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''Star Trek: The Original Series'': Season 3

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Contents
Articles
Season Overview
Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3) 1 1 5 5 8 12 16 19 22 25 28 32 35 38 41 44 47 50 53 56 58 61 64 68 71 74 77

196869 Episodes
Spock's Brain The Enterprise Incident The Paradise Syndrome And the Children Shall Lead Is There in Truth No Beauty? Spectre of the Gun Day of the Dove For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky The Tholian Web Plato's Stepchildren Wink of an Eye The Empath Elaan of Troyius Whom Gods Destroy Let That Be Your Last Battlefield The Mark of Gideon That Which Survives The Lights of Zetar Requiem for Methuselah The Way to Eden The Cloud Minders The Savage Curtain All Our Yesterdays Turnabout Intruder

References
Article Sources and Contributors Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors 81 83

Article Licenses
License 84

Season Overview
Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3)
Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3)
Country of origin United States No. of episodes 24 Broadcast Original channel Original run NBC September20,1968 June3,1969 Home video release DVD release Region 1 December14,2004 (Original) November18,2008 (Remastered) December6,2004 (Original) April27,2009 (Remastered) Blu-ray Disc release Region A Region B December15,2009 March22,2010 Season chronology Previous Season 2 Next List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

Region 2

The third and final season of the original Star Trek aired Fridays at 10:00-11:00 pm (EST) on NBC from September 20, 1968 to March 14, 1969. The final episode aired Tuesday, June 3, 1969 at 7:30-8:30 pm (EST).

Episodes

Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3)

No. in series 56

No. in season 1

Title

Stardate

Directed by

Written by

Original airdate

Production code 61

"Spock's Brain"

5431.4

Marc Daniels

Lee Cronin

September20,1968

Captain Kirk pursues aliens who have stolen Spock's brain. 57 2 "The Enterprise Incident" 5027.3 John Meredyth Lucas D. C. Fontana September27,1968 59

The crew of the Enterprise attempts to steal a Romulan cloaking device. 58 3 "The Paradise Syndrome" 4842.6 Jud Taylor Margaret Armen October4,1968 58

A mysterious alien device on a planet with a predominantly American Indian culture erases Captain Kirk's memory, and he begins a life with them as a member of their tribe. 59 4 "And the Children Shall Lead" 5029.5 Marvin Chomsky Edward J. Lakso October11,1968 60

The crew of the Enterprise rescues a group of children stranded on a planet, along with their evil "imaginary" friend. 60 5 "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" 5630.7 Ralph Senensky Jean Lisette Aroeste October18,1968 62

The Enterprise travels with an alien ambassador who must travel inside a special black case because his appearance causes insanity. 61 6 "Spectre of the Gun" 4385.3 Vincent McEveety Lee Cronin October25,1968 56

For trespassing on an alien world, Captain Kirk and his companions are forced to re-enact the famous shoot-out at the O.K. Corral with themselves cast as the losing side. 62 7 "Day of the Dove" Unknown Marvin Chomsky Jerome Bixby November1,1968 66

An alien energy-based life form that feeds on negative emotions (such as fear, anger, hatred) drives the crew of the Enterprise into brutal conflict with the Klingons. 63 8 "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" 5476.3 Tony Leader Rik Vollaerts November8,1968 65

As McCoy discovers he is dying of an incurable disease, the crew of the Enterprise rush to stop an asteroid from colliding with a Federation world, only to discover that the asteroid is, in fact, a disguised alien vessel. They find an entire civilization living in the ship who believe they are actually on a planet and a dictatorial "Oracle" who forbids any attempt to discover the truth. 64 9 "The Tholian Web" 5693.2 Herb Wallerstein Judy Burns and Chet Richards November15,1968 64

Captain Kirk is caught between dimensions while the Enterprise is trapped by an energy draining web spun by mysterious aliens. A sequel to this episode is In a Mirror Darkly, the second to last major story arc of the final season of Star Trek Enterprise 65 10 "Plato's Stepchildren" 5784.2 David Alexander Meyer Dolinsky November22,1968 67

The crew of the Enterprise encounters an ageless and mischievous race of psychic humanoids who claim to have organized their society around Ancient Greek ideals. 66 11 "Wink of an Eye" 5710.5 Jud Taylor Teleplay: Arthur Heinemann Story: Lee Cronin November29,1968 68

Invisible "time-accelerated" aliens take over the Enterprise and attempt to abduct the crew for use as "genetic stock". 67 12 "The Empath" 5121.5 John Erman Joyce Muskat December6,1968 63

While visiting a doomed planet, the landing party is subject to torturous experiments to test an empathic race.

Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3)

3
4372.5 John Meredyth Lucas John Meredyth Lucas December20,1968 57

68

13

"Elaan of Troyius"

Captain Kirk hosts a spoiled princess, who must bring peace to a star system at war. 69 14 "Whom Gods Destroy" 5718.3 Herb Wallerstein Teleplay: Lee Erwin Story: Lee Erwin and Jerry Sohl January3,1969 71

Captain Kirk visits a mental health facility and confronts an insane starship captain who believes he is destined to control the universe. 70 15 "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" 5730.2 Jud Taylor Teleplay: Oliver Crawford Story: Lee Cronin January10,1969 70

The Enterprise picks up the last two survivors of a war-torn planet who are still committed to destroying each other aboard the ship. 71 16 "The Mark of Gideon" 5423.4 Jud Taylor George F. Slavin and Stanley Adams January17,1969 72

An overpopulated race of aliens abduct Kirk to solve their problem. 72 17 "That Which Survives" Unknown Herb Wallerstein Teleplay: John Meredyth Lucas Story: Michael Richards January24,1969 69

The crew of the Enterprise visits an abandoned outpost guarded by a mysterious computer. 73 18 "The Lights of Zetar" 5725.3 Herb Kenwith Jeremy Tarcher and Shari Lewis January31,1969 73

Strange, energy-based alien life forms threaten the Memory Alpha station and the Enterprise crew. 74 19 "Requiem for Methuselah" 5843.7 Murray Golden Jerome Bixby February14,1969 76

The crew of the Enterprise encounters an immortal human who lives as a recluse on his own planet. 75 20 "The Way to Eden" 5832.3 David Alexander Teleplay: Arthur Heinemann Story: Michael Richards and Arthur Heinemann February21,1969 75

The Enterprise is hijacked by a criminal doctor and his loyal, hippie-like followers who are attempting to find paradise. 76 21 "The Cloud Minders" 5818.4 Jud Taylor Teleplay: Margaret Armen Story: David Gerrold and Oliver Crawford February28,1969 74

Kirk races against time to acquire plague-fighting minerals from a world in the midst of a civil uprising. 77 22 "The Savage Curtain" 5906.4 Herschel Daugherty Teleplay: Arthur Heinemann and Gene Roddenberry Story: Gene Roddenberry March7,1969 77

Aliens force Kirk and Spock to battle illusionary villains in a test of good versus evil. 78 23 "All Our Yesterdays" 5943.7 Marvin Chomsky Jean Lisette Aroeste March14,1969 78

Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3)

Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are trapped in the past on a world threatened by a nova. 79 24 "Turnabout Intruder" 5928.5 Herb Wallerstein Teleplay: Arthur Singer Story: Gene Roddenberry June3,1969 79

Kirk's consciousness becomes trapped in the body of a woman bent on killing him and taking over his command while inhabiting his body.

References

196869 Episodes
Spock's Brain
"Spock's Brain"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode

On Kirk's command, Spock grabs Kara's wrist to deactivate her bracelet. Episode no. Season3 Episode 1 Marc Daniels Lee Cronin Fred Steiner Jerry Finnerman 061 September20,1968 Guest actors Marj Dusay - Kara Sheila Leighton - Luma James Daris - Morg Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Assignment: Earth" "The Enterprise Incident"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Spock's Brain" is the first episode of the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast September 20, 1968. It was the first episode to air after NBC moved the show from 8:30 P.M. to 10 P.M. on Friday nights. It was repeated July 8, 1969. It is episode #56, production #61, written by Gene L. Coon (under the pseudonym Lee Cronin) and directed by Marc Daniels. In this episode, an alien female beams aboard the ship and, after incapacitating the rest of the crew, surgically removes Spock's brain. Kirk and the crew have just hours to locate and replace it before Spock's body dies.

Spock's Brain

Plot
On stardate 5431.4, the Federation starship USS Enterprise, under the command of Captain James T. Kirk, encounters a curious ship of unusual design. Upon contact, the ship emits a transport beam and a mysterious woman appears on the Enterprise bridge. She stuns the entire crew using a bracelet-like device, then examines each of them, taking particular interest in the Vulcan First Officer Spock. When the crew awakens, Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy finds Spock lying on a bed in Sickbay with his brain surgically removed. Thankfully, owing to his unusual Vulcan physiology, Spock's body can survive in this "brainless" state mechanically, giving Captain Kirk about 24 hours to find his stolen brain. Sensors detect the ship's ion trail and Kirk follows it to the Sigma Draconis system. The system contains three planets that are reported to be inhabited: Sigma Draconis III, IV and VI. However, the recorded technological levels of each world are determined to be incapable of producing the kind of spacecraft that the Enterprise followed here. The sixth planet however, which shows no sign of industrial advancement at all, radiates energy transmissions that Communications Officer Lt. Uhura states as contradictory to its technological scale. Playing on the hunch that the planet may be deceiving, Kirk beams a landing party to the surface. Sigma Draconis VI is revealed to be a harsh world in the middle of an Ice Age, but the landing party has no trouble locating the local inhabitants, who attack them on sight, believing them to be "The Others". Kirk captures one of the attackers and questions him. The man identifies himself as a Morg and warns Kirk about the "givers of pain and delight". Kirk asks the Morg about the females of his kind, since there were none around, but is only met with the man's bewilderment. Kirk asks the Morg to help him find "the others", but he refuses and runs away. The landing party soon comes upon the ruins of a buried city: here they find an elevator that leads underground. Kirk calls Dr. McCoy down from the Enterprise, who has fashioned a device to remotely operate Spock's brainless body and has the mechanically controlled Spock accompany him. The team heads down and they encounter a woman named Luma who tries to activate her bracelet, but Kirk quickly stuns her with a phaser. When questioned, Luma shows she only has the mentality of a child. Spock makes contact with the landing party through a communicator, but before anything can be done, Kirk and his party are apprehended by Kara, the same woman who appeared on the Enterprise bridge. She identifies herself as the leader of the Eymorgs, the apparent females of the Morg. The Eymorgs place belts on the Enterprise landing party that they can't remove and that inflict intense pain upon them. Kirk demands to know what the Eymorgs have done with Spock's brain, but the frustrated Kara responds with, "Brain and brain, what is brain?" McCoy informs Kirk that if all the Eymorgs have such a low intelligence that they couldn't possibly be capable of removing a brain the way Spock's was removed. Someone, or something else must be behind all this. The landing party manages to overpower their guard and follow Spock's instruction to the central "controller" which is actually his brain kept alive in a black box that is tied to a control panel. Here, they also find Kara, who immediately immobilizes the team using the pain belts. Kirk uses the remote that controls the mechanically operated Spock and makes him grab Kara's wrist and press the release button on her bracelet. Once free of the pain, Kirk listens to Spock's brain via communicator. They realize that Spock is now the "Controller"- a living computer that the Eymorgs hope will last 10,000 years. Spock says he operates the power systems of the planet, recirculating the air, running heating plants and pumping water- all functions that require a supreme intelligence for the regulation of a planet-wide life support system. He also informs them that the Eymorgs can gain temporary understanding of ancient knowledge from a machine called "the Great Teacher" to which Kara leads them. Kirk forces Kara to use the Teacher, hoping it will teach her the techniques necessary to replace Spock's brain. After using the machine to boost her intelligence, Kara instead uses a phaser to threaten Kirk. Chief Engineer Scott pretends to faint and Kirk uses the distraction to grab Kara's phaser. McCoy then tries the Teacher on and discovers how to perform a "reverse brain transplant" on Spock. McCoy conducts the surgery and nearly manages to do so within the three-hour time limit that the implanted knowledge lasts. However, the knowledge leaves McCoy before the operation is complete. Mr. Spock provides some assistance

Spock's Brain himself after McCoy reestablishes Spock's capacity to speak verbally. Without their Controller, the Eymorgs fear for their existence. Kirk then informs Kara that the Eymorgs will have to take their chances on the surface and live as the Morgs do. He suggests the two societies can share "the Teacher" device and learn together. Kara is not overly enthusiastic about the prospect, but Kirk at least offers some assistance.

Reception
The episode is seen by both fans, and those who took part in its production, as the worst episode of the series. William Shatner called this one of the series' worst episodes, calling the episode's plot a "tribute" to NBC executives who slashed the show's budget and placed it in a bad time slot.[1][2] Leonard Nimoy wrote: "Frankly during the entire shooting of that episode, I was embarrassed- a feeling that overcame me many times during the final season of Star Trek."[3] Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode a "D" rating, describing the writing as bad and repetitive and the direction as weak. He added that it had its funny moments and some parts had "a lumpy B-movie charm". Despite the episode's negative reputation, it was included in iTunes' "Best Of Star Trek" compilation.[citation needed] The rock band Phish performs a song entitled "Spock's Brain".

Production
Star Trek co-producer Robert H. Justman ruefully recalled in the book Inside Star Trek The Real Story, that he was the person who suggested that Spock's brain, after being rescued by the Enterprise crew, actually "takes over during surgery and instructs Dr. McCoy exactly how to go back reinserting it back where it came from- inside Spock's skull".

References
[1] Shatner, William (date unknown). Star Trek: Memories. Memoir. [2] Shatner, William (date unknown). Up Till Now. Full general autobiography. [3] Nimoy, Leonard (1995). I am Spock. p.115.

External links
"Spock's Brain" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68782.html) at StarTrek.com "Spock's Brain" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708449/) at the Internet Movie Database "Spock's Brain" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Spock's_Brain) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Spock's Brain" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/spocks-brain-24939/) at TV.com "Spock's Brain" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/06/09/spocks-brain-screenshots/#more-717) Side-by-side comparisons of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

The Enterprise Incident

The Enterprise Incident


"The Enterprise Incident"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Kirk prepares to steal the Romulan's cloaking device. Episode no. Season3 Episode 2 John Meredyth Lucas D.C. Fontana Alexander Courage Jerry Finnerman 059 September27,1968 Guest actors Joanne Linville - Romulan Commander Jack Donner - Sub-Commander Tal Richard Compton - Technical Officer Robert Gentile - Technician Mike Howden - Romulan Guard Gordon Coffey - Romulan Soldier Eddie Paskey - Lt. Leslie Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Spock's Brain" "The Paradise Syndrome"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Enterprise Incident" is a third-season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast September 27, 1968 and repeated December 27, 1968. It is episode #57, production #59, written by D.C. Fontana and directed by John Meredyth Lucas. In this episode, the crew of the Enterprise are on a secret mission to steal a Romulan cloaking device.

Plot
On stardate 5027.3, Captain James T. Kirk takes the Federation starship USS Enterprise, without apparent authorization, into the Neutral Zone between Federation and Romulan space. Three Romulan vessels decloak and intercept the ship, and Kirk is given an order to surrender. Kirk responds by threatening to destroy the Enterprise if the Romulans attempt a boarding. He is then invited, along with Vulcan First Officer Spock to a parley aboard the Romulan flagship. Kirk accepts on condition that the Romulans simultaneously transport two of their officers over as an exchange. Once aboard the Romulan ship, Kirk and Spock are taken before a female commander who demands an explanation for their intrusion into Romulan space. Kirk explains that instrument failure caused the ship to stray off course, but Spock claims the captain ordered entry into Romulan space as an initiative born of insanity. The Romulans lead a furious Kirk, charged with espionage and railing against the treachery of his First Officer, to the brig. The Romulan

The Enterprise Incident Commander then orders Chief Engineer Scott to follow the Romulans back to their base but the combative Scott refuses. In the Romulan brig, Kirk injures himself by lunging against the force field enclosing the cell door. Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy is then summoned from the Enterprise to attend to him. With Spock in tow, the Romulan commander asks McCoy to confirm Spock's characterization of the Captain as being mentally incompetent and McCoy does so. After listening to the Doctor, the Romulan Commander orders Spock to assume command of the Enterprise, Kirk mutters words of outrage and disgust, then lunges at Spock. Spock defends himself by using the "Vulcan death grip" understood to be a variation on the Vulcan nerve pinch on the Captain, who slumps to the floor. McCoy then declares him dead. Alone with Spock in her quarters, the Romulan Commander continues her attempt to persuade him to her people's cause. She argues that humans show their prejudicial disregard of Vulcan talents and capabilities in failing to have placed him in command of a Starfleet ship, but that, should he switch allegiances, he will learn to enjoy the spiritual society of Romulans as her consort. Back on the Enterprise, Kirk returns to life, emerging from a mere state of suspended animation brought on by Spock's "death grip", and orders McCoy to perform the plastic surgery necessary to give him Romulan features. With his features altered, Kirk borrows the uniform of one of the Romulan hostages and has Scotty transport him back to the Romulan vessel. While the Romulan Commander is changing into more comfortable attire, Spock directs Kirk, via communicator, to the section of the Romulan ship where the cloaking device is located. From the bridge, Romulan Subcommander Tal discovers and tracks the signal. While Spock and the Romulan Commander commune with one another in a spiritualized erotic exploration of the other's hand and face, Tal interrupts and informs his superior of the alien transmission. Spock presents himself to the Romulan officers affirming Tal's report, but also that they are too late Kirk has disengaged the cloaking device and returned with it to the Enterprise. Spock takes advantage of the traditional Romulan right of statement before his conviction and eventual execution to stall for time. Simultaneously, Kirk assumes command of the Enterprise as Scotty attempts to adapt the Romulan cloaking device technology to the Enterprise deflectors. Ensign Chekov tries to distinguish between Vulcan and Romulan life signatures so that Spock can be transported back to the Enterprise. He eventually acquires a fix on Spock and begins to beam him back to the Enterprise. As Spock dematerializes, the Romulan Commander rushes to embrace him and she is beamed over with him. They materialize and are brought to the bridge of the Enterprise where Kirk gives the order to return to Federation space. The pursuing Romulans are ready to fire upon them as Scotty activates the cloak and the Enterprise vanishes before their eyes. Kirk orders the ship to the nearest starbase and gallantly invites the Romulan commander to accept Mr. Spock as her escort to her new quarters. Alone with Spock in the turbolift, the Romulan acknowledges defeat and expresses her bitter disappointment at Spock's betrayal. Spock avers that, although his loyalty is to the Federation, she underestimates herself considerably if she believes he was not tempted. She also chides Spock that any advantage the Federation gains from studying the captured cloaking device will only be temporary, as the Romulans will soon simply build a more advanced one. Spock openly agrees that military secrets are perhaps the briefest of all. Later on the bridge, Spock overhears McCoy teasingly ask the Captain whether he wishes to return to sickbay for surgery, or whether he wishes to look like his First Officer for the rest of his life. Spock urges the Captain to go, since Romulan (and by implication, Vulcan) features on humans appear distasteful to him.

The Enterprise Incident

10

Production
Writing
D. C. Fontana based this story very loosely upon the Pueblo Incident, in which a United States Navy ship and its crew were captured and held on charges of espionage for a period of almost one year after they allegedly strayed into North Korean waters.[1] The first draft script had Spock "raining kisses on every square inch above the shoulder" of the Romulan Commander, but this was changed, at Nimoy's insistence, to the more demure finger caresses. Fontana has pointed out in recent years that the "raining kisses" scene was actually an embellishment by Gene Roddenberryone of the few he applied to third season scriptsand that the original script submitted had only an embrace and kiss, with most of the passion being delivered by the Romulan commander. Originally, both Kirk and McCoy were disguised as Romulans and went aboard the Romulan ship to steal the cloaking device. This was dropped not only due to cost concerns, but after Robert H. Justman pointed out that having McCoy doing plastic surgery on his own ears would have stretched believability a bit unless another actor was hiredcosting more moneyto perform the surgery on both Kirk and McCoy.[citation needed]

Models
The D7 models for the Romulan warships are actually Klingon ships, used instead of the Romulan Bird-of-Prey model seen in the episode "Balance of Terror". Although in production order the model was first used (as a Klingon ship) in "Elaan of Troyius", in transmission order it is first seen in this episode. It was stated in the first draft of the script that the Romulans and Klingons had an exchange of technology, where Romulans received four Klingon heavy D7 battlecruisers and the Klingons were given Romulan cloaking technology. There have been two different explanations over the years for this apparent exchange of technology. According to one account, the show's production staff had just finished new Klingon ship models and wanted to show off Matt Jeffries' work and help boost sales on the about-to-be released model kit from AMT. Another report - one considered most likely by Trek historians and somewhat confirmed by model master and sculptor Wah Chang in a 1982 National Public Radio interview - was that the original Bird-of-Prey model was destroyed after its initial use in "Balance of Terror". According to Wah in the interview, there were some issues over payment for the model - which he had designed and built - following a complaint by one of the special effects unions over Wah's non-membership. While Wah's membership was an issue because the union refused to allow him into their guild for the simple reason that his skills were superior to most of the guild's current members, Desilu and the Star Trek production staff used his talents anyway, claiming that the props he made were already made and "bought off the shelf". However, the local guild had evidence that Wah had built the Bird-of-Prey model specifically for the show, and after some negotiation agreed to drop the grievance if Wah received no payment for the model. Desilu capitulated, and returned the model to Wah. In a fit of anger, Wah took the model into his back yard, and proceeded to bash it to bits with a sledge hammer.[citation needed]

Legacy
The actual name of the Romulan commander, and her ultimate fate, are not known for certain. At least three different explanations are given in Trek novels--The Price of the Phoenix, Rihannsu#1: My Enemy, My Ally and Vulcan's Heart--(in the early days of Trek writing, many novels tended to contradict each other, and so the commander has had many different names and fates). The latest (and most popular) explanation is given in the novel Vulcan's Heart, by Josepha Sherman and Susan Shwartz, in which her name is given as Liviana Charvanek. Apparently, some time after the events of this episode, Charvanek was returned to Romulus (ch'Rihan) and resumed her military career.

The Enterprise Incident D.C. Fontana co-wrote a sequel: "Star Trek: Year Four - The Enterprise Experiment", a graphic novel published by IDW Publishing in 2008. This episode is referenced in the video game Star Trek: Tactical Assault. During a Federation mission the player's ship is equipped with the Romulan cloaking device stolen by Kirk and ordered to launch a sneak attack on a Klingon starbase. This episode is also referenced by Sheldon Cooper in The Big Bang Theory episode #206.

11

References
[1] Sarantakes, Nicholas Evan: Cold War Pop Culture and the Image of U.S. Foreign Policy: The Perspective of the Original Star Trek Series, in: Journal of Cold War Studies, Volume 7, Number 4, Fall 2005, pp. 97-99 (74-103).

External links
"The Enterprise Incident" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68778.html) at StarTrek.com "The Enterprise Incident" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708464/) at the Internet Movie Database "The Enterprise Incident" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/The_Enterprise_Incident) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Enterprise Incident" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/the-enterprise-incident-24940/) at TV.com "The Enterprise Incident" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/enterpriseincident.htm) First draft report and analysis by Dave Eversole

The Paradise Syndrome

12

The Paradise Syndrome


"The Paradise Syndrome"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Kirk examines the alien symbols on a obelisk built by the Preservers. Episode no. Season3 Episode 3 Jud Taylor Margaret Armen Gerald Fried Jerry Finnerman 058 October4,1968 Guest actors Sabrina Scharf - Miramanee Rudy Solari - Salish Richard Hale - Goro Naomi Pollack - Indian Woman John Lindesmith - Engineer Peter Virgo, Jr. - Warrior Lamont Laird - Indian Boy William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Enterprise Incident" "And the Children Shall Lead"
List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Paradise Syndrome" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast October 4, 1968. It is episode #58, production #58, written by Margaret Armen and directed by Jud Taylor. In this episode, an alien device on a primitive planet erases Captain Kirk's memory, and he begins a new life with the planet's indigenous people.

