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Bases de estatuas con relieves Autor:Autor Annimo Fecha:300 a.C.

Museo:Museo de la Acrpolis de Atenas Caractersticas: Material:Mrmol Estilo:Grecia

Partenn. Jinetes del friso del lado norte Autor:Fidias Fecha:425-420 a.C. Museo:Museo de la Acrpolis de Atenas Caractersticas: Material:Relieve Estilo:

Partenn. Jinetes del friso del lado norte Autor:Fidias Fecha:425-420 a.C. Museo:Museo de la Acrpolis de Atenas Caractersticas: Material:Relieve Estilo:

Partenn. Jinetes del friso de las Panateneas Autor:Fidias Fecha:425-420 a.C. Museo:Museo de la Acrpolis de Atenas Caractersticas: Material:Relieve Estilo:

English: Fully armed warriors. Detail from the Warrior Vase, a Pictorial Style krater discovered by Schliemann at Mycenae, in a house on the acropolis. Height: 41 cm. Date: 1200-1100 BC. Athens, National Archaeological Museum. Photo by Adam Carr. HIGGINS, R. Minoan and Mycenaean Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 1981. PEDLEY, J.G. Greek Art and Archaeology. London: Lawrence King, 2nd ed., 1998.

English: Funerary naiskos of a young soldier (Aristonautes, son of Archenautes, of the deme Halai). Pentelic marble, found in the Kerameikos necropolis in Athens, ca. 350 325 BC. Franais : Naiskos funraire de marbre pentlique, provenant de la ncropole du Cramique Athnes. Un jeune soldat athnien revtu de la panoplie militaire complte et portant une chlamyde est reprsent sur le champ de bataille. Il porte un bouclier au bras gauche et devait tenir une pe de la main droite. Les trous sur le front servaient fixer une couronne ou un casque de bronze. L'expression faciale dramatique et la musculature rappellent l'uvre du sculpteur parien Skopas. L'pistyle du naiskos porte le nom du soldat, Aristonautes fils d'Archenautes du dme d'Halai. La base du loutrophoros prserv sur l'acrotre centrale du naiskos indique qu'il mourut clibataire. Vers 350325 av. J.-C. Muse archologique national, Athnes.

Espaol: Encoe tica de estilo geomtrico representando a guerreros posiblemente domando un caballo. Museo arqueolgico del Cermico de Atenas. 800-775 a. C.

Espaol: Procesin funeraria y plaideras. Fragmento de una crtera (c. 750-725 a. C.), descubierta en el cementerio de Dipiln de Atenas. Fragmento de una crtera del Pintor de Dipiln, h. 750-725 a. C., Museo del Louvre

English: Menelaos and Hector fighting over the body of Euphorbos. Plate, Middle Wild Goat style, made in Rhodes ca. 600 BC. From Kameiros. Franais : Combat de Mnlas et Hector sur le corps d'Euphorbe. Assiette, style des Chvres Sauvages moyen, production rhodienne, vers 600 av. J.-C. Provenance : Kamiros.

{{BritishMuseum |Unknown |Menelaos and Hector fighting over the body of Euphorbos. Plate, Middle Wild Goat style, made in Rhodes ca. 600 BC. From Kameiros. |Diam. 38.5 cm (15 in.) |Unspecified |GR 1860.44.1 |Main floor, room 13, Greek & Rome |[[User:Jast

Athens, Parthenon, section of the "Elgin Marbles", now in British Museum, London, Duveen Gallery.

English: Athenian youths arming themselves. Side B of the so-called Euphronios krater, Attic red-figured calyx-krater signed by Euxitheos (potter) and Euphronios (painter), ca. 515 BC. H. 45.7 cm (18 in.); D. 55.1 cm (21 11/16 in.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (L.2006.10).

