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t h e a n n u a l r e p ort of t h e u n i v e r s i t y of d e n v e r , 2 0 0 7 - 2 0 0 8

Great universities are those that at tack the great issues


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CONTENTS

LETTER FROM THE CHANCELLOR 3

LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN 4

YEAR IN REVIEW 7

IN SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC GOOD 11

ATTRACTING THE BEST AND BRIGHTEST 14

AN INCOMPARABLE YEAR FOR PIONEER ATHLETICS 19

THE ARTS: DU’S EXCITING T WIST ON A GREAT TRADITION 24

A VISIONARY EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT 26

GLOBAL DU: AT WORK IN THE WORLD 34

AN EVOLVING CAMPUS 39

A SUSTAINABILIT Y PL AN FOR THE FUTURE 41

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW 42

ADVANCING THE INSTITUTION 43

MANAGING THE CAMPUS AS AN ASSET 44

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND ADMINISTRATION 48

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LETTER FROM THE CHANCELLOR

Dear Friends,

As we accelerate through this, our 145th year, we at the University of Denver have our
gaze firmly focused on a bright future that holds many possibilities. Those possibilities are
bounded and informed by the past, though, and it is wise to look back, taking stock of the
year just passed and assessing its lessons.
With that in mind, we are very pleased to present this summary report for the 2007–
2008 year at DU (fiscal 2008). The year was, in many ways, the best in our history, marked
by a number of major milestones thoroughly aligned with our vision of being a great private
university dedicated to the public good.
The intellectual capital of the University continued to deepen and grow, as was clearly
reflected in our teaching and learning environment and in our scholarship and research.
The University community continued to bind itself together more tightly, as it focused its
energies on a number of key strategic objectives. Our national and international reach
widened, as we enrolled more international students, sent a record number of our under-
graduates abroad to study and engaged our intellectual assets with a vast array of constituents
across the world. Our business operations ran more effectively than in virtually any previous
year, generating new capital that was invested in our students, faculty, programs and facilities.
As all of this activity and progress continued to serve the intellectual and personal
growth of our students, so did it also impact the lives of countless people in the many
communities with which we interact — in Denver, the region and the world. We remain
committed to the notion that our success is measured by the lives of our alumni, the work
of our faculty and the manner in which they impact the lives of people outside the realm
of academia.
As we look ahead, the state of our economy is certainly such as to warrant due caution,
and we are constantly scanning the horizon for signs of trouble. Those signs have not yet
appeared, in enrollments, fundraising or other aspects of our operations where they might
be expected. Surely we will ultimately be affected, but the University is far better prepared to
weather an economic storm than in times past. Good long-term planning, healthy reserves
and a far broader reach will serve us well. All of that being said, at this moment the current
year shows every indication of being still better than the last.

R OBERT D. C OOMBE

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LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN

Dear Friends,

Throughout its history, the University of Denver has sought to embody the highest ideals
of its faculty, staff, administrators, alumni and supporters. That has never been an easy task,
but it has always been a delight to pursue.
Today, after nearly two decades of improving the campus infrastructure, of investing in
people and programs, the University is positioned to extend and expand its legacy.
Thanks to a multimillion-dollar building campaign, today’s students and faculty work
in state-of-the-art buildings and labs that are designed to enhance collaboration and inquiry.
All of our new and renovated academic facilities provide optimal environments for teaching
and learning. Even our residence halls have been created to encourage the exchange of ideas
and to support a community characterized by respect and inclusiveness.
The people who come here — to study, to learn, to research and to teach — are among the
most capable individuals who have ever graced the campus. Despite the fact that they work in
different disciplines and come from different backgrounds, every member of the University
community shares a passion for generating, sharing and deploying new knowledge. Whether
they are athletes or artists, social workers or lawyers, scientists or would-be entrepreneurs,
our students and faculty are committed to working for a better world and to serving the
public good.
This campus and these people — put them together and you have an environment that
empowers greatness. That is our legacy.

J OY S. B URNS
C HA I R M A N  U N I V E R SI T Y OF DE N V E R B OA R D OF T RU ST E E S

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2007–2008 ACADEMIC YEAR


ENROLLMENT
Undergraduate: 4,890
The Women’s College/University College: 395
Graduate and professional: 5,768
Total fall enrollment: 11,053

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Applications: 6,365
Offers of admission: 3,752
Enrolled: 1,140
Selectivity ratio: 58.9%
Matriculation ratio: 30.4%

DEGREES CONFERRED
Baccalaureate: 1,101
Master’s: 1,768
First professional: 317
Doctoral: 116
Post-baccalaureate certificates: 114
Post-master’s certificates: 5
Total degrees conferred: 3,421

Undergraduate Tuition Rate: $31,428


Percent increase over prior year: 6.07%

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a culture that prizes ethics, values and social responsibility

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YEAR IN REVIEW

Like so many chapters in the University of > Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright
Denver’s distinguished history, the 2007–2008 delivers the keynote address at the University’s
academic year was characterized by success and annual Korbel Dinner, where Newmont Mining
striving, by inclusiveness and innovation— in the CEO Wayne Murdy receives DU’s prestigious
classroom, in the laboratory and on the playing International Bridge Builder Award for promoting
fields; wherever, in fact, we pursued our goals social responsibility in the gold mining industry
and chased our dreams. and his own company. Outside the downtown
Here is a month-by-month journey of the Denver’s Marriott City Center, site of the dinner,
year just ended. protesters gather to object to Murdy’s receipt
of the award.
J U LY 0 7
SEPTEMBER 07
> The University of Denver begins its 144th year.
> With passports in hand, the first of the year’s > The University’s most capable first-year class
study abroad students begin departing for in history arrives on campus. The class includes
programs in the Southern Hemisphere. By year’s 15 Boettcher Scholars, bringing the number of
end, 629 DU students will have participated in a Boettcher Scholars studying at DU to 57.
study abroad experience of a quarter or longer in > Investor/philanthropist Frederick Pardee
duration at one of more than 100 sites scattered presents a $7.45 million gift to the Graduate
across every continent except Antarctica. Most School of International Studies to support and
will have studied under DU’s prestigious expand the school’s International Futures program.
Cherrington Global Scholars program. The gift will be used to create the Frederick S.
> The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Pardee Center for International Futures and fund
commits $200,000 to DU research professors in the center’s endowment and operating costs
the Department of Physics and Astronomy and through 2012. The United Nations, the European
their development of new teaching methodology Commission and the National Intelligence
incorporating an international online 3-D Council all make use of the International Futures
community known as Second Life. Their site, program in developing essential strategies
complete with a replica of DU’s F.W. Olin Hall and forecasts.
and Meyer Womble Observatory, regularly hosts > In his annual Convocation address, Chancellor
the online simulcast of National Public Radio’s Robert Coombe confirms the institution’s vision.
Science Friday. “Great universities are those that attack the great
issues —those that play a positive, catalytic role in
AU G U S T 0 7 their resolution,” he says. “DU will be a university
where research and scholarship are focused on
> The Sturm College of Law welcomes a new
the improvement of individual lives and the
class of 421 students.
collective good of the public.”
> As part of its Strategic Issues Program, the
> Reporting on its findings after six months
University creates a Strategic Issues Panel — a
of study, a 24-member Water Futures Panel,
13-member nonpartisan, independent group
assembled by DU and consisting of Colorado
made up of citizens from across the state — to
civic, business and agricultural leaders, proposes
study issues in Colorado’s state constitution.
a nine-point roadmap for Colorado’s water future.
Assessing input from local and national experts
Co-chairing the panel is DU Chancellor Emeritus
on constitutional issues, the panel meets from
Dan Ritchie, along with Denver-based CH2M
September 2007 through January 2008, when it
Hill Chairman and CEO Ralph Peterson. The
reports to the public and the newly convened
panel is affiliated with the University’s Strategic
state legislature.
Issues Program.
> The American Bar Association honors
> For the fifth consecutive year, the Daniels
the Sturm College of Law with its highest award
College of Business ranks highly among the
for achievement in environmental law, presented
world’s top graduate business schools for produc-
to the law school at an awards ceremony in
ing students with strong ethical standards. This
San Francisco. 7
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year, according to a Wall Street Journal/Harris N OV E M B E R 0 7


Interactive survey, the Daniels College comes in
> Peter Groff, a Colorado state senator and
at No. 7 globally in ethics. Two months later,
executive director of DU’s Center for African
BusinessWeek ranks the Daniels College No. 6 in
American Policy, is elected president of the
the nation—and No. 1 in the region—for the
Colorado Senate by his fellow Democratic Party
school’s part-time MBA program.
senators. Groff is the first African-American
> DU gymnast Jessica Lopez is selected to
Senate president in Colorado history and only the
represent her home country of Venezuela at the
third black state Senate president in U.S. history.
2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. She joins a roster
> DU alumnus Ed Schafer (MBA ’70) is nomi-
of more than 65 DU athletes to have competed
nated by President George W. Bush to be the new
in the games since 1948.
U.S. secretary of agriculture. A former two-term
governor of North Dakota, Schafer becomes the
O C TO B E R 0 7
fourth DU alum to serve in Bush’s Cabinet.
> Roughly 200 alumni return to campus for the
University’s first Alumni Symposium Weekend, DECEMBER 07
a two-day celebration of academic discovery
> Faculty and staff from the Graduate School of
featuring faculty-led discussions, networking
Social Work’s Butler Institute for Families travel
opportunities and keynote addresses by two
to Nevada to lead development of a comprehensive
prominent alumni: Andy Taylor, chairman and
program to train the state’s child-welfare workers.
CEO of Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and Bob Perito,
The effort is part of a $1.7 million contract calling
senior program officer of the U.S. Institute of
for an 18-month commitment from GSSW with
Peace and an adviser to the Iraq Study Group.
the Nevada Child & Family Services division.
> The University’s revised land-use plan is
> Two sophomore hockey players, both
approved by DU’s Board of Trustees, further
forwards, are selected for the 2008 U.S. National
defining campus boundaries and University
Junior Team. They are among 22 players who
intentions, first laid out in a predecessor plan five
travel to the Czech Republic to compete in the
years earlier. Among items added is a sustainability
International Ice Hockey Federation World Junior
statement that augments DU’s commitment to
Tournament in December and January.
forward-looking environmental practices and
stewardship. The plan serves the institution, nearby
JA N UA RY 0 8
neighborhoods and the city by openly communi-
cating the University’s development plans. > A University of Denver Strategic Issues Panel
> When devastating wildfires ignite in Southern releases a report recommending modifications to
California, the DU Student Life team offers the Colorado Constitution and the constitutional-
assistance to students from the region. The office amendment process. The panel cites an acute
uses home ZIP codes to identify all students who need to improve the state constitution, primarily
may be affected. due to the document’s numerous conflicting
> With a victory over Notre Dame, hockey requirements. A few weeks later, the members of
coach George Gwozdecky achieves his 300th win the panel testify before a legislative committee
as a Pioneers coach and the 450th win of his of the Colorado General Assembly, providing
collegiate coaching career. the impetus for Referendum O, which seeks to
> Lynn Gangone, dean of the Women’s College improve the way citizen-sponsored constitutional
at the University of Denver, delivers a State of amendments go before voters. It is voted down in
the Women’s College address to an assembly of the November 2008 general election.
students, faculty and alumni gathered to celebrate > Fraternity brothers begin sizing up their
the college’s 25-year association with the digs at the new Lambda Chi Alpha house, made
University. Looking ahead, Gangone notes that possible by pledges of $1.38 million from
the college will foster new ways of learning, new fraternity donors and $2.76 million from the
programs and new connections to other DU University. To the delight of Lambda Chi alumni,
colleges and schools. the new building and joint financing signal
a durable partnership between DU and
Greek organizations.