The Paradise Syndrome

13

Plot
On stardate 4842.6, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at an earthlike planet while en route to deflect an asteroid that is heading to the world on a collision course. With little time to spare before intercepting the asteroid, Captain Kirk beams to the surface along with First Officer Spock and Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy, for a half-hour investigation. There they find the land breathtaking with thick pine forests and a sparkling blue lake. The team then comes across an ancient obelisk of unknown origin. The structure is made of a mysterious metal that resists sensor scans and is covered with strange writing. They also discover a group of primitive humanoids living nearby whose customs and appearances closely resemble North American Natives; more specifically as Spock describes, is a mixture of Mohegan, Navajo, and Delaware tribes. The team returns to the obelisk and Kirk goes to relay their findings to the ship. As he flips open his communicator and says "Kirk to Enterprise", something about the action trips a trap door at the base of the structure and he falls inside. The strange machinery housed within zaps him with a bolt of energy and knocks him unconscious. The trap door quickly seals shut leaving Spock and McCoy unable to find their Captain. With too little time to conduct a search, the two return to the ship which quickly leaves orbit in an attempt to intercept the asteroid and deflect it off its destructive course. Meanwhile, Kirk awakens with amnesia having no idea who he is or what his equipment does. He finds a way out of the obelisk and is discovered by a group of native women who are leaving an offering at the "temple". Among them is Miramanee, the chief's daughter and tribal priestess. They immediately mistake him for a god and bring him to their village, but the tribal elders are doubtful of Kirk's "divinity" and demand that he prove himself. At that moment, a boy is rushed to the village who has fallen into the lake and is not breathing. Salish, the village medicine chief, pronounces the child dead, but Kirk rushes over to help and recalling his first aid skill of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, he revives the child. The elders look on in awe and believe Kirk has performed a resurrection and proving that he is indeed a god. The elders force Salish to give up his position as a healer and he angrily concedes his emblems. The elders ask Kirk his name; he tries to remember, but it comes out "Kirok". They accept this as his name and make him the new medicine chief as Salish jealously walks away. Back in space, Spock orders the Enterprise to intercept the asteroid at a dangerous warp speed. Arriving at the asteroid, he attempts to push the huge rock to a benign course using deflector beams in conjunction with the warp drive but to no effect. He then orchestrates a series of phaser blasts, but the beams only manage to blast chunks of rock loose. In an act of final desperation, Spock orders a full bombardment with all phasers but the resulting energy demand damages the warp drive and the asteroid remains on its lethal course. Chief Engineer Scott then announces that he cannot repair the warp drive without putting into a starbase. Having failed to stop the asteroid, Spock orders the Enterprise to return to the planet on its auxiliary impulse power; which will take them just short of two months to get back to the planet with the asteroid four hours behind them all the way.

The Paradise Syndrome

14 Back on the planet, Salish's anger for Kirk grows. Tradition holds that the medicine chief and the tribal priestess must always be husband and wife. Now that Kirk is medicine chief, Miramanee must marry him instead. She is clearly attracted to Kirk over and above traditional duty and Salish is disgruntled over this and argues violently with her. Kirk accepts Miramanee's offer to "settle" with him, and asks her to pick the day of "joining" where they will be married. She chooses the next day. Not remembering the imminent doom of the asteroid, Kirk agrees. On his way to the joining he is attacked by Salish who cuts his hand. Salish gloats "Behold a god who bleeds!", and denounces him before the rest of the tribe. The rest however, still believe Kirk to be a deity. Some weeks or months after the joining ceremony, Miramanee reveals that she is pregnant. Kirk tells her he's very happy, but is unable to shake off his dreams of "the strange lodge which moves through the sky". He feels that is where he truly belongs.

Captain Kirk, with Miramanee

Meanwhile, over the two-month journey back to the planet, Spock works on the translation of the obelisk's symbols. He theorizes the obelisk may have been placed on the planet as an "asteroid deflector" built by the ancient Preservers who are believed to have seeded the galaxy with humans, particularly groups that may have been in danger of dying out thousands of years ago. The asteroid deflector was designed to protect them in a high-risk star system. Spock concludes that the device has ceased to work properly. Spock determines that the only hope of saving the planet is to somehow activate the deflector. He eventually realizes that the symbols aren't words but musical notes; a possible activation code of some kind. As the asteroid approaches, the planet's sky begins to darken and the weather begins to pick up force that blasts the terrain with fierce winds. The elders tell Kirk he must go to the "temple" and stop the storm before "the ground begins to tremble". Kirk makes his way to the obelisk, but doesn't remember how to get inside. He pounds his fists against the sides shouting, "I am Kirok! I have come! I am Kirok!", but nothing happens. Salish witnesses Kirk's failure to get into the "temple" and turns the tribe against him. With his encouragement, they begin stoning Kirk. Keeping her faith in Kirk, Miramanee throws herself in the line of fire to stop the attack, but she is mortally injured. Just then, Spock and McCoy beam in, which frightens the villagers away. McCoy rushes over to Kirk to treat his injuries, discovers he has no recollection of who they are and calls for Nurse Chapel to beam down and assist. Spock uses a Vulcan mind meld to reach Kirk's mind while McCoy checks on Miramanee. Kirk becomes himself again and flicks his communicator open to contact the ship. As soon as it makes a noise and Kirk says "Kirk to Enterprise," the door to the obelisk is opened. Kirk and Spock go inside and repair the deflector beam. The device targets the asteroid and successfully diverts it away from the planet just minutes before collision. The storm quickly subsides, and later in the lodge where Kirk and Miramanee had lived, McCoy tells Kirk she suffered internal injuries and will not survive. Moments later, Miramanee dies in Kirk's arms.

The Paradise Syndrome

15

External links
"The Paradise Syndrome" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Paradise Syndrome" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Paradise Syndrome" [3] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Paradise Syndrome" [4] at TV.com "The Paradise Syndrome" [5] Review at TrekMovie.com

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68776. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708475/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Paradise_Syndrome http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-paradise-syndrome-24941/ http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2007/ 02/ 24/ the-paradise-syndrome-screenshots-and-video/ #more-531

And the Children Shall Lead

16

And the Children Shall Lead


"And the Children Shall Lead"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 4 Marvin Chomsky Edward J. Lakso George Duning Jerry Finnerman 060 October11,1968 Guest actors Melvin Belli - Gorgan Caesar Belli - Steve Craig Hundley - Tommy Starnes James Wellman Pamelyn Ferdin - Mary Mark Robert Brown - Don Brian Tochi - Ray Lou Elias - 1st Technician Jay D. Jones - 2nd Technician Paul Baxley - Security Guard Dick Dial - Security Guard Eddie Paskey - Lt. Leslie Frank da Vinci - Transporter Operator William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Paradise Syndrome" "Is There in Truth No Beauty?"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"And the Children Shall Lead" is a third-season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast October 11, 1968. It is episode #59, production #60, written by Edward J. Lakso and directed by Marvin Chomsky. In this episode, on a distant planet, Kirk, Spock and McCoy find a scientific team dead, and their children who, unknown to the crew, have great powers at their disposal.

Plot
The Federation starship USS Enterprise intercepts a distress call from the planet Triacus, where a scientific expedition is located. Arriving at the planet, Captain Kirk, Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy, and First Officer Spock beam down to investigate. They find the expedition leader, Professor Starnes, has gone insane; he almost immediately dies. The other adult members of the team have apparently committed suicide. However, the expedition's five children (led by Starnes's pre-teen son Tommy) remain alive and well, continuing to play as if

And the Children Shall Lead nothing has happened. Recordings made by Prof. Starnes explain that the survey team were driven to suicide to escape "the enemy from within". The landing team buries the dead adults. The children continue to appear emotionless toward the loss of their families. After the funeral, the children and Dr. McCoy beam to the Enterprise while Kirk and Spock investigate a nearby cave. Once inside, Kirk finds himself in the throes of an anxiety attack which abates the instant he leaves the cave. He wonders if the anxiety might be caused by the same phenomenon that is causing unusual tricorder readings. McCoy speculates that the children witnessed the shocking deaths of their parents and are now suffering temporary lacunar amnesia; they are unaware of what has happened and incapable of grieving. He warns that confronting them with the truth too soon could damage them psychologically, and that it would be best to wait until they begin to remember in the natural way. Kirk tries to talk to them and they reveal that they did not like living on Triacus and were resentful their parents wanted to stay. Kirk tries to ask more questions but the children begin to chant "busy busy busy" and simply ignore him. The children are assigned quarters and, once they are left alone, form a circle and begin to perform a summoning ritual. Answering the call is Gorgan, a humanoid apparition surrounded by a green glow. He tells the children they have completed their "first step": he encourages them to take over the Enterprise and change its course to the planet Marcus XII. There he promises the children will be happy, living without responsibilities or rules, once they are with the others of his kind. On the bridge, Tommy asks Kirk to take him and his friends to Marcus XII, explaining that he has relatives there. Kirk denies the request and tells him the plan is to take the children to Starbase 4 where their relatives will be contacted. Kirk and Spock watch a recording from Prof. Starnes who documents the onset of paranoia and anxiety among his staff after excavation of a new archaeological site. Just then, Tommy concentrates deeply and, using a series of gestures made with his clenched fist, telekinetically disrupt the playback. Kirk and Spock leave the bridge to watch the tape elsewhere. Tommy stays behind and observes Lt. Sulu and Ensign Chekov at the helm. He telepathically forces them to change course though they believe they are still orbiting the planet. Lt. Uhura notices they have left orbit, but before she can say anything, Tommy gives her the same illusion. In a briefing room, Kirk, Spock and McCoy watch the rest of Professor Starnes's recordings. Starnes speaks of doing things against his will and how he requested a transport with no apparent need of it. When he realized what was happening, he decided to send out a dispatch to Starfleet to warn them. Starnes closes the entry shouting, "Alien upon us, the enemy from within!" Mr. Spock reports his findings on the history of Triacus that may be linked to the disturbances felt by the research expedition. Triacus was the ancient home of planetary marauders who fought wars throughout the sector thousands of years ago. The marauders were eventually defeated, but according to legend, the embodiment of their evil remained, and only needs some sort of catalyst to bring it alive again. Kirk assembles two security members to beam down to the planet to relieve personnel looking over the excavation site. While attempting to beam up the first team, Kirk realizes the Enterprise has left orbit and that he has just had two men beamed into space. Kirk rushes to the bridge to discover the children in the midst of their circling, chanting routine and the crew merely watching and smiling indulgently at the "game". Gorgan appears, encouraging them to maintain their control of the ship. Kirk realizes the children have taken over. He attempts to regain control by issuing orders, but the bridge crew's minds have been affected in a variety of ways so that they can no longer hear or obey. Kirk fears that he has lost his ability to command, and his fear is amplified by Tommy's telepathic control. Spock manages to resist Tommy's influence and quickly leads Kirk into the turbolift, reassuring him that he is indeed in command.

17

And the Children Shall Lead Once back on his feet, Kirk goes to auxiliary control to convince Chief Engineer Scott to put the Enterprise back on course, but Scott and his technicians are under the children's control as well, refusing to obey Kirk's commands. During the argument, Kirk notices one of the children standing behind a screen making peculiar gestures. Spock says that the children are not evil, but are being used by an evil, alien power. In the corridor, they encounter Chekov, who believes he has received an order to arrest them. As they disable him, they notice one of the children nearby making the same gestures. Back on the bridge, Kirk confronts the children and demands that their alien friend show himself. When the children refuse to call him, Kirk replays the audio chant. Gorgan appears and sneeringly describes his plan, saying that people who are full of goodness and gentleness are unworthy of being his followers and will always be vanquished by stronger forces. Kirk plays back video recordings of the children playing with their families on the planet's surface, followed by a few shots of the dead bodies and the graves. The children realize what has happened, and Kirk implores them to see Gorgan as he truly is. The children begin to sob as their faith in Gorgan fails and the entity's face begins to decay. He fades away, chanting "Death to you all!" With the evil gone, the illusions subside and control of the ship is restored. The Enterprise resumes its course to the Starbase.

18

Production
In an interview with Sondra Marshak, published in Star Trek Lives (written by Jacqueline Lichtenberg, Sondra Marshak and Joan Winston), Leonard Nimoy explained that when he complained about the script to producer Fred Freiberger, Freiberger said, "This script is going to be what 'Miri' should have been". Nimoy objected, calling "Miri" a beautiful, well-acted story, and felt that Freiberger's comments were as much as saying, "'Miri' was a piece of trash".

Reception
While the general fan consensus was that this was one of the poorer third season episodes, and that Captain Kirk's "brusque, exaggeratedly authoritarian and at times unmistakably hostile attitude" towards the titular children undermined both the moral and the plot, Richard Keller of TV Squad listed Gorgan as the tenth scariest television character.

References External links


"And the Children Shall Lead" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68780. html) at StarTrek.com "And the Children Shall Lead" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708417/) at the Internet Movie Database "And the Children Shall Lead" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/And_the_Children_Shall_Lead) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "And the Children Shall Lead" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/and-the-children-shall-lead-24942/) at TV.com "And the Children Shall Lead" (http://www.agonybooth.com/recaps/Star_Trek/the_original_series/ And_the_Children_Shall_Lead___.aspx) reviewed in The Agony Booth (http://agonybooth.com) Gorgan (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Gorgan) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki)

Is There in Truth No Beauty?

19

Is There in Truth No Beauty?


"Is There in Truth No Beauty?"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 5 Ralph Senensky Jean Lisette Aroeste George Duning Jerry Finnerman 062 October18,1968 Guest actors Diana Muldaur - Dr. Miranda Jones David Frankham - Larry Marvick Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "And the Children Shall Lead" "Spectre of the Gun"
List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Is There in Truth No Beauty?" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast October 18, 1968. It is episode #60, production #62, written by Jean Lisette Aroeste, and directed by Ralph Senensky. The title of the episode is taken from the poem Jordan by George Herbert: Who sayes that fictions onely and false hair Become a verse? Is there in truth no beauty? Is all good structure in a winding stair? May no lines passe, except they do their dutie Not to a true, but painted chair?" In this episode, the Enterprise travels with an alien ambassador whose appearance induces madness.

Plot
On stardate 5630.7, the Federation starship USS Enterprise picks up a Medusan ambassador named Kollos. The ambassador belongs to a race of energy-based creatures, emotionally beautiful on the inside, yet with an outward appearance so hideous it drives humanoids insane. The Federation seeks a council with the Medusans for a technology trade, especially in the area of improved navigation equipment for all starships. To be transported, the Medusan must remain concealed inside a container. Lawrence Marvick, one of the principal designers of the Enterprise is beamed aboard first, then the transporter room is cleared, all except for First Officer Spock, who dons the special visor, since Vulcans can better tolerate the appearance of a Medusan while wearing it, and operates the controls to beam the ambassador and his passenger aboard. Kollos' container materializes along with Dr. Miranda Jones, who is Kollos' beautiful assistant and a gifted young telepath.[1]

Is There in Truth No Beauty? The ambassador's party are assigned quarters, and Spock offers Miranda help in carrying the Medusan container to her room. It is already clear, even in Mr. Spock, that he and the young doctor find each other very intriguing. Spock invites her and Marvick to a dinner with Captain Kirk later that evening. Spock leaves and Miranda opens the container to look upon her Medusan companion. The being appears as a wildly strobing array of light and color. Oddly enough, she seems immune to its appearance. During the dinner, Miranda notices Spock's "Vulcan IDIC" ceremonial badge and questions him about it. She concludes that Spock is far more powerful with his telepathic abilities than she could ever be, including being able to better communicate with her Medusan companion. After bringing the Medusan up in conversation, Miranda feels faint, sensing murderous intentions from someone in the room. She asks if she can be excused and quickly leaves. She later senses that the murderous desires emanate from Marvick, but she still doesn't know his intended target. Marvick is obsessively in love with Miranda, who rebuffs his advances. He is extremely jealous of her close relationship with the Medusan, to the point where he plots to kill it. Later that evening, Marvick enters Kollos' room with a phaser, but Kollos senses the intrusion and emerges from his box. Marvick then sees the Medusan and goes insane. Marvick runs down to engineering, fights with and knocks out Chief Engineer Scott and the other engineering crew members, and begins to reset the controls of the ship. Suddenly the Enterprise lurches forward to Warp Factor 9, and is sent on an unstable course that takes the ship outside of the galaxy. Marvick is finally apprehended and after pointing at Miranda and shouting the warning "Don't love her! She'll kill you if you love her!", he dies instantly. Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy cannot find any cause. Without any navigational references of where they are the Enterprise is lost in space. Being naturally gifted navigators, the Medusan agrees to mind meld with either Mr. Spock or Miranda and use their humanoid body to operate the ship's controls to return it to known space. Miranda, who is extremely jealous of Spock's ability to join with the Medusan, strongly objects when Kirk chooses him over her. She debates the decision but realizes there is no alternative, since she has no idea how to pilot the ship, but Spock does. When questioned about her strong attachment toward the alien, she claims it is because Kollos' mind is the most beautiful thing she has ever seen, so serene and pure. At this time, it is also revealed that Miranda is completely blind. This is the true reason that she is immune to the presence of the Medusan when out of his container. The special netting over her dress is actually a sophisticated sensor net which allows her to "see". Kollos is brought to the bridge, where a special partition is set up to keep him hidden from the bridge crew. Mr. Spock dons the special visor and opens Kollos' container. He mind-melds with the creature as everyone curiously watches. Soon, Spock emerges from the partition with a happy smile and warmly greets the crew as Kollos. Miranda's jealousy seems to remain as she impatiently watches Kollos use Spock's body to pilot the Enterprise back into known space. With the ship safely returned and Kollos indulging in a few observations about life in a solid body, it is time for Kollos to go back to his box. Spock moves behind the partition, but then Lt. Sulu notices Spock's protective goggles are still sitting on the helm console. Kirk tries to stop him, but it is too late. Spock emerges from the partition and madly attacks the crew. Kirk uses a phaser to stun Spock and he is rushed to sickbay, while Kirk, knowing Miranda was jealous of Spock, accuses her of telepathically suggesting that Spock forget his visor. McCoy reports Spock is dying, but as an act of goodwill, Miranda goes to join minds with him, restoring his sanity and saving his life. Later, Miranda and Kollos arrive at their destination, by which time Miranda has made the mind link with Kollos. She is no longer jealous, and now understands what Spock experienced. She has also forgiven Captain Kirk, but before she and Kollos depart, Kirk offers Miranda a rose. Miranda asks, "I suppose it has thorns", whereupon Kirk replies, "I never met a rose that didn't".

20

Is There in Truth No Beauty?

21

Notes
[1] Played by Diana Muldaur, who 20 years later would play Chief Medical Officer Dr. Katherine Pulaski in the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

External links
"Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68784. html) at StarTrek.com "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708433/) at the Internet Movie Database "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/is-there-in-truth-no-beauty-24943/) at TV.com "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Is_There_in_Truth_No_Beauty?) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/is_there_in_truth_no_beauty. htm) Story outline dated May 24, 1968; report and analysis by Dave Eversole "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/03/22/is-there-in-truth-no-beauty-screenshots/ #more-1780) Remastered version reviewed at TrekMovie.com

Spectre of the Gun

22

Spectre of the Gun


"Spectre of the Gun"
Episode no. Season3 Episode 6 Vincent McEveety Lee Cronin Jerry Fielding Jerry Finnerman 056 October25,1968 Guest actors Ron Soble - Wyatt Earp Bonnie Beecher - Sylvia Charles Maxwell - Virgil Earp Rex Holman - Morgan Earp Sam Gilman - Doc Holliday Charles Seel - Ed Bill Zuckert - Johnny Behan Abraham Sofaer - Melkotian Voice Ed McCready - Barber Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" "Day of the Dove"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Spectre of the Gun" (originally titled "The Last Gunfight") is an episode from the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek that was first broadcast on October 25, 1968 and repeated on April 4, 1969. This show was the last episode to air on NBC at 10 P.M. on Fridays. It is episode #61, production #56, and was written by former producer Gene Coon (under the pen name of Lee Cronin) and directed by Vincent McEveety. In this episode, having been found trespassors into Melkotian space, Captain Kirk and his companions are sent to die in a re-enactment of the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Plot
On stardate 4385.3, the Federation starship USS Enterprise, under the command of Captain James T. Kirk, is instructed to make peaceful contact with the Melkotians, the mysterious alien inhabitants of Theta Kiokis II, but is warned away by a strange space buoy that orders it not to proceed to the Melkotians' planet. Ignoring the warning, Kirk takes the Enterprise to the planet anyway. Captain Kirk assembles a landing party consisting of himself, First Officer Spock, Chief Engineer Montgomery Scott, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Leonard McCoy, and Navigator Ensign Pavel Chekov and beams down to the surface of the planet to make contact. The Melkotians are angered by this and imprison the team in a psychic illusion that takes the form of the town of Tombstone, Arizona, on Earth on the historic date October 26, 1881.

Spectre of the Gun The setting for the town is drawn from Kirk's mind, but the illusion has a surreal incompleteness to it buildings are obvious facades, windows and pictures appear to float in mid-air, doors open to nowhere, etc. The landing party also sees their equipment is changed: phasers have turned into six-shooters, communicators and tricorders are missing, and there is no longer a way to make contact with the Enterprise. Kirk and his companions quickly realize they are now impromptu characters in a bizarre reenactment of the legendary "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral". Kirk and his team are playing the role of the infamous Cowboys: Kirk as Ike Clanton, Scotty as Billy Clanton, Bones as Tom McLaury, Spock as Frank McLaury, and Chekov as Billy Claiborne. They are forced into a confrontation with the Earp brothers, lawmen Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan Earp, and Doc Holliday. This is the team's punishment for trespassing and violating the Melkotians' strict privacy, a duel to the death, played out as one of the most famous historical events in the Wild West with the crew on the losing side. They encounter various inhabitants who treat the Enterprise crew members as if they are in fact the people whose roles they are playing. That is especially true for the Earps, who are belligerently determined to kill them at the appointed hour, or sooner if they have an excuse. The crew try every means available to them to prevent the fight, but nothing works. They are physically prevented from leaving the town, the Earps cannot be pacified, and the Sheriff refuses to interfere apart from suggesting the tactic, unacceptable to the Enterprise crew, of ambushing the Earps. The stakes rise further when Chekov is romanced by a local girl. She is harassed by Morgan Earp, who kills Chekov when he interferes. As a result of this tragedy, Spock realizes that this suggests that events in the Melkotian creation can be altered from what happened in reality, as in fact the real Billy Claiborne survived the gunfight (as did Ike Clanton). That glimmer of hope is dashed when an improvised gas grenade they plan to use on their enemy totally fails on testing, thereby erasing their one possible advantage. Spock remarks that it should have worked, but the hour of the fight comes before he can explain his reasoning. When the crew refuses to go to the corral, they find themselves immediately teleported there and cannot escape. The team fears for their lives, but Mr. Spock explains his realization. He notes that the gas bomb should have worked according to physical laws; its failure implies that what they are experiencing is not real, despite appearances, but is an elaborate illusion occurring in the minds of the crew that is only as real as their minds accept it to be. Spock's will is strong enough for him to believe this logical conclusion that nothing in this situation can harm him, but he has to convince the others of the same, as any lingering doubt will prove deadly. Kirk orders Spock to mind meld with each member of the team, in an attempt to wipe away any and all doubt from their minds and convince them that the bullets from the Earps' guns are mere phantasms and will pass through their bodies without injury. The shootout replays as history dictates, but when the Earps fire their revolvers, their bullets have no effect as Spock predicted. Kirk tackles Wyatt Earp but does not kill him and tosses his gun to the ground. After the fight is over, the Melkotians return Kirk and the rest of the landing party to the Enterprise - including Chekov, whose attraction to the girl clouded his perception of the false reality enough for him to survive. A Melkotian appears again on the bridge viewscreen and claims he is impressed that even though Kirk had the opportunity to kill the Earps, he chose instead to spare their lives. This act of mercy changes the Melkotians' distrustful opinions of the Federation and opens their doors to relations with them.

23

Spectre of the Gun

24

Reception
Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode a 'B+' rating, marking it down for loose writing but praising its impressive final showdown and "weird, arrhythmic vibe working for the show for once".

Notes
As money was not available for a full set, director Vincent McEveety was asked to use a stylized Western street of false building fronts and no sides.

References External links


"Spectre of the Gun" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68772.html) at StarTrek.com "Spectre of the Gun" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708448/) at the Internet Movie Database "Spectre of the Gun" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Spectre_of_the_Gun) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Spectre of the Gun" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/spectre-of-the-gun-24944/) at TV.com "The Last Gunfight" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/last_gunfight.htm) Script review and analysis of "Spectre of the Gun"'s first draft by Dave Eversole Melkotian (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Melkotian) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki)

Day of the Dove

25

Day of the Dove


"Day of the Dove"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 7 Marvin Chomsky Jerome Bixby Fred Steiner Al Francis 066 November1,1968 Guest actors Michael Ansara - Kang Susan Howard - Mara David Ross - Lt. Johnson Mark Tobin - Klingon Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Spectre of the Gun" "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"
List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Day of the Dove" is the seventh episode of the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast November 1, 1968 and repeated June 17, 1969. It was written by Jerome Bixby and directed by Marvin Chomsky. In this episode, an alien force drives the crew of the Enterprise into brutal conflict with the Klingons.

