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Study Guide

2006/2007

intro pagina www.masteryourfuture.nl (zwartwitversie van cover)

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Disclaimer
This guide has been compiled with the utmost care by the Faculty. There are a number of items about which further information will only become available after this guide has been published. For this reason the information published in this guide can be subject to change. Changes, additional information and more detailed course descriptions are available on Blackboard: blackboard.tudelft.nl and/or on the SIS website www.tudelft.nl/sis.

Table of contents
2 > Disclaimer 3 > Table of contents 5 > Personal details 6 > Preface 7 > Academic calendar 2006/2007 9 > TU Delft University facts and mission 9 > International Office 10 > Service Desk 10 > Blackboard 11 > Schedules 11 > TU Delft Library 12 > Regulations 12 > European Student Union (AeGee) 12 > TU Delfts Student Union (VSSD) 14 > Useful web addresses 14 > Addresses 18 > Map of TU Delft 22 > 1. Bachelor/Master system: a brief explanation 23 > 24 > 24 > 25 > 26 > 26 > 28 > 33 > 35 > 35 > 36 > 37 > 38 >
 APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

Study programme Research The organisational position of the department Mission The study programme Organisation Research 3.1 Applied Geophysics 3.2 Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences 3.2.1 Petroleum Engineering 3.2.2 Reservoir Geology 3.3 Engineering Geology 3.4 Resource Engineering
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24 > 2. Department of Geotechnology

29 > 3. MSc programme Applied Earth Sciences

40 > 46 > 46 > 46 > 47 > 48 > 50 > 52 > 52 > 53 > 53 > 54 > 54 > 55 > 55 > 55 > 56 >

3.5 Convergence course Academic year Exam schedule Attendance ECTS credits and grading Examinations Honours track Programme evaluation and quality assurance Formal regulations Student information Computer facilities Ordering study materials through Nextstore Student health care Studying abroad Internship Office Emergencies Student society

Personal details
name address postal code / city telephone mobile e-mail

46 > 4. Study information

49 > Graduation / application for Masters examination 51 > Graduation in Technology in Sustainable Development

53 > 5. Facilities

NOTIFY In CASE OF EMERGEnCY: name address postal code / city country telephone mobile

59 > 6. A  dditional information for students with a non-AES BSc degree 59 > General information 59 > 59 > Admission requirements Initial conditions MEDICAL InFORMATIOn: medications allergies passport no blood group organ donor: yes / no; card no:

65 > 7. MSc specialisations and course descriptions

If found, please return this student guide or contact the owner.

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Preface
Considerable attention has been devoted to collecting the information for this study guide. A student survey has shown appreciation for the compact format of this booklet. Because of its size, all subjects are described briefly. For detailed information please check the websites mentioned in this study guide. If you cannot find the information you need, please email us at DienstO&S@tudelft.nl. We will ensure that your e-mail reaches the right person. Drs. Ms. E. Touw Head of Education and Student Affairs Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences

Academic calendar 2006/2007


Fall semester 4/9/06 4/09 23/10 6/11 27/12 8/1/07 15/1 - 20/10 - 3/11 - 22/12 - 5/1/07 - 12/1 - 2/2 15.00 Aula: opening academic year scheduled teaching activities no scheduled activities/ examinations/ scheduled teaching activities scheduled teaching activities Christmas vacation no scheduled activities examinations

Spring semester 5/2/07 26/3 - 23/3 scheduled teaching activities teaching activities scheduled teaching activities Easter Monday no scheduled activities (May vacation) scheduled teaching activities Ascension day no scheduled activities Whit Sunday no scheduled activities examinations examinations/repeats - 5/4 (do) no scheduled activities/ examinations/ scheduled

10/4 (Tue) - 27/4 9/4 30/4 7/5 - 4/5 - 8/6

6/4 Good Friday

17/5, 18/5 26/5 28/5 11/6 18/6 20/8 - 15/6 - 6/7 - 31/8

Note: examinations are usually called tentamens in Dutch. Formally an examen in Dutch is the degree audit taking place at the end of a programme phase such as a Propaedeuse (end of first year), a Bachelor or a Master phase. These examens are formalities in the Dutch university system. There are no end-of-year examinations!

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Class hours for Delft University of Technology Period Time 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 08.45 09.30 09.45 10.30 10.45 11.30 11.45 12.30 13.45 14.30 14.45 15.30 15.45 16.30 16.45 17.30

TU Delft University Facts and Mission


Founded in 1862, Delft University of Technology is the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive university of technology in the Netherlands. With over 13.000 students and 2100 scientists (including 200 professors), it is an establishment of both national importance and significant international standing. Renowned for its high standard of education and research, the University collaborates with other educational establishments and research institutes, both in the Netherlands and overseas. It also enjoys partnerships with governments, branch organisations, numerous consultancies, the industry, and companies from the small and medium business sectors. Delft University of Technology has eight faculties offering a host of engineering programmes, many of them unique in the Netherlands. Working together with other educational establishments, various research institutes, international business partners and the industry, TU Delft aims to provide students with all the necessary tools for a successful career: an excellent education, relevant, practical experience, and the broadest possible knowledge base. Detailed information can be obtained from the website www.tudelft.nl

International Office
This office will be your first point of contact at the University. The International Office staff handles the application procedure, financial and housing matters, and the distribution of student ID cards. The International Office comprises the central TU Delft Student Registration Office, which registers you as a student when you are admitted to TU Delft. The Student Facility Centre publishes a Guide to Services, which is available from Julianalaan 134 or can be obtained by phoning +31 (0)15 27 88012 or emailing sfc@tudelft.nl TU Delft International Office PO Box 5 2600 AA Delft
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The Netherlands Tel: +31 (0) 15 27 88012 Fax: +31 (0) 15 27 85690 E-mail: admission@tudelft.nl Website: www.studyat.tudelft.nl Visiting address: Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft The Netherlands Around October 2006 the International Office and the Student Facility Centre will move to a new location at the Mekelweg. Postal address: Jaffalaan 9A 2628 BX Delft Visitors entrance at the Mekelweg

screen, but to access all information, you need a personal login ID. Website: blackboard.tudelft.nl Request assistance through Blackboard-support@tudelft.nl

Schedules
For up-to-date schedules, go to blackboard.tudelft.nl or the campus website of your faculty.

TU Delft Library
The TU Delft Library consists of a central branch located behind the Aula and seven faculty branches in a number of locations. The collection, the excellent study facilities, the modern PCs and the package of services in each library are designed to provide you with optimal access to relevant science and technology literature. On the Librarys website, www.library.tudelft.nl, you can find all information you need if you want to visit a library or use one of the services of the TU Delft Library. Customer Services TU Delft Library:

Service Desk
The Service Desk provides you with your transcripts, timetables and exam dates, and it posts the exam results. Here you submit forms, you inform them of recently acquired marks, and a change of address. The Service Desk tracks student progress, i.e. the number of credits and marks you obtain and any group work done in a semester and/or academic year. More information is available on servicepunt.tudelft.nl The Service Desk is open Monday to Friday, from 8.00 to 17.00 hours.