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F E B R UA RY 0 8 role as a cultural resource for the Denver area.


More than 125,000 people attend the center’s 400
> The Department of Languages and Literatures
concerts, operas, dance performances, plays and
receives a $1.5 million gift from the Anna and
recitals each year.
John J. Sie Foundation to establish the Anna
> The Pioneer men’s lacrosse team scores a
Maglione-Sie Endowed Chair in Italian Culture,
breathtaking 9-8 win over No. 5 Notre Dame at
DU’s first endowed chair in languages.
Chicago Fire Stadium. The victory ensures DU
> DU and the American Humane Association
a share in the Great Western Lacrosse League
establish the American Humane Endowed Chair
championship tournament.
in the Graduate School of Social Work. The
$2 million endowed chair is the first for GSSW
M AY 0 8
and one of the first in the U.S. related to animal-
assisted social work and research into the bond > Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine
between humans and animals. Albright joins her brother and sister at an
on-campus ceremony marking the name change
MARC H 08 of the Graduate School of International Studies
to the Josef Korbel School of International
> The Pioneer ski team wins its 19th NCAA
Studies. Korbel, Albright’s father, nurtured the
championship, staging an exciting comeback on
school through its first two decades until his
the last day of competition at Bridger Bowl,
death in 1977.
Mont. DU leads the NCAA in the number of
> New deans are appointed for the Daniels
national skiing championships to its credit.
College of Business and the Arts, Humanities and
> The Pioneer hockey team claims the 2008 Red
Social Sciences. Christine Riordan will lead the
Baron WCHA Final Five playoff championship
Daniels College, while Anne McCall will take the
with a 2-1 win over Minnesota. The victory propels
helm of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.
the Pioneers into the NCAA tournament.
> The University reaches its fundraising goal for
the Morgridge College of Education’s programs
APRIL 08
and new building, Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall.
> The Fisher Early Learning Center launches Beyond the funding needed for the building, two
the Marsico Institute for Early Learning and donations from James C. Kennedy, totaling $10
Literacy, developed with a $1.5 million gift from million and made via a direct gift to the University
the Cydney and Tom Marsico Family Foundation and a gift to the Denver Foundation for the
(both Cydney and Tom are DU alumni). The University’s benefit, will create the James C.
institute will serve as a clearinghouse for resources Kennedy Institute for Educational Success. The
related to improving learning opportunities, new institute will include three endowed faculty
particularly for children who may have chairs and will seek to develop innovative ways
learning disabilities. to keep vulnerable learners on the pathway to
> DU kicks off the centennial celebration of educational achievement.
its world-renowned business school. The Daniels
College of Business plans a yearlong series of JUNE 08
events celebrating the fact that the business
> University Chancellor Robert Coombe presents
school, founded in 1908, is the eighth-oldest
an honorary doctor of public service degree to
collegiate school of business in the country.
DU alumnus Peter Groff, who delivers the
> Eric Johnson is named the 10th head coach
Commencement address to students collecting
of the University of Denver women’s basketball
their graduate degrees. The next day, Coombe
program. Johnson comes to DU after serving as
awards an honorary doctor of higher education
an assistant coach at Boston College. While there,
degree to Chancellor Emeritus Dan Ritchie at
he assisted head coach Cathy Ingeles as the
undergraduate Commencement ceremonies. As
Eagles advanced to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA
Commencement speaker, Ritchie urges the Class
Tournament in 2006.
of 2008 to make the most of their degrees and
> The Newman Center for the Performing Arts
their exceptional education.
marks its fifth anniversary with a concert and
> The Pioneer ski team celebrates its national
fundraiser featuring the Manhattan Transfer.
championship with a visit to the White House.
“A Night in Manhattan” celebrates the center’s
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research focusing on the collective good of the community

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IN SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC GOOD

Service to the public good takes center stage at really unique in that aspect. Most other places —
the University of Denver. It permeates our culture even places that are really committed to
and drives much of the University’s research and community-engaged work — don’t provide the
programming. As we define it, it means putting institutional support that we do.”
our intellectual resources to work in the commu- That support funds a varied scope of work,
nity, addressing the challenges facing the less ranging from research on early learning to studies
fortunate, fostering public-policy debates and relating to infrastructure improvements in
preparing our students for a lifetime of thoughtful diverse communities. Funds also underwrite
and engaged citizenship. projects focusing on leadership development,
The commitment to the public good begins mentoring and improvement in younger-student
in the classroom. According to the University’s academic performance, to name just a handful.
Center for Community Engagement and Service (The maximum grant for any individual project is
Learning (CCESL), DU has, over the last five $10,000.) During fiscal year 2007–2008, a total of
years, experienced steady growth in the number 28 DU faculty members — many working in
of faculty teaching courses with a service learning teams—received grants of varying amounts from
component, in the number of such courses offered the Public Good Scholarship Fund.
and in the number of students enrolled. In
2007–2008, 55 faculty members taught 85 service
OUR VISION: THE UNIVERSIT Y OF DENVER
learning courses to 1,300 students. In fact, 26
WILL BE A GREAT PRIVATE UNIVERSIT Y
percent of DU undergraduate students participated
in service learning courses, well over the national DEDICATED TO THE PUBLIC GOOD.
average of 20 percent.
DU students also participated in an array Many of the University’s efforts are directed
of international service learning opportunities at helping individuals overcome the barriers that
administered by the Office of Internationalization. prevent them from fully participating in society.
These service learning programs — Project Some programs, like DU’s Volunteers in Partnership
Bosnia-Herzegovina, Project Dharamsala, Project (VIP) and the long-standing Bridge Project, send
Ecuador, Project El Salvador, Project Thailand members of the DU community into economically
and Project South Africa — combine academic disadvantaged neighborhoods and schools to help
course work on campus with service in a host children and teenagers succeed academically. The
community overseas. The experiences take place VIP program, for example, offers the opportunity
during winter interterm or summer session and for student role models to encourage underprivi-
range in length from three to eight weeks. leged students to stay in school, learn to excel
Since 2001, the number of international and, ultimately, pursue higher education.
service learning courses has grown from two to The Bridge Project, created in 1991 through a
six, while the number of students participating has collaboration involving community representatives
jumped from 38 to 60. Because of demonstrated and faculty members of the Graduate School of
interest in international service learning opportu- Social Work, aims to reduce educational barriers,
nities, the program is exploring the possibility of increase educational opportunities and improve
launching new projects in East Africa, Timor-Leste learning outcomes for children and youths living
and Nepal. in Denver’s public housing communities. It offers
To support faculty interest in community three primary programs — an after school
engagement, the CCESL administers the program, a scholarship program and a summer
University’s Public Good Scholarship Fund and program — that are designed to help these
service learning grants. These were created to students graduate from high school and attend
address pressing social issues and advance college or learn a trade.
positive change. In 2007–2008, about 400 children and youth
“The University provides significant financial participated in a Bridge Project program. More
support to DU faculty members to do what we than 150 youth were matched with adult tutors
call ‘community-engaged scholarship,’” said Eric and attended after-school tutoring, and 10 high
Fretz, director of the CCESL. “This institution is school seniors were awarded college scholarships. 11
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To serve the community at large and to foster to study policy issues of local and regional
informed discussion about public policy issues, importance. During 2007–2008, the University
the University hosted a series of Bridges to the assembled a Strategic Issues Panel to analyze
Future programs. These programs began in 2002, problems confronting the Colorado state consti-
shortly after the September 11, 2001, attacks on tution. The panel began meeting in September
the World Trade Center, with the intent of provid- 2007 and presented its findings and recommen-
ing the community a forum for civic dialog. dations to the Colorado state assembly in early
Always free and open to the public, these 2008. The legislature incorporated many of the
panel discussions and lectures bring nationally report’s recommendations when it drafted
and internationally recognized thought leaders Referendum O, which appeared on the November
to campus to explore topics with an impact on 2008 general election ballot. Defeated by voters,
the future. In 2007–2008, Bridges to the Future Referendum O sought to improve the way
focused on “The Pursuit of Happiness,” offering citizen-sponsored statutes and constitutional
insight into life’s true purpose. An estimated amendments go before the electorate.
2,000 people attended the various events. The SIP also released the findings from a
Critical issues also were addressed through panel that explored Colorado’s water challenges.
DU’s high-profile Strategic Issues Program (SIP), The report recommended nine steps toward wise
which convenes panels of leaders and subject- use of this precious natural resource.
matter experts from the public and private sectors

Tom Knecht and These results have lent further credence to Knecht’s underlying basis
Project Homeless Connect for conducting the surveys, which he hopes to be able to continue at
future Project Homeless Connect events.
IN MAY 2008, DU hosted its second Project Homeless Connect at Knecht shared the results from his surveys with DU classes and
the Daniel L. Ritchie Center for Sports & Wellness. The project was at public forums. “We presented a paper on the subject at the
conducted in conjunction with Denver’s Road Home, a program Western Political Science Association conference in San Diego,” said
aimed at dramatically reducing homelessness in the city within a Knecht. “We also shared our results with the Office of the Mayor
decade. Over the course of a weekend, more than 1,000 DU and here in Denver, as well as some of the organizations that conduct
community volunteers worked to help 800 homeless individuals Project Homeless Connect.
access services and necessities such as health care. “The idea is that we are publicizing and sharing our findings
For Tom Knecht, an assistant professor of political science, the with the broader community, so it doesn’t become simply a narrow
initiative represented an opportunity to explore questions relating academic piece of work — this is actually something that’s practical,
to homelessness. “When Project Homeless Connect first came here, informative and widely shared.”
there was a call for faculty to get involved and to do research that
would dovetail with the event,” said Knecht. “And that’s something I
do. My primary field of research is in public opinion and foreign policy.
So I thought, ‘This is a good fit, and it’s an interesting project.’”
During Project Homeless Connect’s two engagements on the
DU campus, Knecht teamed with Lisa Martinez of DU’s sociology and
criminology faculty to conduct surveys designed to measure volunteers’
attitudes toward the homeless before and after the project.
“The actual theory that informs our study for Project Homeless
Connect is drawn from sociology,” said Knecht. “It’s called ‘the
contact hypothesis,’ which basically says that when two dissimilar
people or groups of people get together, there’s oftentimes an
erosion of stereotypes. People have prejudices or fears of somebody
who’s different from them, largely because they don’t know them.
Once you get to know somebody, those fears and prejudices some-
times wash away. It’s a sociology theory that’s been around for a
long, long time — and has often been applied in cases of race.
We’re looking at it in a slightly different context ... but the same
theory should really apply in both cases.”
Bearing out the theory, volunteers’ overall attitudes toward T OM K NECHT
the homeless did, indeed, change — in quantifiably positive ways.
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enlisting student talent in the enrichment of public life