Plot
On stardate 5630.3, the Federation starship USS Enterprise receives a distress call from a human colony on Beta XII-A. Captain Kirk beams down with a landing party but finds no evidence of a human settlement. Moments later a landing party from a crippled Klingon ship, led by Commander Kang, beams down to the planet and capture Kirk and his men. Kang denies attacking any human colony but asserts that his ship was fired upon unprovoked by the Enterprise, and he demands that Kirk surrender his ship. Suddenly Ensign Chekov accuses the Klingons of having killed his brother, Piotr, however Kang takes this as an opportunity and tortures Chekov with an agonizer until Kirk gives in. Kirk pretends to agree and surrender quietly, however, he manages to trigger a security alert to First Officer Spock on the bridge just before beaming up. When Kirk's team, along with their captors, returns to the Enterprise, Kang and his crew are "held" in the transporter beam, rematerializing later and finding themselves surrounded by an armed security force. The Klingons surrender. Undetected by the crew, a strange swirl of energy sneaks aboard the Enterprise. The entity interfaces with the ship's main computer, and suddenly the Enterprise jumps into warp at maximum speed on an uncontrolled heading to the edge of the galaxy. Fear and anxiety begin to rise as the ship races out of control. Emergency bulkheads begin to

Day of the Dove close throughout the ship isolating the majority of the crew away from the conflict and evening out the number of Enterprise personnel with the Klingons. At the same time, mysterious racks of bladed weapons appear throughout the ship and the crew's phasers disappear, replaced by swords and knives. The crew and the Klingons both now armed with the primitive weapons, a savage melee breaks out between them. Kirk manages to fight his way back to the bridge where Spock reports that he has detected an alien presence that seems to have taken over the ship. Spock begins to work on a way of getting rid of it. Meanwhile, the Klingons have taken over engineering and begin to shut down life support to the rest of the ship; however, their attempts are futile and life support is restored completely on its own. Also, inexplicably, severely injured crew who fought during the skirmish find their wounds have rapidly healed, keeping both sides of the battle on a matched footing. Kirk and Spock surmise that the alien intruder is playing some kind of twisted wargame, but its motives are unknown. Kirk wants his crew to stop fighting, but they find themselves uncontrollably driven to violence through fearful paranoia. Kirk and Spock decide to try to reach Kang, in order to alert him to the situation, and to reason with him. Meanwhile, Mr. Chekov roams the ship seeking revenge for the murder of his brother Piotr - even though Lt. Sulu points out that Chekov is an only child. When Chekov finds the Klingon female Mara, who is Kang's wife and science officer, he threatens to rape and kill her. Mara is rescued by Kirk and Spock who manage to knock Chekov out. Mara remains wary of Kirk's help. She tells him she has heard that Klingons that are captured are put into Federation concentration camps for later execution or experiments. Kirk tries to calm her down telling her there are no such camps, and that an alien force is behind what is going on. Mara still refuses to believe Kirk; however, the alien entity finally makes an appearance just outside Sickbay. The being lingers for a moment and then vanishes through a bulkhead. Spock believes the entity may be feeding off everyone's negative emotions, especially fear and anger. He suggests it may have faked the colony distress call and set up this battle between the crew and Klingons so that it has a convenient source of nourishment. Having seen the alien herself, Mara is finally convinced and leads Kirk to Kang, who remains holed up in engineering. Mara tries to explain the situation to her husband, but Kang doesn't believe it and demands a final duel to the death with Kirk. The two ship captains begin their swordfight and soon the entity appears to feed off their anger. Despite the presence of the being, Kang continues fighting. Kirk, however, struggles to ask Kang if he would like to spend the next thousand lifetimes satisfying the alien's twisted desires. Mara also convinces her husband to lay down his arms. Kang now realizes the fight is pointless and agrees to a truce. To combat the alien entity, the Klingons and Enterprise crew begin to show goodwill and positive emotion toward each other. This finally drives the weakened alien from the ship.

26

40th Anniversary remastering


This episode was remastered in 2006 and aired January 5, 2008 as part of the remastered Original Series. It was preceded three weeks earlier by the remastered version of "A Taste of Armageddon" and followed a week later by the remastered version of "Who Mourns for Adonais?". Aside from remastered video and audio, and the all-CGI animation of the USS Enterprise that is standard among the revisions, specific changes to this episode also include: The planet Beta XII-A has been given a more realistic earth-like appearance. New scenes and more dramatic shots of the Klingon battle cruiser have been added, including replaced footage of the ship as it explodes above the planet.

Day of the Dove

27

Reception
Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode an 'B-' rating, describing it as having potential, reminiscent of A Clockwork Orange in its fast-paced action sequences and the addictive and seductive use of "the old ultra-violence," but ultimately hampered by a script that makes no real statement on the nature of violent conflict.

References External links


"Day of the Dove" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68792.html) at StarTrek.com "Day of the Dove" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708427/) at the Internet Movie Database "Day of the Dove" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/day-of-the-dove-24945/) at TV.com "Day of the Dove" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Day_of_the_Dove) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Day of the Dove" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/01/06/day-of-the-dove-remastered-screenshots/#more-1428) Review of the remastered at TrekMovie.com "Day of the Dove" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/day_of_the_dove.htm) story outline dated June 3, 1968 Script analysis by Dave Eversole

For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky

28

For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky


"For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 8 Tony Leader Rik Vollaerts George Duning Al Francis 065 November8,1968 Guest actors Kate Woodville - Natira Byron Morrow - Admiral Westervliet Jon Lormer - Old Man Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Day of the Dove" "The Tholian Web"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" is the eighth episode of the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek. It was aired by NBC on November 8, 1968 and was written by Rik Vollaerts, and directed by Tony Leader. In this episode, the crew of the Enterprise rush to stop an asteroid from colliding with a Federation world, but discover the asteroid is actually an inhabited generation ship.

Plot
On stardate 5476.3, Dr. McCoy, the Federation starship USS Enterprise's Chief Medical Officer, discovers he has a rare, incurable disease called xenopolycythemia and has only one year to live. At the same time, the sensors suddenly detect a set of ballistic missiles targeting the ship; however, the Enterprise quickly disposes of the primitive weapons. The missiles' point of origin is quickly determined, and the Enterprise approaches. It is a large asteroid called Yonada which is on a deadly collision course with the Federation world of Daran V, a planet with nearly four billion inhabitants. Unless a way is discovered to divert Yonada, the asteroid will destroy the planet in just over a solar year. When the asteroid is discovered to contain a breathable atmosphere, Kirk assembles a landing party consisting of himself, Dr. McCoy and First Officer Spock to beam into the habitable interior to investigate. Upon their arrival, the landing team discovers several metal cylinders that strangely protrude from the ground. The team is then quickly captured by a group of humanoid men who emerge from the cylinders, along with a stunningly

For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky beautiful woman who appears to be their leader. The woman identifies herself as Natira, the High Priestess of Yonada, and orders her men to take the prisoners below. The three officers are escorted to a chamber that appears to be some kind of temple. Natira kneels on a platform and communicates with the Oracle. Kirk steps forward and tries to explain that their team came in peace. Natira wants to believe the party, but the Oracle threatens severe punishment if the party members are found to be enemies. As a show of force, the Oracle strikes the party with a powerful electric shock that knocks them unconscious. Kirk and Spock awaken sometime later; however, McCoy is slower to recover owing to his medical condition. Kirk tells Spock about McCoy's condition. An old man comes into the room. He tells them that the others on Yonada do not know they are living in a hollow sphere and how, when he was young, he climbed a high mountain and discovered the secret for himself, saying "...for the world is hollow and I have touched the sky." As he is talking he cringes as though in pain, and collapses dead at Kirk's feet. A red glow appears under the skin at the temple of the old man's head. Natira comes into the room with a small entourage and informs Kirk, Spock and McCoy that the man has been killed by the Oracle for uttering "forbidden words". It is then revealed that the Oracle controls the people by means of an implanted device referred to as an "instrument of obedience". McCoy's health upsets Natira who quickly shows an attachment to the doctor. Natira tends to McCoy giving Kirk and Spock an opportunity to have a look around. The two find out that the entire asteroid is artificially built. It is in fact a giant spacecraft housing millions of people. It is a fact that the Yonada people do not seem to be aware of; all except for the old man, who realized that Kirk and Spock were visitors. Kirk and Spock then make their way to the Oracle chamber. They discover ancient texts inscribed in the wall by a race known as the Fabrini. It is learned that the Fabrini constructed the asteroid ship 10,000 years ago, before their star exploded in a supernova. They created the ship in hopes of saving members of their race, and later transplant them to a new world. All the current inhabitants of Yonada are Fabrini descendants. Kirk wishes to get a closer look at the Oracle which he and Spock believe is nothing more than a central computer, but they hide when Natira enters the chamber to pray. She expresses to the Oracle that she wishes McCoy to become her mate. Kirk's and Spock's forbidden intrusion into the temple chamber is discovered and again they are painfully stunned and taken away to be punished for their transgressions. Meanwhile, McCoy has grown fond of Natira and expresses his desire to remain behind on Yonada, since he has one year to live. He agrees to Natira's marriage proposal only if she allows Kirk and Spock to go free. Natira agrees, but if McCoy is to remain behind, the Oracle demands that he be implanted with a punishment device like all the others. McCoy accepts under the circumstances, and Kirk and Spock are released. They attempt to convince McCoy to return with them since Starfleet will resort to destroying the generation ship if they cannot divert it, but McCoy is adamant about staying; his friends return to the Enterprise. Kirk, however, never gets the chance to reveal Yonada's secret and warn Natira of its imminent doom. McCoy undergoes the implant procedure. Afterwards, he and Natira are married in an elaborate ceremony. After the wedding, McCoy is allowed to look at the "Book of the People", the sacred text that reveals information on numerous star systems and Fabrini technology. McCoy excitedly contacts the Enterprise with his communicator about the discovery of the book, but the Oracle discovers what he is doing, activates McCoy's punishment device, and terminates the communication to Enterprise. Kirk and Spock waste no time in beaming back to Yonada to find McCoy. He is unconscious, and Natira is nearly hysterical with worry. Spock operates on McCoy and removes the punishment implant. Kirk explains to Natira that her world is really a spaceship that will be destroyed if she does not convince the Oracle to alter course. She believes him, and confronts the Oracle for the truth. The Oracle responds to her "blasphemy" with a blast of pain from her punishment implant, almost killing her. McCoy rushes to Natira's side and begins to remove her implant. Kirk and Spock enter the temple chamber to retrieve the book and find a way to shut down the Oracle computer. The Oracle becomes furious at their attempts to

29

For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky gain access, and the stones of the chamber begin to glow red-hot. Kirk and Spock retreat, but having seized the book they find a way to bypass the Oracle's defenses and shut the machine down. They also discover a secret room containing the navigation controls for the asteroid ship. With the Oracle disabled, Kirk and Spock enter the room and learn that a malfunction in the navigation system has moved Yonada off its intended course. Kirk and Spock make the proper repairs to the ancient navigation system and redirect Yonada onto its proper heading, sparing both the ship and Daran V. Kirk and Spock discover Fabrini medical records, including a cure for xenopolycythemia. McCoy is returned to the Enterprise for a successful treatment, but hopes to see his "wife" Natira again once the Yonada people reach their new homeworld in just over a year.

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Reception
Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode an 'B-' rating, describing it as having potential, but being hampered by a script that fails to act on that: "we have Kirk and Spock unraveling the mystery by the halfway mark, and then spending the rest of the episode on clean-up duty. You know McCoy is coming back, you know he'll be cured, and you know that the computer will be defeated. About the only question is whether or not Natira will make it to the end credits, and happily, she doeswhich means McCoy, unlike Kirk, isn't a widower." Star Trek novelist Dayton Ward wrote, "For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" is a decent idea, in and of itself. The idea of a generational ship encased in an asteroid is well worth exploring. After all, variations on the concept were already a staple of science fiction long before Star Trek came along. My biggest problem is why someonethe Fabrinifelt it necessary to conceal the truth behind the "worldship" from its population. Wouldn't it make more sense for the generations of Yonadans to be informed as to their purpose, and be working and training the next generation(s) to be ready for when the ship arrives at its destination? Instead, they're wandering the halls, apparently doing little more than tossing Frisbees and getting the occasional spanking from the Oracle. ... The episode is typical of the third season: Long on talk, light on action, adequate yet hardly spectacular in execution. David Alan Mack, also a Star Trek novelist, remarks on the episode's peculiar similarity to The Paradise Syndrome, which aired only five weeks prior. Both episodes involve the Enterprise being tasked with altering the trajectory of an asteroid headed toward a populated Class M planet, discovering a displaced culture with a love of peculiar obelisks, and one of our series regulars getting married to the culture's high priestess. In fact, these episodes are so similar that they reused the effects shot of the asteroid from The Paradise Syndrome as a stand-in for the asteroid-disguised generation ship Yonada. Mack writes that he "simply didn't buy the romance between McCoy and Natira," but otherwise liked the characterizations: The episode's performances are quite good, all things considered. William Shatner's scenery chewing is kept in check, and DeForest Kelley brings a quiet dignity to his portrayal of McCoy facing his own imminent demise. The argument between McCoy and Nurse Christine Chapel (Majel Barrett) feels genuine and heartfelt, and Leonard Nimoy brings the perfect degree of quiet compassion to the moment when Spock, having learned of McCoy's illness, reaches out to steady his wounded friend, and McCoy reacts with understated surprise at Spock's sudden display of concern. In fact, that scene is the best one in the entire episode, because it captures the dynamics of the three principals' friendship in a single, eloquently dramatized moment. Samuel Walters called it "a surprisingly effective episode about blind faith in rules and dogma, as well as a touching love story," with the qualification that the story "does a good job of providing character growth for McCoy. Had the

For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky episode not succumbed to an easy solution to his predicamentpurely because these episodes need their characters to remain, essentially, the samethen this could have been a profound, moving narrative." A negative review by Michelle Erica Green focused on plot illogic: "Why are the men wearing shiny plaid suits and carrying swords when wrongdoers can be punished for their crimes by a computer? Why are the women wearing provocative gowns when only the priestess is allowed to choose her own mate?" Game creator Jon Van Caneghem used the plot of this as the basis for his first computer game, Might and Magic Book One: The Secret of the Inner Sanctum.

31

References External links


"For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/ episodes/TOS/detail/68790.html) at StarTrek.com "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708430/) at the Internet Movie Database "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/ For_the_World_is_Hollow_and_I_Have_Touched_the_Sky_(episode)) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/ for-the-world-is-hollow-and-i-have-touched-the-sky-24946/) at TV.com "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/01/29/ remastered-for-the-world-is-hollow-and-i-have-touched-the-sky-video/) Preview of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

The Tholian Web

32

The Tholian Web


"The Tholian Web"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
The Tholians spin an energy web around the Enterprise. Episode no. Season3 Episode 9 Herb Wallerstein Judy Burns Chet Richards

Directed by Written by

Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Fred Steiner Al Francis 064 November15,1968 Guest actors

Sean Morgan - Lt. O'Neil Barbara Babcock - Voice of Loskene Paul Baxley - Defiant Captain Frank da Vinci - Lt. Brent Robert Bralver - Crazed Engineer Jay D. Jones - Dizzy Engineer Lou Elias - Crazed Crewman William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Previous Next "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" "Plato's Stepchildren"
Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3) List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Tholian Web" is the ninth episode of the third season of the original American science fiction television series Star Trek. It is episode #64, production #64, first broadcast on November15, 1968 and repeated August19, 1969. It was written by Judy Burns and Chet Richards and directed by Herb Wallerstein. Set in the 23rd century, the series follows the adventures of Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and the crew of the Federation starship Enterprise. In this episode, Captain Kirk is caught between dimensions while the crew of the Enterprise works to retrieve him. All the while, the Tholians demand that the Enterprise leave their space.

The Tholian Web

33

Plot
On stardate 5693.2, the Federation starship USS Enterprise enters an uncharted region of space to search for her sister ship, the USS Defiant, which disappeared three weeks previously. The Enterprise's warp engines begin to slowly lose power for no apparent reason and sensors detect nearby dimensional fractures in space. They visually find the Defiant, adrift and glowing eerily, despite sensors reporting the vessel is not really there. Captain Kirk (William Shatner) assembles a boarding party consisting of himself, Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Science Officer Spock (Leonard Nimoy) and Navigator Ensign Chekov (Walter Koenig) in environmental suits, as the life support conditions of the Defiant are unknown. They discover the entire crew dead, having apparently killed each other. What's worse, the ship appears to be dissolving as McCoy is able to put his hand through a corpse and a table. The dematerializing of the Defiant is causing the Enterprise's transporter frequencies to be blocked; only three are working and even these are dubious. Kirk orders the landing party back while he remains. The other three barely make it back, but before Kirk himself can be beamed off, the Defiant disappears altogether, taking the Captain with it. Spock determines that due to the Enterprise's transporter lock, Kirk has been left in the interdimensional rift when the Defiant phased out, and they can recover him again during the next period of spatial interphase. Spock notes that the Captain has just over three hours of oxygen left in his environmental suit. Meanwhile, Chekov suddenly goes berserk and attacks the bridge personnel. McCoy surmises that the spatial interphase causes psychotic effects in the human brain, and the same murderous hostilities that affected the Defiant's crew will eventually overcome the Enterprise crew. McCoy strongly suggests that they put some distance between themselves and the Defiant but Spock refuses, believing any movement from their position could disrupt the delicate fabric of space in their region and jeopardize their chances of finding the Captain. A small vessel of unknown configuration approaches the Enterprise. A crystalline being initiates contact and identifies itself as Commander Loskene of the Tholian Assembly, and demands that the Enterprise leave their territory immediately. Spock apologizes for their intrusion and explains their situation to Loskene (voiced by Barbara Babcock), asking they be given time to retrieve the Captain. Loskene agrees to give the Enterprise precisely the 1 hour and 53 minutes Spock had asked for until the next spatial interphase period. The moment comes when the Defiant should phase in again, and Spock attempts to lock onto the Captain; however the ship is not where she is supposed to be. Spock believes the arrival of the Tholian vessel has somehow disturbed the Defiant's position and they have apparently lost Captain Kirk for good. Before any other action can be taken, the Tholians punctually open fire on the Enterprise and refuse any attempts at communication. Spock returns fire and disables the Tholian vessel. Chief Engineer Scott (James Doohan) reports that the Enterprise's damage coupled with the lack of power means he cannot hold the Enterprise purely stationary and she might even drift through the rift herself. Meanwhile, another Tholian vessel arrives and begins to form a filament structure between itself and the other ship. This filament thread is spun by either ship around the Enterprise in a web-like pattern. Spock scans it and learns that it is an energy field that, if activated before the Enterprise is repaired, means they "will not see home again." After Spock conducts a memorial in the ship's chapel, he and McCoy adjourn to the Captain's quarters where McCoy plays a recording Kirk made for them just in case he was ever killed on a mission. The somber recording gives the officers their final orders and some words of advice for their future missions without him; especially when he exhorts them to use their constant arguments and different points of view to support and help each other. After the message is heard, Spock orders the Enterprise to leave the area. However, in the midst of her private memorial for Kirk in her quarters, Communications Officer Lt. Uhura (Nichelle Nichols) notices a ghostly image of the Captain, still in his space suit, and floating inside the ship, speaking and making gestures. McCoy thinks Uhura is beginning to go mad and seeing things and confines her under restraint in Sickbay, but then Scott later reports

The Tholian Web catching a glimpse of Kirk in engineering. Wondering if they might be about to lose their Chief Engineer, Spock, McCoy and others see a similar apparition floating on the bridge and confirm that Uhura isn't going mad. Despite that Kirk is trying to tell Spock to leave him and just save the ship, Spock rushes to locate the Captain, but Kirk phases out again before he can get a lock. If indeed the Captain is still alive, his pressure suit's life support would be dangerously low and his time is running out. More reports of Kirk's "ghost" come in from around the ship and Spock tries to lock a tractor beam on him when he appears again. In the meantime, Dr. McCoy has developed a preventative/curative agent for the madness from the phasing effect by using a diluted form of the deadly Klingon nerve agent, Theragen. As the Tholian web is nearing completion, Kirk's image is spotted once more and Spock locks onto him with the tractor beam. Just before the Tholians were able to complete the web, Spock takes a gamble and activates the ship's engines. The Enterprise briefly drops into the rift, and is hurled 2.72 parsecs away, enabling it to escape the Tholian web. They manage to retrieve Captain Kirk from the rift using the transporter, barely in time, for his oxygen supply was exhausted. Kirk makes a full recovery and is keen on learning what happened aboard his ship while he was "away". He was surprised to learn McCoy and Spock worked well together, and a little disappointed when McCoy claims they didn't have time to open their Captain's "last orders" and his words of wisdom had gone unheard.

34

Sequel
A two-part episode set of Star Trek: Enterprise called "In a Mirror, Darkly", followed up the story and revealed what happened to the Defiant after it disappeared: it materialized in the Mirror Universe of the past (before Mirror Kirk's time) and was taken from the mirror-Tholians as a prize by the Terran Empire. The dissolution and disappearance the ship experienced were apparently the process of its phasing through the continuum anomaly it encountered. For the sequel, the Defiant bridge (as seen in this episode) was recreated in precise detail; even the positions of the dead crewmen were identical.

External links
"The Tholian Web" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Tholian Web" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Tholian Web" [3] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Tholian Web" [4] at TV.com "The Tholian Web" [5] Remastered FX reel at TrekMovie.com

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68788. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708479/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Tholian_Web http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-tholian-web-24947/ http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2007/ 03/ 31/ the-tholian-web-screenshots/

Plato's Stepchildren

35

Plato's Stepchildren
"Plato's Stepchildren"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 10 David Alexander Meyer Dolinsky Alexander Courage Al Francis 067 November22,1968 Guest actors Michael Dunn - Alexander Barbara Babcock - Philana Liam Sullivan - Parmen Ted Scott - Eraclitus Derek Partridge - Dionyd William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Tholian Web" "Wink of an Eye"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Plato's Stepchildren" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast November22, 1968. It is episode #65, production #67, written by Meyer Dolinsky, and directed by David Alexander. This episode is one of the first scripted American television broadcasts to depict an inter-racial kiss between a white man (Kirk) and a black woman (Uhura). This episode was withdrawn by the BBC in the UK because of 'sadistic plot elements' during the initial run in 1971 and was not shown until a repeat run in January 1994.[citation needed] In this episode, the crew of the Enterprise encounters an ageless and sadistic race of humanoids with the power of telekinesis and who claim to have organized their society around Ancient Greek ideals.

Plot
Captain Kirk, along with First Officer Spock and Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy beam down to a planet (highly enriched with rare "kironide" mineral deposits) to investigate a distress call. Once there, they are greeted by a friendly dwarf named Alexander (Michael Dunn), who leads the landing party to meet the rest of his people, who have adopted classical Greek culture, and name themselves Platonians in honor of the Greek philosopher Plato. All of the Platonians, except for Alexander, seem to possess telekinetic powers. The Platonians explain that they "lured" the Enterprise to their planet because their leader, Parmen, requires medical help. After being treated by Dr. McCoy, Parmen demands that McCoy remain on the planet to treat other Platonians. When captain Kirk objects, the Platonians use their powers to punish him. They humiliate Kirk and Spock as Dr.