Tel: Fax: E-mail: Website:

+31 (0)15 27 85678 +31 (0)15 27 85706 library@tudelft.nl www.library.tudelft.nl

Opening times central branch:


Tuition period Monday - Thursday Friday Saturday - Sunday 9.00 - 22.00 9.00 - 18.00 10.00 - 18.00 Examination period Summer holiday 9.00 - 24.00 9.00 - 22.00 10.00 - 22.00 9.00 - 17.00 9.00 - 17.00 closed

Blackboard
Blackboard provides you with the most recent information about your courses. It is a commercial E-learning medium that serves as a virtual notice board for announcements, timetables, presentation of programme materials, practice materials, exercises and solutions as well as interesting links. You can enter the system using the Preview button in the login
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The opening times of the faculty libraries can be found at www.library.tudelft.nl under locations.

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Opening times central information desk:


Monday - Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 9.00 - 19.00 9.00 - 17.00 10.00 - 13.00 closed

TU DELFTS STUDENT UNION (VSSD) The purpose of the VSSD is to safeguard the interests of all students studying at Delft University of Technology. The Union mainly focuses on areas such as education, income, legal status and housing. The VSSD is a member of the National Student Union (LSVB) and of the ISO (a national student body). As well as representing the collective interest of students, the VSSD also provides support and services to individual students by helping them with financial, housing, study and other problems, and through the publication and sale of reasonably priced textbooks. Office: Leeghwaterstraat 42 (building 45 on map) Tel: +31 (0)15 27 82050 Fax: +31 (0)15 27 87585 E-mail: balie@vssd.nl Website: www.vssd.nl Opening hours: Monday to Thursday 08.30-17.00, Friday 08.30-13.00 Shop: Leeghwaterstraat 42, Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84125 Fax: +31 (0)15 27 81421 E-mail: winkel@vssd.nl Opening hours: Monday to Friday between 10.30-14.00 and 15.00-17.00

Every first Monday of the month: 11.00 - 19.00

Regulations
There are a number of formal regulations for the faculty organization, the programmes and their execution. These are: The Faculty Regulations T  he Course and Examination Regulations (Onderwijs- en Examenreglement). (  Per programme) The Execution Regulations of the Education and Examination Regulations (Uitvoeringsregeling). T  he Rules and Guidelines of the Board of Examiners (Regels en Richtlijnen van de Examen Commissie). The Student Charter (Studentenstatuut) These regulations are published yearly on the web, see the Blackboard community of the programme involved. In case of doubt, your Director of Education or your Study Adviser will be glad to inform and advise you. EUROPEAN STUDENT UNION (AEGEE) AEGEE is the European students association, represented in 271 cities in 40 countries. Over 17,000 member students are actively involved in travelling, participating in fun and pleasure events and conferences on topics that concern you. There are a lot of possibilities to travel to other places in Europe, meet new people and make friends everywhere! In every city there is an independent local association such as AEGEE-Delft. Check out the website: www.aegee-delft.nl

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Useful web addresses: www.tudelft.nl (general information about Delft University, history, programmes, research, etc.) www.studyat.tudelft.nl (information about all BSc and MSc programmes offered by Delft University of Technology, information about the requirements, how to apply, costs, funding, insurance, housing, medical and pastoral care, facilities for special needs students etc.) www.ideeenlijnOS.tudelft.nl (You can post your suggestions and comments with a view to improving the services provided by O&S on this website. You can also use this address for complaints, of course.) www.snc.tudelft.nl (TU Delft Sports & Cultural Centre) www.dsdelft.nl/centrum (information about Delft) www.denhaag.org (for activities in the nearby city of Den Haag)

Tel: +31 (0)15 27 89111 Fax: +31 (0)15 27 86522 E-mail (for questions): voorlichting@tudelft.nl (For information about the city of Delft, please see www.delft.nl) Education and Student Affairs Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84670 E-mail: OS@tudelft.nl Website: www.OS.tudelft.nl - Central Student Administration (CSA) PO Box 5 2600 AA Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 84249 E-mail: msc2@tudelft.nl Website: www.csa.tudelft.nl/ Office hours: 8.30-17.00 - International Office

www.uitaandemaas.nl (activities in Rotterdam) www.amsterdam.nl (activities, news, public transport in and around Amsterdam) Addresses: Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) Visiting address: Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft The Netherlands Postal address: PO Box 5 2600 AA Delft The Netherlands
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Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88012 E-mail: msc2@tudelft.nl Website: www.studyat.tudelft.nl - Student Facility Centre (SFC) Study Advisers: Opening hours: Monday to Friday 09.00-17.00. Student Psychologists: Tuesday and Thursday 11.30-12.30 Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88012 E-mail: sfc@tudelft.nl

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Around October 2006, Education and Student Affairs (i.e. CSA, International Office, Student Facility Centre) will move to a new location on the Mekelweg. Postal address: Jaffalaan 9A 2628 BX Delft Visitors entrance at the Mekelweg Sports & Cultural Centre Mekelweg 8-10 2628 CD Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 82443 E-mail: sportcentrum@tudelft.nl Website: www.snc.tudelft.nl Monday to Friday: 08.30-23.30; Saturday and Sunday: 08.30-19.00. Student Health Care: SGZ Surinamestraat 4 2612 EA Delft To make an appointment, call +31 (0)15 212 1507 Monday to Friday 8.30-12.15 Stichting DUWO (Delft Housing Agency) Marlotlaan 5 2614 GV Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 219 2200 E-mail: info@duwo.nl Website: www.duwo.nl Office hours: Monday to Friday 08.30-17.00. Student Restaurants in Delft - University main cafeteria, Aula, Mekelweg 5 - SnC Caf, Mekelweg 8 - Sint Jansbrug, Oude Delft 50-52
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- Koornbeurs, Voldersgracht 1 - Alcuin, Oude Delft 123 - CSR, Oude Delft 9 - De Bolk, Buitenwatersloot 1-3 - Novum, Verwersdijk 102-104

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

A Ezelsveldlaan 61 Delft Technology Museum 2 Mijnbouwplein 11 Used by various external parties 3 Mijnbouwstraat 120 Applied Earth Sciences 5 Julianalaan 67 Biotechnology(Kluyver Lab) 6 Poortlandplein 6 Botanic Gardens 8 Julianalaan 132-134 TU Delft Student Facility Centre 9 Zuidplantsoen 2 MultiMedia Services (MMS) 10 Zuidplantsoen 6 Student Council 11 Zuidplantsoen 8 Real Estate and Facility Management 12 Julianalaan 136 Delft ChemTech 15 Prins Bernhardlaan 6 Kramers Laboratorium voor Fysische Technologie 17 i-WEB: Vehicle for Research, Education and Design 19 Mekelweg 3 Stud: student employment agency 20 Mekelweg 5 Aula Congress Centre 21 Prometheusplein 1 TU Delft Central Library 22 Lorentzweg 1 Faculty of Applied Sciences 23 Stevinweg 1 Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences 24 Berlageweg 1 Faculty of Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences 30 Jaffalaan 9 OTB Research Institute 31 Jaffalaan 5 Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management 32 Landbergstraat 15 Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering 33 Landberghstraat 19 Composites Laboratory INHOLLAND/TU Delft 34 Mekelweg 2 Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering 34a Cornelis Drebbelweg 9 Executive Board 35 Cornelis Drebbelweg 5 Examination rooms 36 Mekelweg 4 + 6 Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science 37 Mekelweg 8 TU Delft Sports Centre 38 Mekelweg 10 TU Delft Cultural Centre 40 Rotterdamseweg 137 Materials Engineering 43 Leeghwaterstraat 36 Cogeneration plant 44 Rotterdamseweg 145 Yes!Delft/Technostarters
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45 Leeghwaterstraat 42 VSSD & Low Speed Wind Laboratory 46 Leeghwaterstraat 44 Process and Energy Laboratory (API) 50 Mekelweg 15 Radiation Radionuclides & Reactors (R3) / Reactor Institute Delft (RID) 61 Kluyverweg 3 Faculty of Aerospace Engineering: Vliegtuighal 62 Kluyverweg 1 Faculty of Aerospace Engineering 63 Anthony Fokkerweg 1 Faculty of Aerospace Engineering: SIMONA 64 Kluyverweg 2 High Speed Wind Laboratory 65 Kluyverweg 4 + 6 Delft Transport Centre (DTC)