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AT T R A C T I N G T H E B E S T A N D B R I G H T E S T

For the last five years, the undergraduate Office of Recruiting efforts also emphasized the
Admission has focused its efforts on attracting the University’s commitment to inclusive excellence
best and the brightest students to the University and diversity. “As a result,” Willoughby said,
of Denver. “the domestic and international diversity of our
Its strategy is working. From 2003 to entering- first-year class represents 21 percent of our class.”
class 2008, first-year student applications to the The University has been particularly success-
University rose 94 percent, allowing DU to be ful in attracting students from out of state. Until
more selective in whom it admits. Just as recently, students from Colorado accounted for
impressive, the median high school grade point more than half of the undergraduate student
average of entering first-year DU students rose population. Today, roughly 58 percent of DU’s
from 3.13 in 2003 to 3.66 for 2008. Scores on 5,000 undergraduate students come from
college entrance exams also rose dramatically. outside Colorado.
In fact, average SAT scores increased from 1134 “The Ammi Hyde Interview program has
in 2003 to 1191 in 2008. been another reason for DU’s enrollment success,”
“Much of the enrollment success we’ve had Willoughby said. “This is a program that our
over the past five or six years — and dramatic former chancellor, Dan Ritchie, introduced. He
increase in applications — clearly has to do with believed every student applicant should have the
the rising reputation and high quality of the opportunity for a face-to-face interview.”
University,” said Tom Willoughby, vice chancellor To implement this program, the University
for enrollment. sends three-person interview teams to 30 U.S.
“We also realized the importance of intro- cities two times a year. Each team consists of a
ducing DU to students much earlier in their DU faculty member, a staff person and a DU
high school careers. We needed to begin the alumnus or alumna.
conversation much sooner to position DU in “A couple of years ago, we conducted
their minds,” he explained. “Most research over 5,000 face-to-face interviews with student
indicates that by the time students reach the applicants, to the great benefit of both the
midpoint of their junior year in high school, students and the University. It’s an extraordinary
they have formed a list of schools in their minds. commitment on the part of the DU community,”
And if you arrive on the scene much later than Willoughby said.
that, it’s difficult to get on their list.”
The admission team’s strategy has centered
on an extensive direct-marketing campaign to
reach the students DU wants to attract—students Daniels Scholars at DU
with high ambition, as reflected in top GPAs;
students from diverse backgrounds; and students Each year, the Denver-based Daniels Fund
from across the country and around the world.
awards scholarships to deserving students at
“We have focused on telling our story better,
risk of not being able to afford a college edu-
not just to the students, but to their parents and
high school counselors,” said Willoughby. “To do cation. Since the program’s inception in 2000,
that, we created a rich multimedia mix of print more than 1,500 students from Colorado, New
publications, strengthened our Web site, and Mexico, Utah and Wyoming have used their
encouraged more students and families to visit Daniels Scholarships to pursue their dream of a
the DU campus. Instinctively, we knew if we college education. Many of them have chosen
could get people on campus, they’d be impressed
to enroll at the University of Denver.
with the quality of the academic program and the
attractiveness of the campus. We knew it would FALL 2007 ENROLLMENT AT DU: 30
elevate their interest and probably prompt many
more to apply and to tell others about DU. Word- NUMBER OF DANIELS SCHOLARS IN RESIDENCE: 104
of-mouth marketing, quite frankly, is invaluable.”
THE OVERALL SIX-YEAR GRADUATION RATE
FOR DANIELS SCHOL ARS IS 92%.
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Recruitment — Undergraduate Admissions

Academic Year Ending May 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004

APPLICATIONS 8,394 6,365 5,820 5,199 4,534

OFFERS OF ADMISSION 4,600 3,752 3,403 3,312 3,302

ENROLLED 1,145 1,140 1,142 1,097 1,138

SELECTIVITY RATIO 54.8% 58.9% 58.5% 63.7% 72.8%

MATRICULATION RATIO 24.9% 30.4% 33.6% 33.1% 34.5%

Academic Profile of First-year Class

FALL 08 FALL 07 FALL 06 FALL 05 FALL 04

High School GPA

Number 1,093 1,097 1,104 1,008 890

Mean 3.66 3.59 3.58 3.57 3.34

25th Percentile 3.44 3.34 3.32 3.28 2.98

75th Percentile 4.00 3.96 3.95 3.96 3.75

SAT

Number 685 729 735 766 725

Mean 1191 1176 1180 1165 1146

25th Percentile 1110 1080 1090 1070 1050

75th Percentile 1280 1260 1270 1250 1240

High School Standing

Number 609 612 681 660 631

Top Tenth 42.2% 34.8% 35.2% 35.9% 33.1%

Top Quarter 75.7% 65.7% 66.8% 68.7% 59.8%

Top Half 96.2% 94.9% 92.4% 90.0% 85.3%

15
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Boettcher Scholars Savor “After visiting the campus and talking with a few students, I
DU Experience fell in love with DU,” said Squatrito. “It seemed like a great commu-
nity, where students learn much more than just academics, they
FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY, the Boettcher Foundation learn how to be productive, engaged citizens. … The Cherrington
in Denver has been providing full academic scholarships to 40 of Global Scholars program was also one of the things that initially
Colorado’s top graduating high school seniors, but only if they pursue attracted me to the University. I’m really interested in studying in
their collegiate studies in the state. These Boettcher Scholars may Shanghai, and I’m also considering a few programs in France
enroll at any Colorado public or private institution, and their tuition, and Australia.”
housing, books and fees are paid by the foundation. An accounting major, Squatrito is pursuing a dual bachelor’s
For two years running, in 2007 and 2008, DU has led the and master’s degree in just four years. She hopes to work for a
state in the numbers of Boettcher Scholars accepting offers of public-accounting firm.
admission. In 2007, 15 Boettcher Scholars enrolled at DU, bringing “I came to college expecting to be challenged academically,
the total enrollment of Boettcher Scholars studying at DU to 57. In meet some cool people and have some interesting experiences,”
spring 2008, 13 Boettcher Scholars accepted offers of admission. Squatrito said. “My first year at DU far exceeded any expectations
“These students are getting admitted to Stanford, they’re I could have had.”
getting admitted to Harvard and many other top-end Ivy League
schools,” said Tom Willoughby, vice chancellor for enrollment. “All
of the colleges and universities in Colorado just would love to have
any of these students attending their institutions.”
Willoughby attributes DU’s popularity among Boettcher
Scholars, in part, to the school’s rising academic reputation,
opportunities for exceptional study abroad experiences and its
attractive dual degree programs.

A NDREW W HITE

WHEN ANDREW WHITE BEGAN EVALUATING his college choices,


he had one eye cast on medical school.
A Boettcher Scholar from Aurora’s Gateway High School, White
was considering Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Creighton University,
Colorado College, the University of Colorado, Colorado State and DU.
S TACEY S QUATRITO With its reputation for placing students in highly selective medical
schools, DU emerged as his choice.
“Though each of these schools offered its own advantages
UPON HER 2007 GRADUATION from Pine Creek High School in and appeal,” White said, “the University of Denver surpassed all my
Colorado Springs, Boettcher Scholar Stacey Squatrito realized she expectations, needs and desires — both as a student and as a person
had a range of outstanding options for pursuing her stratospheric — to fulfill my dreams and develop new ones along the way.”
goals in higher education. Today, he’s majoring in biochemistry and international studies.
“I was accepted by Colgate, Duke, Washington University in Looking ahead to medical school, White plans to focus on “general
St. Louis and Cal Poly, and was offered scholarships to all of them,” practice or pediatrics, especially pertaining to individuals in third-
Squatrito said. “In Colorado, I was also accepted to Colorado State world nations.”
University and the Colorado School of Mines.” With his career goals firmly in mind, White is already planning
Squatrito’s decision was made easier once she paid visits his junior-year study abroad experience. “I would sincerely enjoy
to some of the institutions on her list and once she reviewed the studying abroad and will most likely venture to a Spanish-speaking
programs and curricula at her various choices. country, either in Central America, South America or Western
16 Europe,” he said.
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Graduate Programs Lure High-Caliber Students a result, new enrollments are up by 26 percent
since 2004 for a total graduate enrollment of 464.
The traditional and professional graduate The Morgridge College of Education enrolled
programs at the University of Denver continue about 800 students in fall 2007, up 25 percent from
to attract high-caliber students across a broad 641 in 2004. The college is poised for additional
international spectrum. What’s more, enrollment growth but will need to limit enrollments until
in most of these programs is expected to remain construction is completed on its new home,
on a steady course, with the total graduate Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall, in fall 2010.
enrollment in 2007 accounting for 52 percent The Graduate School of Professional
of all DU students. Psychology has expanded its programming
The largest graduate programs, the Sturm incrementally over the past several years, adding
College of Law with an enrollment of 1,234 and programs in international disaster psychology,
the Daniels College of Business with an enrollment forensic psychology, and sport and performance
of 874, account for more than 36 percent of the psychology. The highly selective school had a
University’s total graduate-student enrollment. total enrollment of 217 graduate students in
In the Graduate School of Social Work, 2007, accepting just 33 percent of its applicants.
the faculty and dean are focusing on scholarly Enrollments in the arts, humanities, social
research as they maintain their primary commit- sciences, natural sciences and mathematics have
ment to train social workers. Enrollment held held steady in the last four years, reflecting the
steady in 2007, with 202 new students beginning programs’ solid reputation for faculty mentoring.
their studies and a total enrollment of 364. Meanwhile, at the School of Engineering and
The Josef Korbel School of International Computer Science, graduate enrollment has
Studies continues to expand in national and increased almost 188 percent, from 56 students
global stature, making it an increasingly attractive in 2004 to 161 in 2007.
choice for students interested in global issues. As
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t h e u n i v e r s i t y ta k e s g r e at p r i d e i n i t s s t u d e n t- at h l e t e s
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A N I N C O M PA R A B L E Y E A R F O R P I O N E E R AT H L E T I C S