Plato's Stepchildren McCoy watches, forcing them to sing and dance like court jesters. Parmen forces Spock to laugh and, despite the strong objection of Dr. McCoy, to cry. Later, the Platonians use their powers to force two other Enterprise officers to the planet for their entertainment: Communications Officer Lt. Uhura and Nurse Chapel. Once on the planet, the officers quickly get their bodies usurped by Parmen who proceeds to make Kirk, Spock, Chapel and Uhura, all forced to wear Greek garb, perform for the gathered Platonians and a captive McCoy, including forcing Kirk and Uhura to kiss. Alexander becomes angry after watching the humiliating tricks played upon the crew by his Platonian masters. He tries, unsuccessfully, to attack Parmen with a knife. Earlier however, Dr. McCoy had managed to isolate and identify the substance that provides the inhabitants with their special powers: the kironide mineral itself, which is abundant in the natural food and water supply of the planet. McCoy is able to prepare a serum and inject Captain Kirk and Spock with doses of it. Furthermore, since Alexander tells them that each person has a different and incompatible psionic frequency, they will not have to deal with a massed attack. As a result, Kirk uses his newfound telekinetic powers to defeat Parmen, for Alexander's life. The Platonian admits defeat and begs for mercy where he promises to mend his bullying ways. Kirk warns him that the events encountered here will be reported to Starfleet and if Parmen goes back on his word, the powers can be recreated by anyone whenever they wish in order to defeat him. Kirk promises to send appropriate medical technicians to the planet as long as the Platonians behave themselves. Alexander, who would not internalize the empowering substance because he did not wish to "become one of them", is released from his duty as serving the planet's denizens as a slave and jester, and requests to go with the Enterprise to start a new (and presumably happier) life elsewhere in the galaxy.

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Production and reception


The episode features a kiss between James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and Lt. Uhura (Nichelle Nichols) which is often, incorrectly (see Emergency Ward 10), cited as the first interracial kiss depicted on a scripted television series. Similarly, over two years earlier on The Wild Wild West, James T. West (Robert Conrad) and Princess Ching Ling (Pilar Seurat), shared a white and Asian interracial kiss ("The Night the Dragon Screamed", aired 1966 Jan 14). In the same year on I Spy, Kelly Robinson (Robert Culp) and Sam (France Nuyen) would also share a white and Asian interracial kiss ("The Tiger" [1], aired 1966 Jan 5). However, Plato's Stepchildren was the first white and black interracial kiss produced on US television, drawing critical and negative attention where the white and Asian interracial kisses did not. The episode portrays the kiss as involuntary, being forced by telekinesis, perhaps to avoid any hint of romance that would risk outrage among some sensitive viewers. As one TV critic put it, "The underlying message was, 'If I have to kiss you to save my ship and crew, by God, I'll do it.'" Also, William Shatner recalls in Star Trek Memories that NBC insisted their lips never touch (the technique of turning their heads away from the camera was used to conceal this). However, Nichelle Nichols insists in her autobiography Beyond Uhura (written in 1994 after Shatner's book) that the kiss was real, even in takes where her head obscures their lips.[2] When NBC executives learned of the kiss they became concerned it would anger TV stations in the Deep South.[3] Earlier in 1968, NBC had expressed similar concern over a musical sequence in a Petula Clark special in which she touched Harry Belafonte's arm, a moment cited as the first occasion of direct physical contact on American television between a man and woman of different races. At one point during negotiations, the idea was brought up of having Spock kiss Uhura instead, but William Shatner insisted that they stick with the original script.[citation needed] NBC finally ordered that two versions of the scene be shotone where Kirk and Uhura kissed and one where they did not.[4] Having successfully recorded the former version of the scene, Shatner and Nichelle Nichols deliberately flubbed every take of the latter version, thus forcing the episode to go out with the kiss intact.[5][6] As Nichelle Nichols writes:

Plato's Stepchildren 'Knowing that Gene was determined to air the real kiss, Bill shook me and hissed menacingly in his best ham-fisted Kirkian staccato delivery, "I! WON'T! KISS! YOU! I! WON'T! KISS! YOU!" It was absolutely awful, and we were hysterical and ecstatic. The director was beside himself, and still determined to get the kissless shot. So we did it again, and it seemed to be fine. "Cut! Print! That's a wrap!" The next day they screened the dailies, and although I rarely attended them, I couldn't miss this one. Everyone watched as Kirk and Uhura kissed and kissed and kissed. And I'd like to set the record straight: Although Kirk and Uhura fought it, they did kiss in every single scene. When the non-kissing scene came on, everyone in the room cracked up. The last shot, which looked okay on the set, actually had Bill wildly crossing his eyes. It was so corny and just plain bad it was unusable. The only alternative was to cut out the scene altogether, but that was impossible to do without ruining the entire episode. Finally, the guys in charge relented: "To hell with it. Let's go with the kiss." I guess they figured we were going to be cancelled in a few months anyway. And so the kiss stayed.'[7] There were, however, few contemporary records of any complaints commenting on the scene.[8] Nichelle Nichols observes that "Plato's Stepchildren" which first aired in November 1968 "received a huge response. We received one of the largest batches of fan mail ever, all of it very positive, with many addressed to me from girls wondering how it felt to kiss Captain Kirk, and many to him from guys wondering the same thing about me. However, almost no one found the kiss offensive" except from a single mildly negative letter from one white Southerner who wrote: "I am totally opposed to the mixing of the races. However, any time a red-blooded American boy like Captain Kirk gets a beautiful dame in his arms that looks like Uhura, he ain't gonna fight it." Nichols notes that "for me, the most memorable episode of our last season was 'Plato's Stepchildren.'"[9]

37

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0609487/ Nichelle Nichols, Beyond Uhura: Star Trek and Other Memories, G.P. Putnam & Sons New York, 1994. pp.195-198 Nichols, p.195 Nichelle Nichols bio at NNDB.com (http:/ / www. nndb. com/ people/ 712/ 000023643/ ) Nicholls, p.195-196 Nichelle Nichols also claimed this to be fact in an August 2006 Comedy Central online interview, recorded the day of her participation in the network's roast of Shatner. [7] Nichols, p.196 [8] Nichols, pp.196-197 [9] Nichols, p.193

External links
"Plato's Stepchildren" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68794.html) at StarTrek.com "Plato's Stepchildren" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708443/) at the Internet Movie Database "Plato's Stepchildren" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Plato's_Stepchildren) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Plato's Stepchildren" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/platos-stepchildren-24948/) at TV.com "Plato's Stepchildren" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/06/20/review-platos-stepchildren-remastered/) Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com "Plato's Stepchildren" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/06/19/platos-stepchildren-remastered-screenshots-video/) Side-by-side comparisons at TrekMovie.com

Wink of an Eye

38

Wink of an Eye
"Wink of an Eye"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 11 Jud Taylor Arthur Heinemann Lee Cronin Alexander Courage Al Francis 068 November29,1968

Directed by Teleplay by Story by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Guest actors Kathie Browne - Deela Erik Holland - Ekor Jason Evers - Rael Geoffrey Binney - Compton Richard Geary - Scalosian William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Previous Next "Plato's Stepchildren" "The Empath"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Wink of an Eye" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast on November29, 1968, and repeated on June24, 1969. It is episode #66, production #68, and was written by Arthur Heinemann, based on a story by Gene L. Coon under the pen name "Lee Cronin", and directed by Jud Taylor. In this episode, invisible "time-accelerated" aliens take over the Enterprise and attempt to abduct the crew for use as "genetic stock".

Plot
On stardate 5710.5, the Federation starship USS Enterprise follows an automated audio-visual distress call to the planet Scalos, which is outside known Federation space. When the ship arrives, Captain Kirk beams down with a landing party to investigate, finding a beautiful but empty metropolis, with not a single being around. In fact, the only trace of life found is heard in what sounds like the buzzing of unseen and un-scanable insects. Soon after their arrival, Crewman Compton vanishes in a wave of energy right before the party's eyes. After a wide search of the area, Compton is still missing, and Kirk orders the landing party to return to the Enterprise. Once aboard however, strange things begin to happen as equipment fails and ship systems become erratic. A strange alien device suddenly appears in engineering, seemingly attaching itself to the main life support system. The strange buzzing of insects encountered on the planet is now heard aboard the ship.

Wink of an Eye Kirk puts the ship on full alert, and while he takes a coffee break on the bridge, he notices the movements of the bridge crew seem to slow down to a stop as if time itself is being manipulated. Suddenly, a beautiful woman in a colorful gown appears on the bridge and addresses Kirk. The woman identifies herself as Deela, Queen of the Scalosians, and she explains to Kirk that the bridge crew has not slowed down, but he has been sped up, having been matched to the Scalosian's "hyper-accelerated" physical existence. It is only through this accelerated process that the aliens can interact with humans. From the perspective of the bridge crew, Kirk has simply vanished the same way Compton did. Compton however, is alive and well, and aboard the Enterprise, having already been physically accelerated to the Scalosians' existence. Deela explains that exposure to radiation has caused the hyperacceleration of her people, and at the same time has made all the males sterile. She reveals her plan to have the crew of the Enterprise cryogenically frozen, providing an uncontaminated genetic stock her people can use to rebuild their population. She also claims Kirk as her consort, and demands that he join her on the planet below. Kirk of course, has no say in the matter, and having been accelerated as well, he cannot interact with his slow-moving crew or give them warning of what is going to happen. Kirk's only hope is Mr. Compton, but Compton has been won over to the Scalosians' cause. When Compton attempts to defend his Captain against an assault by a Scalosian, however, he himself is knocked down, damaging his skin. The damage proves to be fatal as he rapidly ages and dies. In the meantime, Deela meets with her fellow Scalosian and chief scientist, Rael. Kirk takes the opportunity to buy time to sabotage the transporter systems and delay the aliens' departure Meanwhile, back in real time, Science Officer Spock, and Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy try to figure out what happened to their Captain. Spock discovers that the strange buzzing is the hyperaccelerated conversations of the aliens, and learns they exist outside normal physics. Analyzing Kirk's coffee cup, McCoy discovers traces of radioactive water from Scalos in the beverage, and realizes it must have something to do with Kirk's disappearance. McCoy and Spock use the Scalosian water to make an antidote that could reverse the acceleration effect. Armed with the antidote, Spock drinks some Scalosian water and hyperaccelerates himself to rescue the Captain. Rael manages to repair the transporter and the other aliens aboard beam down to Scalos. Kirk meanwhile tricks Deela into thinking he has adjusted to their cause, until Kirk surprises her and steals her weapon. Kirk then joins Spock and the two rush to engineering to destroy the alien machinery that has been wired into the ship. The two escort their Scalosian prisoners to the transporter room and return them to their planet empty-handed. Kirk then takes the antidote and returns to the normal speed of time. Spock however, remains accelerated a while longer and makes the necessary repairs to the ship's vital systems at lightning-fast speed. Spock then returns the ship, along with himself, to normal. Then Spock says to the Captain that he had an "accelerating" experience. The scene ends with the Scalosian's audio-visual distress call accidentally replaying on the large viewing screen.

39

Reception
Star Trek novelist Dayton Ward judged that "the setup for 'Wink of an Eye' is interesting enough at first blush: A race of beings who move through time at a rate so fast that they're all but undetectable. Unfortunately, it's upon the second and subsequent blushes that the concept begins to fall apart." He writes that the Scalosians had too limited imagination for continuing their race, and that mating with members of other species would be no help. He found the science wanting, though "I have to admit that here it provides for one of the series' more original 'redshirt deaths.'" Ward did admire the set design: "Clever use of tilted camera angles and lighting help to sell the illusion of the characters moving about the ship at their hyper-accelerated rate. One nice touch is the slowing down of the various lights and gauges that fill the bridge's workstations when Kirk and Deela are there."

Wink of an Eye David Alan Mack, also a Star Trek novelist, wrote, "It's not a bad idea for an episode, but the execution on this one felt sorely lacking." He noted some gaps in logic: "Still, how does one propagate a species by mating one's women with aliens? ... And if time moves so slowly for them, why would they need to place the Enterprise crew in suspended animation? Wouldn't a few days' worth of knockout drugs suffice?" Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club was unimpressed by the episode, assigning it a B- and noting some plot holes: "They manage to beam aboard the Enterprise somehow, which doesn't make a lot of sense, science-wise. If their speed makes them invisible to the computer as life-forms, how would the transporter even work? Especially since they get brought on without anyone on the ship realizing it." Handlen judges that the "hook is clever," although "the ep might've been stronger if it had spent more time focusing on the mystery, and the danger that mystery represented, instead of dropping Kirk down the rabbit hole and spoiling the question so early on." He concludes, "In a stronger season, "Eye" would've been a low spot, a perfunctory by-the-numbers programmer which, while not embarrassing, wouldn't have made much of an impression. Here, it reminds us that, for a while anyway, competency was the least we could hope to expect from the series." Melissa N. Hayes-Gehrke of the University of Maryland found more problems with the science: Unfortunately, the ramifications of the accelerated living just do not stand up under scrutiny. If a Scalosian stays in one place for awhile [sic] - even just to have a protracted conversation - he should become visible, albeit briefly, to a normal person. We didn't see any indication that this could happen. Kirk fires his phaser at Deela and she steps out of the way because the beam is moving so slowly. This is patently ridiculous; phaser beams travel at the speed of light, and no object with mass can travel faster than that. From a practical perspective, how do the ship's doors know to open for the Scalosians, when the ship's sensors cannot detect them? How can the Scalosians flip and slide switches (like the transporter controls), that are not designed to move so quickly, without breaking them? StarTrekReviews.com found some praise: "There's no character interaction between our heroes, save for the wonderful moment when Kirk meets Spock in the corridor and simply smiles"a moment which many other reviewers also enjoyed.

40

References External links


"Wink of an Eye" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68796.html) at StarTrek.com "Wink of an Eye" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708490/) at the Internet Movie Database "Wink of an Eye" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Wink_of_an_Eye) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Wink of an Eye" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/wink-of-an-eye-24949/) at TV.com "Wink of an Eye" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/01/13/wink-of-an-eye-screenshots/) Screenshot comparisons at TrekMovie.com

The Empath

41

The Empath
"The Empath"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 12 John Erman Joyce Muskat George Duning Jerry Finnerman 063 December6,1968 Guest actors Kathryn Hays - Gem Alan Bergmann - Lal Willard Sage - Thann Davis Roberts - Dr. Ozaba Jason Wingreen - Dr. Linke Richard Geary - Security Guard William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Empath" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast December6, 1968. It is episode #67, production #63, written by Joyce Muskat and directed by John Erman. It was not without controversy and was one of a handful of episodes of the series deliberately not screened in the United Kingdom by the BBC due to its perceived disturbing content. The episode was withdrawn because of 'sadistic plot elements' during the initial run in 1971 and was not shown until a repeat run in January1994. In this episode, while visiting a doomed planet, the landing party is subject to torturous experiments by powerful aliens.

The Empath

42

Plot
On stardate 5121.5, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at Minara II to pick up research personnel. The Minaran star is close to going supernova. Captain Kirk, Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy, and Science Officer Spock beam to the planet to locate the research team while the Enterprise waits in orbit. The landing team finds the research camp abandoned and the scientists missing. Meanwhile in orbit, the Enterprise is bombarded by intense solar radiation which is causing instrumentation failure, and threatening the lives of the crew. Chief Engineer Scott orders the ship to break orbit while the landing party continues the search for the missing scientists on the planet. As the search continues, the landing party finds themselves teleported to an underground chamber, and there they find a young woman lying on a raised platform. The woman awakens but she appears to be mute and all attempts to verbally communicate with her are in vain. Dr. McCoy names the mystery woman "Gem". Soon, two silver-robed aliens appear, and identify themselves as Vians. Kirk approaches the beings but they repel the team with a force field. Kirk is injured and knocked to the floor. The silent Gem then rushes to Kirk's side and uses a mental power to absorb Kirk's injuries, taking them on herself and then dissipating them, healing him instantly and revealing that she is a powerful empath. The Vians leave the chamber to prepare experiments upon their newly arrived subjects. Spock takes the opportunity to scan their "prison" for a way out. He locates a nearby area filled with sophisticated machinery and computer banks. Along with the equipment are several glass cylinders, two of which contain dead bodies frozen in ghastly poses. Signs on the cylinders identify the test subjects as "Linke" and "Ozaba", the missing research scientists. Three more cylinders next to them are empty but contain name plaques: "McCoy", "Spock" and "Kirk". Just then a Vian appears and states that they are just in time. Spock performs a Vulcan nerve pinch on the Vian and the landing party and Gem make it to the surface where they find Scotty and some others from the Enterprise. Kirk sees two Vians who have followed them to the surface and instructs the others to get to Scotty while he takes care of them. The Vians slow Kirk with their weapons and note the powerful will of the humans to survive. Spock, McCoy, and Gem find that Scotty and the others were never really there and turn back to help the Captain. The Vians claim that they now only want one specimen, Kirk, and that they have no interest in keeping the others longer. But as the others turn to leave, they are suddenly transported away, apparently to gauge Kirk's reaction. The storm in space has continued for four hours longer than expected, but it is still too strong for the Enterprise to return to the planet. Scotty decides to hold the ship from going back to the planet for a time longer, unaware that the landing party is in danger. The Vians take Kirk back inside and subject him to physical torture while Gem watches, but won't tell him why. The Vians explain that Linke's and Ozaba's "own fears killed them." They then send him back to the first chamber where Gem heals his wounds. Kirk has been so badly hurt that Gem expends almost all her power on him, and faints from the strain. Because Gem takes on others' injuries in order to heal them, Kirk and McCoy are concerned that she could severely hurt or kill herself if she overdoes it. McCoy points out that her instinct for self-preservation would take over to prevent this. Not satisfied with the results of the experiment, the Vians return and demand another test subject, giving Kirk the choice of McCoy or Spock. They even "helpfully" explain that there is an 87% chance McCoy will die, and a 93% chance Spock will suffer brain damage resulting in permanent insanity. They leave once again. Spock makes adjustments to a teleportation device stolen earlier from the Vians. As Kirk ponders what to do, McCoy sedates him, intending to offer to be taken next. Spock, now in command as Kirk is unconscious, wants to offer himself, but McCoy sedates him as well and goes with the Vians. Upon awakening, though Spock suggests that they return to the surface, Gem holds up McCoy's medical tricorder and Kirk says, "The best defense is a good offense, and I intend to start offending right now." Kirk, Spock and Gem use the teleportation device to go to the Vians' medical chamber,

The Empath finding McCoy near death. They return to the first chamber where Gem rests. She is still weak and fearful. Kirk speculates that he may persuade her to stabilize McCoy, at which point the Vians reappear and imprison Kirk and Spock in the force field to prevent them from interfering. At last, Gem overcomes her fear and tries to help the doctor but struggles painfully with her remaining power to ease his suffering. Kirk angrily demands an explanation for the tortures. The Vians explain that they aren't testing the landing party, but are in fact testing Gem. They claim they have the ability to save only one of the peoples living in their system from the impending supernova disaster. They want to see if Gem's race are worthy of rescue. If she has learned to value the lives of others before her own, they will consider her people worthy. If not, the Vians will spare another race that is doomed to die. The aliens continue to observe Gem as she grows weaker, sacrificing her remaining energy to save McCoy's life, but breaking away from him to rest. This leads them to determine that she is not willing to give her life for that of another, and that her people will be the ones chosen to die. They demand that the test proceed to "completion", presumably the death either of Gem or McCoy. Gem does return to McCoy, but aware her attempt will cost her her own life, he shoves her away. Too drained to return, she falls to the floor. Meanwhile, Spock observes that the force field's energy increases with strong emotions. He manages to break free and overpowers the two aliens. Kirk confiscates the devices used for controlling the force fields. The Vians watch as Spock explains that since Gem has already offered her life, she's earned the right of survival for her planet. Moreover, McCoy's life is not solely dependent on Gem; the Vians have the technology to save him as well. But the Vians refuse, saying that Gem offering her life is not enough. Kirk accuses the aliens of lacking the one thing that Gem has already shown herself capable of, and the one thing the Vians sought: compassion. Kirk even returns the Vians' devices, saying, "If death is all you understand, here are four lives for you." The aliens consider the behavior and agree that Kirk's words have merit. The aliens restore Gem and McCoy to health and agree her people will be the ones they spare. The aliens, along with Gem, teleport away, and Kirk and his team return to the Enterprise. Kirk muses on the "chance" encounter with Gem, and Scott talks about her in terms of the biblical parable of the "Pearl of Great Price".

43

External links
"The Empath" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Empath" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Empath" [3] at TV.com "The Empath" [4] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Empath" [5] Story outline report and script analysis by Dave Eversole

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68786. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708462/ http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-empath-24950/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Empath http:/ / www. orionpressfanzines. com/ articles/ empath. htm

Elaan of Troyius

44

Elaan of Troyius
"Elaan of Troyius"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 13 John Meredyth Lucas John Meredyth Lucas Fred Steiner Jerry Finnerman 057 December20,1968 Guest actors France Nuyen - Elaan Jay Robinson - Ambassador Petri Tony Young - Kryton Lee Duncan - Evans Victor Brandt - Watson K.L. Smith - Klingon Captain Dick Durock - Guard #1 Charles Beck - Guard #2 Eddie Paskey - Lt. Leslie Frank da Vinci - Transporter Operator William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Empath" "Whom Gods Destroy"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Elaan of Troyius" is a third-season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast December20, 1968. It is episode #68, production #57, and was written and directed by John Meredyth Lucas, the only person ever in Star Trek production history to both write and direct a filmed Star Trek television episode, whether animated or live-action. In this episode, the USS Enterprise ferries a spoiled princess whose betrothal to a royal Troyian is hoped will bring peace to a star system at war.

Plot
On stardate 4372.5, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at the planet Troyius, the outermost world in the Tellun System, to pick up Petri, a green-skinned, white-haired Troyian ambassador. He is then taken to Elas, the innermost planet to pick up the Dohlman, Elaan a beautiful but very demanding young woman who is a member of a royal family. Though she is politically powerful herself, it is unclear who the "real" power is on Elas. What is clear is that the ruler or rulers of Elas have made the decision to marry Elaan to a royal family member from Troyius to

Elaan of Troyius secure peace between the warring planets. Both planets are in a border area between the Federation and the Klingon Empire and are at war with each other. It is hoped that the marriage of the Troyian and Elasian leaders will bring peace to the system and sway their leanings toward the Federation, over the Klingon Empire. It is obvious that Elaan is reluctant to be her enemy's bride, cursing that the arrangement was decided on by the Council of Elas in cooperation with the Troyian leader. Petri's job is to try to civilize Elaan, who is spoiled and arrogant, to the posh and noble ways of the Troyians. Not long after Elaan's arrival, a Klingon vessel is detected entering the Tellun system and avoids all communication hails from the Enterprise. Captain Kirk is then summoned to Elaan's quarters where he finds Ambassador Petri has been stabbed by Elaan. The ambassador is rushed to Sickbay where he refuses to have any more dealings with the girl and threatens to advise his leader not to marry her. The job of straightening her out now falls to Kirk. While in sickbay, Nurse Chapel asks why Elasian women are so prized in spite of their savagery. Petri explains that if the tears of an Elasian female touch a man's skin, he will be enraptured to her forever. Elaan does not take kindly to being "civilized" and tries to stab Kirk. He manages to overpower her and she begins to cry saying she is worried by the fact that nobody likes her. Kirk embraces her and tries to comfort her, but then he is overcome by the biochemistry of her tears. Meanwhile, one of the engineering crew is killed by Kryton, an Elasian bodyguard, who is secretly working for the Klingons. Kryton sabotages some of the Enterprise's systems and tries to contact the Klingon ship. He is captured, but commits suicide before he can be interrogated. Elaan explains that Kryton was from a noble family and had loved her. The arranged marriage had infuriated him and he sold out to the Klingons, probably hoping to disrupt the alliance so that he could marry Elaan. Elaan tries to use her new power over Kirk to do her bidding. She suggests that he destroy the Troyian planet, but his ethics and willpower are still stronger than her influence. He orders Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy to work on an antidote to counteract the power of her tears. Elaan is impressed by Kirk's resolve and begins to treat him as a loving equal, obeying him when he asks her to go to sickbay (the safest part of the ship). Meanwhile, Chief Engineer Scott discovers Kryton's sabotage and takes the ship off main power. He reports Kryton had damaged the dilithium crystals making it impossible to go to warp or use weapons. Scott and Science Officer Spock work feverishly to repair the damage as the Klingon ship takes up an attack position. There is little they can do about the threat without dilithium crystals. Kirk, still under the influence of Elaan's tears, manages to pull himself together and bluff the Klingons into thinking the Enterprise is fully operational. In Sickbay, the Troyian ambassador again approaches Elaan with the royal gifts a wedding dress and a necklace of large, roughly cut gemstones, saying that they symbolize hope for peace. Elaan accepts and subsequently appears on the bridge wearing the gifts. Spock detects strange energy readings from her necklace. Elaan is puzzled because to her the jewels are common stones the necklace is of little monetary value on her world. Spock discovers the "common stones" are crude dilithium crystals, which explains the Klingons's keen interest in controlling the system. The stones are quickly delivered to Scott in Engineering; there, he uses the crystals in the ship's antimatter reactor. Power returns to the Enterprise just before the Klingons attack and the enemy ship is successfully driven off. Elaan is again puzzled by Kirk's decision to just cripple the enemy ship and not destroy it. She asks, "Aren't you going to finish them off?" To that, he replies, "No." A much changed Elaan is delivered safely to Troyius. Before she departs, Elaan gives Kirk her knife as a memento of their encounter, explaining Troyian women do not wear such things. Later, McCoy appears on the bridge to report that he has found the antidote, but it seems not to have been needed after all, because Kirk was apparently even more strongly in love with commanding the Enterprise.

