal of Distinction.
Ministers from both countries were expected to
sign several agreements, including one to allow
Israelis visiting countries without diplomatic rela-
tions with the Jewish state to get German consular
services, Reuters reported.
This visit is a golden opportunity to underline
Germanys longstanding and robust support for
Israel and strengthen Germanys increasing role in
Mideast affairs Germany and Israel have strong
common interests and values, said Deidre Berger,
director of the American Jewish Committees Berlin
office.
JNS.ORG
Hamas terror cell nabbed
in plot to bomb convoy
Members of a Hamas terror cell who planned to det-
onate a roadside bomb against an Israel military con-
voy in the West Bank have been apprehended as part
of a larger group of Palestinian terrorists, the Israeli
Security Agency (Shin Bet) said.
The Hamas cell was part of a group of 15 Pales-
tinians from the village Bayt Ur a-Tachta, who were
arrested by the Shin Bet for their involvement in
roadside attacks, including Molotov cocktails and
rocks, against Israeli drivers on Route 443 outside
of Jerusalem.
According to the Shin Bet, Masab Ibrahim Badran,
27, who was one of the 15 apprehended, confessed
to forming a Hamas terror cell and that its members
had practiced assembling an explosive device.
Route 443, which runs through the West Bank for
about 10 miles, is one of only two major roads that
connect Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
JNS.ORG
IDF chief sees threats
from Iran, Syria, Gaza
For Israel, there is no front where Iran is not
involved, handing out torches to pyromaniacs, with
munitions and rockets, Israel Defense Forces Chief
of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz told reporters during a
tour of the Golan Heights on Sunday.
Commenting on the nuclear negotiations that
world powers are conducting with Iran, Gantz said
a nuclear Iran is dangerous for the world, the
region, and Israel in that order.
I hope that international pressure on Iran will
continue in a way that keeps Iran from renewing its
military nuclear program, he said.
Gantz said the ongoing transfer of weapons from
Syria to Lebanon was not a good thing, adding that
events could happen from time to time, a possible
reference to Israeli military action to prevent such
transfers.
In Gaza, Hamas and the other [terrorist] organi-
zations are continually building up their strength,
Gantz said.
JNS.ORG
Jewish World
JS-43
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 43
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BRIEFS
Organizations mobilize
emergency assistance
to Ukrainian Jews
Jewish organizations have set up emergency assis-
tance for Ukraines roughly 200,000-member Jewish
community amid ongoing political unrest there.
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
( JDC) said that it is providing immediate assistance in
areas of Kiev, Ukraines capital, to ensure that elderly
Jews and people with disabilities receive essential sup-
plies at home. JDC staff and volunteers have been pro-
viding food packages and medical supplies to these
homebound individuals.
Natan Sharansky, chairman of the Jewish Agency for
Israel, said immediate assistance for Ukrainian Jews
would come from the Emergency Assistance Fund for
Jewish Communities, established after the 2012 terror
attack on a Jewish school in Toulouse, France. Addi-
tionally, the Jewish Agency is launching a fundraising
campaign to boost the Ukrainian Jewish communitys
security.
On Friday, Ukrainian Rabbi Moshe Reuven Azman
asked Kiev Jews to leave the city and if possible, the
country due to fears that Jews might be targeted in
the ongoing chaos. Some Jewish shops have reportedly
been vandalized.
I told my congregation to leave the city center or
the city altogether and if possible the country too
I dont want to tempt fate... but there are constant
warnings concerning intentions to attack Jewish insti-
tutions, Azman told Maariv.
JNS.ORG
Anti-Israel conference
will convene at NYU
The American Studies Program at New York Univer-
sity, with the support of American Studies Association
president-elect Lisa Duggan, is set to hold a two-day
anti-Israel conference.
The event this weekend, titled Circuits of Influ-
ence: U.S., Israel, and Palestine, comes following an
unprecedented wave of public dialogue in response
to the American Studies Associations recent endorse-
ment of a boycott of Israeli academic institutions,
according to an event flier. About 200 universities
have condemned the ASA boycott.
Duggan, in a Facebook post, describes the event as a
kick ass conference that will feature speakers solely
from the anti-Israel perspective, such as Students for
Justice in Palestine and the Jewish Voice for Peace.
JNS.ORG
Forum backs bill to promote
Israel as Jewish state
Former Israeli Cabinet Secretary Zvi Hauser is pro-
moting a bill intended to legally anchor the notion of
Israel as a Jewish state as one of the countrys Basic
Laws, which serve in lieu of a constitution.
The Kohelet Policy Forum, whose mission state-
ment is to secure the future of Israel as the nation-
state of the Jewish People, held a conference on the
issue Sunday, according to Israel Hayom. Five min-
isters from the governing coalition were invited to
speak, including Interior Minister Gideon Saar, Jus-
tice Minister Tzipi Livni, Economy and Trade Minister
Naftali Bennett, Education Minister Shay Piron, and
Immigrant Absorption Minister Sofa Landver.
At a time when Israel is trying to get the Palestinians to
recognize Israel as the Jewish state, we should practice what
we preach and do the same, Hauser said. JNS.ORG
Congress may condition
Palestinian Authority aid
on curbing incitement
The Appropriations Committee of the House of Representa-
tives is considering freezing aid to the Palestinian Authority
unless its continued incitement against Israel is curtailed,
according to a report Saturday on Israels Channel 2.
Strategic Affairs Minister Yuval Steinitz reportedly met
with members of Congress to express his appreciation for
the initiative.
Maybe now, when there is international recognition and a
monetary threat on the aid, the incitement will lessen, Stein-
itz said.
Itamar Marcus, director of Palestinian Media Watch, told
JNS.org, How can the U.S. justify funding a PA regime that
glorifies murderers using American money? How can the
U.S. justify giving money to a regime that demonizes Jews
as descendants of monkeys and pigs? Conditioning funding
on the end of hatred is the ethical thing to do. And hopefully
the PA will get the message that they have to choose between
being a terror-promoting entity ostracized by the U.S. and the
Western countries, like Hamas, or a sincere peace partner.
Americas current funding of the PA has enabled them
to continue promoting hate and terror and still be seen as a
peace partner, even though the two are inherently contradic-
tory, added Marcus. JNS.ORG
Dvar Torah
44 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
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Shabbat Shekalim: Building community
A
t a recent com-
munity discus-
sion with other
l ocal rabbi s
about the future of the
Jewish people, I remarked
that just as people buy
OtterBoxes for thei r
iPhones to protect the
valuable interior electron-
ics, it is up to us to create
our own metaphoric Jew-
ish OtterBoxes. This will
help us keep our Judaism
from becoming too bat-
tered to effectively and
purposefully function.
The special reading for
this weeks Shabbat Shek-
alim presents a commandment that at
face value appears somewhat irrelevant
to our 21st century societal and sanctu-
ary structure: the Biblical obligation of a
half shekel annual tax which males over
the age of 20 are required to give to the
construction of the Tabernacle. This
portion is read on the Shabbat before
Rosh Chodesh Adar so that
every adult man would have a
months notice to prepare the
money, which due on the first
of Nissan during the times of
the Temple in Jerusalem.
The question is, without the
Temple, how can we practi-
cally fulfill this mitzvah today?
Even the Mishnah Berurah
(Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan of
Radin, 1839-1933) ruled that
the only way we can perform
this mitzvah is through the
reading of Parashat Shekalim
during this Shabbat preceding
Rosh Chodesh Adar.
Perhaps, however, we can
perform this mitzvah using
an OtterBox approach of preserving its
spirit, by both accounting for the commu-
nity and contributing to the communitys
welfare.
In an important disagreement with the
halachic decisor Rabbi Moshe Isserles
(the Rema), the Magen Avraham disputes
the Remas assertion based directly on
the Torah that this mitzvah was intended
for men over the age of 20. He writes in
concurrence with the Rambam and the
Ramban that the Biblical mitzvah to con-
tribute a half-shekel to the Temple applies
to all those who have reached the age of
bnai mitzvah.
There are still many people for whom
a divine presence needs to be nurtured
through communal giving. Thats why
this time of year (Shabbat Shekalim)
should be a time to help inspire our chil-
dren to contribute the equivalent half-
shekel to our greater community. After
all, children are among those in the Torah
who are not commanded to contribute.
When Parashat Shekalim is read, many
of our children also celebrate the 100th
day of school. What if, on the 100th day
of school, all of our schools, private and
public, collect a quantity of 100 of house-
hold items (toiletries, food, and cloth-
ing) and give them to 100 area families in
need?
