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DOE/ID/12079-L109 DE84 012188


NOTICE
PORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE. It has been reproducedfrom the best available copy to permit the broadest possible avail-

sbtlity.
RESULTS OF A DETAILED GRAVITY SURVEY I N THE ALANOSA AREA, ALANOSA COUNTY, COLORADO

bY
Claron E. Vackelprang

September, 1983

Work performed under Contract Number DE-AC07-801012079

DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document.

00E/ID/12079-109 E SL -126

RESULTS OF A DETAILED GRAVITY SURVEY I N THE ALAMOSA AREA, ALAMOSA COUNTY, COLORADO

Claron E. backelprang

September, 1983

Work performed under Contract Number DE-AC07-80ID12079

E a r t h Science Laboratory U n i v e r s i t y o f Utah Research I n s t i t u t e 420 Chipeta Way, S u i t e 120

I
I

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1

Prepared f o r U.S. Department o f Energy D i v i s i o n o f Geothermal Energy

*
NOTICE T h i s report was prepared t o document work sponsored by the United States

Government.

Neither the U n i t e d States nor i t s agent, the United States

Department of Energy, nor any Federal employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors o r their employees, makes any warranty, express or imp1 Sed, o r assumes any 1egal 1iabi 1i t y o r responsi bi 1i t y f o r the accuracy, completeness, o r usefulness o f any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, o r represents t h a t its use would not infringe privately owned r i g h t s .
.

NOTICE Reference t o a company or product name does not imply approval o r recommendation of the product by the University of Utah Research Institute o r
the U.S.

Department of Energy t o the exclusion of others t h a t may be suitable.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
ABSTRACT.

............................................................. INTRODUCTION. ......................................................... GENERAL GEOLOGY.. ..................................................... Gravity Data. .................................................... Survey Survey Results. ............................................. Model R e s u l t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Procedure.............................................5

. l
. 2 . 2
.3

-5

GEOLOGIC I M P L I C A T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

........................... .......................... ..........................


).........................13 ILLUSTRATIO

11 12

APPENDIX B.................................,

Figure 1 . P1a t e I Plate I 1

Location Map
A1 amosa Basin Geologic Cross-Seci ions

Simple Bouguer Gravity Map o f thc A1 amosa Area, A1amosa County, Colorado 1 Alamosa Area, Colorado

P l a t e 111 Computed three-dimensional g r a v i l Plate I V Plate V

21/2- Dimensional Gravity Model Ba I ' , Alamosa Area, Colorado 21 / 2 Dimensional Gravity Model

,'B

Alamosa Area, Colorado

ABSTRACT

A t o t a l o f 322 s t a t i o n s , centered on t h e City o f Alamosa, were surveyed

w i t h a gravimeter during September, 1981. h o r s t t o have an i r r e g u l a r top.

These data have shown t h e Alamosa

This i r r e g u l a r i t y i s thought t o be caused by

paleoval l e y s and/or down-dropped f a u l t blocks w i t h i n t h e Precambrian horst. The City o f Alamosa l i e s d i r e c t l y over a l o c a l g r a v i t y low. Volcanic rocks

w i t h i n t h i s low may contain a r e s e r v o i r f o r geothermal f l u i d s , as y e t unsubstantiated by d r i l l i n g . Thermal f l u i d s a r e thought t o e n t e r t h e Alamosa

area v i a a q u i f e r s f r o m t h e west (San-Juan Mountains) and/or f r o m t h e Rio Grande R i f t zone with t h e f l u i d s r i s i n g along f r a c t u r e s w i t h i n and bordering
\

t h e horst.

The most favorable d r i l l i n g t a r g e t s appear t o be e i t h e r near t h e

center o f t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low o r i n t h e f r a c t u r e zone a t t h e edges o f t h e i n f e r r e d down-dropped f a u l t blocks.

INTRODUCTION

A t t h e request o f DOE/DGE Idaho Operations Office t h e Earth Science


Laboratory/University o f Utah Research I n s t i t u t e (ESL/UURI) undertook a d e t a i l e d g r a v i t y survey o f a 200 square m i l e area centered on t h e City o f Alamosa, Colorado.