45

Elaan of Troyius

46

Production
Cut from the episode was a scene in the ship's recreation room, where Kirk, McCoy, Uhura and Spock meet and discuss how to calm Elaan. Uhura suggests using the sound of Spock's Vulcan harp to calm her; the music is later heard piped into Elaan's cabin.

Reception
The A.V. Club's Zack Handlen rates "Elaan of Troyius" as a B, making note of character development and the unexpected ending: "If you'd asked me to predict the rest of the episode after Elaan and Kirk hooked up, I would've guessed it would have something to do with Kirk interfering with the wedding...[i]nstead, we get a nifty space battle against the Klingons, a traitor in the Elasians, an unexpected source of dilithium crystals, and a curiously muted performance from Shatner that does a good job at conveying his internal struggle between feeling and duty without overselling it." Samuel Walters of [dauntlessmedia.net] rates the episode as a C-, citing a "scattershot approach to the plot" which "leaves too many possibilities unexplored and underdeveloped," and calling the entire episode "flat."

References External links


"Elaan of Troyius" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68774.html) at StarTrek.com "Elaan of Troyius" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708428/) at the Internet Movie Database "Elaan of Troyius" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/elaan-of-troyius-24951/) at TV.com "Elaan of Troyius" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Elaan_of_Troyius) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Elann of Troyius" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/03/31/elaan-of-troyius-remastered-review-video/ #more-1808) Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

Whom Gods Destroy

47

Whom Gods Destroy


"Whom Gods Destroy"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Marta (left) and Fleet Captain Garth of Izar Episode no. Season3 Episode 14 Herb Wallerstein Lee Erwin Lee Erwin Jerry Sohl Fred Steiner Al Francis 071 January3,1969 Guest actors Keye Luke - Governor Donald Cory Steve Ihnat - Fleet Captain Garth Yvonne Craig - Marta Gary Downey - Tellarite Richard Geary - Andorian Frank da Vinci - Lt. Brent William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Teleplay by Story by

Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Elaan of Troyius" "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Whom Gods Destroy" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek. It is episode #69, production #71, and was broadcast on January3, 1969. It was written by Lee Erwin, based on a story by Lee Erwin and Jerry Sohl, and directed by Herb Wallerstein. The title is based on a quote often misattributed to Euripides: "Those whom the gods wish to destroy they first make mad."[citation needed] This episode was withdrawn by the BBC in the UK because of 'sadistic plot elements' during the initial run in 1971 and was not shown until a repeat run in January1994. In this episode, Captain Kirk faces off with a demented shape-shifting starship captain determined to control the universe.

Whom Gods Destroy

48

Plot
On stardate 5718.3, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at the planet Elba II, an inhospitable world known for its very poisonous atmosphere and underground asylum for the few remaining Federation citizens that are criminally insane. The Enterprise brings with her a shipment of a new medicine that will at last cure the insanity. Captain Kirk and First Officer Spock beam down to the facility with the shipment of drugs and meet with the facility director, Donald Cory, who oversees the treatment of fifteen of the most dangerous mental patients in Federation custody. Along the way, one of the inmates, Marta, a mentally unstable Orion female, warns Kirk and Spock that their host, Dr. Cory, is not who they think he is. They soon discover the real Cory is imprisoned in a cell, put there by the impostor, who is none other than Fleet Captain Garth of Izar (Steve Ihnat), a famous starship captain and one of Kirk's personal heroes. Garth's crew had mutinied against him when he had gone insane, the result of injuries in a rescue mission. Aliens from Antos tried to teach Garth just enough shapeshifting abilities to heal said injuries; he taught himself complete shifting. Garth tried to attack Antos before his crew rebelled. Garth imprisons Kirk and Spock and tries to beam himself to the Enterprise masquerading as Kirk. He plans to use it to track down his mutinous crew. When Chief Engineer Scott does not receive a certain countersign passcode from "Kirk", he refuses the beam up order. Garth then activates a force field that prevents Scott from attempting a rescue. Garth later invites Kirk and Spock to a dinner where they hear Marta recite Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 which she claims she wrote herself. She then performs a strange "exotic dance" that Spock compares to a dance performed by Vulcan schoolchildren. In the meantime, Garth boasts about his incredible career as a starship captain, bragging that he has charted more planets and catalogued more star systems than any other man in history. He fishes for Kirk's pass phrase, but Kirk doesn't fall for it. Garth tries to get the code by torturing Doctor Cory and Kirk. This fails. Marta's seduction attempt fails when Spock subdues her. The duo manage to communicate with the ship. A concerned Kirk has Spock give the code; he cannot, for he is actually Garth. Kirk is subdued again. The crew on the Enterprise learn they cannot break through the shield without killing many innocents. Garth puts on a coronation ceremony, declaring himself "Master of the Universe"; the other inmates are delighted. He kills Marta, whom he has named consort, to demonstrate the power of an explosive he has created. Spock disables his guard, acquires a phaser and finds two Kirks in the control room. Spock attempts to distinguish between the two by asking: "What maneuver was used against the Romulans near Tau Ceti?" One Kirk replies "the Cochrane Deceleration", but the other points out that it is a classic battle maneuver any good captain would know. The two Kirks begin to fight, but eventually one of them tells Spock to stun them both to ensure the safety of the Enterprise. Knowing that only the real Kirk would make a demand like that (putting the safety of the ship ahead of his own), Spock stuns the other Kirk, who is revealed to be Garth. With the matter resolved and Garth back in custody, control of the station is given back to Dr. Cory. The experimental drugs are administered to Garth and the other inmates who begin a long road to recovery.

Whom Gods Destroy

49

External links
"Whom Gods Destroy" [1] at StarTrek.com "Whom Gods Destroy" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "Whom Gods Destroy" [3] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Whom Gods Destroy" [4] at TV.com "Whom Gods Destroy" [5] Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68802. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708489/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ Whom_Gods_Destroy http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ whom-gods-destroy-24952/ http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2008/ 05/ 25/ whom-gods-destroy-remastered-review-screenshots-video/ #more-2003

Let That Be Your Last Battlefield

50

Let That Be Your Last Battlefield


"Let That Be Your Last Battlefield"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 15 Jud Taylor Oliver Crawford Lee Cronin Fred Steiner Al Francis 070 January10,1969 Guest actors Frank Gorshin - Commissioner Bele Lou Antonio - Lokai William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Episode chronology

Directed by Teleplay by Story by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Whom Gods Destroy" "The Mark of Gideon"


Star Trek: The Original Series (season 3) List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" is the fifteenth episode of the third season of the original American science fiction television show Star Trek. It was first broadcast January10, 1969 on NBC and repeated August12, 1969. It was written by Oliver Crawford, based on a story by Gene L. Coon (writing under his pen name "Lee Cronin") and directed by Jud Taylor. The script evolved from an outline by Barry Trivers[1] for a possible first season episode called "A Portrait in Black and White". The script was accepted for the third season following budget cuts. The episode guest-stars Lou Antonio and Frank Gorshin, best known for his role as The Riddler in the Batman live-action television series. Contrary to popular rumor and articles, Gorshin was not Emmy nominated for this role.[2] In this episode, the Enterprise picks up two survivors of a war-torn planet, who are still committed to destroying each other aboard the ship.

Plot
On stardate 5730.2, the Federation starship Enterprise is on a mission to help decontaminate the polluted atmosphere of the planet Ariannus, when sensors track a Federation shuttlecraft reported stolen from Starbase 4. The craft is disabled and brought aboard along with its strange alien pilot, who is found injured and taken to sick bay. The man later awakens and identifies himself as Lokai, a political refugee from the planet Cheron, who requests asylum. Lokai's most striking feature is that his skin is half black and half white, the two halves split perfectly down the center of his body. Science Officer Spock remarks that his physiology may be "one of a kind". Shortly thereafter, sensors detect another spacecraft in fast pursuit of the Enterprise. Curiously, the craft remains invisible to all but sensors and sets itself on a direct collision course with the ship. Moments later, Spock reports the

Let That Be Your Last Battlefield that invisible craft has disintegrated and deposited an "alien presence" aboard the ship. Captain Kirk turns to see the alien pilot who has beamed himself directly to the bridge. The second alien identifies himself as Bele. Like Lokai, Bele is half black and half white, with the color divided by a line through the exact center of his face. However, the sides of Bele's black and white skin are reversed from those of Lokai, a difference which seems inconsequential to the Enterprise crew, but of great importance to Bele, Lokai, and, apparently, their civilization. Bele explains he is a police commissioner from Cheron and is on a mission to retrieve political traitors. His current quarry is Lokai, whom he has been chasing for what Bele claims to be 50,000 Earth years. Bele then instructs Captain Kirk to take him to see his "prisoner". Bele is taken to Lokai, but Lokai reacts fearfully to Bele's presence and strongly demands he be taken away. The two aliens begin arguing about slavery and racial segregation, and almost attack each other. Kirk decides to ignore their heated arguments and returns to the bridge. Bele soon follows and demands that Kirk change course to Cheron. Kirk refuses, informing him that Bele's mission is no concern of his, and that he has more urgent matters to attend to. He allows Bele and Lokai to remain aboard and tells them he will drop them off at Starbase 4 once the mission is complete "and let them sort it out". Lokai comes to the bridge and demands that Kirk kill Bele and grant him asylum. Kirk refuses and calls security to escort the two off to the brig. However, both aliens generate a personal powerful force field that resists both phaser blasts and the guards' physical attempts to subdue them. Tired of Kirk's commands, Bele invokes a strange power that takes control of the ship and steers it toward Cheron. With no way to return control, Kirk threatens to destroy the Enterprise. Bele believes Kirk is bluffing until Kirk activates the ship's auto-destruct sequence with the voice code approval of First Officer Spock and Chief Engineer Scott. Bele nervously watches as the countdown nears zero, then the alien finally relents control in the last seconds. Kirk cancels the auto-destruct and changes course back to Ariannus.[3] Kirk informs Lokai and Bele that they are to be treated as guests, provided they do not further interfere with the operation of the ship. Lokai is later shown in a recreation room attempting to sway several off-duty Starfleet crewmen to the perceived justness of his cause, including a skeptical Sulu and Chekov. In the corridor outside the recreation room, a curious Spock hears Lokai's oratory through the partially open door, but decides not to intervene. Meanwhile, Bele meets with Kirk and Spock, where it is quickly revealed that Bele believes his black and white coloration to be superior to Lokai's "I am black on the right side" ... "Lokai is white on the right side. All of his people are white on the right side" even though Kirk sees no difference in the two and refuses to agree in Bele's convictions of racial superiority. Once the Ariannus mission is completed, Bele takes control of the Enterprise again, but this time he deactivates the auto-destruct in the process and sends the ship to Cheron. Once there, the two aliens find the planet's population completely wiped out by a global war fueled by insane racial hatred. Both Lokai and Bele stare silently at the destruction on the monitor and realize they are the only ones left of their race (or, as they see it, their "races"). Instead of calling a truce, the two beings begin to blame each other for the destruction of the planet and a brawl ensues. As the two aliens fight, their innate powers radiate, cloaking them with an energy aura that threatens to damage the ship. With no other choice, Kirk sadly allows the two aliens to chase each other down to their obliterated world to decide their own fates, consumed by their now self-perpetuating mutual hate. Forlorn, Lt. Uhura asks if their hate is all they ever had. Kirk ruefully says, "No but it is all they have left."

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Let That Be Your Last Battlefield

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Production
The script for the story was developed from a story outline written by Gene Coon under his pen name Lee Cronin.[4] Although Gene Roddenberry liked it, it was initially rejected by NBC studio executive Stanley Robertson. The look of the aliens Bele and Lokai was decided only a week before filming began, on the basis of an offhand comment from director Jud Taylor. This half white, half black makeup led to criticism of the episode as heavy-handed.[5]

Reception
Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode a "C+" rating, noting positively the aliens' makeup and some "good moments", but also noting that these were outweighed by an overpowering message. In their compendium of Star Trek reviews, Trek Navigator, Mark A. Altman and Edward Gross both rated the episode as mediocre, describing its message as heavy-handed and obvious. They did find some redeeming moments, such as the climactic chase to the ruined planet's surface and Gorshin's performance as Bele.

Notes
Footnotes
[1] Dorothy Fontana to Gene Roddenberry, September 28, 1966, Gene Roddenberry Star Trek Television Series Collection, 1966-1969, Box 19, Folder 11, University of California at Los Angeles Library. Dorothy Fontana's assessment of the script "Portrait in Black and White" September 28, 1966 [2] Frank Gorshin listing on Emmy's official website (http:/ / www. emmys. com/ celebrities/ frank-gorshin) [3] This exact same auto destruct sequence is later used in the film Star Trek III: The Search for Spock with Kirk, then Scott and Chekov giving the three codes. [4] Solow Justman, p.399. [5] Solow & Justman 1997, p.400.

Sources

References
Solow, Herbert; Justman, Robert (June 1997). Inside Star Trek The Real Story. Simon & Schuster. ISBN0-671-00974-5.

External links
"Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/ 68800.html) at StarTrek.com "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708435/) at the Internet Movie Database "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Let_That_Be_Your_Last_Battlefield) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/ let-that-be-your-last-battlefield-24953/) at TV.com "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/01/22/ let-that-be-your-last-battlefield-remastered-screenshots/#more-1478) Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

The Mark of Gideon

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The Mark of Gideon


"The Mark of Gideon"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 16 Jud Taylor George F. Slavin Stanley Adams Fred Steiner Al Francis 072 January17,1969 Guest actors Sharon Acker - Odona David Hurst - Ambassador Hodin Gene Dynarski - Krodak Richard Derr - Admiral Fitzgerald Frank da Vinci - Lt. Brent Jay Jones - Gideon Guard Episode chronology

Directed by Written by

Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield" "That Which Survives"
List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Mark of Gideon" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast on January17, 1969. It is episode #71, production #72, written by George F. Slavin and Stanley Adams (who portrayed Cyrano Jones in "The Trouble With Tribbles"), and directed by Jud Taylor. In this episode, a race of overpopulated aliens abduct Captain Kirk to solve their problem.

Plot
On stardate 5423.4, the Federation starship Enterprise arrives at the planet Gideon to begin diplomatic relations and invite the inhabitants to join the Federation. Gideon is reported to be a virtual paradise where the people live incredibly long lives in a nearly germ-free environment. Upon arrival however, the Gideon representative, Ambassador Hodin, refuses to allow anyone to beam down to the planet except for Captain Kirk, whom he gives specific coordinates to transport to. Kirk agrees to beam down and finds himself sent from one transporter room, directly to another, identical transporter room. It looks as if he is still aboard the Enterprise; however, after looking around, he finds to his surprise, the ship is completely devoid of any crew. Back on the "normal" Enterprise, First Officer Spock is later informed that the Captain never arrived on the planet; however, Ambassador Hodin refuses to allow a search team to investigate. Spock contacts Admiral Fitzgerald of Starfleet to report Kirk's disappearance and request further instruction; however, Starfleet is bogged down by bureaucratic red tape between the planet Gideon and the Department of Planetary Treaties. Fitzgerald orders Spock

The Mark of Gideon to "stand by" for the time being. Spock knew the coordinates were to send Kirk directly to the Gideon council chamber, so Spock asks to beam a member of the Gideon council up to the Enterprise to test the transporter. Hodin agrees and sends a member of his staff up to the ship and then back down to the planet. The transporter appears to be working normally. Meanwhile, Kirk wanders the deserted Enterprise and then notices a strange bruise on his arm. He eventually runs into a beautiful young woman named Odona. She too, has no idea how she got to the empty Enterprise, recalling only that she was in an overcrowded auditorium and struggling to breathe. For the moment, Odona is just relieved to have freedom of movement. Kirk insists that she must be from Gideon, but Odona denies any knowledge of Gideon. Kirk learns from Odona that her home planet is severely overpopulated, with crowds of people everywhere and no privacy. To her, the privilege of being alone, even for a moment, is a dream come true. Kirk thinks Odona's beauty is a dream come true, and the two share a passionate kiss. Neither notice the strange ghostly image of a dozen faces appearing on the bridge monitor behind them. As Kirk and Odona leave the bridge, Kirk hears a strange sound outside the ship. He goes to a viewport and catches a glimpse of a crowd of people dressed in tight fitting body suits. The scene quickly fades to a view of normal space and he realizes something is very wrong. Kirk confronts Odona about what is going on, but she denies knowing what is happening. She then quickly falls ill, fainting to the floor. Kirk carries her to Sickbay where he encounters Ambassador Hodin, who explains that Kirk is part of a secret experiment on Gideon. Odona is his daughter, and Kirk has just infected her with Vegan choriomeningitis, a potentially lethal virus that Kirk carries in his blood but has an immunity to. Hodin's plan is to infect his people with the virus in an attempt to "control" the overpopulation problem caused by the people's long lifespans in a germ-free environment. Kirk is angered that he has been an unwitting pawn, a mark, in their hideous plan, and questions why the Gideons haven't tried sterilization or birth control regulations. Hodin explains that the Gideon people have regenerative abilities that have foiled sterilization attempts, and that their people hold love and the ability to create life sacred. Kirk is also horrified to learn that he must remain behind to supply the virus as needed, however Kirk believes that Odona can fulfill that role now that she has been infected. Hodin explains that Odona must die from the virus so that she will become a "role-model" for the youth of the world, who will step forward and give up their lives for the benefit of the population. Meanwhile, Spock becomes anxious to learn what happened to his Captain. When he discovers that Kirk's coordinates and the coordinates given to test the transporter do not match, he goes against Starfleet orders and beams down to Kirk's original coordinates. Once there, he finds the false Enterprise set that was built to deceive Kirk. Spock overpowers some guards and finds Kirk and Odona. Hodin tries to stop Spock, but Spock warns him not to interfere since he has just disobeyed Starfleet orders and must now return to resolve the matter. Kirk, Spock and Odona return to the real Enterprise where Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy saves Odona's life. Odona still carries the virus but is now immune to it as Kirk is. Odona is returned to Gideon and Hodin is told she can now supply the virus as needed.

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The Mark of Gideon

55

External links
"The Mark of Gideon" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Mark of Gideon" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Mark of Gideon" [3] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Mark of Gideon" [4] at TV.com "The Mark of Gideon" [5] Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com The Mark of Gideon [6] story outline dated July 12, 1968; Report and analysis by Dave Eversole

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68804. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708470/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Mark_of_Gideon http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-mark-of-gideon-24954/ http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2008/ 06/ 01/ the-mark-of-gideon-remastered-review-screenshots-video/ #more-2027 http:/ / www. orionpressfanzines. com/ articles/ mark_of_gideon. htm

That Which Survives

56

That Which Survives


"That Which Survives"
Episode no. Season3 Episode 17 Herb Wallerstein John Meredyth Lucas Michael Richards Fred Steiner Al Francis 069 January24,1969 Guest actors Lee Meriwether - Losira Arthur Batanides - Lt. D'Amato Booker Bradshaw - Dr. M'Benga William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Naomi Pollack - Rahda Kenneth Washington - Engineer John B. Watkins Brad Forrest - Ensign Wyatt Episode chronology

Directed by Teleplay by Story by Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Mark of Gideon" "The Lights of Zetar"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"That Which Survives" is the seventeenth episode of the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast January24, 1969 and repeated July29, 1969. It was written by John Meredyth Lucas, based on a story by D.C. Fontana under the pseudonym Michael Richards and directed by Herb Wallerstein. In this episode, the crew of the Enterprise visit an abandoned outpost guarded by a mysterious computer.

Plot
The Federation starship Enterprise happens upon a planet that appears very young compared to the evolutionary stage of its surface life-forms. Captain Kirk, along with Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy, Lt. Sulu and geologist D'Amato, prepare to beam down to the planet to investigate further. In the midst of dematerializing, they see a beautiful woman appear in the transporter room and try to stop the landing. She touches the baffled transporter technician, Ensign Wyatt, killing him instantly. As soon as Kirk and the others materialize on the planet, they are rocked by a violent tremor. The Enterprise is also jolted as it is thrown 990.7 light years away from the planet by an unknown force. Dr. M'Benga examines Wyatt and learns his death was caused by complete cellular disruption. The landing party loses communications with the Enterprise and they realize they are stranded. They split up and begin to scout around. As D'Amato surveys a rocky area, he comes face-to-face with the woman who appeared in the transporter room. Strangely, she knows his name. She approaches him slowly and the confused D'Amato stands struck by her beauty. When she touches him, he too falls dead.

That Which Survives First Officer Spock orders the Enterprise back to the mysterious planet. En route, Chief Engineer Scott reports a vague feeling that the ship "isn't right" and he orders Engineer Watkins to check equipment in a secluded area. The mysterious woman assassin appears again. She knows Watkins' identity and the Enterprise warp drive systems. She kills Watkins and sabotages the Emergency Overload Bypass. On the planet, while burying D'Amato, Kirk discovers that the planet's surface is highly resistant to phaser fire. Kirk and McCoy sleep and Sulu takes the first watch. The woman appears to Sulu, knowing his name, and Sulu discovers she is invulnerable to phaser fire. He trips on a rock so she only brushes his shoulder briefly with her fingertips. Sulu screams in pain, bringing Kirk and McCoy who find him injured but alive. The woman puts her hand solidly on Kirk's shoulder but nothing happens. They discover that the woman can only kill one specific person during each appearance. Meanwhile on the Enterprise, the ship's speed begins to increase uncontrollably. Scott discovers the woman's sabotage and estimates that the Enterprise will explode in 15 minutes. Spock and Scott devise a dangerous plan to manually cut the matter-antimatter fuel flow to the warp engines in a small service crawlway sparking with energy. Scott begins the risky repairs as the Enterprise passes warp 13.2. On the planet, the three narrowly avoid death when Kirk's phaser suddenly goes into overload and explodes. The woman appears "for Kirk" but Sulu and McCoy block her path. She touches them without effect. Questioned by Kirk, the woman says she is Losira, the station commander. She is alone, and her only purpose is to defend the planet from intruders. Kirk's conversation unsettles her and she vanishes without killing him. The landing party discover the entrance to a room that is the source of the strong power emanations. They enter. Back on the Enterprise, Scott cannot stop the fuel flow. He begs Spock to jettison the fuel pod and sacrifice him to save the rest of the crew. Spock calmly urges him to continue. Scott manages to stop the flow at the very last second, saving the ship and restoring control. Inside the station, the landing party finds a cube-shaped computer. It projects three copies of Losira, one each to kill Kirk, Sulu and McCoy. Before they can kill the landing crew, Spock and a security officer beam into the room. At Kirk's command, the security officer quickly shoots the computer and the three assassins disappear. A viewscreen then displays a pre-recorded message by Losira, a Kalandan who had been the last survivor at the outpost. She had programmed the computer to defend the outpost and it used her likeness for the assassins. The recorded Losira explains that while creating the planet they created a deadly organism. McCoy surmises that the disease spread throughout the Kalandan race and drove them to extinction long ago. Kirk suggests that the landing party had survived only because the image of Losira was so complete that it experienced regret about killing.

57

Writing
The original story outline was written by D.C. Fontana under the pseudonym Michael Richards. In this outline, called "Survival", Losira is more brutal, encouraging the crew to turn on each other and fight.

References External links


"That Which Survives" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68798.html) at StarTrek.com "That Which Survives" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708450/) at the Internet Movie Database "That Which Survives" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/That_Which_Survives) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "That Which Survives" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/that-which-survives-24955/) at TV.com

That Which Survives "That Which Survives" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/03/16/ that-which-survives-remastered-review-video/) Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com Kalandan (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Kalandan) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki)

58

The Lights of Zetar


"The Lights of Zetar"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 18 Herb Kenwith Jeremy Tarcher Shari Lewis Alexander Courage Al Francis 073 January31,1969 Guest actors Jan Shutan - Lt. Mira Romaine John Winston - Lt. Kyle Libby Erwin - Technician Frank da Vinci - Crewman William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by

Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "That Which Survives" "Requiem for Methuselah"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Lights of Zetar" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast January31, 1969 and repeated on August26, 1969. It is episode #73, production #73, written by Jeremy Tarcher and his then-wife Shari Lewis, and directed by Herb Kenwith. In this episode, strange incorporeal aliens threaten the Memory Alpha station and the Enterprise.