In 2007–2008, the Pioneer varsity athletics program In winter 2008, the men and women of
celebrated its 10th year of competition in the the Pioneer ski team downhilled and slalomed
NCAA’s elite Division I and nearly a decade of their way to DU’s 19th national championship,
stellar performances in the Sun Belt Conference. solidifying the program’s position as the most
The program celebrated in style, securing a successful in NCAA skiing history. The champion-
national skiing championship and finishing 47th ship earned the student skiers an invitation for
among all Division I schools in the Directors’ Cup, a June visit to the White House, where their
which is a measure comparing the achievements accomplishments were honored by President
of all NCAA Division I institutions’ athletic George W. Bush.
teams. This represents DU’s best showing ever, The Pioneer women’s golf team finished
with 12 of the 17 Pioneer teams qualifying for sixth nationally in the NCAA women’s golf
postseason NCAA tournament play. championship, an all-time high for the program.
“We enjoyed our finest athletic and academic The gymnastics team also enjoyed a successful
year in school history this past year, thanks to the season, finishing 12th in the nation. In addition,
hard work and dedication of our student-athletes DU gymnast Jessica Lopez was selected to
and coaches,” said Peg Bradley-Doppes, vice represent her home country of Venezuela at the
chancellor for athletics, recreation and Ritchie 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.
Center operations. Eight other teams participated in NCAA
Based on the Directors’ Cup standings, DU postseason-championship play, including the
was No. 1 in the Sun Belt Conference, as well as men’s golf, hockey, men’s and women’s swimming
the top-ranking collegiate athletics program in and diving, men’s and women’s tennis, women’s
Colorado. The University was also the top-ranking soccer and men’s lacrosse teams.
collegiate athletics program in NCAA Division Pioneer teams and individual student-athletes
I-AAA, which encompasses all Division I performed so well largely because of DU’s top-
non-football-playing schools. notch coaching. Fully half of DU’s head coaches
DU tied with the University of Wisconsin received “Coach of the Year” honors acknowledg-
for 23rd overall in a “Top 25” NCAA Division I ing their efforts during 2007–2008.
sports ranking for the 2007–2008 collegiate year. Finally, George Gwozdecky marked his
These rankings were published by Sports Illustrated milestone 300th win as DU hockey coach and
online affiliate SI.com. 450th career win in the same game, a 3-1 victory
Just as important, the Pioneer program over Notre Dame. Although the Pioneers’ hockey
cemented its reputation for promoting academic, season ended in the NCAA regionals, DU
as well as athletic, achievement. For the eighth co-hosted the NCAA Frozen Four national
consecutive year, Pioneer student-athletes captured championship at the Pepsi Center in downtown
the Sun Belt Conference graduation award, an Denver, marking the event’s return to Denver
honor that recognizes the program that graduates for the first time in 32 years.
the highest percentage of its student-athletes. In
addition, DU has traditionally placed more than
10 members on the All-Western Collegiate Athletic
Association Academic Team, a feat accomplished
again this year.
“We take great pride in our student-athletes
at the University of Denver,” said Bradley-Doppes.
“We’ve always commanded excellence and effort
in the classroom, but since turning NCAA
Division I, we have pioneered excellence on the
playing field, as well.”

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The Pioneers: We are the Champions


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No. 1 ON THE FIELD


AND IN THE CLASSROOM

ATHLETICS

• No. 1 Athletics Program in the Front Range

• No. 1 NCAA 1-AAA

• No. 23 in sportsillustrated.com

• No. 47 NACDA Directors’ Cup

• 12 NCAA Championship Tournaments

• 2 NCAA Individual Champions

• 13 All-Americans

• 8 Conference Coaches of the Year

ACADEMICS

• 77% Graduation Rate /92% Graduation Rate


When Accounting for Transfers — Highest in
Sun Belt Conference

• 3 All-Americans

• 8th Consecutive Sun Belt Conference


Graduation Rate Award

• 58 Student-Athletes Named to Sun Belt


Academic Honor Roll

• 102 Student-Athletes Made DU Dean’s List


With a 3.75 GPA or Better
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we have pioneered e xcellence on the pl aying field

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T H E A R T S : D U ’ S E X C I T I N G T W I S T O N A G R E AT T R A D I T I O N

In April 2008, the Robert and Judi Newman the facility sponsors a performing arts series,
Center for the Performing Arts celebrated its fifth Newman Center Presents, that introduces Denver
anniversary and its recurring role as a cultural audiences to some of the world’s finest dance,
resource for the Denver metropolitan area. theater and music groups. Just as important, the
Home to the Lamont School of Music and to venues provide a showcase for Lamont’s many
an array of state-of-the-art concert and theater ensembles and its orchestra, as well as for the
venues, the Newman Center marked its fifth year theater department’s well-reviewed productions.
of existence with brisk business at the box office. “When you have vast and diverse program-
Stephen Seifert, executive director of the Newman ming — as we do at the Newman Center — you
Center, estimates that during the 2007–2008 bring people from all walks of life together for a
season, the facility hosted more than 400 wide variety of interactions. Our stages are like a
performances, including student recitals. campfire— they bring people together for a couple
“It’s hard for us to give precise numbers of hours of shared experience,” Seifert said.
about how many people, every year, come here, Over the years, Newman Center Presents has
but we believe we’re conservative when we say that filled a gap in Denver’s cultural programming,
over 125,000 people come to the Newman Center offering everything from classical music and
to those 400-plus performances,” Seifert said. contemporary dance to world music and spoken-
Looking back on the center’s successes, word theater. “In Newman Center Presents,
Seifert points to its role in providing innovative we select and present a variety, which is in the
programming for DU students and faculty, as tradition of what American universities have
well as for the community at large. Not only are done for the last 130 years or so,” said Seifert.
the various venues rented to community arts “Today, the University of Denver is offering its
organizations for their own performances, but own exciting twist on that great tradition.”

An Opera Singer’s Dream Come True

In July 2007, renowned basso and DU alumnus Hao Jiang Tian (MA
music performance ’87) took the stage at the Central City Opera to star
in a world premier of Poet Li Bai by Chinese composer Guo Wenjing.
Cast as Li Bai, an itinerant poet during China’s Tang Dynasty,
Tian earned effusive reviews for his resonant voice and sensitive
portrayal. The accolades were in keeping with the praise that has HAO J IANG T IAN
accompanied his impressive career. In the last two decades, he has
performed more than 50 operatic roles — 26 of them at the
Metropolitan Opera. Li Bai was his first title role. The opera, which is written in verse, allowed Tian to share the
The role was a dream come true for Tian, who grew up in beauty of Li Bai's poems with a modern audience. Although Tian is
China during the Cultural Revolution, when the trappings of Western fluent in Chinese, he primarily sings opera in Italian and French.
culture were forbidden, as were ancient Chinese philosophy and Tian’s former DU classmates remember him as a brilliant artist
literature. “We were very thirsty — eager to look into different and humble man who arrived in Colorado in 1983 with a guitar,
things,” he recalled. $50 in his pocket and hardly a word of English beyond the John
Li Bai’s were the first poems Tian read, and he quickly Denver songs he’d memorized. At the time, China had just opened
memorized dozens of them. The poet wrote of peach blossoms and its doors to the world. “Before I came to DU,” Tian recalled, “I had
battles, daydreams and drunkenness. One unfortunate night, he never had a performance on stage, had never seen an opera.”
drowned in the Yangtze River after falling from his boat while trying Through required weekly classroom performances, DU's
to embrace the moon. Lamont School of Music forced Tian out of his box. His first operatic
“Li Bai opened the door to ancient Chinese literature,” Tian said. role was a small one in a Lamont production of Susannah.
“In my heart, Li Bai was the most important Chinese poet in history.” The world premier of Poet Li Bai included a chorus of Lamont
students directed by alumna Catherine Sailer (BM ’95, MM ’97).
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Va s t a n d d i v e r s e p r o g r a m s b r i n g p e o p l e t o g e t h e r
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A V I S I O N A RY E D U C AT I O N A L E N V I R O N M E N T

Determined to offer its students an extraordinary undergraduate experience. In addition, the


education, the University of Denver began the initiative added 24 tenure-track faculty positions
2007–2008 academic year guided by several and 20 lecturers to key programs.
far-reaching themes outlined by Chancellor The initiative’s signature programs include a
Robert Coombe at Convocation in early fall. first-year experience that begins with a four-credit
Aligned with the institution’s new vision, seminar introducing incoming students to the
values, mission and goals, the themes called for nature of university-level work and to the concept
DU to be: of intellectual passion. It continues in winter and
spring with a two-course writing sequence that
• a university where research and scholarship are
develops strong skills through multiple writing
focused on the improvement of individual lives
experiences. The emphasis on writing advances
and the collective good of the public
throughout the next three years, with writing-
• a research university that provides a truly intensive courses offered throughout the disciplines
extraordinary undergraduate experience and across the curriculum. Writing courses are
supported by a Writing and Research Center that
• a university where exceptional student talent
provides consultations to individual students.
blossoms, thrives and enriches public life
(In 2008, the University’s comprehensive Writing
• a great international university for Denver and Program became one of only 23 programs
the Rocky Mountain West internationally to have earned a Certificate of
Excellence from the Conference on College
• a university that develops, demonstrates and
Composition and Communication.)
implements visionary educational practice, from
Other Marsico programs in effect in 2007–
early childhood through graduate education
2008 include new math foundations courses that
• a university where ethics, values and social cultivate quantitative reasoning, a visiting scholars
responsibility are imbedded in our curriculum, program that builds intellectual depth, and
our culture and in the lives of our graduates enhanced opportunities for hands-on learning
via field experiences and internships.
• a university where diversity, inclusion and
Thanks to the Marsico programs, the
excellence mold leaders for a changing America
undergraduate experience at DU reflects the
These themes did much to shape the academic faculty’s aspirations. “When we embarked on this
environment at DU throughout the year—across faculty-driven initiative,” Kvistad said, “we asked
the divisions and at every level of instruction. In ourselves, ‘What kind of people do we want
fact, said Provost Gregg Kvistad, “by focusing on a to help produce?’ With their strong emphasis
handful of carefully articulated and tightly focused on writing and rhetoric, with their multiple
themes, the University has created a lively and opportunities for close interaction with faculty
dramatically diverse intellectual environment mentors, our undergraduate programs are
with all the advantages of a small college and the designed to produce thoughtful graduates who
research culture of a larger institution.” are motivated and prepared to contribute to
Characterized by the opportunity for close their communities and professions.”
relationships with faculty mentors and an environ- As part of its emphasis on the collective good,
ment that fosters collaborative and hands-on the University began laying the groundwork for
learning, the undergraduate experience was an innovative sustainability movement across
shaped by many programs piloted and refined several diverse but increasingly interconnected
under the Marsico Initiative. The initiative— programs, including the Josef Korbel School of
which was spurred by a $10 million gift from International Studies, the Daniels College of
alumni Tom and Cydney Marsico—was launched Business and the Sturm College of Law. The
in 2002 to intensify arts and sciences education three programs will collaborate through a
at DU. Many of the programs originated under forthcoming Sustainability Institute, which will
the initiative have received permanent funding look at sustainability issues from numerous
and now constitute an integral part of the global perspectives.
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a universit y where e xceptional student talent blossoms