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1. Bachelor/Master system: a brief explanation


In the year 2000, 29 Europe ministers of education signed the Bologna Declaration on the European Space of Higher Education: the first step towards implementation of the Bachelor/Master system in the Netherlands. The main targets of this system are: - to stimulate international mobility of students - development of international study paths - an increase of the transparency and harmonisation of the educational system - better international recognition of the Dutch educational programmes

Study ProGramme The two-year Master of Science (MSc) programme aims at talented students who hold at least a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree, or an equivalent degree, in a relevant technical or engineering discipline. The MSc programme provides academic training with excellent prospects for an international career. The working language of the programme throughout each course is English. Students from more than 30 countries in Asia, Africa, America and Europe participate in the TU Delft MSc programme. The prime objective of the MSc programme is to offer a challenging high-level

The system has been implemented in the Netherlands from September 2002. TU Delft is the first university in the Netherlands to implement the system to all its degree programmes. The traditional programme of 5 study years is divided into a BSc programme of 3 years and an MSc programme of 2 years. The BSc programme ends with a BSc thesis. Only after completing the MSc programme the education is complete. Features of BSc: - selecting and orientating preliminary exam - collective courses in clusters - BSc thesis as an integral test of the degree programme - official language is Dutch

education and research environment. The courses provide students with ample opportunities to analyse technical problems and develop innovative solutions. Furthermore, TU Delft, by virtue of its long tradition as an advanced learning centre and also by virtue of its broader setting in Europe, invariably stimulates the students personal creativity, self-reliance and originality. The MSc International programme brings together bright young people and places them in an international and intercultural atmosphere, in which they will also discover a lot about each other and will learn from each other. The group members, sharing unfamiliarity with various new circumstances, are likely to develop a sense of solidarity and mutual understanding, respect and appreciation. This not only has a meaningful effect on the students own personal and professional growth and awareness, but also contributes to a better future world. Depending on the course, the first year comprises theoretical study, as-

Features of MSc: - several specialisations and focus areas based on research - improved admittance of foreign students - official language is English - degree with the title Master of Science TU Delft emphasises that the implementation of this system should in no way interfere with the progress of students who started their programme before 2002. If, however, this occurs it is recommended to consult the study adviser.
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signments and laboratory work. The second year is largely devoted to the final thesis work, which involves participation in the universitys advanced research or design projects or development work in a company. All courses devote ample attention to a broadly based general development of the prospective engineer. As such, the student may also acquire knowledge of business economics, economics, and law, and will develop considerable social and communicative skills. An internship, which can be completed at a scientific institute or company in the Netherlands or abroad, may be a component of the study programme.
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Continuous attention is devoted to the universitys educational system. In addition to the lectures, tutorials, and practicals, new educational forms and methods are introduced when necessary and desirable. From the first year on, students learn to work in project groups. Tutors counsel students throughout the first phase of their study, and students can ask for advice and guidance from advisers throughout their study at TU Delft. Research Well over 2300 scientists and 650 PhD researchers at TU Delft contribute to the technological innovations which are so characteristic of the present era. The researchers conduct both fundamental theoretical research and practical research. The fundamental research is financed by the Ministry of Education and Science and by foundations for fundamental and pure scientific research, such as the NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research). Thesis work of MSc and PhD researchers is an important element of the research programmes.

Sciences department was merged with the Geo-engineering section within the Civil Engineering branch and given the new departmental name of Geotechnology. Since this merger the Geotechnology department has been responsible for the Applied Earth Sciences degree courses. The Geotechnology department consists of the following sections: Geo-engineering Resource Engineering Petroleum Engineering Applied Geophysics & Petrophysics Applied Geology Mission The judicious use of the sub-surface of the Earth, and the sustainable exploration, exploitation and use of raw and recycled materials are central themes to the research conducted at the Department of Geotechnology. Our Department, therefore, endeavours to: -i nvestigate, describe, and predict those natural systems and processes that define the characteristics and distribution of earth materials; -  provide relevant and beneficial approaches to geological and engineering aspects of the exploitation, use and reuse of the Earths surface and subsurface, ant its raw materials; -e  valuate the entire material cycle (raw materials, use, waste, reuse of material) by considering the impacts of infrastructure on environment and economics, and the required technology to minimise these impacts. The Department exploits the synergy between the research groups covering, geotechnology, geology and exploration of the sub-surface, geophysics, petrophysics, petroleum engineering, mining, metal production, and material recycling. The mineral and material properties and the dynamics of the Earth (including the mineralogy of waste and products) link these disciplines and therefore form the golden thread of our Department.

2. Department of Geotechnology
The orGanisational position of the department Delft University of Technology has eight different faculties. The faculty within the university that is responsible for the Applied Earth Sciences degree course is the one known as the Civil Engineering and Geosciences faculty. Apart from being responsible for the Applied Earth Sciences studies, the faculty is also responsible for Civil Engineering affairs. It is also the general secretariat for the inter-facultative Masters degree courses in Geomatics, Offshore Engineering and for TIL (i.e. Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics). The Civil Engineering and Geosciences faculty comprises a number of different departments. Up until recently Applied Earth Sciences was just one of those departments and, as such, it was responsible for all degree courses of the same name. At the beginning of 2004, however, the facultys departments underwent a reorganisation so that the Applied Earth
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Within the national and international societal context, physical and chemical properties of earth materials and systems, and their relationships to material and energy flows, are investigated and assessed in geological, engineering, environmental, and economic terms. Therefore, this Department contributes to the sustainability of modern society. Concisely stated our mission is: Revealing and explaining the Earths resources and supporting their sustainable use in an environmentally conscious manner for the benefit of society The study proGramme

The Director of Education The Director of Education, Dr R. Weijermars (telephone +31 (0)15 27 87801) is responsible for, among other things, the organisation, content and quality of the education and the development of policies and plans related to future developments in the field of education. The Education Committee (Opleidingscommissie/OC) Dutch law requires each study to have an Education Committee, advising the Director of Education on educational matters. Half of its members are students; the other half is made up of scientific staff. The Committee advises the Dean and the Director of Education on educational matters. The Examination Committee (Examencommissie/EC)

The community of Geotechnology is small, which has the advantage of flexibility and knowing each other. The broad and internationally oriented courses make it possible that graduates find employment in a wide range of businesses, both inside and outside the disciplines offered at Geotechnology.