In the spirit of the Magen Avraham and
full disclosure, that is exactly what one
of our students at Solomon Schechter
did. He has successfully galvanized our
entire school community to give their
half-shekel in the form of shampoo, toi-
let paper, and other personal-care items
to 100 area families. For more informa-
tion about this inspiring project, please
go to our Facebook Page at https://www.
facebook.com/ssdsbergen.
In explaining Rav Kooks discussion of
this special parasha, Rabbi Chanan Mor-
rison writes that through the giving of the
half-shekel, a society may be unified in
two ways: in deed and in thought. Unity
in deed refers to practical actions to
assist ones neighbors or to contribute to
the nation as a whole. Unity in thought
means concern for fellow citizens and
love for ones people. For Israel, unity
in thought is the ultimate goal, while
unity in deed is a means to bolster and
strengthen it.
Let our commandment to each con-
tribute our individual half-shekel unify
us in thought and let the actions of our
youth inspire us to be united in deed
regardless of our affiliation. That is an
unbreakable OtterBox.
Rabbi
Fred Elias
Congregation
Kol HaNeshama,
Englewood,
Conservative
Solomon Schecher
Day School of
Bergen County,
Paramus
BRIEFS
Pollard release
urged by hundreds
at U.S. embassy
Hundreds of people demonstrated on
Sunday evening outside the U.S. Embassy
in Tel Aviv, calling on the U.S. to release
imprisoned Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard.
The demonstrators held signs read-
ing Free Pollard and 29 years, thats
enough. A number of Knesset members
took part in the demonstration, including
Moshe Feiglin and Tzachi Hanegbi (both
Likud), Shuli Mualem-Rafaeli (Habayit
Hayehudi), and Nachman Shai (Labor).
We are appealing to the Americans and
telling them, Enough, Shai said. Its
been almost 30 years. This man has paid
everything he owes to American society
and American law. Let him go.
Pollards wife Esther said, Today, after
30 years, there is no one in the world who
doesnt know that the life sentence Jona-
than is serving is completely out of propor-
tion and unfair. Pollard is the only person
in U.S. history to receive a life sentence for
spying for an American ally.
JNS.ORG
Alice Herz-Sommer,
worlds oldest-known
Holocaust survivor,
dies at 110
Alice Herz-Sommer, who is considered the
worlds oldest-known Holocaust survivor,
died Sunday at the age of 110 in London.
Herz-Sommers death comes a week
before a film chronicling her story, The
Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life
will be up for Best Short Documentary at
the March 2 Academy Awards.
We all came to believe that she would
just never die, Frederic Bohbot, a pro-
ducer of the Oscar-nominated documen-
tary, told the Associated Press.
Born in Prague in 1903, Herz-Sommer
became an accomplished pianist. In 1943
she was sent to the Terezin-Theresienstadt
concentration camp along with her son
and husband. At the camp she was allowed
to continue to perform music. But her hus-
band was eventually sent to Auschwitz and
then Dachau, where he died. JNS.ORG
Israeli Air Force
reportedly strikes
targets at Syria-
Lebanon border
The Israeli Air Force bombed two tar-
gets in the Syria-Lebanon border region
on Monday night, according to Lebanese
media reports.
We heard warplanes followed by explo-
sions, it could be along the border with
Syria, Jaafar al-Musawi, head of the Al-
Nabi Shayth municipality, told Lebanons
Al-Jadeed TV network.
Various reports suggested that the tar-
gets of the airstrike could have been Hez-
bollah weapons storage facilities, a Hez-
bollah rocket base, or an arms convoy
traversing the Syria-Lebanon border. Israel
has repeatedly warned that it would act
to thwart the transfer of advanced weap-
onry from Syria to Hezbollah in Lebanon,
but has never officially confirmed several
strikes that it has reportedly carried out
inside Syria to halt such transfers. JNS.ORG
Muslim worshippers
arrested for Temple
Mount violence
Several dozen Muslim worshippers
clashed with Israeli security forces on
the Temple Mount on Tuesday morning,
throwing stones and firecrackers at forces
routinely deployed in and around the com-
pound, Israel Hayom reported.
Two policemen sustained mild injuries,
and three rioters were arrested. The com-
pound remained open to visitors through-
out the incident.
The riot erupted ahead of Tuesdays
Knesset plenum debate on Israeli sover-
eignty over the Temple Mount. Member
of Knesset Moshe Feiglin (Likud) called for
the session. JNS.ORG
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
JS-45
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 45
PURI M I S RI GHT
AROUND THE
CORNER
SINAI
Purim cards
are on sale
now!
Cost: $1 per card
(includes envelope)
3 WAYS TO ORDER:
1) Online at www.sinaischools.org/purimcards
2) Call 201-833-1134 x106
3) Purchase at the following locations:
Maadan Caterers Best Glatt
Rosenbaum Yeshiva of North Jersey
Joseph Kushner Hebrew Academy
Torah Academy of Bergen County
Maayanot Yeshiva High School
Across
1. Georgia city where Dannenbergs
Department Store was one of the first
to desegregate
6. Jewish ones may sell hamantaschen to
raise money
10. Belonging to a controversial Kotel
group (abbr.)
14. ___ Beach (location of the Jewish
Museum of Florida)
15. Act like Anne Frank from 1942 to 1944
16. First name in Israeli astronauts
17. Reacts to a Holocaust memorial, per-
haps
18. And let us say, ___
19. Girls name thats Hebrew for spirit
renewed
20. Tony-winning Ragtime lyricist
22. Let the blood ___ down into the
depths of darkness... (verse of
Bialiks On the Slaughter)
23. Harvard president Rudenstine (1991-
2001)
24. Changes Rashis text
26. Jacobs of womens fashion
30. King Jehoshaphats father
31. Something to atone for on Yom Kippur
32. Israels Eldan Rent-___
33. Kosher laws, essentially (abbr.)
35. Suddenly, a Knock on the Door
author Keret
39. Rabbanite opponent
41. Something anti-Semites and philo-
Semites have in common
43. Vowels in a song
44. Baron who wrote an 18-volume history
of the Jews
46. Ramat ___ (prestigious neighbor-
hood)
47. Bearded one
49. Levis part
50. Ner Tamid (Eternal ___)
51. Servings of a deli smoked whitefish
54. U.S. womens organization founded by
Bessie Goldstein
56. ___ Shalt Not Commit Adultery
57. Michael Oren is Israels to the United
States
63. U.S. fairness group
64. Israeli 2008 Eurovision contestant
Mauda
65. Express Numbers of Lamentations
66. ___ World (Israeli tour company)
67. The Blind and the ___ (Talmudic par-
able)
68. The First Baron Rothschilds nickname
69. Why ___ a Jew pick his nose? Its
cheaper than using a tissue. (Anti-
Semitic joke)
70. And so on for Josephus (abbr.)
71. Martina Urbans Theodicy of Culture
and the Jewish ___
Down
1. Year far in the future for Herod the
Great
2. Marylands Jewish Camps ___ and
Louise
3. Marked Genesis character
4. The Talmud considers an eclipse to be
a bad one
5. In 2014, it starts on April 1
6. Saducees alternative
7. Length of the wait between eating
meat and milk
8. The Cairo Genizah contains letters from
the Jews of this Red Sea port
9. Saadia Gaon said all five are mentioned
in the Bible
10. Nazi-hunter Simon
11. Kind of days with a Jewish monarchy
12. Acted like the moon right after Purim
13. What Annie Leibovitz does with her
camera
21. Israel at ___ (Program for Ethiopian
Jews)
25. Amsterdam Hero Gies
26. ___ Aliyah (move to Israel)
27. Juice berry
28. Like Bob Dylan interviews
29. Prelude to a Kiss playwright
34. Yiddish for an extremely unlucky per-
son
36. Kibbutz where Shimon Peres lived as
a youth
37. Song of Glory ___ Zmirot
38. Indicate youre coming to the Bat
Mitzvah (abbr.)
40. Adam Horovitz ex Skye
42. Followers of the Kosher Sutra
45. State where the Deep South Jewish
Voice is published
48. Quality of things donated to a
gemach
51. Haman was hanged in Mordechais
52. Self-Portrait of ___ (collection of
Yoni Netanyahus letters)
53. Jews and ___: Becoming American in
the Age of Prohibition
55. ___-Rene (16th century Jewish wom-
ens book)
58. The Tower of David had one
59. Na___ USA (womens org.)
60. Biblical verb
61. Operation ___ (Nazi plan to annex
Austria)
62. German Jewish refugees who created
Curious George
The solution to last weeks puzzle
is on page 55.
Arts & Culture
46 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-46*
The Legacy
Garage Theatre Group premiers prize-winning play
MIRIAM RINN
I
ts not often that residents of north-
ern New Jersey have the opportunity
to see the world premiere of a home-
grown theatrical talent, but thats
just what is going on at the Garage Theatre
Group at the Becton Theatre on the cam-
pus of FDU in Teaneck.