Low temperature (90-110F) geothermal f l u i d s are c u r r e n t l y


These include d i r e c t

being used by several businesses i n o r near Alamosa.

heating o f motels, shopping malls and p u b l i c swimming pools. The City o f Alamosa, through p a r t i c i p a t i o n i n t h e DOE/DGE User-Coupled D r i l l i n g Program, had contracted t o d r i l l f o r thermal f l u i d s which would be used f o r d i s t r i c t heating and i n d u s t r i a l processing.

A d r i l l s i t e had been

selected and d r i l l i n g scheduled b u t p r i o r t o i t s commencement, ESL received

r o m DQE/DGE Idaho Operations O f f i c e t o perform a g r a v i t y t h e request f


survey. This g r a v i t y survey was t o provide a d d i t i o n a l data which would a i d i n

t h e s e l e c t i o n o f a d r i l l s i t e w i t h i n t h e area most promising f o r thermal fluids.

A meeting was h e l d w i t h t h e d r i l l i n g contractor, Dr. Jay Kunze o f Energy


Services Inc., Idaho F a l l s , Idaho, immediately f o l l o w i n g t h e f i e l d survey.
A

rough copy o f t h e Bouguer g r a v i t y map was presented and i t s general i m p l i c a t i o n s were discussed. Unfortunately, t h e i n i t i a l d r i l l s i t e was

d r i l l e d i r r e s p e c t i v e o f t h e g r a v i t y results. GENERAL GEOLOGY The generalized geology of t h e Alamosa area presented i n t h i s r e p o r t i s , f o r t h e most part, a summary o f Colorado Geological Survey Special P u b l i c a t i o n

17 by Dr. Richard L. Burroughs (1981).

The City o f Alamosa i s located a t t h e south-central end o f an intermontane s t r u c t u r a l depression. This v a l l e y i s approximately 40 m i l e s

wide and 70 m i l e s long (Figure 1) and i s designated t h e Alamosa Basin. Trending north-south through t h e center o f t h e Alamosa Basin i s a buried bedrock horst. The City o f Alamosa l i e s d i r e c t l y above t h i s h o r s t which

consists o f Precambrian rocks and has been penetrated a t a depth o f about 5400 f e e t by a d r i l l t e s t located roughly 10 m i l e s n o r t h o f town i n t h e CSESW Sec. 16, T.29N.,
R.1OW.

A d d i t i o n a l d r i l l i n g s t i l l f u r t h e r t o t h e n o r t h o f town has shown t h a t t h e two grabens formed on e i t h e r s i d e o f t h e Alamosa Horst (Plate I ) have developed a t d i f f e r e n t times g e o l o g i c a l l y and t o s i g n i f i c a n t l y d i f f e r e n t depths. The Baca Graben which formed t o t h e east o f Alamosa has an This

accumulation o f v a l l e y f i l l estimated t o be a t l e a s t 19,000 f e e t t h i c k . graben was w e l l formed p r i o r t o t h e l a t e Eocene. formed west o f t h e h o r s t d u r i n g t h e Pre-Miocene and has accumulated about

10,000 feet of m a t e r i a l which contains ash-flow t u f f s and volcanoclastics from t h e San Juan volcanic f i e l d s t i l l f u r t h e r t o t h e west.
'

These volcanics are

n o t thought t o extend, i n any s i g n i f i c a n t thickness, across t h e Alamosa Horst nor are they present i n t h e Baca Graben t o t h e east. G r a v i t y Data
/

The g r a v i t y data i n t h e Alamosa Basin p r i o r t o t h e

ESL survey consisted,

i n part, o f USGS data presented on Map GP-895 by Behrendt and Gajwa (1974); a Masters Thesis, U n i v e r s i t y o f Texas approximately 3500 s t a t i o n s f r o m th Paso (Davis, 1979) which included of t h e Department of Defense

g r a v i t y l i b r a r y ; and recent unpublished datal f r o m t h e Colorado School o f Mines. With t h e exception o f t h e Colorado School o f Mines data, these g r a v i t y

Figure 1.