English: Rider. Interior of an Attic red-figure cup, ca. 500490 BC. Found in Vulci. Franais : Cavalier. Intrieur d'une coupe attique figures rouges, v. 500-490 av. J.-C. Dcouvert Vulci

English: Aulos player. Attic redfigured kylix, ca. 490 BC. From Vulci. Franais : Joueur d'aulos. Kylix attique figures rouges, vers 490 av. J.-C. Provenance : Vulci. English: Hoplite putting his armor on, surrounded by two Scythian warriors. Inscriptions: (armored) for the hoplite, [] (blow?) for the Scythian archer (right). Side A of an Attic red-figure belly-amphora. From Vulci. Franais : Hoplite enfilant son armure, entour par deux guerriers scythes. Inscriptions : ( cuirass ) pour l'hoplite, [] ( coup port ) pour l'archer scythe (droite). Face A d'une amphore panse attique figures rouges. Provenance : Vulci.

English: Warriors. Side B from an Attic black-figure amphora, ca. 570565 BC. Franais : Guerriers. Face B d'une amphore attique figures noires, vers. 570565 av. J.-C.

English: Ajax and Achilles playing a board game. Black-figure oinochoe. Franais : Ajax et Achille jouant un jeu de plateau. noch figues noires. Italiano: Achille e Aiace giocando a un gioco da tavolo. Oinochoe a figure nere.
530 BC

English: Ancient Greek Terracotta Vessel with Battle Scenes and Ships: Black-figured dittos attributed to the Circle of the Antimenes Painter. Made in Athens, 520-510 BC.,with a modern stand.

English: Attic black-figure eye-cup attributed to Oltos; Tondo: running warrios, Asite/B-site: female dancer betrween eyes; about 520 BC; Museum August Kestner Hanover; Inventary number 1966.84

Black-figure panel amphora; last quarter 6th century B.C.; Height: 46.4 cm, diameter (maximum): 28.6 cm); Ceramic; Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, Texas; Munger Fund object number 1965.29.M

Black figured vessel,Antimenes Painter; Muse des Beaux-Arts de Lille ANT 35

Archeological Artefacts in Sozopol Museum Walters Art MuseumWalters Art MuseumWalters Walters Art Museum

English: Black-figure Amphora.


530-520 B.C.).

English: The death of Achilles, which occurred after the events recounted in "The Iliad," was described in another epic poem called "The Aethiopis", which has not survived. On the front of this amphora, the dead Achilles is carried from the Trojan battlefield by his comrade, Ajax. In front of Ajax, a woman leads the way and raises her hand to tear at her hair in a gesture of mourning. Two armed warriors follow behind. On the back, two armed horsemen clash on the battlefield, their horses rearing above a fallen warrior trapped beneath them. between 530 and 520 BC (Archaic)

English: The death of Achilles, which occurred after the events recounted in "The Iliad," was described in another epic poem called "The Aethiopis", which has not survived. On the front of this amphora, the dead Achilles is carried from the Trojan battlefield by his comrade, Ajax. In front of Ajax, a woman leads the way and raises her hand to tear at her hair in a gesture of mourning. Two armed warriors follow behind. On the back, two armed horsemen clash on the battlefield, their horses rearing above a fallen warrior trapped beneath them. between 530 and 520 BC (Archaic)

English: Lekythoi, often used in funerary rituals and found in burials, commonly show scenes of daily life or funerary themes. Here, three young men are depicted preparing for battle. The central figure plays a trumpet, which, though rarely depicted on pottery, was commonly used to help keep time while marching. The two warriors are armed with spears and carry heavy shields, called "hoploi," from which the term hoplite, or foot soldier, is derived. circa 480 BC

English: Three Amazons on this black-figure lekythos face right, and appear to march one after the other. Their skin is white, but their facial features, eroded or rubbed away, are indistinguishable. Each wears a helmet, holds a long spear and has a horizontal quiver. The middle figure holds both hands near her waist; the other two have one hand raised. Amazons are first mentioned in the "Iliad" (6.186) as allies of the Trojans; later authors emphasize their fearlessness and their status as foreigners. They were introduced on Attic vases in the early 6th century BC, and quickly became a popular subject. Early black-figure depictions of Amazons resemble Greek warriors, with one notable difference-their white skin color, which identifies them as "women." In red-figure vases, the Amazons acquire more feminine features and bodies, and their foreigness is emphasized by their attire: Scythian or Thracian clothing and subsequently Persian garb. In some places in Greece, Amazons were the object of cult. Jennifer Larson (1995, 11116) has suggested that despite the fact that they were considered hostile to the Greeks, their complete otherness from the Greek way of life also gave them protective powers and entitled them to be worshiped as heroines.
irca 500 BC