The Lights of Zetar

59

Plot
On stardate 5725.3, the Federation starship Enterprise heads for Memory Alpha, a planetoid where the Federation has set up a storehouse of computer databases containing all cultural history and scientific data it has acquired. While en route, the ship detects a strange energy storm moving at warp factor 2.6 and on a course to the planetoid. Given the storm's faster-than-light speed, it is believed that it cannot be a natural phenomenon. The Enterprise intercepts the storm which bypasses the ship's shields and penetrates the hull. The exposure to the storm begins to affect crew members' nervous systems differently; Communications Officer Lt. Uhura is unable to move her hands, Navigator Ens. Chekov is unable to control his eyes, and both Captain Kirk and Helmsman Lt. Sulu are unable to speak. Lieutenant Mira Romaine, aboard to oversee the transmission of newly acquired data from the Enterprise to the Memory Alpha station, faints from the effects of the storm, much to Chief Engineer Scott's dismay, as he is also madly in love with her. Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy examines Mira who seems paralyzed and unresponsive and makes strange grunting sounds as she lies on the deck of the bridge. Mira soon recovers in sickbay and refuses to be examined any further. The storm continues straight for Memory Alpha and the Enterprise gives chase. The storm manages to penetrate the station and destroys the main computer core, wiping out the crucial stores of data. Captain Kirk, along with Science Officer Spock Dr. McCoy and Mr. Scott, beam down to the station to inspect the damage. Meanwhile, Mira has a strange premonition of dead people, apparently of various Federation races. The landing party finds the Memory Alpha staff have been killedexcept for one, a woman who lies unconscious on the floor. She makes the same strange guttural noises as Mira did and her skin seems to be charged with a mysterious colored energy. As the energy fades, she dies from what McCoy determines to be a brain hemorrhage. Kirk then has Mira beamed to the station who is terrified to see the exact scene about which she had the premonition. She then warns that the storm is returning, and the landing party returns to the ship. Scans of the storm determine that it may be a life form and Kirk tries to communicate with it through the Universal Translator, but gets no response. He then fires phaser warning shots, but the storm still approaches. Kirk then orders a full attack and blasts phaser streams through the core of the storm. This action seems to cause Mira considerable pain and she crumples to the floor. Scott believes Mira and the storm are connected and begs Kirk to stop his attack. Kirk backs off and Mira is taken back to sickbay. McCoy reveals that Mira's medical records show her to have an extremely flexible ability to assimilate new knowledge and experiences. A neural scan shows her mental pathways have been adjusted to match those of the intelligence pattern of the storm. It appears the beings are trying to possess her body and completely take over her mind. Lying weak on the examining table, Lt. Romaine manages to confess her latest vision to Scott: seeing him dying. Making an attempt to rid her of the alien influence, Kirk has Mira taken to a gravity pressure chamber. The alien force however, enters the ship and finishes its invasion of Mira's mind and have now completely taken over her body. The aliens speak through Mira, identifying themselves as survivors from the long dead planet of Zetar. The creatures have evolved to shed their physical bodies and now seek one tuned to their mental capacity, as Mira, to live out their remaining existence. As the aliens cannot be persuaded to abandon their plan, Kirk is about to place Mira in the chamber, but Scott intervenes, predicting that Mira will not kill him. He is stricken with an energy blast as he places Mira in the chamber, but (presumably because of Mira's resistance) he is only heavily shocked. The chamber then exposes Mira's body to dangerously high atmospheric pressure that drives out and kills the aliens before they can completely wipe her mind. With the conclusion of the crisis, Kirk, Spock, Scott and McCoy all agree to allow Mira to complete her original assignment on Memory Alpha, which will now involve overseeing the salvaging and repairs. Kirk laughingly remarks that this is an Enterprise first: Spock, Scotty and McCoy all in agreement.

The Lights of Zetar

60

External links
"The Lights of Zetar" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Lights of Zetar" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Lights of Zetar" [3] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Lights of Zetar" [4] at TV.com "The Lights of Zetar" [5] Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68806. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708468/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Lights_of_Zetar http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-lights-of-zetar-24956/ http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2008/ 06/ 08/ the-lights-of-zetar-remastered-review-screenshots-video/ #more-2050

Requiem for Methuselah

61

Requiem for Methuselah


"Requiem for Methuselah"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 19 Murray Golden Jerome Bixby Ivan Ditmars Fred Steiner Al Francis 076 February14,1969 Guest actors James Daly - Flint Louise Sorel - Rayna Kapec William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Written by Featured music

Cinematography by Production code Original air date

Previous Next "The Lights of Zetar" "The Way to Eden"


List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Requiem for Methuselah" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast on February14, 1969. Its repeat broadcast, on September2, 1969, was the last official telecast of the series to air on NBC. (Star Trek would immediately debut in syndication on the following Monday, September8, a full three years after its debut.)[citation needed] It is episode #74, production #76, written by Jerome Bixby and directed by Murray Golden. It guest-stars James Daly as "Mr. Flint", and Louise Sorel as "Rayna Kapec". ("Kapec" is an anagram of Capek, after Karel Capek, who introduced the term robot.) In this episode, the crew of the Enterprise encounter an immortal human in this science fiction variation on Shakespeare's The Tempest.[citation needed]

Plot
The crew of the Federation starship USS Enterprise is struck with the deadly disease Rigellian Fever. They arrive at the remote planet Holberg 917-G in search of the mineral Ryetalyn, used to manufacture a cure. Sensors detect humanoid life. Captain Kirk, First Officer Spock and Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy beam down to the planet to investigate and are attacked by a sentry robot. The robot is called off by its master, who steps forward and identifies himself as Flint. Flint claims that the landing party is trespassing, and orders them to leave his planet immediately. Kirk will not accept Flint's authority and calls Chief Engineer Scott on the Enterprise to fire the ship's phasers at their position if any harm comes to them. McCoy informs Flint about the disease that threatens the Enterprise crew and about the urgent need for Ryetalyn. Flint shows emotion when hearing Dr. McCoy's comparison of the disease to

Requiem for Methuselah the bubonic plague, and Flint describes the agonies suffered by the stricken in Constantinople in the summer of 1334. Flint allows the landing party two hours to gather the Ryetalyn and offers the services of his sentry robot, "M4", to find and gather the mineral. Flint escorts the landing party to his home. Flint has an impressive collection of Earth artifacts including paintings by Leonardo da Vinci and a Gutenberg Bible, but Spock is puzzled when his tricorder scans reveal that the works are recent creations made with contemporary materials. The party is surprised by the appearance of Flint's beautiful young ward, Rayna Kapec, who instantly takes a liking to Spock. Spock is impressed with her knowledge of advanced physics. Flint states that Rayna's parents used to be in his employ, but died in an accident. Kirk plays billiards with Rayna, then they dance while Spock plays a waltz on the piano. Spock determines the waltz to be an unknown piece written by Johannes Brahms, written in his style and by his own hand again using contemporary materials. In Flint's lab, McCoy analyzes the Ryetalyn gathered by M4 and discovers that it is contaminated with "irilium", rendering it inert and useless. When Kirk romances Rayna, M4 appears and attacks him. Spock destroys the robot with his phaser. Kirk confronts Flint about the attack. Flint excuses it as a misunderstanding, explaining M4 misinterpreted Kirk's advances toward Rayna as hostile. Kirk forgives the incident and is rather relieved by M4's demise, but Flint quickly summons a replacement sentry. Kirk contacts the Enterprise and asks Communications Officer Lt. Uhura to check out Flint and Rayna's identities. Uhura learns that Holberg 917-G was purchased thirty years earlier by a private investor named Brack. Spock uses a surreptitious tricorder scan to discover that Flint is over 6,000 years old. When the materials are almost ready, Rayna comes to say goodbye to Kirk. Kirk has fallen in love with her and begs her to come with him. McCoy informs them that the Ryetalyn is missing. Spock follows the tricorder readings to a hidden chamber where they find other Raynas, who are all androids. Kirk demands an explanation from Flint. Flint confesses that he is immortal, born on Earth in Mesopotamia in the year 3834 BC. He was a soldier, and after falling in battle and later recovering he discovered he could not die. As time went on, he lived several "lifetimes" under names that would become historically important, including Da Vinci, Brahms, Solomon, Alexander, Lazarus, Methuselah, Merlin, Abramson, and others. He made Rayna as a mate who would never grow old, and who could "live" forever just as he can. Flint refuses to let them leave with their knowledge of his secret. He claims that Kirk has taught Rayna something he has never been able to: how to love. He now wants Kirk to redirect Rayna's love toward Flint. Kirk refuses to cooperate. He requests the Enterprise beam them up and prepare to leave orbit. Flint activates a device that miniaturizes the Enterprise and its crew, and brings them into his home. Flint is quickly shamed into restoring the ship, but when he realizes Rayna will not return his love, Flint attacks Kirk. Rayna tries to stop the fight, but her feelings are confused between the two men. Her mental circuits overload and she collapses dead on the floor. Flint and Kirk stop fighting, and the two grief-stricken men mourn her. Flint regains his composure and allows Kirk to leave with the supply of Ryetalyn. Back on the Enterprise, McCoy discovers from his tricorder readings that Flint is dying. Conditions on Earth made him immortal, but living outside that environment has gradually caused him to age normally again. Kirk remains distraught over Rayna; after McCoy leaves the room, Spock uses a Vulcan mind meld to make Kirk forget her.

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Requiem for Methuselah

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40th anniversary remastering


This episode was remastered in 2006 and aired June 21, 2008 as part of the remastered Original Series. It was preceded a week earlier by the remastered "The Way to Eden" and followed a week later by the remastered "The Savage Curtain". Changes made specific to this episode include: Flint's home is now a large palatial home, complete with observation tower. Originally, Flint's home was represented by a reuse of the matte painting of Rigel VII from "The Cage". Planet Holberg 917-G is now more realistic, with two moons orbiting behind it. The effect of the Enterprise being miniaturized from space is remastered.

In other media
The Crew meet up again with the character Flint in the Star Trek book The Cry of the Onlies by Judy Klass, which is a follow-on from both "Requiem for Methuselah" and "Miri". He is also encountered in Greg Cox's non-canonical novels The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, as Dr. Evergreen, a 1980s scientist who discovers a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, in Immortal Coil by Jeffrey Lang, and in Federation (Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens) as Zefram Cochrane's benefactor Micah Brack. The author of the Star Trek screenplay, Jerome Bixby, would write a film script at the end of his life which has many plot elements of this previous story, including an ageless man who is 14,000 years old, and has been a student of the Buddha, while he himself was the basis for the story of Jesus. This film, The Man from Earth, was released in 2007. In the crossover comic Star Trek/Legion of Super-Heroes, the crew of the Enterprise join forces with the Legion of Super-Heroes to investigate an alternate timeline where Earth has become a galaxy-conquering empire, learning that the villain is immortal Vandal Savage, who turns out to be an alternate version of Flint, Flint being a Vandal Savage who turned his back on violence and conquest.

External links
"Requiem for Methuselah" [1] at StarTrek.com "Requiem for Methuselah" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "Requiem for Methuselah" [3] at TV.com "Requiem for Methuselah" [4] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Requiem for Methuselah" [5] Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com A Timeline of the Methuselah's life [6]

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68812. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708444/ http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ requiem-for-methuselah-24957/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ Requiem_for_Methuselah http:/ / trekmovie. com/ 2008/ 06/ 23/ requiem-for-methuselah-remastered-review-video-screenshots/ http:/ / www. pjfarmer. com/ secret/ Immortal/ flint. htm

The Way to Eden

64

The Way to Eden


"The Way to Eden"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
The "space hippies" Adam and Mavig sing "Long time back when the galaxy was new" Episode no. Season3 Episode 20 David Alexander Arthur Heinemann Arthur Heinemann Michael Richards Fred Steiner Al Francis 075 February21,1969 Guest actors Skip Homeier - Dr. Sevrin Charles Napier - Adam Mary Linda Rapelye - Irina Galliulin Victor Brandt - Tongo Rad Deborah Downey - Girl #1 (Mavig) Elizabeth Rogers - Lt. Palmer Phyllis Douglas - Girl #2 Episode chronology

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Way to Eden" is the twentieth episode of the third season of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast February21, 1969. It was written by Arthur Heinemann, based on a story by Arthur Heinemann and D.C. Fontana (using the pen name Michael Richards), and directed by David Alexander. In this episode, the Enterprise is hijacked by a madman-scientist and his fanatical, hippie-like followers who are blindly obsessed in finding a mythical planet of perpetual paradise.

The Way to Eden

65

Plot
On stardate 5832.3, the Federation starship USS Enterprise is in hot pursuit of the stolen space cruiser Aurora, which is heading into the dangerous Romulan Neutral Zone, with Tongo Rad (the son of the Catuallan ambassador) on board. The Enterprise locks onto the ship with a tractor beam, but the Aurora tries to flee. With the craft already straining with pushed engines, the vessel begins to break up. Captain Kirk orders the transporter room to lock on the passengers and beam them aboard immediately. As the Aurora explodes, the six humanoid passengers are safely brought aboard the Enterprise. Kirk heads down to meet with them and is shocked by their wild appearance. The six beings are barefoot, dressed in lavish robes and colorful tunics. Despite their close brush with death, they appear completely calm and relaxed as if nothing has happened. The group identifies themselves, starting with Tongo Rad (whose presence must be handled carefully, owing to the delicate relationship between the Federation and the people of Catualla), Irina Galliulin (a Starfleet Academy dropout and a former love interest of Ensign Chekov), Dr. Sevrin (a noted communications and electronics researcher from Tiburon, who specializes in the theories of sonic manipulation), Adam (a popular musician), and two other women. The group shows a disrespect for authority and demands to be taken to a planet they call "Eden" (a reference to the Biblical Garden of Eden). Eden's existence is believed to be a myth, however. The group refuses to cooperate with Kirk, calling him "Herbert". However, the group is impressed by First Officer Spock, who understands their philosophy. Spock makes an oval "symbol of peace" hand gesture and simply says: "One". The group responds with the same gesture: "We are one." They ask Spock: "Are you One, Herbert?" Spock replies that he is not Herbert, and Adam declares: "He's not Herbert. We reach!" Having developed a respect for Spock's straightforwardness, the group agrees to go to Sickbay for a medical examination. Meanwhile, Spock explains to Kirk that "Herbert" is a derogatory term for a rigid, hidebound person, named from an unimaginative "minor official", notorious for his "limited patterns of thought". Medical scans reveal the party to be in good health, except for Dr. Sevrin, who is a carrier of the Synthecoccus novae virus, which has been accidentally created by technological society. The disease is fatal to anyone who hasn't been vaccinated, but he nonetheless insists that the planet of Eden will somehow "cleanse" him, and that his group will build a new civilization, the likes of which the galaxy has never seen before. After interviewing him, Spock concludes that Sevrin is clinically insane. Kirk orders Sevrin to be quarantined to prevent the virus's spread; however, his group loudly protests the decision, insulting Kirk further with a song. Spock attempts to reason with Sevrin and offers to help him find Eden in exchange for his cooperation, stating that he empathizes with the group: "There is no insanity in what they seek." Sevrin is taken to a holding cell while his group is allowed to freely walk the Enterprise. The group, however, secretly plans to take over the ship. Adam distracts the crew with a music concert, where even Mr. Spock joins in. Meanwhile, Chekov is alone with Irina, and the two revive their old feelings for each other. While Chekov is distracted, Irina manages to gain access to the ship's navigation computer. Tongo distracts Lt. Sulu with interest in Sulu's botany project, then slips away to free Sevrin. Tongo knocks out a guard and lets Sevrin out of his cell. The group heads down to auxiliary control and changes the Enterprise's course for Eden. Once the crew realize what is happening, Sevrin renders all Enterprise crew unconscious with an ultrasonic frequency broadcast through the intercom (the occupants of the auxiliary control room are the only ones protected from this ultrasonic broadcast). Once the Enterprise arrives at Eden, a planet inside Romulan territory, Sevrin and his followers steal the Galileo II shuttlecraft and head down to the planet. Kirk manages to reach auxiliary control and deactivates Sevrin's sonic device. He then joins Spock, Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy, and Chekov and beams down to Eden to fetch the group.

The Way to Eden They materialize in the middle of a lush and beautiful garden; a real "Eden" by all outward appearance. Suddenly, Chekov severely burns his hand when he touches a flower and McCoy scans his wound. It is discovered the plant life (even the grass) secretes a powerful acid and the fruit is poisonous. McCoy informs Kirk that their clothing will protect them from the acid for a while. The team soon finds Adam, the only one of the group not barefoot, lying dead on the ground a half-eaten fruit in his hand. Sevrin and the other survivors are then found in the shuttlecraft, all with severe acid burns on their feet. Kirk tries once again to convince them that this "paradise" is completely uninhabitable, but Sevrin refuses to listen and bites into one of the fruits. The poison kills him in a matter of seconds. Irina, heartbroken at how things have turned out, goes to the bridge to say goodbye to Chekov. Luckily, no Romulans arrive, and everyone returns to the Enterprise and heads back to Federation space. Spock advises her not to give up their search for Eden as he believes they will either find it, or create one for themselves.

66

Production
Writing
Originally, the teleplay was titled "Joanna", and was written by D. C. Fontana, the title character being Dr. McCoy's daughter, who would become romantically involved with Captain Kirk. Later, she was changed to Irina, and Chekov, instead, was made her foil.[1] Fontana's script was so heavily rewritten that she asked her name to be removed from it and replaced with Michael Richards, a pseudonym she also used on the episode "That Which Survives".[2]

Casting
In a 2009 interview with The A.V. Club, Charles Napier recalled auditioning for the part of Adam, which was his first guest starring role. He won the part by jumping onto a table and singing "The House Of The Rising Sun" in front of others trying for the part.

Reception
The episode has generally be seen as one of the weakest in the show's history, but its portrayal of characters representing the counter-culture of the late 60s has produced widespread comment. Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode a 'C-' rating, describing the "space hippie" characters as "too strange and irritating for me to view them sympathetically" and finding fault with the singing, which he described as "the worst kind of padding". Handlen did note as a positive aspect that the episode did allow for the voice of dissent at the "utopia" portrayed by Star Trek. In their compendium of Star Trek reviews, Trek Navigator, Mark A. Altman and Edward Gross both viewed the episode negatively, describing it as an episode that aged badly because of the hippie characters and also noting the poor musical parts of the episode. Grace Lee Whitney, who had played Janice Rand in earlier episodes of the show, described the episode as a "clinker" on a par with another slated third season episode "Spock's Brain". Several writers have discussed the way the episode represents the "space hippies". Aniko Bodroghkozy touched on the topic in her book Groove Tube: Sixties Television and the Youth Rebellion. In it, Bodroghkozy noted a negative and positive portrayal, on one hand Sevrin's followers have been duped and must return to "civilization, apparently contrite, chastened children". On the other, they challenged the supposed benefits and superiority of the Federation, which Bodroghkozy described as a "reading of the counterculture". Timothy Brown argue that Dr. Sevrin is "a clear stand in for Timothy Leary". Like the acolytes of Leary and other counter-culture leaders, Sevrin's followers are "under the spell of charismatic but dangerously unhinged leaders" and "stand for a sixties generation in the thrall of misled idealism".[3]

The Way to Eden

67

Legacy
In Star Trek
The original script, as written by Fontana, would have provided much background on McCoy, including an unsuccessful marriage which led him into Starfleet (which was later incorporated into the alternate reality of the 2009 film Star Trek. McCoy's backstory was later incorporated into the novels Planet of Judgment and Shadows on the Sun. Joanna herself was mentioned in the animated Star Trek episode "The Survivor", as well as being featured in the novel Crisis on Centaurus by Brad Ferguson. In a 2009 interview with The A.V. Club, Charles Napier recalled being invited to star again on Star Trek, as part of an anniversary celebration. He agreed to appear only if he could play a military character and not "wear that silly shirt again". His next Star Trek character would be General Denning in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Little Green Men".

In music
Deborah Downey, who played the blonde singer Mavig, co-wrote the music with Charles Napier (Adam). She released a version of the song "Heading Into Eden" on her album Painting Pictures. Dialogue from the episode was sampled in the song "Starface" (1992) by American heavy-metal band White Zombie. McCoy's line "All this plant life is full of acid, even the grass" provided the title for the debut album by Alice's Orb: Even The Grass Is Full Of Acid (1992).[4] The song "Long time back when the galaxy was new", sung by Adam and Mavig during the concert, has been covered by Gaye Bykers on Acid on their 2001 album Everything's Groovy, under the title "Golf Trek".

References
[1] Joanna (http:/ / www. orionpressfanzines. com/ articles/ joanna. htm) precursor to "The Way to Eden" [2] D.C.Fontana (http:/ / us. imdb. com/ name/ nm0284894/ ) on IMDB [3] Brown, Timothy, "United States of Amnesia: 1968 in the USA" Memories of 1968: International Perspectives, Ingo Cornils, Sarah Waters (eds), Peter Lang, 2010, p.142. [4] Joachim Gaertner, They could have been bigger than EMI: a discography of now defunct independent record labels that released vinyl, Gaertner, 2007, p.483

External links
"The Way to Eden" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68810.html) at StarTrek.com "The Way to Eden" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708482/) at the Internet Movie Database "The Way to Eden" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/the-way-to-eden-24958/) at TV.com "The Way to Eden" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/The_Way_to_Eden) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki)

The Cloud Minders

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The Cloud Minders


"The Cloud Minders"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
The floating city of Stratos where the elite city-dwellers live. Episode no. Season3 Episode 21 Jud Taylor Margaret Armen David Gerrold Oliver Crawford Fred Steiner Al Francis 074 February28,1969 Guest actors Jeff Corey - Plasus Diana Ewing - Droxine Charlene Polite - Vanna Fred Williamson - Anka Ed Long - Midro Kirk Raymone - Cloud Guard #1 Jimmy Fields - Cloud Guard #2 Garth Pillsbury - Prisoner William Blackburn - Lt. Hadley Harv Selsby - Guard Marvin Walters - Troglyte #2 Louie Elias - Troglyte #1 Jay Jones - Prisoner #2 Richard Geary - Cloud City Sentinal #1 Bob Miles - Cloud City Sentinal #2 Episode chronology

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Featured music Cinematography by Production code Original air date

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Cloud Minders" is a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, and was broadcast on February28, 1969. It is episode #76, production #74, written by Margaret Armen, based on a story by David Gerrold and Oliver Crawford, and directed by Jud Taylor. In this episode, Captain Kirk races against time to acquire plague-fighting minerals from a world in the midst of a civil uprising against a grievous social class disparity.