Adam Siegels play The Legacy is get-
ting a full production for the first time; it
is being performed through March 9 on
Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 8
p.m. and on Sundays at 3 p.m.
Mr. Siegel, who lives in Maplewood, has
written other plays, and The Legacy was
a finalist for the New Jersey Playwrights
Contest and a semifinalist for the ONeill
Playwrights Conference. The well-con-
structed three-character play focuses on
the contentious relationship between
a crotchety childrens book writer and
illustrator, his long-time partner, and his
son, Jacob. Marty Rothberg is 84, in poor
health, and cantankerous. His lover and
caregiver, Nathaniel, also an artist, puts
up with his endless complaints and his
forgetfulness with what seems to be loving
patience. The two men live in a tastefully
appointed house in Connecticut nicely
designed by Robert Perkel and seem to
be like any other couple who have been
together for 40 years.
The fly in this honeypot is Martys
son, Jacob, who arrives unexpectedly. A
museum curator, Jacob has come to get a
specific painting of his fathers for a show
that hes putting together. It is a painting
that Marty did of Nathaniel when they
were both much younger. Jacob insists
that this is Martys greatest work, the piece
that finally will get him the genuine recog-
nition he deserves. He is astonished and
outraged when his father flatly refuses.
What possible reason could he have for
saying no?
Doesnt he want to help his son?
Doesnt he want to finally be taken
seriously?
Aside from writing plays, Mr. Siegel
is also the editorial director of a chil-
drens book publisher, so its somewhat
surprising that all the characters feel such
disdain for childrens books. Both Jacob
and Nathaniel believe that Marty has
wasted his talent on illustrations for his
series of books called Nate at Eight. As
a former childrens writer myself, maybe
Im a tad overly sensitive, but what would
Maurice Sendak say?
Of course, Jacob and Marty are not really
fighting over a painting. They are arguing
over what that painting symbolizes Mar-
tys abandonment of his wife and children
for his lover, Nathaniel. What that meant
to all three characters is revealed in the
first scene of the second act, a flashback
to that time of painful decision. Marty is
torn between his sense of responsibility
to his children and to his genuine love for
Nathaniel. Painting doesnt pay the rent,
he tells Nathaniel when he decides to work
on childrens books, giving the protagonist
the nickname his lover hates.
Although The Legacy can be seen
as a testament to the loving bonds of gay
couples, the play wouldnt change much
if Nathaniel had been another woman.
The emotional rupture and betrayal that
Jacob feels is only somewhat related to his
fathers homosexuality. Mr. Siegel does not
always seem fully to appreciate that, and
Jacob is presented as an ungrateful and
vindictive child.
Ironically, Marty criticizes Jacobs wife
for staying home with the kids and learn-
ing Mandarin, when of course Nathaniel
does pretty much the same thing, minus
the Chinese. Both father and son need
a wife at home. Developing the simi-
larities between them might deepen the
production.
Thom Molyneaux is particularly good as
Marty, and Michael Horowitz as Nathaniel
makes a believable object of desire. Bren-
dan Walsh plays Jacob with a lot of inten-
sity, and sometimes seems to be repeating
himself. Thats not his fault, of course, and
the first act would have benefited from a
trim.
But its always fun to see a new play
locally, and Garage Theatre has mounted
a respectful and entertaining production
of The Legacy.
Arts & Culture
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 47
JS-47*
Beauty coming from ugliness
A conversation with Omar director Hany Abu-Assad
ERIC GOLDMAN
M
y interview with Hany Abu-
Assad took place during
the New York Film Festival
in the fall. Abu-Assads film
Omar had been chosen to be screened
at the festival and he would shake up the
crowd at a post-screening conversation
at Lincoln Center later that week with
some political remarks. My conversation
with Hany was pleasant, even warm; he
seemed to appreciate that I represent a
Jewish newspaper; no one in my position
had ever sat down to chat with him.
We generally avoided politics, though
he would periodically raise the issue of
the occupation of the Palestinian peo-
ple. I did not challenge his politics, but
rather stayed with questions about the film
and his work as a Palestinian filmmaker.
Omar, as I wrote in my review of the film
last week, is smart and well made. The film
is not a finalist for Best Foreign Language
Oscar by mistake; it is because of the films
quality, not its politics. Though Omar is
a fine film, I would be very surprised on
March 2 if the members of the Academy
choose it over the other nominated films
from Belgium, Cambodia, Denmark, and
Italy, but you never know.
Hany Abu-Assad already had a Golden
Globe award and an Oscar nomina-
tion when he made Omar. He is highly
respected in Israel, and we should look
forward to a collaborative film between
him and an Israeli film colleague in the
not-too-distant future.

EG: You grew up in Nazareth. How has


that experience affected your work?
HA: I always felt that I was curious about
life when I was kid. I was a Palestinian in
Nazareth. I was a Muslim in a Christian city
and a Palestinian in Israel. I am coming from
the middle class in a very poor environ-
ment. The people [around me] in the 60s
were very poor and we [my family] had a
good standard of life. I became furious. Why
a Muslim as a minority in a Christian city?
Why a Palestinian in Israel? Why am I rich
in a poor society?
This led me to go outside when I grew up.
I wanted to conquer the world! And then
again I was a minority in Europe. I was the
Arab in Europe you know, the foreigner in
Holland. You know as this kind of minority,
you always try and find out the differences
and actually the beauty in it and the con-
flict in it. Somehow, I believe my movies tell
more about me than about anybody else
which is actually a fusion of things.
EG: How does that relate to Omar?
HA: Omar is a love story and it is a
thriller. Usually, they dont go together,
but I made them go together. Being a Mus-
lim in Nazareth seems that it doesnt go
together, but I made them live together.
I truly believe that in my view of the
political situation, there is no way but to
share that land and live together. There
is no other solution. We have to be equal.
Yes. This is why we are different, but we
can still find something beautiful about it.
This is my vision. This is who I am. If you
ask my identity I am a fusion of things
that dont usually go together and yes, I
make them very beautiful through my art.
In the end, I think my movies are beauty
coming from ugliness.
EG: In Omar. you use the Wall [the
barrier that separates the Palestinian terri-
tories from Israel] as a central visual. What
about it?
HA: Every time I see the Wall I am
depressed, as I see it dividing Palestin-
ians from Palestinians, not the West Bank
from Israel. It is a source of tension for me.
When I was writing the story, a love story
and love stories need two obstacles,
the inner obstacle and the outer obstacle
and you need to visualize the outside
obstacles. You dont want to talk about the
obstacles.
And thenthe Wall! For five seconds, I
was happy with the Wall. What is stronger
than a wall being an obstacle between two
lovers? Nothing.
EG: At a certain point, the man cannot
climb that wall to reach his love. What of
that? What of the old man who comes to
the aid of the youth?
HA: In a love story, when you lose
the motivation which is the love you
become impotent. This is why it is visually
very strong. When we as human beings
feel broke, this old man with his experi-
ence in life can give the youth the power
he needs to climb again. It is a statement
about life. We all come to a point where
we might feel impotent. We cant do it any
more. You are broke. The only thing that
can bring you back is wisdom and wis-
dom is [embodied by] the old man.
EG: Speak about your three major male
characters.
HA: Tarek is the adventurer who starts
the war. Every war is started by the adven-
turer. Omar is the brave one who will fight
this. Then there is Amjad, the opportun-
ist, who will win the one who goes with
power and survives in any war.
EG: And what of Nadja? Women in the
film seem to be relegated to second class
status. She seems modern, but she still has
to adhere to a certain set of standards.
HA: I was accused by Palestinian women
about this and maybe it is right. But it is
not about this. The film is about men and
she is only the victim.
EG: How are your films received by
Palestinians in power and the Palestinian
people?
HA: What is important to me is not what
the authorities think. It is the real people,
the normal people, whether they are Pal-
estinians or Israelis. What I found about
Palestinians who watch my work is that
they cannot be involved; there is some
kind of distance. They my movies
were not popular. They were more or less
of interest only to some people who are
interested in culture.
Most felt that my movies did not talk to
them. They preferred Turkish and Egyp-
tian soaps. With Omar, I feel that nor-
mal people are feeling it, compelled to it,
living with it. This is an achievement.
Authorities[he nods, intimating that
they dont matter]. The shift is that this is
a movie that the normal people can follow.
Even if there is intellectual discourse and it
is difficult and deep, it still is entertaining.
This combination is the most difficult to
be both entertaining and go to the depth of
the core of your subject. I feel that in Pales-
tine, with Omar, I succeeded.