Pinysiographic subdivisions San Luis basin (modified after Upson, 1939).

a '

data are o f a regional nature w i t h s t a t i o n s l b e i n g occupied generally a t two

Avenues.

An a l t e r n a t e base s t a t i o n was s e t a t benchmark H364 located on t h e


I

1967 (Wool lard, 1979). Survey Resul t s The r e s u l t s o f t h e survey are presented as t h e Simple Bouguer Gravity Map

c o n s i s t i n g o f s t a t i o n s numbered 2 0 0 1 t o 2060 and 1 8 0 1 t o 1822, was provided by

*'

Or. Ralph C. Holmer o f t h e Colorado School o f M'ines.

This p r o f i l e indicates

t h e western edge o f t h e Alamosa h o r s t as a steep l o c a l gradient which i s superimposed upon a strong regional g r a v i t y gradient. The regional trend

undoubtedly continues westward i n t o t h e t h i c k volcanic section comprising t h e San Juan volcanic f i e l d . The g r a v i t y p r o f i l e across t h e h o r s t indicates t h a t The Colorado School o f Mines data This p r o f i l e was The eastern

t h e c i t y o f Alamosa sets on a g r a v i t y low.

d i d not define t h e eastern edge o f t h e Alamosa Horst.

therefore extended an a d d i t i o n a l f o u r miles t o t h e east by ESL.

edge o f t h e h o r s t appears t o be located approximately one m i l e east of t h e p o i n t where t h e School o f Mines p r o f i l e ended, ( a t s t a t i o n 1822). While t h e

ESL extension d i d not completely cross t h e Baca graben, s u f f i c i e n t data were acquired t o i n d i c a t e t h i s graben i s l i k e l y formed f r o m several down-faulted b l ocks Three g r a v i t y highs, separate and d i s t i n c t from each other, were delineated within t h e l i m i t s o f t h i s survey. These occur t o t h e northwest, This

northeast and south o f town and border t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low a t Alamosa. low i s centered roughly midway between main s t r e e t (Highway 160) and t h e airport. amplitude. The low i s l o c a l i z e d An east-west t r e n d

Monte V i s t a and Baca grabens. and i t i s these "troughs" t h a t These "troughs" then form an i n being a t t h e i r junction. Model Resu?t s
I

r t e d "T" (

1 ) with the

l o w on t h e h o r s t

I
I

The g r a v i t y data presented on P l a t e I1 were i n t e r p r e t e d i n terms o f subsurface s t r u c t u r e by computing two and one-half dimensional and three-

dimensional models using algorithms modified a t ESL.

The r e s u l t a n t models,

shown as P l a t e I11 t o Plate V, are excellent f i t s t o t h e Bouguer g r a v i t y data. I n t e r p r e t a t i o n a l ambiguities include t h e density, depth of b u r i a l and

thickness of t h e various rocks units, and these r e s u l t i n a non-unique i n t e r p r e t a t i o n o f t h e g r a v i t y data. I n computing t h e three-dimensional model, rectangular prisms o f varying dimensions and density a r e combined t o approximate i r r e g u l a r i t i e s i n t h e subsurface bedrock. The parameters f o r t h e model determined t o be a "best

f i t " t o t h e Bouguer g r a v i t y map a r e l i s t e d i n Appendix A.

The model on P l a t e I11 suggests t h e two northern g r a v i t y highs are caused by Precambrian rocks occurring a t depths between 4,750 f e e t and 5,600 feet. The g r a v i t y low between t h e northern highs i s formed i n t h e model by p l a c i n g a down-dropped block a t a depth o f 5,600 feet. This block has an i n f e r r e d The

s e c t i o n o f v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s 600 f e e t t h i c k above t h e Precambrian rocks.

g r a v i t y low upon which Alamosa i s l o c a t e d was modeled with two down-dropped blocks. The f i r s t , ceqtered on t h e

ow, has i n f e r r e d v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s , 1400


The second,

feet t h i c k , i n t h e depth i n t e r v a l o f 5,600 f e e t t o 7,000 feet.

which forces an eastward elongation o f t h e low, has i n f e r r e d v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s ,

900 f e e t t h i c k , i n t h e depth i n t e r v a l o f 5,600 f e e t t o 6,500 feet.