The Cloud Minders

69

Plot
On stardate 5818.4, the Federation starship Enterprise arrives at the planet Ardana on a mission to retrieve the mineral zienite, which is needed to halt a vegetation plague on the planet Merak II. Captain Kirk wishes to speed along the negotiations for the mineral and beams down directly to the zienite mines with First Officer Spock, despite Ardana's leader High Advisor Plasus's request to beam to the floating city of Stratos. Once Kirk and Spock arrive at the mine, they are surrounded by angry miners and a savage brawl ensues. During the struggle, Kirk notices a strange yet beautiful woman among the rioters. Plasus quickly arrives with a security force, who easily drives the rioting miners off, then invites Kirk and Spock to go with him back to the city immediately while his people search for the zienite. Once on the floating city, Kirk and Spock are entertained as guests until the zienite can be procured from the mines. They learn that the people of Ardana are divided between the labor-class Troglytes, who work hard in the dangerous mines, while the elite city-dwellers reap all the profits and live in luxury. Currently the Troglytes are rebelling with the elites, and unknown to Kirk, the city's police have captured a Troglyte who had sneaked into the city and defaced priceless artwork. Instead of divulging the leader of the rebellious workers, the man jumps to his death from a city balcony. Plasus's daughter, Droxine, takes a liking to Spock, fascinated by his exquisite ears, and her interest is initially returned. Another woman, Vanna seems to be interested in Captain Kirk. Vanna, however, is really the rebel leader of the Troglytes and takes Kirk hostage until the city elite meet her demands. Kirk recognizes her as the woman he saw at the mine and begins to question her, but she does not cooperate. She accuses the city-dwellers of using the Enterprise as an intimidation tactic toward her people. Spock, Droxine, and a sentinel arrive, and Vanna is subdued. She is then taken in for interrogation where Plasus has her tortured until she reveals the names and locations of her fellow rebels. Kirk is outraged at Plasus's actions and demands the interrogation stopped. Plasus instead orders Kirk and Spock to leave his city immediately. The two return to the Enterprise where Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy reports that unprocessed zienite emits an odorless, invisible gas, which diminishes mental capacity and heightens emotion. Spock believes that the workers serving aboard the floating city have been isolated from the effects of the zienite gas. Instead of being mindless workers toiling away in the mines, they have become aware of their unfair treatment by the higher class. Kirk has special masks made that will filter against the zienite gas and offers Plasus them for his workers; however, Plasus shows no interest. Kirk violates his ban from the city and secretly beams down to Vanna's holding cell. He explains his offer to help her and the other workers achieve equality with the city-dwellers and offers her the masks. Vanna seems interested, and Kirk overpowers a guard, whereupon Vanna and Kirk, return to the zienite mines. Once there, however, she grabs Kirk's phaser and takes him hostage again with the help of two other Troglytes, Midro and Anka. The two men would rather see Kirk dead but Vanna has other plans. Vanna forces Kirk to experience the hardship of the miners and puts him to work digging for zienite. Vanna's men depart leaving her alone with Kirk, who takes advantage of the situation and regains his phaser. He blasts the ceiling of the mine and seals the only way out. He then contacts the Enterprise to have Plasus found and beamed to his location. An indignant Plasus arrives and Kirk forces him and Vanna to mine for zienite. The effects of the zienite gas become apparent as Kirk becomes more hostile. As the supply of oxygen depletes, Plasus demands to be set free, but Kirk strikes him and the two begin to brawl with mining implements. Vanna, realizing that Kirk was right about the gas after all, manages to find Kirk's communicator and signals the Enterprise to quickly beam them up before the men kill each other. Once the effects of the gas wear off and the three settle down, Kirk offers the masks to Vanna once again. She accepts Kirk's offer in exchange for a supply of the zienite, to which Plasus strongly protests, but realizes he really has no other option. Kirk tells Plasus that the elite and miners must be treated as equal while Vanna vows that her

The Cloud Minders people, who will no longer be impaired by the gas, will demand it even more vigorously now. With the supply of zienite in hand, he and Spock return to the Enterprise.

70

Reception
Zack Handlen of The A.V. Club gave the episode a 'C+' rating, noting that it "had enough story that it didn't drag too terribly near the end" but that "philosophy-wise, it chickened out in a way that's highly unusual for the show".

Influence
Manny Coto, showrunner of Star Trek: Enterprise, stated in an interview for StarTrek.com that he had wanted to feature the cloud city of Stratos in the fourth season of that series; "There was one I really wanted to do set on Stratos, the Cloud City [from "The Cloud Minders"]. I really wanted to do a two-parter on that location, to see Stratos in its earlier stages."

References External links


"The Cloud Minders" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68808.html) at StarTrek.com "The Cloud Minders" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708456/) at the Internet Movie Database "The Cloud Minders" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/The_Cloud_Minders) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Cloud Minders" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/the-cloud-minders-24959/) at TV.com "The Cloud Minders" (http://trekmovie.com/2008/07/14/ the-cloud-minders-remastered-review-video-screenshots/) Review of the remastered version at TrekMovie.com

The Savage Curtain

71

The Savage Curtain


"The Savage Curtain"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
The Excalbians experiment on good and evil. Episode no. Season3 Episode 22 Herschel Daugherty Gene Roddenberry Arthur Heinemann Gene Roddenberry Fred Steiner Al Francis 077 March7,1969 Guest actors Lee Bergere - President Abraham Lincoln Barry Atwater - Surak Phillip Pine - Col. Phillip Green Arell Blanton - Chief Security Guard Carol Daniels DeMent - Zora Robert Herron - Kahless Nathan Jung - Genghis Khan Bart LaRue - Voice of Yarnek Janos Prohaska - Yarnek Episode chronology

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"The Savage Curtain" a third season episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast on March7, 1969 and repeated July1, 1969. It is episode #77, production #77, written by Gene Roddenberry and Arthur Heinemann, based on an original story by Gene Roddenberry, and directed by Herschel Daugherty. In this episode, aliens force Captain Kirk and First Officer Spock to join forces with "Abraham Lincoln" and "Surak" to battle villains in a contest of good vs. evil.

The Savage Curtain

72

Plot
On stardate 5906.4, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at the volcanic planet of Excalbia to conduct a geological survey. Sensors curiously pick up the presence of carbon-based life on the surface which Science Officer Spock deems impossible owing to Excalbia's extreme volcanism. Suddenly, the Enterprise detects sensor scans from the world and receives a friendly greeting. Before a stunned bridge crew, the image of a seated Abraham Lincoln appears drifting toward them on the viewscreen. Spock indicates that the figure cannot possibly be the real historic president, and that whoever is on the planet demonstrates the advanced ability to read minds and manipulate matter. Regardless of the true identity of the being, Kirk considers Lincoln to be his personal hero and extends full presidential honors to the former leader of the United States as he transports aboard the ship. The president appears to be human, claiming to be "all too human", alluding to Nietzsche who famously treated the topic of good and evil. Lincoln has no knowledge of technology past the 19th century, but he is curiously (and inconsistently) familiar with the Vulcan philosophy of Nom (meaning "all"). Lincoln invites Kirk and Spock to accompany him down to the planet. Kirk happily accepts despite objections from Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy and Chief Engineer Scott. Lincoln reassures them by showing a patch of newly created "Earthlike" vegetation on the planet and informing them that they will be perfectly safe. Once on the planet, Kirk and Spock discover their tricorder and phasers did not transport with them. They then encounter a Vulcan named Surak, whom Spock remembers as "the father of Vulcan civilization". Although Surak may be Spock's personal hero, he does not believe this Surak is real and accordingly refers to him as the "Image of Surak". Nearby, what once appeared as a boulder changes form into a rocklike being with clawed hands and several glowing eyes atop a bulbous head. The eyes flash in sync with the creature's voice, and the alien, named Yarnek, announces that the inhabitants of the planet wish to conduct an experiment to determine which opposing human philosophy is stronger good or evil. The inhabitants of the planet, as well as the crew of the Enterprise, will be able to witness the drama but will not be allowed to interfere. The test will be a simple one of survival. The alien then gestures to four more beings: the dangerous Earth human warlord Colonel Green (who led a genocidal war on Earth during the 21st century), the Klingon Kahless (who spawned the Klingon Empire), a feral-looking woman named Zora (who conducted brutal experiments on the primitive tribes of Tiburon), and the Earth human barbarian Genghis Khan. The aliens then pit Kirk, Spock, Lincoln, and Surak against Green, Kahless, Zora, and Genghis in a fight to the death. Colonel Green, notorious for attacking his enemies while in the midst of peace negotiations, starts the battle by offering Kirk a truce; stating that they should not fight for the amusement of the Excalbians. Meanwhile, Green's associates secretly ready an attack. Familiar with Green's treachery, Kirk and his companions call Green's bluff and are prepared for the surprise attack. They manage to fend off their opponents and make a run for cover. Safe for the moment, Kirk protests the experiment and refuses to continue the battle. The Excalbians offer an incentive to fight by threatening to destroy the Enterprise in four hours if Kirk does not comply. Without another choice, Kirk and the others plan strategies and begin to manufacture primitive spears. While carving his weapon, Lincoln muses about the battlefield tactics of Ulysses S. Grant. After another round of savage rock tossing and spear throwing, Surak chooses against further hostilities and claims his position is clearly one of peace. Spock says that he will fight alongside Kirk, but also urges Kirk to let Surak attempt a negotiation. Surak plans to negotiate with their opposition despite Kirk's warnings that they cannot be trusted; Surak surmises that perhaps their belief in peace is being tested. Surak's mind cannot be changed and he makes his way to the enemy camp to talk while Kirk and Lincoln continue their counterattack. A moment later, a scream of pain is heard in the distance followed by Surak shouting for Spock's help. Green tries to lure Kirk from hiding by taunting him about Surak's need for assistance. Spock believes it's a

The Savage Curtain trick saying a Vulcan would not cry out so. Lincoln offers to sneak around and fetch Surak while Kirk and Spock cover him. When Lincoln arrives, he finds Surak dead and discovers Kahless's uncanny ability to mimic voices. Kirk impatiently waits for Lincoln to return and runs toward him when he finally appears. Lincoln shouts a warning not to come any closer and that the enemy is planning a trap. Lincoln then collapses dead with a spear in his back. Angered, Kirk vows to finish the battle and engages the enemy head on. Kirk and Spock easily defeat them one at a time and when Green is killed the others panic and flee for their lives. With the fight over, the Excalbian reappears and announces that while evil retreats when confronted with force, there is no great difference otherwise between the two philosophies. At this point Kirk states that the representatives of evil were motivated by a desire for power, while the good side was motivated by the requirement to protect the members of the Enterprise crew, implying that it is not the methods but the ends that distinguish good and evil. The aliens conclude their experiment and allow Kirk and Spock to return to the Enterprise.

73

External links
"The Savage Curtain" [1] at StarTrek.com "The Savage Curtain" [2] at the Internet Movie Database "The Savage Curtain" [3] at TV.com "The Savage Curtain" [4] at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "The Savage Curtain" [5] Cut scripted scene report and analysis by Dave Eversole

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. startrek. com/ startrek/ view/ library/ episodes/ TOS/ detail/ 68814. html http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0708477/ http:/ / www. tv. com/ shows/ star-trek/ the-savage-curtain-24960/ http:/ / memory-alpha. org/ wiki/ The_Savage_Curtain http:/ / www. orionpressfanzines. com/ articles/ savagecurtain. htm

All Our Yesterdays

74

All Our Yesterdays


"All Our Yesterdays"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Episode no. Season3 Episode 23 Marvin Chomsky Jean Lisette Aroeste George Duning Al Francis 078 March14,1969 Guest actors Mariette Hartley - Zarabeth Ian Wolfe - Mr. Atoz Kermit Murdock - The Prosecutor Johnny Haymer - The Constable Ed Bakey - The First Fop Al Cavens - Second Fop Stan Barrett - The Jailer Anna Karen Morrow - Woman Episode chronology

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"All Our Yesterdays" is a third season (and the penultimate) episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek, first broadcast March14, 1969 and repeated on August5, 1969. It is episode #78, production #78, written by Jean Lisette Aroeste, and directed by Marvin Chomsky. It guest-stars Mariette Hartley as Zarabeth. The title comes from a well-known soliloquy given by Macbeth in Act V Scene V. In this episode, Kirk, Spock and McCoy are trapped in two parts of another planet's pasta world threatened with destruction when its sun goes supernova.

Plot
On stardate 5943.7, the Federation starship USS Enterprise arrives at the class M planet Sarpeidon to evacuate its inhabitants, doomed by an impending supernova explosion of the system's star. Oddly, sensors detect no signs of humanoid life on the surface and Captain Kirk, along with Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy ("Bones") and Science Officer Spock, beam down to investigate. Once there, the landing party finds a sophisticated computer library where they encounter a man named Mr. Atoz.[1] He explains that the library contains an archive of historical data disks. Kirk warns Atoz of the planet's imminent destruction and that they must leave immediately. Atoz however, says he is aware of the destruction of his world, and is already prepared. He informs that he will be joining his wife and family soon. He then activates a machine, called the "Atavachron". By viewing the historic disks, the time portal can send any who enter back in time to the

All Our Yesterdays point recorded in the data. Kirk hears a woman's scream on the other side of the portal. Without realizing what the doorway is, he rushes through and disappears. McCoy and Spock rush into the portal after him, despite Atoz' warnings not to go through, since they have not been "prepared". The two find themselves transported through time 5,000 years into the past, to when Sarpeidon was in the midst of an ice age. The two are trapped in the brutal cold and desperately look around for their captain. Meanwhile, Kirk arrives in an alleyway at a point in Sarpeidon's history reminiscent of England's Restoration Period. He manages to rescue a rumpled, voluptuous-looking woman from being assaulted by sword-bearing nobles. Kirk chases the assailants away, but soon discovers that the "maiden in distress" is really a sly, streetwise thief reminiscent of Moll Flanders who was attempting to steal the man's purse. He offers to have McCoy treat the woman's wounds, but on looking whence he came, sees only a stone wall. Kirk steps back to the alley, but cannot locate the time portal. He discovers he can still talk to McCoy and Spock, but cannot get to them. Spock surmises that all of the planet's inhabitants have escaped their demise by going through the portal to their past, which explains why only Atoz is left. (Atoz later confirms this. He was just about to depart when the landing party arrived.) Authorities arrive and arrest Kirk for helping the thief. At the same time, McCoy asks his captain about what is going on at his end, and the guards are shaken when they hear the mysterious disembodied voice. The thief then betrays Kirk and tells the guards that he is using witchcraft, and the voices forced her to steal against her will. On the verge of freezing to death, Spock and Bones look for shelter and encounter a figure wrapped in heavy furs, who leads the strangers to a warm cave. Unrobing to reveal a beautiful woman, she identifies herself to Spock as Zarabeth, and explains that she and her family have been exiled because one of them was involved in a plot to assassinate Zor-kahn, the tyrant who ruled in her time, or as she wryly puts it, her crime was "choosing my kinsmen unwisely". Meanwhile the imprisoned Kirk is interrogated by a timid, two-faced prosecutor who loudly proclaims his belief in witches in an exaggerated manner reminiscent of the mock-imprisonment of Malvolio in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. Kirk mentions the "library" from which he came through time, and the prosecutor becomes nervous, realizing what Kirk means, for the prosecutor is also a refugee from Sarpeidon's future. At first, the prosecutor seems to believe that Kirk is innocent, but the guard and thief maintain they heard the mysterious voices and that Kirk must be a witch. Kirk realizes the prosecutor is from the future, and earnestly refers to the library and Mr. Atoz in the hope of getting back. The prosecutor becomes frightened and rushes away, saying he wants nothing more to do with the prisoner. Back in the ice age, Zarabeth listens to McCoy's and Spock's story of their arrival, and informs them that she too is from Sarpeidon's future. She explains that the Atavachron portal is "one-way" and alters a traveler's molecular structure so that if they return to their time, they will die. Meanwhile, Kirk sits in his cell and overpowers the jailer when he brings him food. The prosecutor arrives and Kirk confronts him, accusing him of being from Sarpeidon's future and threatening to expose him to the others as a "witch" if he does not help him escape. The prosecutor tries to calm Kirk down, admitting that he is indeed from the future, but Kirk cannot return because of the "preparation" through the Atavachron. Kirk points out that Atoz never prepared him, and the prosecutor says Kirk must return at once, since an unprepared individual can only survive a short time in the past. He guides Kirk back to the alley, and Kirk feels for the portal, soon finding it. Kirk steps through the portal returning to the library. He confronts Atoz and demands he help him rescue his friends. Atoz refuses to help until Kirk "prepares" himself before returning to the past. Believing his friends are dying and no more time can be wasted, Kirk tries to force Atoz to cooperate, but he shoots Kirk with an energy weapon, knocking him unconscious.

75

All Our Yesterdays Back in the ice age, Mr. Spock slowly reverts to the barbaric nature of ancient Vulcans, an effect that may be the result of remaining in the past when those Vulcans are living. McCoy notices the hostile changes in Spock when the Vulcan reacts angrily to one of his typical insults. Spock begins to fall in love with Zarabeth, losing all intention of returning to the future, and wanting only to remain with his new love. McCoy, however, is not convinced that they are trapped despite Zarabeth's statement that trying to return through the portal would cause death; he believes that only Zarabeth is somehow unable to return, but he is willing to risk death for himself. Back in the library, Kirk awakens on a cart just in time to stop Atoz from wheeling him into the time portal, and forces him to find his companions. Trying various disks, Kirk locates Spock and McCoy in the ice age and opens a portal. Meanwhile, McCoy, with Spock and Zarabeth at the base of the ice cliff where they arrived, hears Kirk's voice and manages to drag Spock away from Zarabeth long enough to follow it back to the library. The three are happily reunited, and with time running out, they watch Atoz slam a disk into the machine and make a panicked run for the portal and disappear. Realizing they have seconds before the planet is destroyed, the landing party quickly returns to the Enterprise, which safely warps away just as the star explodes.

76

Legacy
Allan Holdsworth's studio album 'Atavachron' is named after the alien time travel device, which is also the name of the 4th song on the album, and the last song is named "All Our Yesterdays" in reference to the title of the episode as well as the cover art. Allan Holdworth's studio album 'Wardenclyffe Tower' fifth track, "Zarabeth", is named after a character in the Star Trek episode, "All Our Yesterdays".

Notes
[1] According to the Star Trek Encyclopedia, Mr. Atoz's name is a play on "A to Z", that is, a library.

Sequels
Author A.C. Crispin wrote two novel sequels to this episode, titled Yesterday's Son (#11), and Time for Yesterday (#39) (Simon & Schuster).

External links
"All Our Yesterdays" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68816.html) at StarTrek.com "All Our Yesterdays" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708415/) at the Internet Movie Database "All Our Yesterdays" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/All_Our_Yesterdays) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "All Our Yesterdays" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/all-our-yesterdays-24961/) at TV.com "All Our Yesterdays" (http://trekmovie.com/2007/04/21/all-our-yesterdays-screenshots-and-video/ #more-628) Remastered version at TrekMovie.com "All Our Yesterdays" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/all_our_yesterdays2.htm) December 12, 1968 draft; report & analysis by Eric Paddon "A Handful of Dust" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/a_handful_of_dust.htm) precursor to "All Our Yesterdays"; story outline and analysis by Dave Eversone

Turnabout Intruder

77

Turnabout Intruder
"Turnabout Intruder"
Star Trek: The Original Series episode
Kirk has an out-of-body experience with the insane Dr. Lester. Episode no. Season3 Episode 24 Herb Wallerstein Arthur H. Singer Gene Roddenberry Fred Steiner Al Francis Donald R. Rode 079 June3,1969 Guest actors Sandra Smith - Dr. Janice Lester Harry Landers - Dr. Arthur Coleman Barbara Baldavin - Communications Officer David L. Ross - Lt. Galoway John Boyer - Guard Roger Holloway - Lt. Lemli Episode chronology

Directed by Teleplay by Story by Featured music Cinematography by Editing by Production code Original air date

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List of Star Trek: The Original Series episodes

"Turnabout Intruder" is a third season, as well as the final first-run, episode of the original science fiction television series Star Trek. It is episode #79, production #79, written by Arthur H. Singer, based on a story by Gene Roddenberry, and directed by Herb Wallerstein. This was the last original episode of Star Trek to air on NBC. Originally scheduled to air at 10pm on Friday, March 28, 1969, the network pre-empted it at the last minute with a special report on former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had died earlier that day.[citation needed] On June3, 1969, after an absence of 2 months, Star Trek was brought back on a new night and time: Tuesdays at 7:30pmEDT. "Turnabout Intruder" was the only first-run episode to be shown in this new time slot. In this episode, Captain Kirk becomes trapped in the body of a mentally unstable woman bent on killing him and taking over his command in his guise. According to cultural theorist Cassandra Amesley, this episode is agreed by fans to be one of the two worst episodes of the original series (the other being Spock's Brain).

Turnabout Intruder

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Plot
On stardate 5928.5, the Federation starship USS Enterprise rushes to answer a distress call from the planet Camus II, the site of an archaeological expedition that is exploring ancient ruins of a long vanished culture. Upon arrival, the landing party finds three survivors; among them are Dr. Janice Lester and Dr. Arthur Coleman. It is revealed that during their academy days, Dr. Lester and Captain Kirk were intimately involved; however, Lester's inability to achieve command of a starship, which she believes had to do with her gender, caused the two to drift apart. Medical scans reveal that the survivors are suffering from radiation exposure which threatens their lives. Dr. Coleman, Science Officer Spock and Chief Medical Officer Dr. McCoy go off to tend to the other survivors, leaving Lester and Kirk alone for a moment to talk. Kirk finds Lester has been driven to the point of madness by her personality complex and complains about the agony of being a woman in a male-dominated existence. She traps Kirk in an alien device which can swap the personalities between two individuals. Joining Kirk in the machine, Lester's essence is transferred into Kirk's body while Kirk's mind enters hers. Now as Kirk, Lester-in-Kirk tries to strangle her former body, inside which Kirk is trapped. Spock and McCoy return before Lester-in-Kirk can finish him off, and she (as Kirk) orders the landing party and the remaining survivors back to the Enterprise. Once there, Lester-in-Kirk releases McCoy from Lester's case and gives Dr. Coleman, Lester's partner in crime, full authority for treatment. McCoy protests the decision (later telling Lester-in-Kirk that Coleman is known to have been ruled as incompetent to serve aboard a starship by the Starfleet surgeon general; the "captain" asserts that promotions and demotions can be politically motivated), but McCoy stands his ground with an ornery tone of voice. Alone, Coleman and Lester-in-Kirk privately converse about their plans. It is revealed that the two are in love with each other and had planned to have their personnel killed in order to lure the Enterprise to Camus II. Lester-in-Kirk has now achieved her lifelong goal of commanding a starship. Likewise, Coleman has now been given a chance to become a starship's chief medical officer. Lester-in-Kirk charges Coleman to make sure that Kirk-in-Lester, who is still trapped inside Lester's female body, stay out of the way by sedating him. Spock becomes suspicious when Lester-in-Kirk orders a course change to the Benecia Colony to drop off Dr. Lester for medical attention, ignoring their previous mission; to rendezvous with the USS Potemkin at Beta Aurigae. Spock vainly points out that Benecia's medical facilities are comparatively primitive, and they are on course to adequate facilities, which they can reach at maximum warp in a time comparable to reaching Benecia. McCoy invokes his authority to override his "captain"'s orders and perform a full medical examination, including tests that will check for changes in his basic personality traits and responses, the latter test Lester-in-Kirk being leery of but seems to pass. Kirk-in-Lester manages to escape and goes to sickbay for help, but finds Lester-in-Kirk still there being given a bill of health by McCoy. Lester-in-Kirk uses a series of violent slaps to render her "former" body unconscious, which McCoy demands he stops. Lester-in-Kirk orders the "hysterical woman" to be taken into custody and put into isolation: "no one is to speak to her without my permission". Kirk-in-Lester is taken away, and Spock persuades the guard that the captain's orders have never been meant to apply to his senior officers and, in this case, keep Spock from speaking with "Lester". Spock speaks with "Lester", is somewhat skeptical, then Kirk-in-Lester persuades Spock to touch him with the Vulcan mind meld, whereupon he discovers the truth that Captain Kirk's mind is indeed present. Spock tries to free Kirk-in-Lester but is stopped by a security team led by the impostor captain. Lester-in-Kirk accuses Spock of mutiny and immediately (and flamboyantly, via ship-wide announcement) orders a court-martial. Once on trial, Spock tries to make a convincing case that Captain Kirk is really in the body of Dr. Lester, and that the physical Kirk is an impostor. However, his evidence was obtained by telepathy, still considered a form of hearsay in the 23rd century, and is inadmissible. Shocked by the incredible story, McCoy and Chief Engineer Scott converse secretly in the corridor about their Captain's true identity and having witnessed Kirk's irrational behavior, and hostility toward Dr. Lester, they decide as

Turnabout Intruder members of the court martial panel to agree with Spock. Scott says that the "captain" won't let the decision stand, and suggests that he and McCoy "move against him" to relieve the "captain" of command. McCoy is reluctant to the mutiny, but agrees it's the only way. Lester-in-Kirk suspects they spoke in the corridor for a reason, and orders the court recorder to call up the conversation from recordings of corridor activity. Lester-in-Kirk then orders McCoy, Scotty, Spock and Kirk-in-Lester (still in her former body) arrested for treason. Their punishment will be death, and interment of the bodies will be at Benecia. Ensign Chekov and Lt. Sulu are outraged and point out that Starfleet bans the death penalty except for "General Order 4", which isn't the case here. Lester-in-Kirk refuses to listen and demands that everyone return to their posts. The remaining crew quickly turn against their "captain" when they realize that he isn't himself and refuse to obey his orders. Losing self-control and throwing a fit because Chekov and Sulu blatantly ignore her orders and in unison take their hands off their consoles, Lester-in-Kirk falls into the center seat and she and Kirk-in-Lester have a temporary reversion of minds. Kirk-in-Lester determines to fight for his own body if it happens again. Lester-in-Kirk hurries to Coleman and tells him of the incident; Coleman tells Lester-in-Kirk that to make the transfer permanent, she must kill her former self while Kirk still occupies the body. Lester-in-Kirk shames and blackmails Coleman into prepare an injection of a toxic substance. The two head to Lester's holding cell, but Lester-in-Kirk again loses self-control when she sees Kirk-in-Lester struggling with Coleman as he vainly tries to inject the toxin, and the reversion starts again. This time Lester is too late, and the reversion completes. Captain Kirk is finally himself again. The hysterical Lester makes one last attempt to kill Kirk but fails, and Lester and Coleman are taken into custody. Coleman then pleads with Kirk to allow him to care for his mentally deranged love, and Kirk decides that they will be dropped off at Starbase 2 to face charges. In the meantime the Enterprise resumes its current mission with the Potemkin. Kirk muses, "Her life could have been as rich as any woman's. If only... if only..."