EG: There is a similarity between your
Why a Muslim
as a minority
in a Christian
city? Why a
Palestinian in
Israel? Why am
I rich in a poor
society?
Hany Abu-Assad sees Omar as a love story and a thriller.
SEE BEAUTY PAGE 52
Calendar
48 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-48*
Friday
FEBRUARY 28
Shabbat in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers Carlebach-style
davening, 5:30 p.m. 70
Sterling Place. (201) 833-
0515 or www.jcot.org.
Shabbat in Closter:
Cantor Israel Singer
leads J-Voice at Temple
Emanu-El of Closter,
6:30 p.m. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997 or
www.templeemanu-el.
com.
Shabbat celebration:
Shaar Communities
hosts Friday Night
Live! music-filled
spiritual services and
dinner 6:30 p.m.
Location information,
JoAnne, (201) 213-
9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Emanu-El
welcomes scholar-in-
residence Dr. Tal Becker,
the Israeli Ministry of
Foreign Affairs principal
legal adviser, for Shabbat,
to discuss Prospects of
Peace in Israel. His talks
will be tonight at 7 p.m.,
during Shabbat morning
services at 9 a.m., and
during kiddush. 180
Piermont Road. (201)
750-9997 or www.
templeemanu-el.com.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman
with BETY (Beth El
Youth), 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112.
Saturday
MARCH 1
Shabbat in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers services at 9 a.m.;
then Rabbi Lawrence
Zierler discusses Hillels
Ideals Re-worked and
Re-Stated as part of
the Three Cs Cholent,
Cugel, and Conversation.
Kinder Shul for 3- to
8-year-olds while parents
attend services, 10:30-
11:45. 70 Sterling Place.
(201) 833-0515 or www.
jcot.org.
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: Barnert Temple
offers breakfast and a
spirited Torah study,
9:30 a.m. 747 Route 208
South. (201) 848-1800.
www.barnerttemple.org.
Concert: The Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel
begins its Cafe Night
Music series, featuring
jazz by Scott Avidon
and Groove Apparatus,
Saturday, March 1, 8 p.m.
Doors open at 7:30. 10-10
Norma Ave. (201) 796-
5040.
Israeli inventions:
Author Marcella Rosen
discusses her book, Tiny
Dynamo How One
of the Worlds Smallest
Countries is Producing
Some of Our Most
Important Inventions,
with 21 stories about
some of Israels most
recent inventions, at
the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly,
8:30 p.m. Part of the
JCCs annual James H.
Grossman Memorial
Jewish Book Month.
(201) 408-1426 or
jspiegel@jccotp.org.
Games and dessert in
Paramus: The JCC of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah hosts
military bridge, 8 p.m.
Dairy dessert. Prizes.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or www.
jccparamus.org.
Piano concert in
Tenafly: The JCC
Thurnauer School of
Music at the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades holds
the finale to a three-year
series of performances
of Beethovens 32 piano
sonatas by Thurnauer
School faculty member
Steven Masi, 7 p.m. The
series is in collaboration
with Forte Piano of
Paramus and the Puffin
Foundation. (201) 408-
1465 or thurnauer@
jccotp.org.
Salsa and music in
Glen Rock: Karikatura
performs at the Glen
Rock Jewish Center
for its Hot Night of
Sizzling Salsa and World
Music, 9 p.m. The bands
sound combines Latin,
Afro-Cuban, indie rock,
and klezmer. Proceeds
benefit the beautification
of the shuls lobby. 682
Harristown Road. (201)
652-6624.
Sunday
MARCH 2
War veterans meet
in Hackensack: The
Teaneck/New Milford
Post #498 Jewish War
Veterans meets for
breakfast at the Coach
House Diner, 9 a.m.
Prospective members
welcome. Route 4 East.
Past Commander Stan
Hoffman, (201) 836-0814.
Rabbi Jackie Koch
Ellenson
Marking rosh
chodesh in Teaneck:
Congregation Beth
Sholom holds a program
in support of Women of
the Wall during a Rosh
Chodesh Adar II service
and program. Rabbi
Jackie Koch Ellenson,
director of the Womens
Rabbinic Network and
international vice chair
of Rabbis for Women of
the Wall, joins a panel
discussion with Miriam
Suchoff, moderated
by Sandee Brawarsky.
Tefillah, led by women,
9 a.m., followed by
a brunch. Program,
including short film
at 10:30. Women are
encouraged to bring
and wear tallitot (also
available at shul).
$10 contribution. 354
Maitland Ave. (201)
833-2620 or office@
cbsteaneck.org.
Toddler program
in Tenafly: As part
of the shuls Holiday
Happenings program,
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County offers music,
stories, crafts, and
snacks, with a Purim
theme, for pre-k
students and their
parents, 9:30 a.m. 1
Engle St. (201) 568-6867
or educationoffice@
templesinaibc.org.
Childrens program: The
Jewish Community Center
of Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah begins a
four-session Taste of
Hebrew School, for pre-k
to first-graders, 9:30 a.m.
Series continues March 9,
23, and 30. Attendees will
receive game tickets to
the shuls Purim carnival
set for March 16 at noon.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7733.
Hebrew high open
house: The Bergen
County High School for
Jewish Studies holds
an open house for
prospective students
and parents at Maayanot
Yeshiva High School for
Girls in Teaneck, 9:30
a.m. Rebecca Slavin,
(201) 488-0834 or www.
bchsjs.org.
Pre-Purim kids event:
The Academies at
Gerrard Berman Day
School in Oakland host
Mask Making & Magic,
a pre-Purim Party for
children 3-to 8-years old,
10 a.m.-noon. Magic by
Ricky the Magnificent. 45
Spruce St. (201) 337-1111
or www.ssnj.org.
Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten
in September 2014,
10:15 a.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801,
ext. 12.
Hebrew reading in
Emerson: Congregation
Bnai Israel begins a two-
session Hebrew reading
crash course for adults
and teens, 10 a.m. All
levels welcome. Also
March 9. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272 or www.
bisrael.com.
Breakfast in Teaneck:
Byachad, Temple Emeth
of Teanecks mens and
womens group, meets
for a discussion about
borders, Is Peace
Possible? with Rabbi
Steven Sirbu, 10:45 a.m.
$8. 1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322.
Adult trip: Temple
Avodat Shalom in
River Edge hosts a trip
to tour the Spanish &
Portuguese Synagogue
Congregation Shearith
Israel), West 70th Street,
in New York City. Tour
at 11 a.m., lunch at Fine
and Schapiro Kosher
Restaurant. Car pools to
NYC. Trip in conjunction
with Jewish Federation
of Northern New
Jerseys One Book One
Community. This years
book selection is By
Fire, By Water.
(201) 489-2463
or administrator@
avodatshalom.net.
A capella in Leonia:
Magevet, the Yale
Universitys Jewish,
Hebrew, and Israeli
a cappella group,
returns to perform at
Congregation Adas
Emuno, 2 p.m. Sponsored
by the Edward M. Cramer
Music Programming
Fund. 254 Broad Ave.
(201) 592-1712 or www.
adasemuno.org.
Monday
MARCH 3
Blood drive in Teaneck:
Holy Name Medical
Center holds a blood
drive with New Jersey
Blood Services in the
hospital parking lot,
1-7 p.m. 718 Teaneck Road.
(800) 933- 2566 or www.
nybloodcenter.org.
Tuesday
MARCH 4
Play group in Emerson:
Shalom Baby of Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey offers play
time, music, storytime,
snacks, and crafts
for new parents and
caregivers with babies
and toddlers, with a
Purim theme, to connect
with each other and the
Jewish community, at
Congregation Bnai Israel,
9:30 a.m. Administered
by JFNNJs Synagogue
Leadership Initiative,
funded by the Henry and
Marilyn Taub Foundation.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272, (201) 820-
3917, or www.jfnnj.org/
shalombaby.
Edon Pinchot, a kippah-wearing Jewish
day school student/singer/pianist who was
a semifinalist on Americas Got Talent,
performs for Congregation Ahavath
Torah, Kehillat Kesher, and the East Hill Synagogue at
a community-wide Adar concert at CAT on Saturday,
March 8, at 8:30 p.m. Snacks and drinks. 240 Broad
Ave. Chavie, (201) 568-1315, or edonmusic.com.
MAR.
8
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 49
JS-49*
Canasta: The YJCC in
Washington Township
begins a six-week
canasta class led by
Andrea Hershan, 7 p.m.
605 Pascack Road. Jill,
(201) 666-6610 ext. 5812
or jbrown@yjcc.org.