English: This shape of drinking-cup is called a "mastos" and resembles a woman's breast. On the front, a soldier whose nudity signifies heroic status advances against two warriors dressed in short tunics; two heralds watch from either side. On the back, a nude warrior confronts a clothed one in a similar scene. Beneath the horizontal handle stands a siren, a mythical creature with a woman's head and a bird's body, whose powers included knowledge of the outcome of battles. circa 530 BC (Archaic)

English: This vase depicts two warriors in combat flanked by two women on side A, and three kneeling Greek warriors and three standing bowmen on side B. circa 530 BC

English: This vase depicts two warriors in combat flanked by two women on side A, and three kneeling Greek warriors and three standing bowmen on side B. circa 530 BC

English: This vase may portray the common departure scene of two warriors in full armor leaving home for war, or it may represent a famous scene from "The Iliad" in which Priam, king of Troy, comes to claim and pay ransom for the body of his son Hector. Achilles, who killed Hector in single combat, greets the elderly king. Witnessing this scene are a second warrior, who stands next to Achilles, and another man, standing behind. circa between 520 and 510 BC (Archaic)

English: This vase may portray the common departure scene of two warriors in full armor leaving home for war, or it may represent a famous scene from "The Iliad" in which Priam, king of Troy, comes to claim and pay ransom for the body of his son Hector. Achilles, who killed Hector in single combat, greets the elderly king. Witnessing this scene are a second warrior, who stands next to Achilles, and another man, standing behind. circa between 520 and 510 BC (Archaic)

English: Side A of this vase depicts two riders, a warrior and a dog. Side B depicts two men in a chariot beside two Scythians, a warrior and a dog. between 530 and 525 BC

English: On one side of this black-figure amphora, a bearded man in a short chiton is mounting a chariot while grasping the reins of four horses. Though he has no shield or helmet, his sheathed sword and spear identify him as a warrior. In front of the chariot, another bearded man holding a staff in his right hand sits on a diphros. Behind the horses stands Athena, who turns her head toward the charioteer and holds a spear in her right hand. She wears a long, patterned peplos, a snaky aegis and a high-crested helmet. The scene on the opposite side depicts a helmeted warrior, carrying a spear and shield flanked by two mounted horsemen. Below the figural scene are three bands of a meander pattern, a lotus bud chain, and black rays. Palmettes adorn the neck and the area below the handles. The main side of the vase depicts a departure scene, in which the warrior prepares himself to enter the battlefield-a popular motif in Athenian vase painting. The scenes vary in their iconography; some include family members offering armor, libations, and farewell gestures (Shapiro 1990, 120-21). In black-figure examples of this motif, figures are sometimes labeled with the names of epic heroes (Matheson 2005, 26). On this vase, there are no inscriptions to identify the figures, allowing the viewer to draw comparisons between contemporary warriors and their heroic prototypes. Scenes of warriors departing tend to focus on the soldier taking leave of his family and frequently depict the soldier's father and wife or mother. The presence of Athena in this scene may refer to epic or may indicate that the warrior is protected by this armed goddess. between 530 and 520 BC