This Committee is responsible for the organisation and co-ordination of all examinations and the assignment of examiners. It provides instructions and guidelines for student assessment. The Committee is authorised to approve educational programmes, which have been compiled by individual students. The regulators (regelaars) of the MSc programmes

Three major directions are distinguished within Geotechnology: - Resource Engineering (which includes mining, processing, metallurgy and recycling); - Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences (which includes reservoir engineering, petrophysics, production geology, drilling technology, applied geophysics and reservoir geology); - Engineering Geology (which includes tunnelling, the use of underground space, rock mechanics, ground stability and site investigation); OrGanisation

There is a different regulator for each programme: Applied Geophysics: Dr E.C. Slob Engineering Geology: Dr D.M.J. Ngan-Tillard Petroleum Engineering: Dr E.C. Slob Resource Engineering: Ir. J.J. de Ruiter Reservoir Geology: Dr G.J. Weltje The Adviser Quality Assurance and Education Policy vacancy The Study Advisers, appointments and open consultation hours

Chairman of the Geotechnology Department is Prof. S.M. Luthi. He has the final responsibility for the education. Within the Department there are a number of people and committees responsible for educational matters. They are:

Drs. P. (Pascal) de Smidt or K. (Karel) Karsen Stevinweg 1, Room: 2.79 / 2.77.1 Tel: +31 (0)15 27 81068 / 83337 E-mail: P.deSmidt@tudelft.nl K.Karsen@tudelft.nl
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The study advisers advise students on all study-related affairs. This may vary from providing information to pre-university students, students of other institutes of higher education, but they also can help you if there are family circumstances or other confidential affairs which affect your study. The faculty (and the study advisers) guarantee that all private information you have discussed will be treated confidentially. Examples of student questions are generally related to: - the programme and regulations; - illness and private matters; - study support (planning and how to study); - appeal against assessment results. For general information, advice or any help, you can make an appointment with one of the study advisers: Pascal de Smidt and Karel Karsen. Please contact the study advisers Secretariat, room 2.81, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85742. In urgent cases they will be able to put you in immediate contact with the study advisers. If you have brief information-related questions, you can also go to one of the open consultation hours. Time: Monday to Friday from 12.45 13.30 hours.

solid, fluid and gaseous mineral resources, other utilisation and uses of the subsurface, resource consumption and recycling of recourses, and the associated engineering, energy and economic aspects. The research mainly concerns practical subjects with a distinct relevance for the industry or for society at large.

3. MSc programme Applied Earth Sciences


Goals of the MSc proGramme Applied Earth Sciences stand central to the interaction of man with Earth. This interaction takes the form of exploration, extraction, processing and utilisation of raw materials, engineering and construction projects, and the impact of these activities on the environment. As a consequence of new technologies, geological subsurface characterisation has led to completely new concepts and insights. Industry realises that integrating geology with engineering is vital for optimising recovery of underground resources, since the reality of the geological setting determines the dominant processes. In civil engineering, groundwater and mining activities it is essential to incorporate geological characterisation and modelling into the design. Education and research linking applied sciences with geology is, therefore,

University and Faculty Student Councils There is a University Student Council and there is a Faculty Student Council. Both have yearly elections. The University Student Council is elected by all students, while the Faculty Student Council elects only candidates from a degree programme offered by the faculty. These councils have some formal rights, for example approval of the programmes. Ask your Student Society for details.

at the core of our department. The department is by nature strongly multi-disciplinary. Research in the department focuses on long-term fundamental issues of interest for industrial application. The department exploits the synergy between research groups working in the areas of geophysics, geology, petroleum engineering, engineering geology and resource engineering. This synergy between the disciplines is also a characteristic of the MSc

Research The Department carries out a wide range of research in which the linking of earth sciences, raw materials and technology constitutes a common denominator. The research covers exploration, extracting and processing
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courses. The MSc course encourages an interdisciplinary approach, while giving considerable opportunities to go deeply into the chosen specialisation. Students can choose to specialise in one of the following areas: Applied Geophysics, Reservoir Geology, Petroleum Engineering, Engineering Geology, Mining Engineering, Minerals Engineering.
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The course has a strong international character, reflecting the professions which the students generally enter after graduation. Academic staff has strong international networks, both in industry and universities. Strong links exist with highly respected foreign universities in the form of joint degrees and student exchange programmes. The quality of the MSc course is internationally recognised by these universities and industrial companies. General Goals of the MSc proGramme The Dublin Descriptors describe the qualities that any academic courses must fulfil. The department has expanded the Dublin Descriptors to the following general goals for graduates from its MSc course: Knowledge and Understanding  be capable of drawing on a broad and deep scientific knowledge to perform their work in an analytical fashion; Applying Knowledge and Understanding b  e able to synthesise knowledge and to solve complex problems in a creative way; Making Judgements h  ave the qualities needed for employment in circumstances that require sound judgement, personal responsibility and initiative, in complex and unpredictable professional environments; h  ave an awareness of any possible ethical, social, environmental, aesthetic and economic implications of their work, to which they will act appropriately; Communication b  e able to assume leading roles (including management roles) in companies and research organisations, and be able to contribute to innovation; b  e able to work in an international environment, showing social and cultural sensitivity and demonstrating language and communication skills, which will in part have been acquired through experience of team work and any study periods abroad; Learning Skills b  e able to work and learn independently and have an awareness of their need to update their knowledge and skills.

Specific Goals of the MSc proGramme Within the general goals listed above, the department has the following specific goals, in terms of the students that it wishes to attract and the competencies of its graduates: T  he MSc course should be open to all students who obtain a BSc of sufficient standard in a relevant technical or engineering, or natural sciences discipline in any country.  Graduates should have an awareness of the connections between their field and other disciplines, and the ability to engage in interdisciplinary work. Graduates will have a command of the following: o  domain and subject-specific skills and competencies that include the core knowledge and understanding required in the field of Applied Earth Sciences; o knowledge of the methods and technical practice in this field of study; o relevant theoretical knowledge and methods, including modelling; o  advanced knowledge of specific areas, depending on their chosen specialisation; o  the specific attitude and way of thinking required in the subjects of their field of specialisation; Graduates will have extended the understanding or application of this knowledge in original thesis work, integrated into the research activity of the department. Structure of the MSc proGramme To achieve the above goals, the MSc programme in Applied Earth Sciences has been evolving since the introduction of the Bachelors/Masters structure in the Netherlands. The department officially introduced the MSc course in 2002, although earlier informal arrangements existed for foreign students to follow an MSc programme. As explained below, the structure will evolve further, but the final form is clear. Two alternative structures have been chosen for the different programmes of the MSc programme. Both guarantee interdisciplinary awareness and avoid over-specialisation.

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1. A  programme provided fully by TU Delft, consisting of a backbone of common courses, given principally in the first year, complemented by specialised courses and thesis work in the second year. This structure exists for the Masters specialisation in Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences, which offers the two focus areas Reservoir Geology and Petroleum Engineering. A similar structure is developed for the specialisation Engineering Geology, within the broader framework of Geo-Engineering in cooperation with Civil Engineering, starting September 2006. 2. A  n international programme, involving cooperation between different European universities. Students take courses at different universities throughout the first year, returning to Delft for their thesis work. This structure exists for the Masters specialisation Resource Engineering with the focus areas Mining Engineering (with Aachen, Exeter and Helsinki) and Mineral Engineering (with Aachen, Helsinki and Exeter), for Applied Geophysics (with Aachen and Zurich) and potentially for Engineering Geology (with Aachen, Barcelona and Zurich). Both programmes have a strong international character. In the first programme (provided fully by TU Delft), the proportion of foreign students is high, in addition, the courses are attended by students from respected foreign universities who spend a short period at Delft through exchange programmes (University of Texas at Austin, Colorado School of Mines, NTNU in Norway, Leoben University in Austria, Madrid University).