Finally,

t h e g r a v i t y high t o t h e south o f town was modeled w i t h Precambrian rocks a t a depth o f 5,000 feet. Plates I V and V show model r e s u l t s using a o r i g i n a l l y devel oped by
USGS (Cady, 1977).

- dimensional algorithm
This algorithm i s 2l/2-

dimensional i n t h a t i t allows f o r polygons o f f i n i t e r a t h e r than i n f i n i t e

Two p r o f i l e s , labeled B-B' and D-D', were computed as north-south and east-west p r o f i l e s , respectively, across t h e survey area ( P l a t e 11). c o n t r o l f o r these p r o f i l e s i s taken from P l a t e I o f Burroughs, 1981. Geologic This

geologic cross-section crosses t h e Alamosa h o r s t t o t h e n o r t h o f t h e survey 'area and u t i l i z e s deep d r i l l hole data f o r c o n t r o l . GEOLOGIC IMPL ICATIONS Obviously t h e top o f t h e Alamosa h o r s t i s very i r r e g u l a r , t h e most l i k e l y cause being s t r u c t u r a l deformation ( f a u l t i n g ) o f t h e h o r s t i t s e l f due t o rifting.
,

Based upon t h e p i c t u r e presented by t h e ESL Bouguer g r a v i t y map and

t h e computer models, i t i s hypothesized t h a t t h e "troughs" d e f i n e down-faulted blocks w i t h i n t h e horst. The g r a v i t y highs are more s t a b l e p o r t i o n s of t h e

h o r s t and t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low centered on Alamosa i s p o s s i b l y due t o an i n t e r s e c t i o n o f east-west and n o r t h t r e n d i n g f a u l t sets which may have caused a small block t o be down-dropped a few hundred feet. Cuttings f r o m t h e d r i l l hole r e c e n t l y completed f o r t h e City o f Alamosa show t h e presence o f a s i g n i f i c a n t thickness o f Oligocene ( ? ) v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s f i l l i n g i n t h e "troughs". These v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s were encountered a t a depth

o f -approximately 5,300 f e e t and continued u n t i l t h e Precambrian was i n t e r s e c t e d a t 6,370 f e e t ( J . Z e i s l o f pers. comm.). This d r i l l hole was

l o c a t e d on t h e southwest f l a n k o f t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low; hence, a t h i c k e r s e c t i o n o f v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s probably e x i s t s w i t h i n t h e center o f t h e g r a v i t y 1OW.


It i s not known I f v o l c a n i c l a s t i c rocks cap Precambrian basement beneath

t h e g r a v i t y highs.

Conceivably t h e v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s c o u l d have formed a

b l a n k e t over Precambrian highs and these v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s were subsequently

8
\

eroded during t h e Late Eocene.

It i s a l s o possible t h a t t h e g r a v i t y highs a r e

i n d i c a t i v e of Precambrian rocks without associated volcanic cover as assumed by t h e 3-D model. I n any event, t h e recent d r i l l - h o l e has shown the presence

o f t h e v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s w i t h i n t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low and these very probably extend throughout t h e postulated "troughs". EXPLORATION TARGET
I

Burroughs (1981) has mentioned t h e presence o f paleoval leys and/or downdropped blocks along t h e Alamosa h o r s t and has discussed t h e i r importance t o t h e discovery o f geothermal f l u i d s . The d e t a i l e d g r a v i t y survey completed by

ESL has f u r t h e r i n d i c a t e d what appears t o be paleovalleys and/or down-dropped


blocks w i t h i n t h e Alamosa horst. These appear t o t r a v e r s e t h e c r e s t of t h e

h o r s t i n a n o r t h and east-west d i r e c t i o n and could a l l o w f o r communication o f water between t h e Monte Vista and Baca grabens. Services, The hole d r i l l e d by Energy

Inc. has shown t h e presence o f a t l e a s t 1,060 f e e t o f Since these rocks

v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s upon t h e Alamosa h o r s t near t h e a i r p o r t .