Author in Millburn:
Paul Tough, author of
the New York Times
bestseller How Children
Succeed: Grit, Curiosity,
and the Hidden Power of
Character, speaks at the
Millburn Middle School,
7:30 p.m. Co-sponsored
by Jewish Family Service
of MetroWest, Education
Foundation of Millburn-
Short Hills, and Millburn
Municipal Alliance
Committee. 25 Old
Short Hills Road. (973)
765-9050 or sheller@
jfsmetrowest.org.
Wednesday
MARCH 5
Caregiver support in
Rockleigh: A support
group for those caring
for people who are
frail or suffering from
Alzheimers disease or
related dementia meets
at the Gallen Adult Day
Health Care Center at
the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh, 10-11:30 a.m.
Topics include long-term
care options, financial
planning, legal concerns,
and the personal toll of
care-giving. 10 Link Drive.
Shelley Steiner, (201)
784-1414, ext. 5340.
Lavish lunch program:
The Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly
hosts its annual Lavish
Lunches, a culinary
adventure beginning
with a light breakfast,
10:15 a.m., at a private
home. Eleni Gianopulos
of Elenis Cookies is the
guest speaker. Afterward,
participants choose
from a selection of
lunches, served in local
homes and other venues,
at 12:15 p.m. Sharon
Potolsky, (201) 408-1405
or spotolsky@jccotp.org.
Author in Englewood:
Ruchama King
Feuerman, author of
In the Courtyard of the
Kabbalist, speaks at
Congregation Ahavath
Torah during a luncheon
co-sponsored with
Congregation Shomrei
Emunah, at CAT, noon.
The book was a finalist
in this years National
Jewish Book awards. $36;
includes a paperback
copy. 240 Broad Ave.
(201) 568-1315 or www.
ahavathtorah.org.
Diabetes awareness:
The Bergen County YJCC
and the Valley Hospital
present endocrinologist
Dr. Jack F. Tohme, who
will discuss the risk
factors, self-care steps,
and tripod approach
to prevention and
treatment at early stages
of diabetes, at the YJCC,
7 p.m. 605 Pascack Road.
(201) 666-6610 or www.
valleyhealth.com/events.
Thursday
MARCH 6
Mah jong in Washington
Township: The Bergen
County YJCC offers a
beginners mah jong
class, 7:30 p.m., through
April 10. 605 Pascack
Road. Jill, (201) 666-6610,
ext. 5812 or jbrown@yjcc.
org.
Book club in Wyckoff:
The Readers Circle
Book Club at Temple
Beth Rishon will review
and discuss Dara Horns
novel, All Other Nights,
7:30 p.m. 585 Russell
Ave. (201) 891-4466 or
bethrishon.org.
Friday
MARCH 7
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: The Chabad
Center of NW Bergen
County holds its monthly
character tot Shabbat
with songs, cartoon
character guests, food
crafts, and dinner, for
children up to age 6,
4 p.m. 375 Pulis Ave.
(201) 848-0449 or www.
chabadplace.org.
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Rabbi Hayyim Angel is
the scholar-in-residence
for Shabbat Vayikra
at Shaarei Orah, the
Sephardic Congregation
of Teaneck. At 6 p.m.,
erev Shabbat, he will
discuss Rav Haim David
HaLevis Messages of
Purim. On Shabbat
morning at 10:30,
the topic will be the
Sephardic Community
Model: Its Good for
the Jews, and after
Mincha at about
5:45 p.m., he will tackle,
Comparing Sephardic
and Ashkenazic Liturgy.
Rabbi Angel is the
National Scholar of
the Institute for Jewish
Ideas and Ideals. He
also teaches advanced
Bible courses at Yeshiva
University. 1425 Essex
Road. (201) 833-0800.
Shabbat Across
America in Paramus:
The JCCP/Congregation
Beth Tikvah participates
in the annual Shabbat
Across America and
Canada, organized by the
National Jewish Outreach
Program, where nearly
700 synagogues
host a traditional
Shabbat service and
meal. It begins with
candlelighting at
5:30 p.m., followed by
services and dinner. East
304 Midland Ave. (201)
262-7691.
Shabbat in Fort Lee:
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort
Lee offers a Shabbat
service partially set to
Beatles music, preceded
by dinner, 6 p.m. 1449
Anderson Ave. (201) 947-
1735.
Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
holds a service for young
families, 6:45 p.m. 87
Overlook Drive. (201)
391-0801.
Shabbat Across
America in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai Israel
participates in SAA with
dinner, rituals, songs,
and prayers around
the table, led by Rabbi
Debra Orenstein and
Cantor Lenny Mandel,
6:30 p.m. Children can
play Shabbat games. 53
Palisade Ave. (201) 265-
2272 or office@bisrael.
com.
Shabbat in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
holds its monthly family
service, 6 p.m., followed
by dinner at 7. 585
Russell Ave. (201) 891-
4466 or www.bethrishon.
org.
Shabbat in Franklin
Lakes: Rabbis Elyse
Frishman and Rachel
Steiner of Barnert Temple
lead a family-friendly
service, 7 p.m., followed
by a potluck supper.
747 Route 208 South.
(201) 848-1800. www.
barnerttemple.org.
Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
family services, 7:30 p.m.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.
Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley
offers Shabbat Tikvah,
a service of inspiration
and renewal, 8 p.m. 87
Overlook Drive. (201)
391-0801 or www.tepv.
org.
Saturday
MARCH 8
Shabbat in Wyckoff:
Temple Beth Rishon
offers a Torah discussion
group in English with
Rabbi Marley Weiner,
9 a.m. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466 or
bethrishon.org.
Shabbat in River Edge:
Temple Avodat Shalom
begins a three-session
Lunch n Learn series,
Im a Reform Jew
Does That Still Mean
Something in the 21st
Century? Sessions, at
noon, include light lunch.
Also April 12 and May
17. 385 Howland Ave.
(201) 489-2463 ext.
202, or administrator@
avodatshalom.net.
Comedy in River
Edge: Temple Avodat
Shaloms brotherhood
hosts Comedy Night
Part V, with stand-up
comedians Mike Fine,
Brad Trackman, and
Dan Wilson, 8 p.m.
Coffee and cake. 385
Howland Ave. (201) 489-
2463, or brotherhood@
avodatshalom.net.
Aliyah guide in Teaneck:
Baruch Labinsky, author
of A Financial Guide to
Aliyah and Life in Israel,
speaks at Congregation
Beth Aaron, 8:30 p.m.
950 Queen Anne Road.
(201) 836-6210.
Sunday
MARCH 9
Atlantic City trip:
Hadassahs Fair Lawn
chapter takes a trip to
Tropicana Casino Hotel.
A bus leaves the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel
at 9:15 a.m. Breakfast
served on bus at 9. $30;
includes $25 slot play
money. Bring ID and
Tropicana Rewards card.
10-10 Norma Ave. Varda,
(201) 791-0327.
Environmentalism in
Franklin Lakes: Mike
Wilson, an environmental
horticulturalist, speaks
at Barnert Temple,
9 a.m. Learn how to
use native plants in a
home landscape. 747
Route 208 South. (201)
848-1800 or www.
barnerttemple.org.
Play group in River
Edge: Shalom Baby of
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey
offers play time, music,
storytime, snacks, and
crafts, with a Purim
theme, for new moms/
dads and caregivers with
babies and toddlers,
to connect with each
other and the Jewish
community, at Temple
Avodat Shalom, 9:30 a.m.
Administered by JFNNJs
Synagogue Leadership
Initiative, funded by
the Henry and Marilyn
Taub Foundation. 385
Howland Ave. (201)
489-2463, (201) 820-
3917, or www.jfnnj.org/
shalombaby.
Purim in Closter: Temple
Emanu-El holds the
Taam Purim character
brunch, 9:30 a.m. $36
per family. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997 or
ween@templeemanu-el.
com.
Prophecy and social
action: Dr. Suzannah
Heschel, professor
of Jewish studies at
Dartmouth College,
discusses Prophecy and
Social Action in Judaism
for the Food for Thought
Distinguished Speaker
series at Temple Beth
Rishon in Wyckoff,
9:45 a.m. Breakfast
buffet. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466 or www.
bethrishon.org.
Purim party in Wayne:
The Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey,
the Wayne YMCA, and
Temple Beth Tikvah host
a Purim party including
a costume parade,
carnival preschool
games, inflatables, sand
art/face painting, and
hamantashen, at the
YMCA, 10 a.m. Bring a
nonperishable canned
food donation for the
WIN Food Pantry for
JFNNJs Good Deeds
Day. The Metro YMCAs of
the Oranges is a partner
of the YM-YWHA of
North Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100.