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The sustainability focus was complemented Biomedical studies at the University received
by the Daniels College’s emphasis on training a boost when the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute,
business leaders to develop and guide the dedicated to solving the mysteries of human
“sustainable enterprise,” characterized by disease, moved from its facility near downtown
environmental integrity, cultural equity and Denver and relocated to the University Park
economic prosperity. According to this precept, campus in January 2008. The move puts ERI-affil-
businesses and other organizations in the 21st iated researchers at the heart of the University’s
century must adopt sustainability to ensure both ongoing Molecular Life Sciences and Biophysics
the well-being of the organization itself and also Initiative, which seeks to develop a comprehensive
the health of the society in which it operates. understanding of biological processes at the
The University’s emphasis on the collective cellular, molecular, biochemical and physical levels.
good, on efforts that benefit people and the One of three strategic initiatives spearheaded
community, was reflected in many ongoing by the Division of Natural Sciences and
research endeavors conducted in departments and Mathematics, this critical effort involves faculty
divisions across campus. For example, Rahmat from three departments — biological sciences,
Shoureshi, dean of the School of Engineering and chemistry and biochemistry, and physics and
Computer Science, received a grant to develop astronomy. Not only does the initiative provide
brain-imaging technologies that may soon allow basic scientific research for medical developments,
amputees to control electronic prosthetics with it offers students at the undergraduate and
just a thought. Other faculty research covers graduate levels the opportunity to practice cross-
everything from international futures forecasting, disciplinary science—a skill that will characterize
optical-based direct brain control of prostheses, the research environment of the future.
regulation of insulin and glucagons secretion, In programs serving nontraditional students,
and compounds for shielding against ionizing the emphasis was on preparing the ground for
radiation to deciphering the evolution of the future developments. At University College, for
opioid/orphanin-gene family. example, a major curriculum revision advanced,
Programs at the graduate and professional allowing for more focus, greater coherence and
level also addressed the public good, including increased flexibility. Under the leadership of a
the Graduate School of Professional Psychology’s new dean, Lynn Gangone, the Women’s College
master’s degree in international disaster psychol- instituted a strategic planning process that will
ogy, a training program that is the first of its kind shape the curricula and the college’s marketing
at a major U.S. university. Students are trained to strategy for years to come.
address the psychological and psychosocial needs Finally, in the interest of promoting the
of international communities contending with lifelong learning so critical to our country’s
human-made and natural disasters, HIV/AIDS and future, the University launched its first Alumni
other health-related pandemics. This integrated Symposium Weekend in October. The event
course of study combines the fields of clinical featured keynote addresses by two prominent DU
psychology, public health, disaster mental health alumni and more than 20 educational seminars
and humanitarian aid. and discussions led by DU faculty. For alumni
The Graduate School of Social Work, mean- and faculty, the Alumni Symposium represented
while, participated in a unique partnership with an opportunity to continue the intellectual
the Colorado Department of Human Services, exchange long after graduation day.
Pueblo Community College and many other
agencies to meet the need for graduate-level
social work education in the rural and tribal
communities of the Four Corners area. The
school offered a master’s program focused on
enhancing social service delivery systems,
addressing the special needs of rural communi-
ties, dealing with the concerns and needs of
multiethnic communities, with special emphasis
on local Native American communities, and
strengthening the professional social work
infrastructure of Four Corners communities.
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New Deans Emphasize Strengths and Opportunities

In 2007–2008, the University completed two national searches for new deans, one to lead the Daniels College of
Business and the other to direct the Divisions of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

A NNE M C C ALL — DEAN C H R I S T I N E R I O R D A N — DEAN


DIVISIONS OF A RTS , H UMANITIES DANIELS C OLLEGE OF BUSINESS
AND S OCIAL S CIENCES
“… the more you know about the
University and the Daniels College and
“The really great programs, all the different units on the campus,
when they get started, almost always the more you’re impressed, just because
come from a really cool faculty idea.” there are so many great things going on.
DU is an exceptional university.”

Anne McCall comes to DU from Tulane University in New Orleans, As she assumes the helm at the Daniels College of Business,
where, as an associate dean, she helped the school and city tackle Christine Riordan looks forward to keeping Daniels competitive in the
the ravages of Hurricane Katrina. educational marketplace by enhancing the academic reputation of
A language specialist with fluency in French and German, the college, shaping programs and initiatives that will benefit
McCall accepted her new post hoping to help the division develop its students, cultivating Daniels as a community of choice and building
many resources. financial strength for the college.
“There’s a lot here at DU that excites me,” McCall said. Fortunately, she said, the college is well positioned for that
“What interested me in a general way was the opportunity to come challenge. “There is a lot of energy among our faculty, staff,
to a University that’s in what I would call that ‘magic’-size zone: students and alumni. This is an important time for us to position
big enough so there are many different kinds of programs and ourselves in the business school marketplace. We are absolutely going
opportunities and interdivisional exchanges, small enough so you’re to leverage our current strengths as well as build new opportunities.”
not anonymous — with an emphasis on teaching and high-caliber Riordan earned her bachelor’s degree from Georgia Tech and
research taking place at the same time.” her master’s and doctorate from Georgia State. She then spent
McCall plans to focus on enhancing the framework for research several years at the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business,
and on fostering connections and collaboration across departments where she was managing and founding director of the Institute for
and disciplines. She also hopes to spearhead the development of a Leadership Management.
Language Center, which will serve students satisfying their language After her stint at the University of Georgia, she was associate
requirements and preparing for stints abroad through the Cherrington dean for three years at Texas Christian University’s Neeley School of
Global Scholars program. Business in Fort Worth. She arrived at DU with a solid reputation in
On that score, she brings plenty of firsthand experience to the leadership development and diversity.
table. McCall completed her PhD at the University of Strasbourg and “I’ve been familiar with Daniels for years,” said Riordan.
worked on her dissertation during an extended stay in Madrid. “When I was at the University of Georgia, I benchmarked against
Daniels because of the strong emphasis on leadership and ethics.”
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Morgridge College of Education Recovery. In addition, it continued a number of partnership programs


that put faculty and students to work in the community. These include
With education issues at the forefront of public concern, the the Ritchie Program for School Leaders, the Boettcher Teacher Program
Morgridge College of Education is helping develop innovative and the Buell Early Childhood Leadership Program. Because these
approaches to educational improvement and practice at all levels. programs build deep partnerships within the community, they have
During his 2007 Convocation address, Chancellor Robert brought a significant amount of external funding to the college.
Coombe heralded the college’s coming role in shaping everything Through the Boettcher Teacher Program, the Morgridge College
from public policy debate to the nature of the learning experience partners with the Boettcher Foundation, the Public Education and
at all levels of the education spectrum. Business Coalition, Mapleton Public Schools and Adams 12 Five Star
“We want the Morgridge College of Education to become Schools to provide an alternative teaching license and a master’s
the fulcrum on which the intellectual capital of the University is degree in curriculum and instruction, paid for by a full scholarship.
leveraged to produce positive change in the schools of our With a focus on urban education, Boettcher fellows are mentored
communities,” Coombe told the University community. through rigorous course work and engaging teaching experiences
Those words resonated with Ginger Maloney, who served as within the first year of the program. During the five-year commitment,
dean of the Morgridge College until summer 2008. She believes that, theory and practice are woven together as fellows receive ongoing
as the college strives to become an effective agent for meaningful support from experienced practitioners. Meanwhile, the Buell Early
change locally, nationally and even internationally, it is well Childhood Leadership Program aims to develop a committed cadre
positioned to harness and deploy the knowledge that has been of early-childhood leaders to meet the challenges of achieving high-
developed in recent years. quality programs for infants and young children in Colorado, especially
“We are learning more every day about the human brain, how those at risk of failure due to socio-economic and language barriers.
it changes throughout life, and what’s happening biologically and Within the University, the Morgridge College has also fostered
chemically during the learning process. We now have this incredible innovative partnerships, including a collaborative effort with the
science that undergirds education. The cutting edge of the field of School of Engineering and Computer Science to use computer
education is to explore how to apply this basic science of learning to gaming in teaching math and science. This initiative is aimed at
the real-world work of teachers, counselors, librarians and other engaging young women and students of color in engineering and
education professionals — in much the same way that the field of other technical fields.
engineering is about applying the sciences of physics, chemistry and Through endeavors like these, and by training the next
biology to solve real problems,” Maloney said. generation of leaders, the Morgridge College hopes to maximize
Throughout 2007–2008, the Morgridge College advanced its impact on education and educators. “That’s how we make a
a number of mission-critical projects. It secured funding for a new difference in our community,” Maloney said, “by producing people
Institute for Educational Success, the Marsico Institute for Early who can be agents for transformative change in education at all
Learning and Literacy and a new University Training Center for Reading levels and in all venues.”
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T r a i n i n g t h e n e x t g e n e r at i o n of l e a d e r s
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Every year, the University of Denver honors outstanding members of the


faculty with a host of awards.
The 2007–2008 honorees were recognized at Convocation in September.

UNITED METHODIS T CHURCH UNIVERSIT Y SCHOL AR/TEACHER OF THE YEAR AWARD


Co-Honorees

CYNTHIA McRAE MARGARET WHITT


M ORGRIDGE C OLLEGE OF E DUCATION D EPARTMENT OF E NGLISH

DISTINGUISHED TEACHING AWARD DISTINGUISHED SCHOLAR AWARD

SCOTT LEUTENEGGER HOWARD MARKMAN


S CHO OL OF E NGINEERING AND D EPARTMENT OF P SYCHOLOGY
C OMPUTER S CIENCE

JOHN EVANS PROFESSORSHIP UNIVERSITY LECTURER

BIN RAMKE JEFF JENSON


D EPARTMENT OF E NGLISH GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
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emphasis on personal at tention and innovative practices


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G L O B A L D U : AT W O R K I N T H E W O R L D