English: This kyathos depicts a characteristic battle scene: two warriors or heroes fighting over a fallen soldier. Two bearded soldiers attack each other with raised spears and large shields decorated with white motifs and red rims. Their swords hang sheathed at their side. The warrior on the left has knocked his opponent's helmet off his head, while his opponent's spear is pointing at his throat. In between, a third warrior has collapsed on his right knee and uses his spear and shield for support. Unlike the standing fighters in their short kilts, he wears a short white garment belted with a bow. On either side of this central scene, a warrior with a shield is driving to the right in a "quadriga" (a four-horse chariot). Without identifying attributes or inscriptions, the warriors depicted could be ordinary soldiers in battle or Greek heroes fighting at Troy. The scene of two warriors fighting over the body of a fallen soldier is a familiar episode from accounts of the Trojan War; the recovery of the body and the armor of a dead comrade was crucial. Even if the warriors depicted on this vessel are ordinary Greeks, the imagery recalls the glory of the heroic warriors of the past. circa 510 BC (Archaic)

English: Beneath the meander-adorned rim of this large volute krater is a band of figural decoration interrupted by the handles on each side. At the center of the scene on one side is a trio of warriors, each wearing a short chiton and a full panoply of armor. The central figure lunges deeply to the right as he looks back at the soldier behind him. The figure on the left prepares to plunge his raised spear into the central warrior. The third soldier, on the right, also wields a spear in his upraised right hand, poised to strike. Flanking this central pair are two women in long, decorated garments. Each raises her hands, as if to address the men or express alarm. Behind the woman on the right is a horse and young man, perhaps a groom. Beyond them are four more figures, including a naked youth with a mantle, two men with staffs, and another fully armed warrior. To the left of the central scene, behind the woman, an armed warrior mounts a chariot, as if ready to flee from the fighting. A man seated in front of the horses interrupts the sense of motion evoked by the charioteer. The two figures behind the

seated man resemble those at the other end of the scene: a naked youth wearing a mantle and holding a staff or spear and a standing man in longs robes with a staff.

Reminiscent of the central trio of warriors, three figures occupy the center of the scene on the opposite side, in a representation of Herakles wrestling the Nemean lion, with a youth, perhaps Iolaos, at hand offering support as he holds the hero's club. As with the composition on the other side, the figures are flanked by two female figures - a seated Athena on the right and a woman fleeing on the left. Further connecting the scenes is the depiction of charioteers mounting their chariots, which once again face seated men with staffs. A standing man with a staff frames the scene at either end.
Warriors figure prominently on both sides of this vase, which appears to celebrate the physical prowess of the central figures. The scenes highlight conduct in war and wrestling, two activities in which male citizens would have been trained and encouraged to emulate their heroic prototypes.

circa between 525 and 500 BC

English: Herakles is depicted on this black-figure lekythos with his usual attributes, the lion skin and the club, which he holds in his right hand, and a quiver. He is facing right, grasping an Amazon who tries to escape from him, though she turns her head to face him. There is an Amazon on each side of this duel. One runs away from Herakles, while the other runs toward his captive, as if coming to her aid. All three are similarly dressed; two carry spears; one has no shield. Herakles' ninth labor for King Eurytheus required him to retrieve the girdle of the queen of the Amazons. While the queen at first willingly acceded to Herakles' request, the goddess Hera spread a rumor among the Amazons that Herakles intended to kidnap their queen; when the Amazons attacked him, Herakles killed her and made off with her girdle. This theme was a common subject on vases depicting the Amazons, and one of the most frequently recurring subjects on vases portraying Herakles and his labors. In vase-painting the Amazon queen is usually named Andromache (she is more often named Hippolyte in the literary evidence), and the girdle itself is usually not depicted until after the 6th century.circa between 525 and 475 BC

English: The Lysippides Painter is renowned for his work with another vase-painter, the Andokides Painter. They produced remarkable "bilingual" vases on which the Lysippides Painter painted one side in the black-figure technique, and the Andokides Painter painted the same image in the newly developed red-figure technique on the other side. On this vase, however, we have an example of the Lysippides Painter's early work in black-figure. On the front, Hermes escorts a woman towards the wine-god, Dionysus, whose satyr and maenad companions stand behind. On the back is a typical "departure scene," in which an armed warrior mounts his chariot as companions see him off. circa 530 BC (Archaic)