Good Deeds Day: Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey holds a
food drive to fill local
food pantries. Schools,
synagogues, families, and
friends are welcome to
participate by collecting
nonperishable/unexpired
food items and bringing
them to the federation
building in Paramus
starting March 5; or by
volunteering to sort
and bag the donations
on Good Deeds Day,
24 p.m. 50 Eisenhower
Drive. Alice Blass,
aliceb@jfnnj.org, (201)
820-3948, or www.jfnnj.
org/gooddeedsday.
Childrens theater in
Tenafly: A professional
childrens theater
company from Chicago
presents Pirate
Adventures and Other
Tales for the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades
Professional Childrens
Theater series, 2 p.m.
Group rates; birthday
parties arranged. 411 East
Clinton Ave. (201) 408-
1493 or www.jccotp.org.
Jewish music: Anshe
Emeth Memorial Temple
of New Brunswick hosts
One Great Afternoon
of Jewish Music with
the Kol Dodi Chorale of
MetroWest and Makhelat
Hamercaz Jewish Choir
of Central New Jersey ,
4 p.m., at Temple Emanu-
El, 756 East Broad St,
Westfield. (908) 232-
6770.
Calendar
50 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-50*
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 49
In New York
Sunday
MARCH 2
Richard Breitman and
Allan J. Lichtman
Authors in NYC: Richard
Breitman and Allan J.
Lichtman discuss their
findings about FDR and
the Jews at the Museum of
Jewish Heritage A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust,
2:30 p.m. 36 Battery Place.
(646) 437-4202 or www.
mjhnyc.org.
COURTESY JM
Family workshop/show: The
Paper Bag Players, celebrating
its 55th birthday, performs a
family show, Hiccup Help,
at the Jewish Museum, 2 p.m.
There will be a special behind-
the-scenes workshop is at
10:30 a.m. Fifth Avenue and
92nd Street (212) 423-3337 or
www.TheJewishMuseum.org.
Friday
MARCH 7
Shabbat Across America
in Montebello: Congregation
Shaarey Israel participates in
SAA, beginning with services,
6 p.m., and a kosher catered
dinner at 7. 18 Montebello
Road. (845) 369-0300 or
Maralewin1@optonline.net.
Singles
Saturday
MARCH 1
Young professionals
meet: Bergen Connections
invites modern Orthodox
professionals, 24-32, to
meet for a trivia event in
Manhattan, 8:30 p.m. Dairy
melave malka meal. $20.
bergenconnections1@gmail.
com.
Singles meet in NYC: The
Mount Sinai Jewish Center
of Washington Heights hosts
a singles event featuring
Chicago City Limits, pizza,
and refreshments. Doors open
8 p.m.; event at 8:30. Early
bird rates. 135 Bennett Ave.
www.mtsinaishul.com/event/
chicago-city-limits.html.
Hadassah takes its show on the road
The Hadassah Players of the Pascack Valley/North-
ern Valley chapter of Hadassah perform The New
View at the Jewish Home at Rockleigh on Thurs-
day, March 6, at 2:30 p.m. This original production
is a tale of well-known personalities and musical
performers. Refreshments will be served after the
show. All are welcome to the program at the Jew-
ish Home, 10 Link Drive. Call (201) 261- 3107.
Participants in last years FLJC/CBI Purim run. COURTESY FLJC/CBI
Purim run will aid children
The sisterhood of the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai
Israel will host its second annual Purim 5K Fun Run/1 Mile Walk on
Sunday, March 9, at 11 a.m. The day begins with registration at 10 in
the FLJC/CBI parking lot.
Runners are encouraged to come in costume.
All proceeds beneit Camp Ramahs Tikvah program for special
needs children. Prizes will be awarded. The entrance fee is $20, and
sponsorships are available. For information, call Ilene Laufer at (201)
6931477.
Local artists work
at London library
Irmari Nachts recycled artwork, Books39Isa-
iah, was selected to be included in an exhibi-
tion in Londons Wiener Library. The exhibi-
tion, Displaced, will be open for six weeks
beginning March 6.
A short ilm showing images of works by
participating artists will play continuously
throughout the exhibition.
Ms. Nacht lives in Englewood. Her work
has been featured in shows at the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in Tenafly and at the Bergen
County YJCC.
Announce your events
We welcome announcements of upcoming events. Announce-
ments are free. Accompanying photos must be high resolu-
tion, jpg les. Send announcements 2 to 3 weeks in advance.
Not every release will be published. Include a daytime
telephone number and send to:
NJ Jewish Media Group pr@jewishmediagroup.com
201-837-8818
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JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 51
MASTER OF CEREMONIES
Business attire. Donation $750 per person.
Other participation and sponsorship opportunities available.
For more information go to www.thisworld.us/gala or call (201) 221-3333. For more information go to www.thisworld.us/gala or call (201) 221-3333.
Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of Rabbi Shmuley, Americas Rabbi, in the rabbinate, and
the Lubavitcher Rebbe sending him to The University of Oxford to establish the Oxford LChaim
Society, and to honor several of its distinguished past presidents and other global luminaries.
The Second Annual Champions
of Jewish Values
International Awards Gala
This World: The Values Network Invites You To
Judy and Michael
Steinhardt
Co-founders,
Birthright Israel
Dr. Miriam and
Sheldon G. Adelson
Global Jewish
Philanthropists
DINNER CO-HOSTS
Lag BOmer, 5774
Sunday, May 18, 2014
Cipriani 42nd Street


New York City
5:00 PM
MAY
18
2014
Bret Stephens
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize
for Distinguished Commentary
Champion of Jewish
Light Award
SPECIAL RECOGNITION
Obituaries Local
52 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-52
BEATRYCE ZENN
Beatryce June Zenn, who was born on June 18,
1929, passed away on Jan. 30, 2014, at her home in
Millburn, NJ.
Bea resided in Millburn for the past 53 years and
was a member of Congregation Bnai Israel for most
of those years.
She worked as a legal secretary in Newark, NJ, until
the birth of her children. Bea then became a full-time
homemaker.
A very loving and caring mother to her three sons,
she excelled at being the same for her grandchildren.
Bea was the glue that kept her family together, and
also the families of her three sisters who predeceased
her.
After her children left for college, Bea returned to
part-time work as a legal secretary.
As a small woman, she cast a giant shadow, and was
loved by all who knew her.
Bea is survived by her husband of 62 years, Bernard;
her children, Dr. Roger Zenn, Robert and Amy
Zenn, and Jerey and Anne Zenn, and nine loving
grandchildren.
Funeral services were conducted from Menorah
Chapels at Millburn, 2950 Vauxhall Rd., Union, NJ,
on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. Interment was at Beth Israel
Cemetery Woodbridge, NJ.
PAID NOTICE
The Board of The Moriah School
extends deepest sympathies
to the family of
RABBI YOSSIE STERN, z"l

May the family be comforted
among the mourners of Tzion
and Yerushalayim
Dr. Elliot Prager, Principal
Evan Sohn, President
Jay Goldberg, Chairman
Donald Frankel
Donald I. Frankel of Fort Lee died on
February 18. Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Howard Katz
Howard Katz, 92, of Scottsdale, Ariz.,
formerly of New Jersey, died on
February 18.
A graduate of Montclair State Teachers
College, during World War II, he was
a captain and Army Air Corps B-24
navigator, receiving the Air Medal with
three Oak Leaf clusters, the Distinguished
Flying Cross, and a presidential citation.
An accountant, he acted in more than
60 plays and musicals for community
theater.
Predeceased by his wife, Muriel, in
2012, he is survived by his children,
Susan, and Michael (Sandra Kurinsky);
two granddaughters; and four
great-grandchildren.
Donations can be made to the New
Jersey Y Camps scholarship fund,
Jewish National Fund, or a local Jewish
community services organization.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoems
Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Max Magid
Max Magid, 87, of Rockaway died on
February 19.
He was an electrical engineer for Singer
Corporation in Totowa. He is survived by
his wife, Sally, ne Cohen; a son, William
( Jessica); and two grandchildren.
Donations can be sent to Memorial
Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New
York City. Arrangements were by Jewish
Memorial Chapel, Clifton.
Alyse Pinto
Alyse Diane Pinto, ne Nass, 52, of
Demarest died on February 23 at home.
Born in New York City, she was an
interior decorator in Bergen County.
She is survived by her husband, Ron,
her parents, Lenore and Robert Nass
of Wellington, Fla.; children, Brett,
Brandon, and Brittany; a sister, Sherri
Leonard of North Carolina; and a
brother, Mark Nass of Rockville
Center, N.Y.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial
Chapels, Fort Lee.
Yefim Rapoport
Yefim Rapoport of Fair Lawn died
February 20.