From its home in the Rocky Mountains, the international “Excellence in Mobility” project to
University of Denver is reaching out to the world, address problems confronting contemporary cities.
developing programs and centers with interna- DU’s international focus and emphasis on
tional focus, enrolling students from scores of academic quality made it an attractive choice
countries spanning the continents, and sending for students outside the United States. In the
students overseas to serve and study. What’s 2007–2008 academic year, DU drew more than
more, its alumni are at work in the world, 700 students from 89 foreign countries, with the
directing businesses, serving their governments number of students from China up by 98 percent.
and contributing to our understanding of Heading into the 2008–2009 academic year,
complex issues. China continued the trend, sending the most
In 2007, the University received a $7.45 international students—more than 200—of any
million gift from investor/philanthropist Frederick other country. The University welcomed about
Pardee to support and expand the International 800 overseas students from 80 foreign countries
Futures program at the Josef Korbel School of to enroll in September 2008, the most in
International Studies. The gift will fund the a decade.
Frederick S. Pardee Center for International “Our success in internationalization really
Futures, directed by Barry Hughes, inventor of speaks to our reputation abroad,” said Mary
the highly respected International Futures Boevers, DU’s director of International Student
modeling system and a professor at the Korbel and Scholar Services. “Bringing international
School. One of the center’s missions is to produce students to DU helps us not only share our vision
a five-volume series called Patterns of Potential with the world, but it creates an atmosphere that
Human Progress, which will center on issues of encourages an exchange of ideas and cultures.”
global justice and equality. The University’s emphasis on study and
Hughes’ computer modeling system has service abroad also encourages cross-cultural
emerged as a preferred forecasting tool for exchange. In keeping with DU’s focus on serving
national and international bodies, including the the public good, its International Service Learning
United Nations, the European Commission and program sent students around the globe to
the National Intelligence Council. The system tackle real-world problems. Students traveled
integrates all the major components that to developing areas in Bosnia, India, Ecuador,
dominate global development — sociopolitical El Salvador, South Africa and Thailand to work
and economic factors, population, agriculture, with refugees, provide health education and offer
energy, technology and environmental issues— tutoring to adults and children.
to assist in the formulation of essential long- Students also ventured abroad with classmates
term strategies. and professors, intent on developing their knowl-
Still another DU entity, the Center for edge through experiential learning. During one
China-U.S. Cooperation, remained the only two-week winter interterm science course, students
institution in the Rocky Mountain region traveled to Thailand to examine the environmental
devoted to enhancing understanding of issues challenges facing urban areas and farming
affecting the United States and China. In May communities. In another geography course,
2008, the center partnered with the Center for students traipsed through muddy jungles to teach
China Studies at National Taiwan University to the people of Guatemala’s lowlands how to filter
host an international symposium, comparing water. They also climbed to the high country to
development models of China and the United work with visionaries learning to trap mountain
States. Meanwhile, the University of Denver- mist and create a new fresh-water source.
Bologna International Center for Civic DU’s wide reach was extended through the
Engagement, an international venue for research efforts of its globally engaged alumni. Gen. George
and study, received a multi-institution, $180,000 William Casey Jr. continued his service as chief
grant from the European Union-United States of staff of the U.S. Army, while Secretary of State
Atlantis Program to develop and implement an Condoleezza Rice traveled the world championing

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the expansion of democratic governments and the United Nations; Pierre-Michel Fontaine, the
Cindy Courville served as U.S. ambassador to the former director of the Office of the High Commis-
African Union. Heraldo Munoz, Chile’s ambassador sioner for Human Rights in the Democratic
to the United Nations, published his thought- Republic of Congo; Thomas M. Stauffer, president,
provoking book, A Solitary War: A Diplomat’s chief executive officer and professor of manage-
Chronicle of the Iraq War and Its Lessons, and ment at the American University of Afghanistan;
came to Denver for a May book signing. Robert M. Perito, senior program officer, Center
Other globally active DU alumni include for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations,
Masoumah Al-Mubarak, who served as Kuwait’s U.S. Institute of Peace; and Paul Trivelli, U.S.
health minister until 2007; Ambassador ambassador to the Republic of Nicaragua.
Mohammad Javad Zarif, the former permanent
representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran to

Cherrington Global Scholars Although not every DU student who studies abroad is involved
in Cherrington Global Scholars, the Cherrington program has proven
With globalization presenting so many social and economic challenges, to be, as expected, a tremendous boost. For example, the University
it’s imperative that University of Denver graduates become comfortable of Denver had 268 students participating in study abroad in 2003–
with and knowledgeable about different cultures and countries. 2004, the year prior to the launch of the Cherrington program. In
That’s the premise behind DU’s Cherrington Global Scholars 2004–2005, when the first students participating under Cherrington
program, an academic initiative that sends eligible juniors and seniors were included, the number of DU students studying abroad for at
abroad for at least a quarter of study. They do so at the same cost least a quarter or semester jumped to 459. The numbers have
of a comparable period at DU. The opportunity allows students to climbed ever since, reaching 629 in 2007–2008.
study differential equations in Budapest or organizational behavior in “In establishing our study abroad academic relationships with
Johannesburg, all while immersing themselves in a different culture. the institutions we work with, we have several primary goals in
Study abroad has grown so popular that it has exceeded one mind,” said Eric Gould, vice provost for internationalization. “We
of its chief goals: to send 60 percent of DU undergraduate students need to serve all academic departments at the University. We also
to another country for academic pursuits. need to serve all languages that are taught at the University — and
Along with other DU study abroad efforts, Cherrington Global some other languages, besides.”
Scholars has put DU at the forefront of internationalization efforts. That means the program must cultivate relationships with
According to the Institute of International Education’s “Open Doors” institutions all over the world. “By area of the world as well as by
report, the University now ranks first among doctoral/research culture, we need to have a highly diverse geographic representation.
institutions in the percentage of undergraduate students who spend And we need, really, a diverse set of programs in terms of a variety
significant portions of their academic careers studying in a foreign of students’ skills, ability and readiness for independence in studying
country. The report shows that DU sent 74.4 percent of its under- abroad,” Gould said, noting that DU sends its study abroad participants
graduates abroad, more than any other school. to more than 100 institutions of higher learning. These are located
on every continent, with the exception of Antarctica.

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Traveling and Studying With ...

Patrick Dichter hadn’t traveled far from his Morrison, Colo.,


home before enrolling at DU. But when the University’s Cherrington
Global Scholars program opened the way, he set his sights on
another continent and another language.
Dichter’s time in France in the fall of 2007 was nothing short
of intense. Opting for the independent, sink-or-swim atmosphere of
a French dorm instead of a host family, Dichter threw himself into
his immersion experience, combining intense language classes
with whirlwind explorations of Rome, Madrid and the French
Mediterranean coast.
“My main focus was to develop my French, learn about
another culture and travel,” Dichter said. “There is so much value in
seeing the world at a young age and seeing other cultures and
seeing how other people view the United States. The younger you PATRICK D ICHTER
are, the more open you are to all those new things and ideas, and
the more it helps you figure out what you want to do in life.”
The 21-year-old international business major is pursuing dual only language they had in common was French, so he rarely spoke
minors in French and finance. He hadn’t really considered study anything but. After classroom study focusing on language, afternoons
abroad until he came to DU and discovered the Cherrington program. were spent getting lost in downtown markets and learning about a
His four months in France at the University of Aix-Marseilles opened new culture.
his eyes, he said. “If there hadn’t been so much emphasis on study abroad here
In France, he lived in a residence hall with a mix of students, at DU, I probably wouldn’t have taken part in the program,” he said.
many of them French, but many of them from other countries. The “It turns out it was a huge part of my education.”

Emily Kolm wanted to go somewhere unconventional and learn developing health and social programs, really getting in and doing
something unusual. DU’s Cherrington Global Scholars program sent the groundwork. I got a real feel for what development work
her to Kenya, where she learned Swahili. really involves.”
“East Africa has always appealed to me, and the program Kolm, 21, is a native of Golden, Colo., majoring in international
module was really great,” she said, after spending three months in studies and creative writing. Learning about the different social
the capital city of Nairobi in the fall of 2007. “We worked on programs governments develop — everything from health clinics to
art centers — opened her eyes to a world of possibilities.
She lived with two host families who helped her learn about
their country while encouraging her to explore the bustling metropolis
on her own. She also took intensive classes and participated in
lectures, fieldwork and independent study. By the time she left, Kolm
said she could converse in the local street language, a mixture of
English and Swahili.
She wrote about her time in Kenya in an essay for Cherrington
Global Scholars: “There were difficult times while I was in Kenya;
there were times that I felt very out of place, lonely for my friends
and family back home, angry about poverty I had seen, or just
frustrated with the complications with living in a foreign country. One
time I came home to my Nairobi host mom after a frustrating day of
getting lost on the public transportation system of matatu vans. My
host mom fixed me a calming thermos full of Kenyan chai and told
me: Kupotea njia ndiyo kujua njia: When you get lost, you will end
up knowing the way.”
Kolm’s time in Kenya did indeed help her know the way.
E MILY KOLM “In addition to what I learned in the classes, I picked up language
skills, cultural skills and a new sense of resourcefulness.”
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creating an atmosphere that encourages cultural exchange


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going to name it after its founder— to do it,” said Tom Farer, who
has served the school as dean for a dozen years.
The school prides itself on producing graduates who go on to
make a difference in the world. Its alumni include Condoleezza Rice,
U.S. secretary of state; Heraldo Muñoz, Chilean ambassador to the
United States; M. Javad Zarif, former Iranian ambassador to the
United Nations; Jami Miscik, former deputy director of the Central
Intelligence Agency; Gen. George W. Casey Jr., U.S. Army chief of
staff; and Susan Waltz, former chair of the international executive
committee of Amnesty International.
“This is such a complex interdisciplinary program,” said Farer.
“From the social sciences, we cherry-pick and integrate relevant
themes in politics, economics, geology, anthropology and psychology;
to them, we add courses in law, history, management, public policy
and public administration. And to them, we add highly technical
courses that enable graduates to add value to institutions from the
moment they join them.”
Offering six degrees and three certificate programs, the Josef
Korbel School strives to prepare students with the intellectual and
technical skills to succeed in either the private, public or nonprofit
sectors. “What we’re doing, in essence, is somewhat similar to what
the business school does,” Farer said. “They call them ‘managers;’
we call them ‘administrators’ and ‘analysts.’ And most people will
The Josef Korbel School of end up doing both in the course of a career in public, private and
International Studies: nonprofit institutions that conduct transactions across national
Making a Difference in the World frontiers. We’re training people to be leaders.”
That means, among other things, exposing students to visiting
When diplomat Josef Korbel and his family escaped their native scholars and professors from around the world. It means running
Czechoslovakia during World War II, moving first to Great Britain and in-house research and training units such as the Center for China-United
later to the United States, they longed for a society free of fascism States Cooperation, the Center for Sustainable Development and
or communism, one in which freedom is a “given.” International Peace, and the human rights center called CORD. It
They found what they were looking for in the United States, also means exchanging ideas and resources with other institutions
settling first in New York and then, in 1949, moving west to begin a and countries.
lasting and defining relationship with the University of Denver. After
15 years as a professor of international relations with the University,
Korbel founded and became the first dean of the Graduate School
of International Studies. The year was 1964.
Korbel worked tirelessly until his death in 1977, establishing
and refining a professional program in international studies that
would prepare DU students for distinguished careers and, through the
research contributions of its faculty, would promote within the region
a far greater understanding of complex international issues and
further greater cooperation globally among nation-states by clarifying
their common interests in an increasingly interdependent world.
Inspired by Korbel’s legacy, in 2008 the University changed
the name of the Graduate School of International Studies to the
Josef Korbel School of International Studies. The new name became
official at a May 28 ceremony attended by Korbel’s children,
including former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
The new name complements the school’s rising stature. In
fact, Foreign Policy magazine currently counts the school among
the nation’s best. “The school now ranks among the top 10
reputationally, and it seemed an appropriate moment — if you were

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A N E V O LV I N G C A M P U S