comprise p a r t o f what i s c a l l e d t h e "confined a q u i f e r " t h e r e appears t o be adequate r e s e r v o i r p o t e n t i a l f o r ponded geothermal f l u i d s p a r t i c u l a r l y w i t h i n t h e areas o f t h e down-dropped blocks. The source o f t h e t The area i s p a r t o f t h e R i waters i s possible. t e r s w i t h i n t h e Alamosa area i s n o t known. e R i f t zone so ep c i r c u l a t i o n o f meteoric
I

These heated f l u i d s would l i k e l y r i s e along t h e border

f a u l t s o f t h e Alamosa h o r s t and could conceivably f i l t e r through. t h e h o r s t along t h e f r a c t u r e s o f t h e down-dropped blocks. A l t e r n a t i v e l y , thermal waters

could be moving l a t e r a l l y away f r o m a heat source i n t h e San Juan volcanic f i e l d and i n t o t h e Alamosa area as postulated by Burroughs (1981). t h e h i g h heat flow measurements (2.85 Certainly

0.65 HFU) i n t h e San Juan volcanic

f i e l d support t h e presence o f a buried heat source.

The eastward d i p o f t h e

volcanic rocks w i t h i n t h e Monte Vista graben would place t h e Alamosa area down d i p and along t h e hydrologic gradient. Regardless o f t h e thermal f l u i d source, i t i s s t i l l possible t o formulate an e x p l o r a t i o n t a r g e t i n t h e Alamosa area.
I f t h e volcanics form a r e s e r v o i r

f o r thermal f l u i d s , then an area such as t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low centered on Alamosa would l i k e l y have a t h i c k e r volcanic s e c t i o n and hence a greater chance f o r development o f a s i z a b l e reservoir. Not a l l volcanic flows have
A

t h e same t e x t u r e or, more importantly, t h e same p o r o s i t y and permeability. d r i l l - h o l e centered on t h e g r a v i t y low would l i k e l y i n t e r s e c t t h e greatest

thickness of v o l c a n i c l a s t i c s and thus increase t h e odds f o r a productive well. Since f l u i d s might be flowing along f r a c t u r e s as w e l l as through aquifers, an a l t e r n a t i v e d r i l l l o c a t i o n could t e s t a major f r a c t u r e zone. While t h e major bounding f a u l t s t o t h e Alamosa h o r s t can not be overlooked as p o t e n t i a l targets, a b e t t e r area might be found on t h e h o r s t i t s e l f along one o f t h e borders t o t h e postulated down-faulted blocks. An area could be Such an

I d e n t i f i e d where two o r more o f these blocks and/or f a u l t s i n t e r s e c t . area may e x i s t along t h e northern s i d e o f t h e l o c a l g r a v i t y low.
, *

It would be

necessary t o b e t t e r define t h e edges o f any down-faulted blocks before

i s area.

This cannot be done w i t h a d d i t i o n a l g r a v i t y data b u t This could be q u i t e o s t l y than d r i l l i n g

d with a r e f l e c t i o n seismic survey.

expensive ($20,000 t o $40,000) b u t i t would s t i l l be 1 a "dry" hole.

10

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Special thanks a r e given t o Dr. Ralph C. Holmer o f t h e Colorado School o f Mines f o r h i s time spent i n discussing t h e geophysical data i n he Alamosa Area and f o r permission t o use t h e g r a v i t y data acquired by t h e School o f Mines along Highway 160. Thanks are a l s o given t o Bear Creek M ning Company

i n Tucson, Arizona f o r t h e i r generous loan o f a gravimeter.

11

REFERENCES

Behrendt, John C., and Bajwa, LaCretia Y., 1974, Bouguer Gravity Map of Colorado, Geophysical Investigations Map GP-895. Burroughs, Richard L., 1981, A Summary o f t h e Geology o f t h e San Luis Basin, Colorado-New Mexico w i t h emphasis on t h e Geothermal Potential f o r t h e Monte Vista Graben. Colorado Geological Survey Special Publication 18. 35 PP. Davis, Gene Howell, 1979, A Gravity Study o f t h e San Luis Basin, Colorado. Thesis, Master of Science, U n i v e r s i t y o f Texas a t E l Paso. Wool l a r d , G. P . , 1979, The New Gravity System--Changes i n i n t e r n a t i o n a l g r a v i t y base values and anomaly values. Geophysics, v. 44, no. 8, p. 1352-1 366.