Arrangements were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Celia Schulberg
Celia Schulberg, ne Silver, 99, of
Waldwick, formerly of Rego Park, N.Y.,
and Coconut Creek, Fla., died January 13.
A New York University graduate,
she worked for the Joint Distribution
Committee. She was a member of the
Rego Park Jewish Center, where she
was a sisterhood president, and Temple
Emanuel of Paterson. She volunteered at Barnert Hospital in
Paterson and was a Hadassah life member.
Predeceased by her husband Jacob in 1975, she is survived
by her children: Rosalie (Lawrence) of Wyckoff, Howard
(Anne Jean) of Livingston, and Helen (Steven) of Randolph;
10 grandchildren, and 25 great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel,
Paramus.
Selma Shaw
Selma Shaw, ne Novinsky, 93, of Fair Lawn died on
February 20.
She and her husband were active members of the
Benjamin N. Cardozo Knights of Pythias Lodge in Fair Lawn.
Predeceased by her husband of 66 years, David, she is
survived by daughters, Melvina Feldman (Bernard), and
experience in making films like
this to that of some Israeli film-
makers. Have you had interac-
tions with Israeli filmmakers?
Are you accepted by them?
HA: Oh yes. A good friend
of mine is Ari Folman (Waltz
with Bashir, The Congress)
and Dror Shaul (Sweet Mud).
I have a good relationship with
many documentary filmmak-
ers [he lists a few]. And I just
received a phone call from (he
mentions another Israeli film-
maker) to work together on a
film.
EG: So you are comfortable
working with Israelis. But in
the film, you seem to ques-
tion Palestinians working with
Israelis.
HA: Working with Israelis is
something different than work-
ing with the Secret Service.
People know the difference.
EG: Some Israeli movie-
makers have used both Israeli
and Palestinian writers, cast,
and crew. You have chosen in
Omar to primarily employ
Palestinians. What of this?
HA: Look. Ill not make a
movie in order to prove that
we can live together. For
me, two things: We can live
together. Period, and Im sure
about it. And there is no prob-
lem being equal if the occu-
pation is condemned. And I
dont need to make a movie to
condemn it or not condemn
it. I dont need to discuss this.
This is how it needs to be, on
any place on this earth. Mak-
ing a movie for me, first of all,
is to tell a good story, a story
that is not just related to one
place. Omar is really about
love, betrayal, friendship, and
trust.
In Omar, I did hire several
professionals who were Israe-
lis, but when I could I wanted
to hire Palestinians, in order to
create to build up an indus-
try. I do want to make it clear
that I am against the occupa-
tion, but not against Jews. If we
can be equal with Jews, it is a
win for Palestinians to have
Jews as partners.
EG: What about screening
your film in Israel?
HA: We are creating an
Israeli version (with Hebrew
subtitles) and the film just like
Israeli films must first pass
the censor. I am not concerned.
Most Israelis who have seen it
like it. I would like to make it a
hit in Israel too, because it is a
good movie.
BEAUTY
FROM PAGE 47
BRIEF
U.S.-Israel differences on Iran
nuclear program persist ahead
of Netanyahu visit with Obama
The Iranian nuclear issue is expected to top the agenda during
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus upcoming early
March meeting with President Obama at the White House.
Netanyahu is angry about recent developments following the
nuclear negotiations between world powers and Iran, including
the U.S. dropping its demand that Iran halt uranium enrichment
and send already-enriched uranium out of the country.
During meetings with Israeli officials over the weekend, U.S.
Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, the
head of the U.S. delegation in the talks with Iran, said Iran would
be able to continue uranium enrichment, as long as it agrees to
do so under supervision.
Sherman said the U.S. and Israel have the same goal pre-
venting Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon but that there
are legitimate differences of opinion over the path to achieve
that goal.
I view with concern [the] fact that Iran believes that it will
realize its plan to be a nuclear threshold state, with an enrich-
ment capacity that it thinks cannot be touched, with the ability
to develop both nuclear weapons and intercontinental missiles,
which it is continuing to work on unhindered, Netanyahu said
at his cabinet meeting Sunday.
JNS.ORG
Obituaries
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 53
JS-53
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ
201-947-3336 888-700-EDEN
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GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588
WIEN & WIEN, INC.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533
402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
ALAN L. MUSICANT, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
MARTIN D. KASDAN, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
IRVING KLEINBERG, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
GuttermanMusicantWien.com
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
50 Eisenhower Drive, Paramus, NJ 07652 (201) 820-3900
Zvi S. Marans, MD
President
Jason M. Shames
Chief Executive O cer
Rabbi Yossie Stern
Founder and Executive Director of Project Ezrah.
We salute his lifelong dedication to Jewish learning
and his tireless eorts to improve the lives of fellow Jews.
Yhe Zichrono Baruch. May his memory be for a blessing.
The Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey
extends condolences on the passing of
Established 1902
Headstones, Duplicate Markers and Cemetery Lettering
With Personalized and Top Quality Service
Please call 1-800-675-5624
www.kochmonument.com
76 Johnson Ave., Hackensack, NJ 07601
201-791-0015 800-525-3834
LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.
Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel
Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years
13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) Fair Lawn, NJ
Richard Louis - Manager George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088 1924-1996
Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefts honored
Always within a familys nancial means
Our Facilities Will Accommodate
Your Familys Needs
Handicap Accessibility From Large
Parking Area
Conveniently Located
W-150 Route 4 East Paramus, NJ 07652
201.843.9090 1.800.426.5869
Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc
Jewish Funeral Directors
FAMILY OWNED & MANAGED
Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services
Gary Schoem Manager - NJ Lic. 3811
Barbara Sadowsky ( Jim); four grandchildren, and
seven great-grandchildren.
Donations can be made to the Jimmy Fund,
Brookline, Mass. Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Aleksandr Stanislavskiy
Aleksandr Stanislavskiy, 75, of Fair Lawn died
February 19. Arrangements were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Kitty Stramberg
Kitty Stramberg of Rochelle Park died on February
19. She is survived by her children, Paul, Ronald, and
Diane, and six grandchildren. Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Obituaries are prepared with information
provided by funeral homes. Correcting errors is
the responsibility of the funeral home.
Classified
54 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-54
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INTERNWANTEDto join our professional staff as a
future funeral director.
The successful candidate will be expected to enroll for the Fall 2014 semester as a full-time student
at a mortuary science school. The Jewish Memorial Chapel will pay tuition and a stipend.
Qualifications: Meet enrollment criteria of a mortuary science school.
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Have excellent interpersonal skills.
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fax: (973) 779-3191 or email: intern.JMC@gmail.com
The Jewish Memorial Chapel is a community owned non-profit funeral home that has been serving
the Jewish Community since 1921.
841 Allwood Road Clifton, NJ 07012
973-779-3048 Fax 973-779-3191
www.JewishMemorialChapel.org
Vincent Marazo, Manager
NJ License # 3424
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Classified
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 55
JS-55
Solution to last weeks puzzle. This weeks puzzle is
on page 45.
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56 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-56*
n 1 Lucille Golden, a Jewish Home at Rock-
leigh resident, made a Purim mask with
help from Stefanie Cohen, a member of the
JHRs Young Leadership. COURTESY JHR
n 2 Billed as an indoor street fair and concert,
New City Jewish Centers Come in from the
Cold attracted more than 500 people on Feb-
ruary 9. The highlight was a sold-out concert
by the Maccabeats, the a cappella group that
was founded at Yeshiva University in 2007
and rocketed to fame performing a Chanukah
parody of Taio Cruzs Dynamite. COURTESY NCJC
n 3 Teaneck native David Bodner, monitors
the video prompter at Yeshiva Universitys
student-run broadcast news team, The Shield.
The groups popular Week at a Glance
videos keep YU students up to date on the
academic calendar, extracurricular events,
and university athletic news. COURTESY YU
n 4 Mayor Ruvik Danilovich of Beer Sheva,
second from left, recently visited northern
New Jersey. At a Jewish National Fund parlor
meeting hosted by Dana and Golan Yehuda of
Tenafly, right, he discussed his citys growth
and the role that JNF has played. With them,
are the board president of the JNF of north-
ern New Jersey, Jill Janowski, left, and Tenafly
Mayor Peter Rustin, center. COURTESY JNF
n 5 Dr. Michael Berenbaum, a scholar, profes-
sor, rabbi, writer, and filmmaker who special-
izes in the study of the memorialization of
the Holocaust, spoke to eighth-graders last
month at the Moriah School. COURTESY MORIAH
1 2
3 4
5
Real Estate & Business
JS-57
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 57
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
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123 Broadway, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
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44 Bilton St, Tnk $320,000 1:00-3:00pm
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129 Wilbur Rd, Bergenfield
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Allan Dorfman
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201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Ofce
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FORT LEE - THE COLONY
1 BR High oor. Updated. $155,000
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Serving Bergen County since 1985.