The campus of any forward-looking college or collaboration. The design for the proposed
university lives, breathes and evolves. That’s School of Engineering and Computer Science,
certainly true of the University of Denver, which meanwhile, will make a bold statement in terms
has seen numerous new buildings added to its of how land is used and how the south end of
skyline over the past 15 years. campus develops.
In 2007–2008, the University wrapped up The new 1,800- to 2,000-seat soccer stadium
major construction on Nagel Hall, a 21st century will incorporate a strength and conditioning
residence building that also accommodates complex that will allow the athletics program to
academic programs. In fact, the psychology train whole teams at one time. The nearby art
department has offices and research facilities in the annex will provide 12,500 square feet of studio
building’s garden level. Nagel Hall also serves as a space for drawing and painting. Plans call for the
crossroads for the entire University community. annex to be tucked partly into the ground and to
“Nagel Hall is designed in a way that, we feature a large skylight and side windows.
hope, allows and certainly encourages people to The Academic Commons project is focused
move through it who are not necessarily residents on fostering interaction. “We’re going to transform
in the building,” said University Architect Mark both the library and the student center over, we
Rodgers. “So I describe Nagel as ‘Grand Central hope, the next five to 10 years to create advantages
Station.’ The building’s dining facility is designed that should be clearly, patently obvious to our
to be ‘grab-and-go’—it’s meant to be very frantic, students, our alumni, our faculty, our staff, our
very active. It’s a place where you’re not sure visitors,” Rodgers said. “And that’s in terms of
who’s going to be there. But you can walk how those buildings ‘feel’—but more importantly,
through it, and if you see your friends, you can how the buildings foster the interactions we really
stop and grab a meal.” want to push in terms of how our students learn.”
Rodgers expects that Nagel Hall will receive In contemplating any new building for
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental the DU campus, Rodgers emphasizes certain
Design) certification from the U.S. Green Building essential criteria.
Council at least at the silver level. The building “Our campus was so disparate in terms of
may even qualify for gold-level certification. architectural heritage that we adopted a couple of
“Several years back, we built the Ricketson rules,” he said. “One is: Build the buildings so
Law building, and it was certified as the first they all ‘fit’ together. So we’ve learned to love
LEED gold building in Colorado,” said Rodgers. Collegiate Gothic, which is the common style of
“But that’s a reflection not necessarily of us being our red-brick buildings trimmed in limestone
extremely innovative—as much as I think we are with pitched roofs. That’s the style on which we
—it’s more that we’ve always been building well.” felt we could best unify the campus design.
Work also continued in 2007–2008 on designs “And the second rule is: You have to assume
for Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall, which will provide that buildings’ uses will change. For example, one
a state-of-the-art facility for the Morgridge College of our landmark buildings is the Mary Reed
of Education, for a new building to house the Library, which, over time, is becoming something
School of Engineering and Computer Science, completely different, even while we are working
and for a soccer complex and art annex near hard to restore some of its signature spaces.
the Ritchie Center for Sports & Wellness. The Programs change. Are the design — and the
University’s staff of architects also tackled plans plan — strong enough and reasonable enough
for a renovation to the library and alterations that they can embrace a new use?”
to the student center, converting them to an
Academic Commons that will serve the entire
University community.
The design for Ruffatto Hall enhances the
Morgridge College’s role as a community partner
by opening to busy East Evans Avenue and by
incorporating plenty of spaces that promote
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a university should be the most progressive place in the city

Enhanced Environmental Awareness

Thanks, in large part, to the efforts of some green-minded students, the University of Denver community is being encouraged
to “Get Caught Green -Handed.”
This call for enhanced environmental awareness — expressed on posters and other collateral materials to be posted
around campus — originated with the Daniels College of Business and two of its graduate students, Charlie Coggeshall and
Jeff Malcolm, who completed their master’s degrees in 2008. Focusing on environmental management, Coggeshall and
Malcolm wanted to see the Daniels College and the entire campus participating in environmental initiatives.
With that in mind, Coggeshall worked alongside undergraduate seniors Liz Pattison and Mary Jean O’Malley on DU’s
new Sustainability Council’s Reduce/Reuse/Recycle committee to energize the institution’s recycling program. One of the
committee’s goals was to place single-stream recycling bins in prominent locations in every building on campus.
This one act, Coggeshall said, will not only increase the amount of materials that are recycled, it will foster awareness
about consumption habits and the role individuals play in reducing them.
“A university should be the most progressive place in the city, leading the way. And we want to be leaders in
recycling,” Coggeshall said, noting that single-stream bins mean participants can toss all their recyclables, everything from
newspapers to plastic bottles, into the same receptacle.

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A S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y P L A N F O R T H E F U T U R E

In June 2007, Chancellor Robert Coombe officially As Cheever noted, reliance on off-site power
made DU a signatory to the American College & generation is one of the biggest issues facing the
University Presidents Climate Commitment. That nearly 600 signatories to the climate commitment.
commitment requires the formation and adoption “We have to find ways, over time, to reduce the
of a quantifiable sustainability plan on the part of greenhouse-gas emissions from our consumption
each participating institution. In fact, signatories of offsite-generated power,” he said. “In this
to the commitment are expected to integrate regard, there is a lot going on, with the city, with
sustainability into their curricula, complete and the state, with universities across the country.
periodically update a comprehensive inventory of There’s a consortium of Colorado universities
all university-related greenhouse gas emissions, working on this issue.
and develop an institutional action plan for “The thing to keep in mind—as they always
becoming climate neutral—and thus minimizing keep telling me—is that, really, the first thing is
global warming—as soon as possible. conservation,” said Cheever. “In other words, the
The University of Denver’s sustainability power you don’t use is the cheapest way of
plan is being carefully devised by DU’s newly reducing your carbon footprint. Then it’s only
created Sustainability Council, formed in fall logical: The next step is efficiency, meaning
2007 and chaired by Professor Federico Cheever power you use well. The third step is technological
of the Sturm College of Law. The council includes innovation, which involves all of the really
members from three key groups: faculty, staff innovative technologies.”
and students. With an eye toward strategic management
In its first months of existence, the council of its resources, the University is examining
mobilized to tackle several high-profile issues. everything from its light fixtures and lighting
First, it laid the groundwork for an ambitious plans to the controls regulating its heating and
campus-wide recycling program, slated to launch cooling systems. As it designs new buildings and
in fall 2008. It also began work on developing a additions, the University is also considering
carbon-neutrality plan, one of the primary require- alternative technologies such as solar power. All
ments of the Presidents Climate Commitment. of these steps should save the institution money
Setting the standards for carbon neutrality while reducing greenhouse-gas emissions.
involves an ongoing process of evaluation, The savings and efficiencies that result from
Cheever said. “We’ve received our ‘greenhouse-gas conservation initiatives could fund investments
inventory,’ which is basically the first step in the in additional energy-saving technologies. “That
Presidents Climate Commitment process. The way,” Cheever said, “the way you spend money is
inventory tells us where our greenhouse-gas connected to what has worked in the past, and it
emissions come from and how much they are.” can create some real advantages in advancing
DU’s primary concern related to greenhouse- very serious environmental objectives.”
gas emissions grows out of its reliance on off-site
power generation. Even though the University
purchases wind power, that alternative source
offsets less than one-third of all the electricity
used on campus.

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FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

At the close of fiscal year 2008, the University’s At the close of the fiscal year, the University’s
financial position was strong, with enrollment endowment stood at $300 million. Just three
trends, significant reserves and fundraising years ago, the endowment was $194 million.
successes positioning the institution for a Growth since then can be attributed to favorable
stable future and for continued investment in investment performance and substantial gifts
academic programs. specifically solicited and designated for the
The University’s revenue stream remained endowment. Development of the endowment
largely dependent on tuition, with tuition and remains a priority for the foreseeable future.
fees accounting for 67 percent of all revenues, The University maintains a diversified
auxiliary operations accounting for 12 percent, portfolio relying on 33 investment managers
gifts and endowment distribution providing investing in asset categories that include private
7 percent, grants and contracts constituting equity, hedged equity and absolute return,
6 percent, and miscellaneous other sources as well as other equity, fixed-income and real
counting for 8 percent. estate investments.
The year just ended marked the 18th As of June 30, 2008, the University had $148
consecutive year that the University completed its million of long-term debt outstanding. Moody’s
fiscal year with an operating surplus, ensuring gives the University of Denver an A1 rating, citing
improved liquidity and allowing the University its significant investment in facilities and its
to make investments that support its vision and strong operating performance. Standard & Poor’s
mission. The operating margin for the year was awards the University an A rating, based on its
$33.9 million on expenses of $307 million, steady headcount enrollment, facilities, moderate
compared to a margin of $39.7 million on debt burden and strong fundraising capability.
expenses of $282 million in the prior year. Of the
2007–2008 operating surplus, $13.6 million was
transferred to about 70 “gain-share” accounts.
(The University’s budget process rewards good
stewardship by departments and divisions,
allowing units that do not spend their budget to
reserve them in “gain-share” accounts for later
use.) Of the remaining surplus, $9.1 million was
transferred to plant funds for specific projects,
$3.8 million to designated reserves and $6.8
million to undesignated plant fund reserves.
The largest component of the positive
operating margin was a net tuition variance of
$10.5 million, attributable to a larger than
budgeted first-year class, improved persistence
among upper-level undergraduates and greater
participation in dual degree programs that award
both degrees after the fifth year. In addition, the
University made a concerted effort in 2007–2008
to constrain compensation costs, which historically
account for nearly 60 percent of all University
operating expenses, by limiting the number of
new staff positions. This consistent track record
of positive operating numbers has ensured that
the University enjoys improved liquidity.