The MSc specialisations and focus areas In the academic year 2006-2007 the department of Geotechnology will offer four MSc specialisations, each with its own focus areas. The specialisations are: P  etroleum Engineering & Geosciences with the focus areas Petroleum Engineering and Reservoir Geology Engineering Geology Resource Engineering Applied Geophysics A short description of each is given below: 3.1 Applied Geophysics Course objective The goal of the Applied Geophysics course is training students to become well qualified in applied geophysics related to either hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation or environmental and engineering investigations (including geothermal energy exploration and exploitation), with a solid background in the other speciality. The final research project will bring our students to the level where they can work in acquisition, processing and interpretation of seismic data at an operational level as well as in R&D. Focal points in research and education -T  U Delft: Time lapse or 4D seismic imaging, linking 4D geophysical parameters to dynamic reservoir parameters -S  eismic structural characterisation of migrated seismic data, improving

MSc programme Applied Earth Sciences

Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences Petroleum Engineering Resource Engineering

Engineering Geology

Resource Engineering EMC EMEC

Applied Geophysics

facies analysis - Imaging and characterisation in complex media, incorporating small-scale effects in imaging, multi-scale analysis, imaging techniques for multi-valued arrivals. -E  TH Zurich: Engineering geophysics for shallow applications, e.g. in geology and archaeology -A  dvanced methods of seismic and electromagnetic prospecting - RWTH Aachen: Borehole geophysics and petrophysics

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- Geothermal energy exploration and exploitation - Numerical modelling The programme contains course modules in all three partner universities; the first part is given in Delft, the second part in Zurich and the last part in Aachen. Students subsequently go to one of the three partner universities to finish their programme with an 8-month graduation research project. Employment Our graduates work in a wide range of companies and research institutes related to the energy and engineering industry such as oil and gas companies, geothermal companies, contractors, engineering companies, operators and financial institutions, while others enrol in PhD programmes around the world. Contact TU Delft: Dr Evert Slob Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88732 E-mail: e.c.slob@tudelft.nl

3.2 Petroleum EnGineerinG & Geosciences 3.2.1 Petroleum EnGineerinG Course objective The Petroleum Engineering course includes all aspects of the upstream petroleum industry from reservoir engineering to drilling techniques and economical evaluation of projects. The main objective of the course is for students to integrate knowledge of the different areas in petroleum engineering (reservoir technology, petrophysics, production technology, production geology) and enable them to manage the development of an oil or gas field and to do research. Focal points in research and education Fluid flow modelling honouring multi-scale geological heterogeneity Conformance control, inflow performance and smart wells Placement and injectivity of fluids and chemical treatments Hydraulic fracturing Groundwater flow and subsurface environmental control The first year consists of fundamental subjects (hydrocarbon properties,

ETH Zurich: Prof. Alan Green Tel: +44 633 2657 E-mail: alan@aug.ig.erdw.ethz.ch RWTH Aachen: Prof. Christoph Clauser Tel: +49 241 809 4825 E-mail: c.clauser@geophysik.rwth-aachen.de Website: www.idealeague.org/geophysics

rock-fluid interaction, numerical mathematics), basic disciplines (drilling and production technology, petrophysics) and 6 credits in a module on technology and society. The second year includes the final thesis work. Furthermore, it consists of a field development project of 6 credits and 6 credits for electives. The course programme puts great emphasis on multi-disciplinary work, integrating engineering and geosciences. Moreover, a significant part of the programme is dedicated to the underlying fundamentals, ensuring that our alumni will be equipped to solve not just the problems of today but also those arising in the future.

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Employment Our graduates work in a wide range of companies related to the petroleum industry such as oil and gas companies, contractors, engineering companies, operators, and financial institutions across the world. A number of them enrol in PhD programmes, again all over the world. Contact For further information about the course content please contact Prof. P.K.Currie. Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86033 E-mail: P.K.Currie@tudelft.nl 3.2.2 Reservoir GeoloGy Course objective The Reservoir Geology course trains students to use modern measurements, computational methods and new geological concepts to obtain a quantitative understanding of the processes that laid down reservoir rocks. These skills are not only highly useful in the petroleum industry but also in other, related branches such as hydrogeology and the search for some emerging new energies. The course meshes closely with the courses in petroleum engineering and geophysics. This course offers a very solid basis to work for companies in the energy sector, above all in the oil and gas industry, but also engineering companies and new venture companies in the energy and natural resource sector. It trains the graduate to think critically and innovatively and it therefore also forms a good basis to continue in a PhD programme.

The first year consists of fundamental subjects (rock-fluid interaction, properties of hydrocarbons & oilfield fluids, reservoir sedimentology) and basic disciplines (exploration geology, production geology, advanced seismic interpretation, log analysis, reservoir characterisation and development). The second year consists of a field development project, the thesis work and 6 credits for electives. The course programme puts great emphasis on multi-disciplinary work, integrating engineering and geosciences. Moreover, a significant part of the programme is dedicated to the underlying fundamentals, ensuring that our graduates will be equipped to solve not just the problems of today but also those arising in the future. Contact For further information about the course content, please contact Prof. S.M. Luthi. Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86019 E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl 3.3 EnGineerinG GeoloGy Course objective Engineering Geology uses geological, geophysical and geotechnical methods to investigate the subsurface for construction projects. The complexity of many projects requires a sound assessment of ground conditions and environmental conditions. The course provides students clear conceptual understandings of the mechanical and hydro-mechanical interactions between the subsurface materials and designated structures. Focal points in research and education

Focal points in research are: Quantitative reservoir characterisation Process-based modelling at reservoir and grain scale Analogue field studies of recent and ancient deposits

A  pplication of geological expertise in the context of ground properties, regime and response Reduction of uncertainties in the subsurface Appropriate engineering geology design and practice procedures S  ustainable development of low-lying countries and adjoining areas, near-shore and offshore

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The first year consists of two semesters of practical and theoretical subjects. Core engineering geology subjects, directed at the development of basic engineering geology skills, are followed by more specialised topics including GIS for engineering geology, subsidence and rock mechanics. The first-year modules culminate in a fieldwork period that includes engineering geological mapping, field data acquisition, feasibility assessment, and expert assessment for potential damage claims. The second year includes courses like professional practice in engineering geology, probabilistic design, geo-risk management and the thesis research work of 42 ECTS. Employment TU Delft engineering geologists are competent to work both offshore and onshore, in soft soil and weak rock environments. They have a sufficiently strong academic basis for becoming registered as professional ground risk engineers/managers. They are employed worldwide by the (Dutch) construction industry, knowledge institutes, municipalities, governmental ministries and financial institutions to assess engineering challenges and risks. Contact For further information on course content, contact Dr D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard. Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86843/83325 E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl 3.4 Resource EnGineerinG Course objective Resource Engineering relates to the knowledge about the total Materials cycle, from Mining and Mineral Processing to Extractive Metallurgy and Recycling. Goal of the course is for students to achieve a clear conceptual understanding of the technical, design and economical aspects of the processes, which are part of the Materials Cycle Graduates are employed worldwide by resource-based industries (mining, processing, metallurgy, recycling) and both resource and not resource38 APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

related manufacturers, financial institutions, and consultants. A number of them enrol in PhD programmes in various parts of the world. Focal points in research are: All aspects of the life cycle of mineral resources. Optimisation of the exploitation of resources by modelling and simulation Design of metallurgical and recycling processes The first year consists of practical and theoretical subjects, covering the fundamentals of particulate systems, unit operations, the metal cycle and sampling and statistics. Specialised topics like mineral economics, geostatistics, extractive metallurgy, recycling, flow sheets and mass balances are covered, as well as modelling and simulation of mining and process control. A number of case studies are carried out covering the entire resource cycle from mine planning, reactor/plant design to recycling product design. A mining business plan is also included, as well as a module on Technology and Society. The second year includes the main part of the thesis work and room is left for a number of elective courses. The course programme puts great emphasis on all technical, design and economical aspects of the total Resource cycle. Parts of the first year consist of the TU Delft modules of the European Mining Course (EMC) and European Minerals Engineering Course (EMEC). During these 5 months students will be joined by EMC and EMEC students, who come from various countries in Europe and beyond. Contact For further information about the course content, please contact ir J.J. de Ruiter. Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85001 E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl

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3.5 ConverGence course During the first period of the MSc programmes, a convergence course is offered to those students who did not attend these classes in their Bachelors programme. It is decided for each individual student which parts of the convergence course will have to be taken. This depends on their background. The parts are: 1. Introduction to Geology (4 credits) 2. Petroleum geology (3 credits) 3. Introduction to reflection seismics (1 credit) 4. Geological excursion (1 credit) 5. I  n addition to this, every student with a NON-AES BSc must attend the basic course Image Analysis (AES 0101) covering 3 afternoons If students have a good background in Geology, the credits mentioned for convergence course/electives in the programme tables can be spent on mathematics, physics or elective courses in or outside the department. Each student has to agree with the regelaar how these credits will be filled in. For students who hold a BSc degree from AES, the credits for the convergence course can be spent as follows: 1. choose electives within AES 2. choose electives outside AES (e.g. at Civil Engineering, TBM) 3. add these credits to your BSc thesis 4. save these credits for an internship (Please note that you have to agree on this with the regelaar of your focus area.) Introduction In this part of the document, we will explicitly inform you about the convergence courses during the first period of your study. For your convenience we have extracted the convergence courses, the courses during the first period.
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The convergence courses deal with subjects that are supposed to be basic knowledge for the rest of your study. We do not expect you to know about these subjects in advance, therefore we have introduced the convergence courses. At the end of the first period, these convergence courses will be examined in a written examination. Convergence Course (AES1000) Contact: Dr G.J. Weltje Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85722 E-mail: g.j.weltje@tudelft.nl Contents For MSc students of Petroleum Engineering this course consists of the following parts: A. Introduction to Geology Lecturer: Dr H. Frikken Tel: +31 (0)6 10123393 E-mail: HunzeGeoConsult@tiscali.nl Prerequisites This course is intended for students with no background in Earth Sciences Course Material  Handouts and textbook Reference literature: Nichols, G. (1999) Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Blackwell Science, Oxford Contents  The course is designed to provide MSc students of petroleum engineering without a geological background with a basic knowledge of sedimentary geology. The course is at a beginners level, but it is assumed that the student is familiar with general scientific and engineering concepts. The students are expected to carry out a considerable amount of self study in order to prepare for the lectures. The geology lectures will be followed
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credit points: ECTS 9

credit points: ECTS 4

by a field trip to the Ardennes. The course comprises the following topics:  Introduction: Global tectonics and the rock cycle Origin and types of sedimentary basins Structural geology: faults and folds Sedimentology: Origin, erosion, transport and deposition of sediments Selected depositional environments (deltas and turbidite systems) Stratigraphy: lithostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy correlation, subsurface stratigraphy (seismic, logs) Goals To attain a basic level of knowledge in Earth Sciences Organisation Self study, lectures (+ assignments) Examination Written examination B. Petroleum Geology Lecturer: Prof. S.M. Luthi Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86019 E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl Credit points: ECTS 3

Online exams and information to test prerequisite knowledge: blackboard.icto.tudelft.nl Course Material Gluyas, J. and Swarbrick, R.: Petroleum Geoscience, Blackwell Publishing. Lecture notes on Blackboard: blackboard.icto.tudelft.nl. Contents  This course gives an overview of the conditions required for oil and gas to accumulate in reservoirs. This is first illustrated in concepts and then in a number of relevant case studies. The life of a reservoir is discussed from initial basin studies to exploration, appraisal development and finally abandonment. The task of the petroleum geologist during these various phases is illustrated, as well as his interaction with other disciplines such as reservoir engineering, geophysics, and petrophysics. Materials on hand include, among others, cores, logs and seismic lines. Goals  The objective of this course is to give the student a thorough introduction to petroleum geology. Organisation  The course consists of 14 hours of lectures. Some exercises and handon practicals may be included. Examination  Written examination together with the other convergence courses. An example can be found on Blackboard: blackboard.icto.tudelft.nl C. Introduction to reflection seismics

Prerequisites General Geology and Sedimentology Books that cover the prerequisite knowledge: General Geology: Skinner, B.J., Porter, S.C. and Park, J.: Dynamic Earth An introduction to physical geology, Wiley International edition (is used during the convergence course of general geology).  Sedimentology: Nichols, G.: Sedimentology and stratigraphy, Blackwell Science.

Lecturer: Dr G.G. Drijkoningen Tel: +31 (0)15 27 87846 E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@tudelft.nl Prerequisites

Credit points: ECTS 1

Signal analysis (Fourier analysis), complex numbers and functions Books that cover prerequisite knowledge:  Signal Analysis: Bracewell, R.N.: The Fourier Transform and its applications,

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McGraw-Hill Education, 1978.  Signal Analysis: Oppenheim, A.V. and Wilsky, A.S.: Signals and Systems, Prentice-Hall.  Complex numbers: any analysis book, e.g.: Wylie, C.R. and Barrett, L.C.: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, McGraw-Hill. Online exams and information to test prerequisite knowledge: blackboard.icto.tudelft.nl  first year BSc course Analyse, wi1266ta (in Dutch) second year BSc course Systemen en Signalen, tn4560tu (in Dutch) Course Material  Lecture notes: Introduction to Reflection Seismology, G.G. Drijkoningen (chapters 2, 4 and 5) Contents Seismic data acquisition Interpretation of raw seismic data Processing of seismic data (stacking and migration) Velocity analysis Goals  This course is designed to show the applications of signal processing in the seismic method and to discuss the most important basic processing steps to go from raw seismic data to a migrated seismic reflection image of the subsurface. Organisation  7 lectures of 2 hours each and 1 afternoon practical on the beach in Wassenaar. Examination Written examination together with the other convergence courses.  Examples can be found on Blackboard: blackboard.icto.tudelft.nl, in TA3630 (only questions dealing with chapters 2, 4 and 5). D. Geological Excursion Lecturer: Doctorandus J.C. Blom Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83628 E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl
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Prerequisites Basic geological knowledge from earlier convergence courses. Course Material Excursion guidebook will be handed out during the excursion. Contents  During a three-day excursion in the Belgian Ardennes we will show basic rock types and different forms of rock deformation. Goals Gain an understanding of real-life geological phenomena. Organisation Three-day excursion. Examination Written report. E. Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis Lecturer: Doctorandus K.H.A.A. Wolf Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86029 J. van Meel Tel: +31 (0)15 27 83220 E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolft@tudelft.nl Prerequisites Basics in geology. Course Material handout Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis. Contents  Explanation of image analysis principles and techniques; practical exercises using applications from applied earth sciences, by means of a specialised computer programme. Credit points: ECTS 1 Goals The goal is that, after the course, the student -b  ecomes aware of the possibilities of Image Analysis as a universal technique for solving various technical and scientific problems,
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Credit points: ECTS 0

- is able to insert this technique in the list of possible solutions to problems during his graduate research work and in a future job, - understands and is able to apply the typical image analysis way of thinking. Organisation  One and a half day computer-aided practical exercises, two students share one computer Examination Attendance compulsory for the complete course.