English: On side A, Athena is striding to the left with a spear in her raised left hand and a shield in her right with a large snake, a popular shield device on Panathenaic vases of the late Archaic period. She is wearing a patterned garment, a high-crested helmet, and the "aegis," from which several snake heads clearly emerge. Two thin columns crowned by roosters frame the scene. The reverse shows two young jockeys in high gallop in the heat of the race. Both boys are nude and ride without saddles or stirrups, guiding the horse with their reins. The rider in the back is using a whip in his raised right hand to gain some ground on his opponent. The focus is clearly on the rider on the left, whose horse occupies the composition's foreground, its head partially obscuring the other rider. The prominence of the horse and rider, captured at a decisive moment in the race, may signal the contest's victor. The amphora lacks the prize inscription on the front that is characteristic of small-scale copies, created for trade and as commemorative souvenirs, of the Panathenaic prize amphoras (see Bentz 1998, 19-22). Dorothy Hill noted that the piece is stylistically and thematically close to the work of the Eucharides Painter, who painted at least three fullscale Panathenaic prize amphoras depicting two riders competing (Maul-Mandelartz 1990, 105). circa between 500 and 480 BC (late Archaic)

Black-figure pottery in the Staatliche Antikensammlungen"

English: Phalanx. Side A of an Attic black-figure Tyrrhenic amphora, ca. 560 BC. Franais : Phalange. Face A d'une amphore tyrrhnienne attique figures noires, v. 560 av. J.-C.

English: Departure of the warrior in front of the home's women and his white-haired father. He his accompagnied by a Scythian archer. Side B from an Attic black-figure amphora. From Vulci. Franais : Dpart du guerrier devant les femmes de la maison et son pre aux cheveux blancs. Il est accompagn d'un archer scythe. Face B d'une amphore attique figures noires. Provenance : Vulci. circa between 530 and 520 BC

English: Ajax carrying the body of Achilles out of the battlefield. Left, Menelas and Paris; right, Neoptolemus and Aeneas. Side A of an Attic black-figure amphora, ca. 510 BC. Franais : Ajax portant le corps d'Achille hors de la mle. gauche, Mnlas et Pris ; droite, Noptolme et ne. Face A d'une amphore attique figures noires, v. 510 av. J.-C.

English: Ajax carrying the body of Achilles. Attic black-figure hydria, ca. 500 BC. From Vulci. Franais : Ajax portant le corps d'Achille. Hydrie attique figures noires, v. 500 av. J.C. Provenance : Vulci.

English: Ajax carrying the body of Achilles. Attic black-figure lekythos, ca. 510 BC. From Sicily. Franais : Ajax portant le corps d'Achille. Lcythe attique figures noires, v. 510 av. J.-C. Provenance : Sicile.

English: Knelt warrior with decladded sword: Achilles waiting for Troilus? Tondo of an Attic black-figure kylix, ca. 560 BC. Franais : Guerrier agenouill l'pe dgaine : Achille guettant Trolos ? Mdaillon d'un kylix attique figures noires, v. 560 av. J.-C.

English: Heracles and Geryon. Side B from an Attic black-figure amphora, ca. 540 BC. From Vulci. Franais : Hracls et Gryon. Face B d'une amphore attique figures noires, v. 540 av. J.-C. Provenance : Vulci.

English: Departure of a war chariot, scene inspired from the homeric tradition. Side B from an Attic black-figure band cup, ca. 560 BC. From Vulci. Franais : Dpart de guerrier sur un char de guerre, scne inspire de la tradition homrique. Face B d'une coupe bande attique figures noires, v. 540 av. J.-C. Provenance : Vulci.

Kerameikos Archaeological Museum (Athens)

Espaol: Hidria con la representacin de un cuadriga, con auriga y hoplita. Obra del pintor Lispides, circa 530-520 a. C.

English: Black-figure white-ground lekythoi of Beldam workshop. Kerameikos Archaeological Museum in Athens. 470-460 BC.

Black-figure pottery in the Vatican City

English: Photograph of an Attic amfora depicting Achilles and Ajax playing a game. By Exekias 540-530 B.C.