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A D VA N C I N G T H E I N S T I T U T I O N

During the two fiscal years from July 1, 2006, The University has completed fundraising for
through June 30, 2008, funds raised at DU totaled several major facilities, including the Morgridge
nearly $150 million, including both gifts and future College of Education’s Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall,
commitments. In each of those two years, DU a new soccer stadium and a training and condi-
raised more than $70 million — more than ever tioning facility for varsity athletes. DU also is well
realized in a single prior year at the University. positioned to secure lead gifts for the proposed
Of that $150 million total, more than $45 School of Engineering and Computer Science
million was designated for scholarships. Over building as well as the Academic Commons,
$65 million was committed to the endowment, which will involve the student center and the
while more than $26 million was directed toward library. DU’s near-term fundraising targets
new capital projects. include these capital projects and endowed funds
DU officials attribute this stellar performance for scholarships and faculty positions.
to a continuation of momentum built during the The May 2008 renaming of the Graduate
16-year tenure of DU’s previous chancellor, School of International Studies to the Josef Korbel
Daniel L. Ritchie. “His commitment to encouraging School of International Studies represented
academic excellence among our faculty and another watershed event for the University. The
students, as well as his work to revitalize many renaming provided an impetus for fundraising,
buildings and spaces on campus, provided the building on the combined $20 million in funds
groundwork for our current efforts to strengthen raised and institutional commitments that have
the University,” said Scott Reiman, a trustee of the been designated to the Korbel School over the
University and chair of the investment committee. past two years.
To support the University’s commitment to A key to reaching these milestones, said
academic programs and scholarship, Chancellor Harris, is recognizing the investment aspect of
Robert Coombe and Vice Chancellor for these individuals’ gifts to DU. Donors increasingly
Advancement Ed Harris have established an expect results and accountability from their
ambitious fundraising strategy. They have investment in the institution, and they want to
developed a greater focus on major gifts as well know that their gifts are making a difference
as gifts that have transformative potential for the in society.
University. As a result, Coombe and Harris have “People give to excellence. They invest in
garnered resources not only for the University’s excellence,” said Harris. “These donors are making
building projects, but also for establishing an investment in the vision of DU, and we must
endowed faculty chairs and student scholarships. honor that. Our past two years of fundraising
These priorities reflect the central themes set have demonstrated that there are many people in
forth by Coombe when he became chancellor. our community who see the University of Denver
Coombe expects the University’s fundraising as a worthwhile investment. They understand
momentum to culminate in the kinds of programs that we’ll do the right thing with their gift, and
and initiatives that make up a great university. that it will have an impact not only on the mission
Strong fundraising will make it possible for DU of DU, but in the broader community: Denver,
to build its endowment while continuing its the state, the region, the nation and the world.”
investment in programs and people. “Our focus
in coming months and years will be on further
developing the academic programs that have
made DU the top choice for so many high-
achieving students, both at the undergraduate
and graduate levels,” Coombe said. “That means,
in part, channeling attention and resources to
faculty scholarship, research and creative work.
After all, faculty and student accomplishments
account for a great proportion of our reputation
and stature in the academic world.”
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MANAGING THE CAMPUS AS AN ASSET

Over the last 18 years, the University of Denver The discipline begins with close budget
has invested time, energy and millions of dollars oversight. “If you take a look at the University’s
in improving its physical assets—its buildings, year-to-year operating margins—which consist of
grounds and infrastructure. Like the University’s revenues less expenses—we’ve been very strong,”
endowment, these assets must be managed Woody said. “A targeted $2.5 million of the
carefully and wisely to ensure their long-term operating margin has generally been transferred
viability and to guarantee that they can serve the to the physical-plant fund for renovation and
students and faculty who rely on them. renewal, which augments the base amount in the
Since the early 1990s, the University’s invest- operating budget. The University has also used a
ment in infrastructure and new buildings has portion of its annual operating margin to match
totaled about $474 million. About half of the lead donations or to augment donor contribu-
University’s current built-out environment has tions for a new building project.
been constructed or renovated in the last decade. That has been made possible by the
The new buildings were designed and built to involvement of deans and directors in budget
stand for decades, if not centuries, providing they development and monitoring, Woody said,
are cared for properly. noting that budget restraint results from “the
With its long-term financial health in mind, way we align our financial incentives so good
the University has made ongoing maintenance of management is rewarded.” In other words,
its campus assets part of the institution’s budget- departments are allowed to carry forward
development process. Recently, in response to a conserved capital from one year to the next —
request from the board of trustees, the University a policy that has contributed to solid operating-
completed a detailed analysis of every building margin results for the past 18 years.
and every system within each building, looking at In addition to developing an adequate budget
everything from roofs and mechanical systems to for maintenance, the University has committed
program space. “We looked at what should be its vision for the stewardship of campus to a
addressed or renovated—or replaced, for example, land-use plan, first authored in 2002 and updated
in terms of equipment — and developed an in fall 2007. Recognizing the importance of a
estimate of when. We arrived at an annual estimate carefully maintained campus to the institution’s
for renovation and renewal that totaled $12.8 student-recruitment, fundraising and program-
million, compared to the $3.2 million that was development efforts, the plan outlines how the
structurally in the budget,” said Craig Woody, University will move forward in its stewardship
vice chancellor for business and financial affairs. of the campus. In addition to providing for future
Once this analysis was completed, Woody construction, it calls for strict maintenance of
and Provost Gregg Kvistad worked with the green space and preservation of sight corridors
Facilities Management staff to determine how and vistas to the mountains.
to cover the necessary funding. They did so “The very culture of this institution requires
by reviewing both central University and and demands a certain keen attention to detail on
departmental resources. Just as important, a day-to-day basis,” Woody said. “This is all part of
they established a systematic method to assure our recognition that it’s the steeple on a building,
that the University never fails to address its it’s clean, beautiful architecture, it’s the quality
maintenance requirements. of the grounds. Every one of those things, every
“Every year now, we have a very disciplined piece, has to go together when you think about
process where the director of facilities recommends the statement that the place, the University of
a portfolio of projects to complete over the Denver, makes.”
summer,” said Woody. “That puts us way ahead of
the game in the deferred-maintenance story. We
recognize the need to do it, have the discipline to
do it, and we’ve done it.”

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ENDOWMENT FUND ADDITIONS ENDOWMENT FUND MARKET VALUE


MILLIONS OF DOLLARS MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

60 300

50 250

40 200

30 150

20 100

10 50

0 0
04 05 06 07 6/30/08 04 05 06 07 6/30/08

ASSET ALLOCATION OF THE


ENDOWMENT FUND

■ Large Cap Equities 18.2%


■ Private Equity 10.1%
■ Small/Mid Cap Equities 5.4%
■ International Equities 6.5%
■ Absolute Return 17.0%
■ Hedged Equity 17.5%
■ Real Estate 9.1%
■ Cash/Short-term Treasuries 16.2%

FUNDING SOURCES FOR


CONSTRUCTION PORTFOLIO

■ Contributions $ 224,789,235

■ Bond Proceeds $ 123,116,739

■ Sale Proceeds $ 39,498,239

■ Internal Funds $ 86,542,001

TOTAL: $ 473,946,214

45
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FINANCIAL SUMMARY

Thousands of Dollars 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS ACTIVITY


REVENUES
Tuition & fees, net $153,723 $172,406 $191,689 $211,281 $227,575
Endowment spending distribution 7,001 7,541 7,971 11,350 10,251
Current use gifts 11,875 13,875 10,475 11,327 14,313
Grants and contracts 24,753 24,150 23,653 21,686 22,066
Auxiliary enterprises 34,018 36,136 37,639 40,423 41,176
Other revenue 13,459 16,842 20,066 26,016 26,099
Total revenues 244,829 270,950 291,493 322,082 341,480

EXPENSES
Instruction 79,414 88,677 96,078 104,727 117,558
Research 15,773 15,453 13,909 13,094 13,044
Public service 3,938 4,037 3,977 3,091 3,044
Academic support 34,922 38,370 43,577 46,268 49,104
Student services 11,822 13,023 14,469 15,697 15,638
Institutional support 30,300 31,686 33,859 38,219 38,678
Auxiliary enterprises 39,899 41,873 44,143 48,120 52,379
Other operating expenses 14,073 17,320 14,208 13,121 18,125
Total expenses 230,141 250,439 264,219 282,335 307,569
Net Operating Results 14,688 20,511 27,274 39,747 33,911
Nonoperating Activities
Undistributed investment gains/(losses) 14,067 10,347 17,097 27,993 (6,701)
Endowed gifts 6,020 21,647 14,040 23,654 28,608
Other nonoperating activities 24,774 (1,456) (6,582) 9,033 10,279
Total Nonoperating Activities 44,861 30,538 24,556 60,681 32,185
Net change in total assets 59,549 51,049 51,830 100,428 66,096
Total net assets, beginning of year 495,850 555,399 606,449 658,278 758,706
Total net assets, end of period $555,399 $606,449 $658,278 $758,706 $824,803

46
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REVENUES EXPENSES NONOPERATING ACTIVITIES


MILLIONS OF DOLLARS MILLIONS OF DOLLARS MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

350 350 60

300 300 50

250 250 40

200 200 30

150 150 20

100 100 10

50 50 0

0 0 -10
04 05 06 07 08 04 05 06 07 08 04 05 06 07 08
BOARD OF TRUSTEES

J OY S. B URNS CHAIRMAN J OHN M ILLER Honorary Life Trustees


J OHN W. L OW VICE CHAIRMAN C ARRIE M ORGRIDGE
PATRICK B OWLEN T RYGVE M YHREN W ILLIAM C OORS
E DWARD E STLOW R ALPH NAGEL W ILLIAM K URTZ
S TEVEN FARBER R OBERT N EWMAN E DWARD L EHMAN
M ARGOT G ILBERT F RANK S COTT R EIMAN DANIEL R ITCHIE
K EVIN C. G ALLAGHER R ICHARD S APKIN B ILL S ORENSEN
NATHANIEL G OLDSTON III D OUGLAS S CRIVNER R OBERT T IMOTHY
L EO G OTO C ATHERINE S HOPNECK C ARL W ILLIAMS
M ARIA G UAJARDO J OHN S IE
PATRICK HAMILL D ONALD S TURM
JANE HAMILTON O TTO T SCHUDI
R ICHARD K ELLEY C LARA V ILLAROSA
PATRICIA L IVINGSTON F REDERICK WALDECK

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

R OBERT D. C OOMBE JAMES R. M ORAN T OM J. FARER


CHANCELLOR VICE PROVOST FOR DEAN, JOSEF KORBEL SCHOOL OF
GRADUATE STUDIES INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
G REGG K VISTAD
PROVOST J O C ALHOUN LYNN G ANGONE
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR DEAN, THE WOMEN’S COLLEGE
P EG B RADLEY-D OPPES STUDENT LIFE
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR J OSE R OBERTO J UAREZ J R .
ATHLETICS, RECREATION & DEAN, STURM COLLEGE OF LAW
PATRICIA S. H ELTON
RITCHIE CENTER OPERATIONS
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR
CAMPUS LIFE A NNE M C C ALL
C AROL FARNSWORTH DEAN, DIVISIONS OF ARTS,
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR
J ULIA M C G AHEY HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR
E D HARRIS BUDGET AND PLANNING
L. A LAYNE PARSON
DEAN, DIVISION OF NATURAL
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR
SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS
UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT J ESUS G. T REVINO
ASSOCIATE PROVOST FOR
K ENNETH R. S TAFFORD C HRISTINE R IORDAN
MULTICULTURAL EXCELLENCE
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR DEAN, DANIELS COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY TECHNOLOGY OF BUSINESS
D ENNIS M AURICE B ECKER
REGISTRAR
T HOMAS W ILLOUGHBY R AHMAT S HOURESHI
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR DEAN, SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
ENROLLMENT
NANCY A LLEN AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
DEAN, PENROSE LIBRARY
C RAIG WOODY J ERRY WARTGOW
VICE CHANCELLOR FOR P ETER B UIRSKI INTERIM DEAN, MORGRIDGE
BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL DEAN, GRADUATE SCHOOL OF
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
AFFAIRS, TREASURER PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

JAMES H ERBERT W ILLLIAMS


E RIC G OULD JAMES DAVIS DEAN, GRADUATE SCHOOL OF
VICE PROVOST FOR DEAN, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
SOCIAL WORK
INTERNATIONALIZATION

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