ECTS credits and GradinG ECTS credits The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System is a student-centred system based on the student workload required to achieve the objectives of a programme, objectives preferably specified in terms of learning outcomes and competences to be acquired. The key features of ECTS are: -T  he workload of a full-time student during one academic year is 60 credits. The student workload of a full-time study programme in the Netherlands amounts to 1680 hours per year, which implies that one credit stands for 28 working hours. -S  tudent workload in ECTS includes the time spent on attending lectures, practical work, independent study, assignment work, preparation for examinations, etc. -C  redits are allocated to all educational components of a study programme (such as modules, courses, placements, dissertation work, etc.) and reflect the quantity of work each component requires in relation to the total quantity of work necessary to complete a full year of study in the relevant programme. -C  redits in ECTS can only be obtained after completion of the work required and appropriate assessment of the learning outcomes achieved. The two-year MSc course comprises 120 ECTS in total. You can find details

4. Study information
Academic year The student year officially starts on 1 September, and ends on 31 August of the following year. The 2006-2007 academic year starts on 4 September 2006. In the Department of Geotechnology, the academic year is divided into four blocks. Each block consists of around seven weeks of education, followed by exam periods of various lengths. Holidays are scheduled for Christmas, Easter and the summer. Exam schedule The exam schedule for the written exams can be found on the website (www.tas.tudelft.nl)

about the modules available for each MSc course - and their credit point values - in a subsequent chapter in this study guide. Grading scale and grades

Attendance During periods of education you are required - but not compelled - to attend lectures, group tutorials, etc. You must, however, attend all laboratory practicals. In view of the intensity of the MSc course, we strongly recommend that you do not take leave of absence during these periods, as you run the risk of missing essential tuition or practical work. The Department is not responsible for delays in your study progress resulting from such actions, and will not initiate remedial action.

The performance of the student is documented by an ECTS grade. The ECTS grading scale ranks the students on a statistical basis (see also Table). The Dutch grading system has marks ranging from 1 (nil) to 10 (excellent). The mark 6 is a pass and 5 and lower is considered as a fail. Sometimes no numerical mark is given for practical work, but a description in words. The following ECTS grading scale has been proposed, but this scale is not yet accepted at TU Delft. However, it gives you a good indication of the mark obtained and your mark can be translated into many other grading scales in Europe.
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Grades in the Dutch university education system (Grades can be given on a scale from 1 to 10) Delft University of Technology 10/9 8 7 6.5 6 5 or lower

Announcement and validity of results Grades for written exams are made known as soon as possible, but always within 15 working days of the examination. The results are published on the Internet. You can obtain an overview of

ECTS A B C D E FX-F

American A AB+ B C F

Definition Excellent / Very good Good More than satisfactory Satisfactory Sufficient Fail

all your grades to date on Blackboard if you are a registered member. The validity of grades for parts of your programme is ten years. Having completed your programme your degree is valid forever. Note that the validity of assessments of parts of modules, such as quizzes, (computer) tests, sub-examinations, homework, exercises, etc. may be quite limited! Exam results on Blackboard To check your exam results on Blackboard, blackboard.tudelft.nl , you should click on the Volg+ grades button on the top right of the portal page. Here you can find the official grades as they are known by the

Examinations Examination registration The Examination Registration System TAS (Tentamen Aanmeld Systeem) permits on-line registration and cancellation of registration for scheduled written examinations. You should register at least 10 working days before the examination (called tentamen in Dutch). Registration is obligatory. All new students receive a password by e-mail. Once you have a password, you may register or cancel your registration for exams from any PC connected to the Internet. You can log in to the TAS system using your password at www.tas.tudelft.nl If you are unable to attend the examination, you should cancel your registration at least five working days before the examination. When attending an exam, you must show your college/campus card (or other proof of admission) - make sure you take this with you! At every exam, you must fill in your name and student number. Examination regulations can vary. In some cases, you are permitted to take books, notes and calculators into the examination room. If English is not your native language you may also take a dictionary.

administration. The grades menu at the bottom of the portal page is Blackboards own grade-system and is not used most of the time. Right of review and appeal After the exam results have been published, you have at least 20 working days to review your work. You are permitted to make a copy of the work. During this period you may also make an appointment with the lecturer to discuss the work. In many cases the lecturer will hand out answer sheets or publish these on Blackboard. Sometimes a class is organised to discuss the exam. If, following discussion with the lecturer, you wish to appeal against a given grade you must do so within 10 working days of receiving the result. You can send your written appeal to the following address: College van Beroep voor de examens PO Box 5 2600 AA Delft Graduation / Application for Masters examination When you have fulfilled all obligations of your MSc programme, you may participate in one of the diploma sessions held during the year. For international students this will be at the end of the academic year, normally mid-August.
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A few weeks before the session you must register yourself at the Service Desk (see schedule below). You must apply for a Masters examination by completing an Exam Application Form; go to www.ta.tudelft.nl/onderwijs and choose: Student Forms. The Administration will check if you are entitled to receive your degree. The Board of Examiners decides. The session itself is a formality. The only thing you have to do is show up, sign your diploma, listen to some speeches and receive well-deserved congratulations. It is a public affair, so your family and friends are welcome! For the 2006-2007 academic year, the following dates have been determined: Apply before 3 October 2006 6 February 2007 8 May 2007 15 July 2007 Meeting Examination Graduation ceremony committee 31 October 2006 6 March 2007 5 June 2007 Mid-July 2007 10 November 2006 16 March 2007 15 June 2007 Mid-August 2007

Motivated students, who have finished their Bachelors programme with a weighted averaged mark of 7.5 or higher and students who have shown an excellent performance during the first semester (no fails and 7.5 or higher), are eligible to follow an honours track in their Masters programme. Students who would like to follow an honours track have to contact the director of education, Dr R. Weijermars. Students who fulfil (or will fulfil) the above-mentioned requirements and are interested in an honours track may apply by means of an essay. The English language essay of the student contains the students motivation and a proposal for an honours track programme. The content of the honours track programme should be consistent around a certain theme and must be approved by the director of education. Graduation in TechnoloGy in Sustainable Development The graduation specialisation Technology in Sustainable Development was launched in September 2000. It fits into all MSc curricula at TU Delft. The specialisation is open to all TU Delft students who completed their BSc programme. The graduation specialisation covers both broader and deeper knowledge regarding Sustainable Development (SD) and technology. Sufficient depth is achieved by the demand that SD has to be a core issue in the graduation project. Within each department, a so-called SD referee with specific expertise will assess the graduation project regarding the way SD has been tackled in the problem definition, the actual work and in the conclusions of the project. The broadening of knowledge is guaranteed through a number of elective courses in the field of SD and the Colloquium Technology in Sustainable Development (wm0922TU). Another goal of this colloquium is to teach the students to apply a long term vision in determining their engineering priorities. Demands: o Graduation project focused on an SD (related) problem oP  articipation in Colloquium Technology in Sustainable Development (WM0922TU), 4 credits o1  1 credits of SD electives, at least 5 credits technical and 5 credits non-technical, see list: www.odo.tudelft.nl
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Honours track An honours track is a special individual programme, in addition to the regular Masters programme, of about 800 hours (30 credits) and is related to the discipline of the Master and/or the role of technology in society. It may offer more depth, for example a preparation for a PhD programme or a wider orientation, for example in the field of sustainability or another science subject. All honours track students of TU Delft follow a specially developed course of 160 hours. This course is interdisciplinary and focuses on academic competences such as communication skills, philosophy of science, methodology and ethics. The additional programme has to be completed during the duration of the Masters programme of the student. Students who have successfully completed their honours track receive a special certificate from the university.
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For more information, visit www.odo.tudelft.nl or contact one of the Sustainable Development referees at our department: Prof. R.J. Arts Tel: +31 (0)15 27 85190 E-mail: r.j.arts@tudelft.nl Prof. S.M. Luthi Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86019 E-mail: s.m.luthi@tudelft.nl