APPENDIX A
Project name: Model : Units i n Feet A1 amosa Area, Col orado Gravity Survey

3-D Gravity Model

PRISM
1

x1

x2

Y1
-85000. 10560. 20000. 10000. 29568. 15840. -18480. -18480. -85000. -10560. -10560. -18480. -18480. -85000. 47520. 6500. -85000. -85000.

Y2
265000. 27984. 25000. 15840. 32736. 40000. -7392. -5280. -18480. 6500. 2112. 265000. 47520. 265000. 265000 47520. 265000. 265000. 265000.

D1
0.

D2
20000. 5200. 5200. 5200. 5200. 5200. 5600. 5600. 20000. 7000. 6500. 20000. 20000. 8000. 20000. 6200. 10000. 20000. 20000. 20000. 5600. 5600.

Dc
-0.83 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 -0.45 -0.45 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 6 3 0 . 8 3 -0.45 0 . 3 5 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3 0 . 8 3

-85000. -21 120. -12144. 15840. 8448. 21120. 18480. -13728. -26400. -2640. 8448. 31680. -26400. -85000. -26500.

100000. -2640. -7392. 24816. 21120. 24816. 31680. -2640. 52800. 8448. 18480. 52800. 31680. -26400. 31680. 8448. -26400.

2 3 4
5

5000. 4900. 4500. 4750.


5000.

7
8 9 10

5400. 5300.

5000.
5600. 5600. 7000.
5600.

11
12 13 14

5600. 5400. 5600. 8000. 12500. 10000.

16

-2640. -85000. 75000. 52800.

17
18

75000. -26400. -2640. 31680.

5000.

20 21

-85000. -26400. 8448.

-85000.
6500. 6500.

265000.
40000.

10000.
5200.

40000. . 5200.

13

Grid Parameters Gravity Model Number of Grid Points i n X Direction: Number of Grid Points i n Y Direction: Grid Spacing i n Feet: 5280.00 X Offset i n Feet: 0.00 Y O f f s e t i n Feet: 0.00

19 15

APPENDIX B PRINCIPAL FACTORS FOR GRAVITY STATIONS

15

I'

. E

4
-2
4

'a

E t & .

L.

EFFICIENCY LINE8 22-2 1 0

EFFICIENCY LINE* 22-2 1 0

...

1
<
ii

I!

. -

I1

L.

.... .- -- . . ... -

... -.. .

.. -. - -

. . . . . . . .- -. .._.- . .

. . .

. . . . . .
. .

...

-. .. - ....

. . . .
.. ._ . .

. . . . .._ " .~

_._..

. . .

-*

..

0
c

b ... , @!
...
...

EFFICIENCY LlNEa 22-2 I O

L d
,

EFFICIENCY LlNEe 22-2 1 0

LJ

@!

* EFnCIENCY LlNEe 22-2 1 0

I ,

3p=

'WJ

s
..

MONTE VlSTA GRABEN

ALAMOSA HORST

PLATE 1

ALAMOSA BASIN CROSS-SECTIONS


aker 8urroughr. 1981

U .-

.
8 .I

I . )

SSR = 3 . 8 8

Xf:
h)

I I

cn

10.56

* I

2 1.82

. I

31.68

42.24

52.80

63.36

K ILOFEET
OLYGON OBSERVED= 0 CRLCULATED= X
1 2

DENSITY CONTRRST -0.43000 -0.331308

# '
1

I ,
WRFRCE

7;;a
U

1
alluvium

,N. a a

KILOFEET

PLATE I V

10.56

21.12

31.68

42.24

52.80

'

6S36

73.92

84.48

55.04

115.60

116.16

KILOFEET
OBSERVED= 0 CRLCULATED- X

OLYGON OENSUY

-0.s5oou -0.4soee
-0.43000
1 .

-o.ssoeo

,
W I Y t

1
allavian