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and April 3 to men and women with visible, abnormal leg
veins such as bulging varicose veins or spider veins. Those
who experience leg pain or have a history of blood clots
are encouraged to attend.
Patients should know the early warning signs for
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p.m. Pre-registration is required. Call (866)-980-3462 or
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Like us on
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Real Estate & Business
58 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-58
I do want to date for marriage. I defi-
nitely want to settle down with a part-
ner. Im a big proponent of gay mar-
riage. Its hard for me to envision having
a gay wedding, just because I know how
opposed my father is to it; I cant imag-
ine having such a simcha without my
father there.
The Chabad community Im part
of is very welcome. I even brought the
woman I was dating at the time. It was
pretty understood that we were a cou-
ple, though it was never really spelled
out.
I know Im very welcome there, as
a person and a Jew. Ive been able to
give divrei Torah and teach the Hebrew
course. The rabbi and rebbetzin know. I
think they know, she said.
Does she have a message she would
like to send to the Orthodox Jews back
home?
Open your doors to every Jew, she
said. To every person. Even to people
who are different. Dont be afraid. Just
be warm and welcoming, she said.
Were just people. Were Jews who
care just as much about Shabbos and
kashrus and everything.
We want t o be par t of t he
community.
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
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Ruth Miron-Schleider
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NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
58 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-58
Retreat
FROM PAGE 17
has changed along with human under-
standing, so too can the halachah here,
she suggested. The rabbis of the rabbinic
period were so much more courageous as
halachic decisors than people tend to be
today.
There is now a tendency for halachic
authorities to shrug their shoulders and
say that there is nothing they can do. That
is a position that is foreign to the halachic
process.
Rabbi Lewittes, who is lesbian, is at the
group as a facilitator, not a participant.
Her wife, Andy Lewittes, who is trained
as a social worker, facilitates as well. The
couple is well positioned to help parents
see a joyous future for their children.
To the extent that I can, I model life
as a gay women, frmly rooted in Jewish
practice, Jewish tradition, and Jewish
values, raising a family in a same-sex
marriage and a richly Jewish home, and
having the privilege of being a leader in
the Jewish community, Rabbi Lewittes
said. I hope that I can help families see
a promising future, and a really hopeful
one, flled with as many possibilities as
anyone else has for a Jewish life.
Partnering with the Bergen County High
School of Jewish Studies, Shaar is planning
the Purim Unmasquerade Ball, a place
where LBGTQ kids and their friends can
feel comfortable removing their masks. It
will be hosted at Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafy.
The next parents meeting is set for
March 25. Confdentiality is assured. For
more information about either event,
email shaarcommunities2@gmail.com or
call JoAnne Forman at (201) 213-9569.
LGBTQ Kids
FROM PAGE 17
Friedberg welcomes
Aviva Baldasar Clark
Aviva Baldasar Clark has
joined Friedberg Proper-
tys staff of professional
real estate associates.
Aviva is located in Fried-
bergs Tenafly office at 20
West Clinton Ave.
Ms. Clark is a lifelong
resident of Tenafy. A
graduate of Tenafy High
School, she attended
Tulane University in
New Orleans.
A member with her
husband and children of the JCC on the Palisades,
Ms. Clark maintains a strong sense of community and
knowledge of the entire Bergen County area, most
notably the school systems, both public and private.
Her expertise lies in her attention to detail, strong
organizational skills, and warm personality. She is ready
to put her expertise to work for buyers and sellers alike
and can be reached in the ofce at (201) 894-1234 or on
her cell, (917) 744-2542.
Aviva Baldasar Clark
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Cell: 201-615-5353 BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com
Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corp. an equal opportunity company, equal housing opportunity, owned and operated by NRT Inc.
Renee Bouaziz Coldwell Banker 130 Dean Drive Tenay, NJ
Cell 201 233-1852 O ce 201 567-7788 Fax 862 345-2468 www.reneebouaziz.net
Renee Bouaziz presents ...
240 Jones Road, Englewood. Classic traditional center hall
colonial with four bedrooms and three and one half baths.
Elegant large living room with stone replace and custom
cherry built ins, extra large dining room with hardwood
oors, eat in kitchen with island, family room has easy
access to backyard, and powder room.
280 Fountain Road, Englewood. Classic Victorian design
expertly blends with contemporary convenience and ame-
nities in this magnicent cedar and stone custom estate
on a lushly landscaped acre by the renowned talents of
James Paragano.
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AYELET HURVITZ
Realtor
NJAR

Circle of Excellence Sales


Award

, 2012
Coldwell Banker Advisory Council, 2013
Member of NAR, NJAR, EBCBOR, NJMLS
Bilingual in English and Hebrew
Licensed Realtor in NJ & NY.
Direct: 201-294-1844
Alpine/Closter Office:
201-767-0550 x235
www.ayelethurvitz.com
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18 LAMBS, CRESSKILL 185 E. PALISADE, ENGLEWOOD
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A longtime Tenafly resident and prior resident of NYC: Ayelet possesses a strong
knowledge of the neighborhoods, communities and schools in Bergen County. This
along with her professional experience working on Wall Street makes a tremendous
difference when assisting her clients, says Terri Buffa, branch Vice President of
Coldwell Banker, Alpine/Closter.
*Based on MLS Report 2013 Coldwell Banker LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark of Coldwell Banker
Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
0003512670-01_0003512670-01 6/25/13 3:32 PM Page 1
AYELET HURVITZ
Realtor
NJAR

Circle of Excellence Sales


Award

, 2012
Coldwell Banker Advisory Council, 2013
Member of NAR, NJAR, EBCBOR, NJMLS
Bilingual in English and Hebrew
Licensed Realtor in NJ & NY.
Direct: 201-294-1844
Alpine/Closter Office:
201-767-0550 x235
www.ayelethurvitz.com
3
5
1
2
6
7
0

N
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18 LAMBS, CRESSKILL 185 E. PALISADE, ENGLEWOOD
J
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20 HEDGEROW, ENGLEWOOD 275 ENGLE ST., ENGLEWOOD
J
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F
O
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S
A
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E
A longtime Tenafly resident and prior resident of NYC: Ayelet possesses a strong
knowledge of the neighborhoods, communities and schools in Bergen County. This
along with her professional experience working on Wall Street makes a tremendous
difference when assisting her clients, says Terri Buffa, branch Vice President of
Coldwell Banker, Alpine/Closter.
*Based on MLS Report 2013 Coldwell Banker LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark of Coldwell Banker
Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
0003512670-01_0003512670-01 6/25/13 3:32 PM Page 1
AYELET HURVITZ
Realtor
Direct: 201-294-1844
Alpine/Closter Ofce:
201-767-0550 x 235
www.ayelethurvitz.com
Gracious victorian on Englewood East Hill.
Traditional charm in this beautiful home,
with 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 2 1/2 baths.
Te backyard has a beautiful perennial
gardens, patio, and a large lawn. Newer roof.
Enclosed front porch. Updated electric.
Semi-nished basement.
NJAR

Circle of Excellence Sales


Award

, 2012-2013
Member of NAR, NJAR,
EBCBOR, NJMLS
Bilingual in English/Hebrew
Licensed Realtor
in NJ & NY
a person and a Jew. Ive been able to
give divrei Torah and teach the Hebrew
course. The rabbi and rebbetzin know. I
think they know, she said.
Does she have a message she would
like to send to the Orthodox Jews back
home?
Open your doors to every Jew, she
said. To every person. Even to people
who are different. Dont be afraid. Just
be warm and welcoming, she said.
Were just people. Were Jews who
care just as much about Shabbos and
kashrus and everything.
We want t o be par t of t he
community.
JS-59
JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014 59
Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
120 DEVRIESE COURT
TENAFLY
82 OAK AVENUE
TENAFLY
29 FARVIEW ROAD
TENAFLY
62 RIDGE ROAD
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ENGLEWOOD
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ENGLEWOOD
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17 HENMAR DRIVE
CLOSTER
41 MCCAIN COURT
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
35 KARENS LANE
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TEANECK
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193 VANDELINDA AVENUE
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WHITEMAN HOUSE, #7-I
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BUCKINGHAM TOWER, #1605
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THE PALISADES, #2507
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Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
60 JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 28, 2014
JS-60
RCBC
Like Glatt Express
Supermarket on
Facebook for daily
specials and offers!
1400 Queen Anne Rd Teaneck, NJ
201-837-8110
*While Supplies last the
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Tomchei Shabbos and Leket Purim cards
are available to purchase in Glatt Express.
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