79

Reception
The episode drew Nielsen ratings of only 8.8, in contrast to rival shows Lancer on CBS and Mod Squad on ABC, which gained ratings of 14.7 and 15.2 respectively, a drop of over fifty percent since the show premiered. Cultural theorist Cassandra Amesley states that this episode is "agreed to be one of the worst Star Trek episodes ever shown" by Star Trek fans. Brenton J. Malin sees the episode as a reactionary response to the radical feminism of the late 1960s. Dr. Lester is a "caricature and condemnation of the feminism of the late '60s, evoking a fear of powerful, power-hungry women.... The message seems clear: women want to kill men and take their jobs, but ultimately they can't handle them."[1] David Greven has a more positive view, even referring to it as "moving". He calls it the "infamous last episode" of the original series, in part because of the "campiness" of Shatner's performance when portraying himself as a female in a male's body, but also because of the sexist premise that "female desire for power was a clear sign of insanity". While accepting that "the sexism of the episode is indisputable", he argues that the exploration of the idea that man can inhabit a woman's body, and vice versa, gives the episode a "radical" dimension, especially in scenes which imply the interchangeability of gender and sexual identity.[2]

Turnabout Intruder

80

References
[1] Malin, Brenton, American Masculinity Under Clinton: Popular Media and the Nineties "crisis of Masculinity", Peter Lang, 2005, p.113. [2] David Greven, Gender and Sexuality in Star Trek: Allegories of Desire in the Television Series and Films, McFarland, 2009, pp.30-33.

External links
"Turnabout Intruder" (http://www.startrek.com/startrek/view/library/episodes/TOS/detail/68818.html) at StarTrek.com "Turnabout Intruder" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708485/) at the Internet Movie Database "Turnabout Intruder" (http://www.tv.com/shows/star-trek/turnabout-intruder-24962/) at TV.com "Turnabout Intruder" (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Turnabout_Intruder) at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) "Turnabout Intruder" (http://www.orionpressfanzines.com/articles/turnabout_intruder.htm) Story outline dated May 8, 1968; Report and analysis by Dave Eversole

Article Sources and Contributors

81

Article Sources and Contributors


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Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, AbbyKelleyite, AdamDeanHall, Afabbro, Antaeus Feldspar, Bangabandhu, Bobblewik, Brhaspati, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Chasingsol, Ckatz, Curps, CyberSkull, Cyberia23, DJ Clayworth, DabMachine, Daniel Case, Danielsangeo, Deckiller, Dernhelm, Dexter Nextnumber, Dhartung, Dvd-junkie, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Ergative rlt, Foobaz, Generalnonsensecomic, Granpuff, GregorB, Hammersoft, Hydrargyrum, Ih8evilstuff, Irishguy, Ithizar, Jay Firestorm, Jaybee From his Castle, Jeepday, Jledoux, JohnLynch, Jonesey95, Kelisi, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, Lots42, LwsP729, Malber, Mandarax, Matthew, Miyagawa, Morwen, NawlinWiki, Ned Scott, Paxsimius, Philip Stevens, RJASE1, Rossumcapek, Seth Ilys, Shawn in Montreal, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, StAkAr Karnak, Stevekass, Svick, Template namespace initialisation script, Ten-pint, Theshatnerdancer, Thesis4Eva, Tim!, Tyronen, Vala M, Warrush, We hope, WikiuserNI, Wl219, Woohookitty, Zeimusu, 89 anonymous edits The Enterprise Incident Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=590595055 Contributors: (aeropagitica), 23skidoo, AarHan3, Aatrek, Acegikmo1, Acegikmoq, BiggKwell, Blue387, Bobkey, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Chris the speller, Ckatz, Cmdrjameson, Cyberia23, Dave-ros, Defunctzombie, Derim Hunt, Dgabbard, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Ferroequus, Gcapp1959, GoodDay, Hgordon22, Illyria05, Isthisthingworking, Janschliecker, Jeffreymcmanus, Jonathan321, Jtk6204, KConWiki, Karn, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Ketiltrout, Kmweber, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, MECU, Matthew, Msa1701, Ned Scott, Neilfein, Paul Barlow, Paxsimius, RadioKirk, Ricky81682, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, SkeezerPumba, THD3, Tamfang, Tim Thomason (usurped), Tim!, Tony Sidaway, Txbangert, Univalonso, Uvaphdman, WikHead, WikiuserNI, Wl219, Wordwright, Zzyzx11, 77 anonymous edits The Paradise Syndrome Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=599362531 Contributors: "alyosha", (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Arcabrera, BRW, Bellerophon5685, BiggKwell, Blaylockjam10, Bluejay Young, C.Fred, CALQL8, Calabe1992, Cbbkr, Cbdorsett, Ckatz, Cutesparkina, Cyberia23, DabMachine, Daniel Case, Deadlock, Denisarona, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward321, Enki Nabu, Extreme Unction, FiverFan65, Fluffernutter, Giraffedata, Glane23, GoodDay, Hajor, Inazz, Janschliecker, Jdcooper, Joel Kirk, Jonathan Drain, JoshuaZ, KConWiki, Kelisi, Koavf, Kuralyov, Kusma, Leoboudv, MacsBug, Matthew, Mercurywoodrose, Mokwella, Ned Scott, Neelix, Paxsimius, RadioKirk, Shikari, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Staszu13, Sven Manguard, TARDIS, THD3, Tim Thomason (usurped), Tim!, Trinadtsat Tomitsu, Vala M, WikiuserNI, Zadcat, Zzyzx11, 44 anonymous edits And the Children Shall Lead Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=591028419 Contributors: (aeropagitica), ***Ria777, A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Al E., Betacommand, Blue63duck, Bluejay Young, Brighat, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Cyberia23, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Excirial, Gcapp1959, Glimmer721, Granpuff, HangingCurve, Hatesgames, Irishguy, Jay Firestorm, Jeepday, Joule36e5, Kbdank71, KeeganB, Kelisi, Koavf, MakeChooChooGoNow, Marshall, Matthew, Misza13, NawlinWiki, Ned Scott, Patriot62371, Pegship, Phil Boswell, RJASE1, RadioKirk, Rich Farmbrough, Ritchy, RoyBatty42, SGCommand, STLocutus, Sir Rhosis, Tim Thomason (usurped), Tim!, WikiuserNI, Wl219, 36 anonymous edits Is There in Truth No Beauty? Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=568040182 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Arcadina, Are2dee2, AviDrissman, Biruitorul, Bluejay Young, Boneyard90, CALQL8, Cadwaladr, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Cyrius, DabMachine, Daniel Case, Darkildor, Dawkeye, Dethme0w, Diberri, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Firefly4342, Gcapp1959, Ithizar, Janschliecker, Jeepday, John Kenneth Fisher, Kamikakushi, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Koavf, Kvn8907, Kyle Nin, LarryJeff, Leoboudv, Lots42, Matthew, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Paxsimius, Peripitus, Philip Cross, R'n'B, Robina Fox, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Stepheng3, TFMcQ, Thisis0, Tilden76, Tim!, UKoch, Warreed, Wiendietry, WikiuserNI, Zzyzx11, 37 anonymous edits Spectre of the Gun Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=585501816 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Alansohn, Amaury, Bart-16, Blue63duck, Bobo192, Btphelps, C1k3, CALQL8, Cathytreks, Cbbkr, Chasingsol, Ckatz, Cwoyte, Cyberia23, Dave-ros, DoctorWho42, DopefishJustin, DragonflySixtyseven, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, FriendlyRiverOtter, Gcapp1959, Heqs, Ike9898, JamesMLane, Janschliecker, Jesster79, JustAGal, Karn, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kencf0618, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Larry laptop, Leoboudv, Lots42, MacsBug, Matthew, Mcoupal, Mr. Laser Beam, Naraht, Ned Scott, Ngebendi, Pahuskahey, Paxsimius, Peace Inside, Pela1007, Queenmomcat, RODERICKMOLASAR, RedWolf, Reinnier, Ronny corral, Sam Hocevar, Scott Sanchez, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, StarryGrandma, Svick, That Guy, From That Show!, Tim Thomason (usurped), Tim!, WaltTFB, WikiuserNI, Yngvadottir, 38 anonymous edits Day of the Dove Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=588105528 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aatrek, AlistairMcMillan, Alpha Quadrant, AvicAWB, Bk9net, Blue63duck, Bobo192, CALQL8, Cakedamber, Cbbkr, Cburnett, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Cyrius, Daniel Case, Darkildor, Dave-ros, David Gerard, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Fabulous Creature, Gcapp1959, Graham87, Harizotoh9, JIP, Janschliecker, Jesster79, John of Reading, Kelisi, Kevinb, Koavf, Larquitte, LeoStarDragon1, Leoboudv, Lots42, Martarius, Matthew, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, NeilEvans, Ninly, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Pennyforth, Phil Boswell, RadioKirk, Rambam rashi, Ritchy, Ronny corral, Shinerunner, SigPig, Sir Rhosis, Sm8900, Tassedethe, Tim!, Univalonso, WikiuserNI, Zzyzx11, 31 anonymous edits For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=594530830 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aatrek, Againme, Arthur Frayn, Autiger, CALQL8, CPWinter, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Curps, Cyberia23, Darkildor, Daveyjones182, David Gerard, DoctorWho42, Dogru144, Dvd-junkie, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, FiverFan65, Fschoenm, George Burgess, Grafen, Jeepday, Karn, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Matthew, Mokwella, Morwen, Ned Scott, Nneonneo, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Peyre, RadioKirk, Richwales, Sabrebd, Sam Hocevar, Sir Rhosis, StuRat, Tallyho70, Tarc, Tim!, WikiuserNI, 26 anonymous edits The Tholian Web Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=583358213 Contributors: (aeropagitica), 23skidoo, A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Bull Market, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Daniel.Cardenas, Darkildor, Doniago, Dopefish, Duggy 1138, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Ferroequus, GoodDay, GuardianOne, Hellbus, Isildain, Jamesjp, Jay Firestorm, Jeepday, Jhsounds, JustAGal, KConWiki, Katharineamy, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Knowledge Seeker, Koavf, Kusma, LarryJeff, Leoboudv, Lots42, M4bwav, Marky1981, Martpol, Matthew, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Nightscream, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Petrarch, Pmsyyz, Rambam rashi, Rich Farmbrough, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, TMC1982, The Rogue Penguin, Tim!, Tony Jonick, User0529, Viriditas, WikiuserNI, Zandperl, 57 anonymous edits Plato's Stepchildren Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=594750009 Contributors: (aeropagitica), 23skidoo, 5Q5, A. 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Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Arcadina, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Daniel Case, Darkildor, DoctorWho42, Dvd-junkie, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, FiverFan65, Frungi, GoodDay, Hahbie, Homagetocatalonia, Howellfilm, JaJaon, Janschliecker, Jgoulden, JohnSawyer, JustAGal, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Kisholi, Koavf, Kusma, Lots42, Matthew, Mjpatterson, Ned Scott, Neelix, Oldag07, OttRider, Paxsimius, RadioKirk, Rich Farmbrough, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Tim!, 12 anonymous edits The Empath Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=568039592 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Bluejay Young, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Comatmebro, Cyberia23, Darkildor, Dave-ros, Davidhorman, Dawgplasma, Deadlock, DenverBrian, DoctorWho42, DragonflySixtyseven, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward321, Firsfron, Gcapp1959, George100, Gettingitrightthefirsttime, GoodDay, JaJaon, Janschliecker, Jay Firestorm, Jdallen, KConWiki, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, Lots42, Matthew, Mike Halterman, Ned Scott, Paxsimius, Pig mongie, RadioKirk, Rambam rashi, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Staszu13, Tim!, Vanarkadie001i, WikiuserNI, 23 anonymous edits Elaan of Troyius Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=566617138 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Alphacatmarnie, Arcabrera, Art LaPella, BHenry1969, Betacommand, Bluejay Young, Bob Burkhardt, CALQL8, Cad87, Calabe1992, Cbbkr, Chasingsol, Cireshoe, Ckatz, Crazyeddie, Crowsnest, Cyberia23, DVdm, Daniel Case, Dave-ros, David Gerard, DoctorWho42, Dysprosia, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Eddos 1983, Edward321, Gcapp1959, Gholson, Glane23, GoodDay, Janschliecker, Jeepday, Jeysaba, Joel Kirk, Kbir1, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Lots42, Matthew, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Newyorkbrad, Nytimes19992000, Paxsimius, Penbat, Robert K S, Rorschach, Schmiteye, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Sophus Bie, Stevensrmiller, THD3, Tim Thomason (usurped), Tim!, Univalonso, Varlaam, WikiuserNI, Wkharrisjr, 50 anonymous edits Whom Gods Destroy Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=583577149 Contributors: (aeropagitica), 2Wikid, A Train, A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, AlistairMcMillan, Andross52, Andycjp, Bcmeister, Bluejay Young, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cubs Fan, Cyberia23, DabMachine, Daniel.Cardenas, Darkildor, Dave-ros, DocKrin, DoctorWho42, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, G4evr, Gaius Cornelius, Gcapp1959, Glimmer721, GoodDay, Grumpyhan, Gvsualan, Hans Urian, Husnock, Hydrargyrum, JLM, Jachim, Jack Merridew, Jackel, Janschliecker, Jasonegg, Jay Firestorm, Jeepday, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, LilHelpa, Lots42, MER-C, MakeChooChooGoNow, Markjoseph125, Matthew, Michael Devore, Mr. ATOZ, Mr. Laser Beam, NapoliRoma, NawlinWiki, Neelix, Noclevername, ParaGreen13, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Pithecanthropus, RadioKirk, RedWolf, Rich Farmbrough, Richard 23, Ronny corral, Shinerunner, Spaceman42, Staszu13, TFMcQ, Tim!, Trevyn, Triwbe, Vladimirg, WikiuserNI, Zzyzx11, 49 anonymous edits

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Let That Be Your Last Battlefield Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=587454180 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Ahwaz, Bambam23888, CALQL8, Canis Lupus, CardinalDan, Cbbkr, Chris the speller, Cireshoe, Ckatz, Cubs Fan, Cyberia23, David Gerard, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, Download, Dp462090, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Egon Eagle, Emurphy42, EoGuy, Eyal0, Ferroequus, Fogeltje, George Ho, Glevum, Hailey C. Shannon, Hydrargyrum, InternetMeme, JBK405, JPG-GR, Jackel, Janschliecker, Jeepday, Johnbtv, JustAGal, Kazvorpal, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Konczewski, Lots42, Matthew, Minaker, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Noclevername, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Petrarch, PookeyMaster, RedWolf, Redactor1802, Reds5fan, Ricky81682, Rlquall, Roger McCoy, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, SoylentPurple, SpyMagician, Spylab, Staszu13, Tamfang, Tim!, Timwi, Todfox, Unfree, WikiuserNI, Yusuf mumtaz, Zzyzx11, 54 anonymous edits The Mark of Gideon Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=588800583 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aatrek, Andycjp, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Chbarts, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Daemonward, Daniel Case, Danielsangeo, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward321, Gcapp1959, Hydrargyrum, J. Van Meter, JRH, Janschliecker, Jeepday, JoshuaZ, Jtk6204, KConWiki, KeeganB, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, M4bwav, Matthew, MrSpock01, NawlinWiki, Ned Scott, Obafgkm, Paxsimius, RadioKirk, Rambam rashi, RedWolf, Ricky81682, Salamurai, Scumbag, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Spaceman42, Tim!, WikiuserNI, Woohookitty, 19 anonymous edits That Which Survives Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=586637339 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Arcadina, BRW, BiggKwell, Bluejay Young, Breakingglass27, BunsenH, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Chris the speller, Chrism, Cireshoe, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Dave-ros, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, Dyl, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward321, Emersoni, Epolk, Euchiasmus, Falcorian, Fayenatic london, Fredrik, Friend1122, Gcapp1959, Jeepday, Karn, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, Lots42, Matthew, Ned Scott, Old-timer0, Paxsimius, Pela1007, Polly, Psonar, Railwayfan2005, RedWolf, Ronny corral, SarekOfVulcan, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, StarGeek, TMC1982, Thanos777, Tim!, Tpriddy, Trueblue9999, Wiendietry, Wikineer, WikiuserNI, Wkharrisjr, Zzyzx11, 23 anonymous edits The Lights of Zetar Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=567177823 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, A2Kafir, AarHan3, Aatrek, Bluejay Young, CALQL8, Captain Pedant, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cyberia23, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Gcapp1959, General Ludd, Jackel, Janschliecker, Jdavidb, Jeepday, KConWiki, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Lots42, Marcosw, Matthew, Mokwella, Ned Scott, Oldag07, Pawl Kennedy, Paxsimius, PhilHibbs, R'n'B, RadioKirk, Rambam rashi, RandomCritic, RedWolf, Ronny corral, Schmiteye, Shinerunner, Skywokker, Sochwa, Tim!, WRK, Wiendietry, WikiuserNI, Zzyzx11, 33 anonymous edits Requiem for Methuselah Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=596877015 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aatrek, Achorny, Altzinn, ArielGold, Aristophanes68, Auric, Bellerophon5685, Bluejay Young, Bobet, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Cburnett, Ckatz, Claytonian, Colm O'Brien, Comatmebro, Cubs Fan, Cyberia23, DabMachine, David Gerard, Dbenbenn, Dbmdeg, DoctorWho42, Dowew, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Eep, Ewlyahoocom, Fabulous Creature, Fayenatic london, FrankWilliams, Gaius Cornelius, Gcapp1959, Gene93k, Hawaiian717, Husnock, IceDragon64, JimDunning, Jtmichcock, Julieta1165, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, LarryJeff, Leoboudv, Matchups, Matthew, MaybeMaybeMaybe, MegX, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Nikkimaria, Od Mishehu, Pariah, Pawl Kennedy, Paxsimius, Quinling, R'n'B, RedWolf, Ricky81682, Ronny corral, Sbharris, Shinerunner, Sietse Snel, Sir Rhosis, TFMcQ, THD3, TMC1982, Tassedethe, Tim!, TonyTheTiger, Wereon, Wiendietry, WikiuserNI, WilliamSommerwerck, Wkharrisjr, Zadcat, Zephyrad, Zzyzx11, 72 anonymous edits The Way to Eden Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=594993739 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Adambro, Akuvar, Andycjp, Arcadina, Arthur Rubin, Atlant, BD2412, Bluejay Young, Bondegezou, Brandonrush, CALQL8, Canoe1967, Cbbkr, ChrisPUT, Ckatz, Cyberia23, DanRuderman, Daniel Case, Dbenbenn, DesmondRavenstone, DoctorWho42, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward321, Eidelbus, El C, Firefly4342, Gcapp1959, GreyCat, Janschliecker, Jeepday, Jonesey95, KConWiki, Kaleidoscopekid, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Kingboyk, Koavf, Konczewski, Kusma, Last Thylacine, Leoboudv, M1ss1ontomars2k4, MakeChooChooGoNow, Malleus Fatuorum, Martin IIIa, Matthew, Mayumashu, Mr. Laser Beam, Ned Scott, Paolo77, ParaGreen13, Paul Barlow, Paxsimius, Pela1007, RadioKirk, Raider Duck, RedWolf, Rockhopper10r, Roger McCoy, Ronny corral, Schmiteye, SchreiberBike, Shinerunner, Signalhead, Sir Rhosis, Skyraider, Sochwa, Squandermania, StarGeek, Staszu13, Stijn Vermeeren, Swfong, TMC1982, Tim!, Ventifax, WikiuserNI, Wl219, Zooks527, Zumbo, Zzyzx11, 62 anonymous edits The Cloud Minders Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=580027114 Contributors: (aeropagitica), A. Carty, AarHan3, Aatrek, Al E., Anticipation of a New Lover's Arrival, The, BartBenjamin, Brandonrush, CALQL8, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cmdrjameson, Cyberia23, Cyfal, Daniel Case, Dbenbenn, Debresser, DoctorWho42, Dvd-junkie, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Edward Z. Yang, Elipongo, Exucmember, Fuhghettaboutit, Gcapp1959, Hailey C. Shannon, Italianstud-lina2, Janschliecker, KConWiki, Karn, Kchishol1970, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, Lots42, Matthew, Mike hayes, Ned Scott, Paxsimius, Rambam rashi, RandomCritic, RedWolf, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, StarGeek, THD3, Tentinator, Tim!, Wikipedia., Wikipediatrix, WikiuserNI, Zzyzx11, 24 anonymous edits The Savage Curtain Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=568038868 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aatrek, AlistairMcMillan, BiggKwell, Bluejay Young, Brandonrush, CALQL8, Cathytreks, Cbbkr, Chasingsol, Ckatz, Cyberia23, D-Rock, DabMachine, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Firefly4342, Gamaliel, Gcapp1959, Ghewgill, Gnfnrf, Gotbeer, Hmains, Husnock, Jack Sebastian, Janschliecker, JayBaxter, JoannaSerah, KConWiki, Kelisi, KenJacowitz, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kusma, Leoboudv, Mr. ATOZ, NawlinWiki, Ned Scott, NeoBatfreak, Paxsimius, Pela1007, RadioKirk, RedWolf, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, StarGeek, THD3, Tim!, Univalonso, Varlaam, WikiuserNI, Woohookitty, Xaurtmj, Ylee, 40 anonymous edits All Our Yesterdays Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=586562618 Contributors: (aeropagitica), 10stone5, 2Wikid, AarHan3, Aatrek, Angusmclellan, Artene50, Axeman, Betacommand, BiggKwell, Bleaney, Blue63duck, Brandonrush, CALQL8, Cathytreks, Cbbkr, Ckatz, Cyberia23, DKMell, DabMachine, Dawkeye, Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, Dogru144, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Ed Poor, Frecklefoot, Gcapp1959, Geeoharee, Gettingitrightthefirsttime, Glimmer721, GrahamHardy, Grstain, Hydrargyrum, JaJaon, Jmac27@aol.com, Karn, Kbdank71, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kuralyov, Leoboudv, Mathmagic, Matthew, Misza13, Mr. Stabs, Obafgkm, Patriot62371, Paxsimius, R'n'B, Rambam rashi, RandomCritic, ReviewDude, Rich Farmbrough, Rustyblue, Salamurai, Shinerunner, Sir Rhosis, Stevegallery, SystemBuilder, TFMcQ, TMC1982, The PIPE, Tim!, Univalonso, VMS Mosaic, Wickkey, WikiuserNI, 48 anonymous edits Turnabout Intruder Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=594701064 Contributors: (aeropagitica), AarHan3, Aardwolf, Aatrek, AdamDeanHall, Blue63duck, Bluejay Young, Brandonrush, CALQL8, CatherineMunro, Cbbkr, Ckatz, CmdrClow, Curps, Cyberia23, DabMachine, Daniel Case, Davepape, David H Braun (1964), Dbenbenn, DoctorWho42, Dr.Who, E Pluribus Anthony, EEMIV, Emurphy42, Gcapp1959, GoodDay, HarmonicSphere, Janschliecker, Jesster79, Jimknut, Joeyconnick, Johnmarkh, Jokestress, Jonesey95, Kelisi, Kilfoylea, Koavf, Kuralyov, Kusma, LeoStarDragon1, Leoboudv, Liz, Lots42, Marshall, Matthew, Mills19, NGC6254, Ned Scott, Paul Barlow, Paxsimius, Rjwilmsi, Ronny corral, Shawnallen, Shinerunner, Shoemortgage, Sir Rhosis, TMC1982, That Guy, From That Show!, Tim!, Whateley23, WikiuserNI, Wjl2, Ylee, 48 anonymous edits

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File:Leonard Nimoy William Shatner Spock's Brain Star Trek 1968.JPG Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Leonard_Nimoy_William_Shatner_Spock's_Brain_Star_Trek_1968.JPG License: Public Domain Contributors: Paramount Television File:The Paradise Syndrome.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:The_Paradise_Syndrome.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Miyagawa

License

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