- The Student Charter (Studentenstatuut). The Teaching and Examination Regulations and the Regulations and Guidelines of the Board of Examiners are published on the website: www.ta.tudelft.nl. Questions may be directed to the Director of Education or the Students Advisor.

5. Facilities
Student information

ProGramme evaluation and quality assurance To determine the quality of the education, the students opinion is important. With this opinion, bottlenecks can be tracked down. Therefore, a quarterly course evaluation is held with the education director, the quality assurance employee and the students association. The course evaluations are meant to improve the quality of the education, so there are positive and negative matters. If necessary, measurements to improve the course are laid down. The summary of the course evaluations are realised on the basis of: c  ourse evaluation with the education director, the quality assurance employee and the students association reaction of the teacher report of the Sensor survey The students association plays an important role in these evaluations. It often contributes information that does not directly come to the fore from the surveys. Formal reGulations There are a number of formal regulations that contain rules pertaining to faculty organisation, the programmes and their execution. These are: - The Teaching and Examination Regulations (Onderwijs- en Examenreglement); - Implementation regulations (Uitvoeringsregeling); - The Rules and Guidelines of the Board of Examiners (Regels en Richtlijnen van de Examencommissie);
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Monitor The monitors in the hallway display the most urgent notices about for instance changes in the schedules or cancelled lectures. It is advisable to check the monitors every day. Newsletter The Department also has its own newsmagazine, called Nieuwsbrief. This Nieuwsbrief will be e-mailed to all students of Applied Earth Sciences regularly (approx. monthly) and contains a variety of news and information submitted by students and staff from the department. Website The website (www.ta.tudelft.nl) contains the most recent information. Delta TU Delfts newspaper, Delta, is published weekly. It provides, along with all the latest University news, interesting articles and interviews, job vacancies, film reviews, etc. Page 4 has been dedicated to English-speaking readers, and contains an overview of the main articles and latest news items. Computer facilities All new students are automatically registered to use the Universitys computing facilities. The university provides each student with an e-mail account.
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OrderinG study materials throuGh Nextstore TU Delft has decided to make it possible for students to order readers through the Internet. The immediate advantage of this is that you can order your study materials at any time and from anywhere in the world and that the materials will be delivered to the address specified by you as soon as you have paid the order amount. It is also possible to pick up your order at the campus. The ordering site for the readers is on TU Delfts Blackboard (blackboard. tudelft.nl). To do this, you will need the NetID and password you received when you enrolled at TU Delft. Student Health Care The student doctors belong to the Student Health Care organisation (in Dutch the SGZ). The SGZ is an independent organisation which also offers students preventive medical care. At the same time the student doctors also operate as ordinary general practitioners. The SGZ is located in the SGZ health care centre. Address: Surinamestraat 4 2612 EA Delft To make an appointment, call +31 (0)15 212 1507. The health care centre also has a physiotherapist and an ordinary doctors practice. Opening times: from 08.30 to 12.15 You may report to the student doctors for vaccinations, medical check-ups and medical declarations. The doctors also help and advise students who have physical or psychological problems that could be detrimental to their studying activities. Insurance Health insurance: According to Dutch law, everyone must be covered by adequate medical insurance, since the Dutch government does not accept
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any responsibility in the case of illness or hospitalisation. Add to this the high cost of all forms of medical treatment and you will see that it is absolutely necessary for you to be insured. See for more information the Visiting Students Guide. Legal liability: If you are to blame for an accident that injures someone or if you damage another persons property, you are in principle responsible for paying all costs arising from the accident. The resulting claim for damages could be very high. You are strongly urged to take out third-party insurance. TU Delft is in no way liable or responsible for any lack of insurance. StudyinG abroad Within the Geotechnology department it is quite easy to arrange to complete a part of your studies abroad. Various cooperative arrangements already exist with various other European universities, all of which make international exchange simpler. (Unfortunately this is not open to foreign MSc students because of visa problems.) For addresses in the various countries go to the www.tudelft.nl/buitenland site. For further information and the manual Studeren in het buitenland Civiele Techniek please contact the International Office at CiTG, room 2.73, tel. +31 (0)15 27 81174/84800. Internship Office The Internship Office can inform and support you on all matters concerning an internship. For general information, registration (through a written form, not via Blackboard) or to obtain the course manual, please come to the desk in room 2.73 (open every working day from 8.30 till 17.00 except Wednesday), where Maaike Kraeger-Holland will be glad to assist you (tel. +31 (0)15 27 81174). She can also make an appointment for you with the Internship Coordinator, Peter van Eck, should you wish to discuss your internship wishes or plans. EmerGencies You may have a problem reaching the venue where you are due to sit an examination. You might be confronted with unexpected traffic jams, a
55 STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

railway power cut or something else entirely beyond your control, causing you to be late or to have to miss the exam altogether. In such cases it is always wise, if possible, to contact one of the study advisers directly, Karel Karsen (tel. +31 (0)15 27 83337) or Pascal de Smidt (tel. +31 (0)15 27 81068). They will then contact the individuals responsible for the examination immediately and every endeavour will be made to find a suitable solution. Bear in mind that such steps can only be taken in the event of real emergencies and that the perfect solution cannot always be found. Students who arrive late for the examination because of travel delays are obliged to report immediately to the invigilator. He or she will then decide on the best plan of action. Obviously the ruling outlined above only applies to students who have registered in time for examinations through the usual channels and according to the usual procedures.

Nowadays it is not strictly a society for Dutch students anymore, since many foreign students have come to Delft over the last couple of years to complete their studies in their MSc phase. The MV finds it important that during their stay in Delft foreign students get to know Dutch students and the typical Dutch student life. Social and student life in Delft originates mostly from the fraternities and other student associations. Nowadays these are all open both to females and males. One of the qualities that make Delft students stand out from the rest is that they participate in more events than classes only. They tune their soft skills so to speak. The MV is a student association which offers all the aspects of student life in Holland. We offer assistance with courses; we organise lectures, excursions and parties. We even have our own pub in the centre of Delft. Because of all these events, students get to know each other easily on a professional and a social level. During the first few weeks in Delft it can be quite handy to get to know

Student Society Mijnbouwkundige Vereeniging (MV) student society Mijnbouwkundige Vereeniging Tel: +31 (0)15 27 86039 E-mail: mv@tudelft.nl The Mijnbouwkundige Vereeniging is a student society which assists students with their studies and provides social events which help them build up an international network! The MV was founded in Delft in 1892. At first the sole objective was to organise lectures and excursions, later this objective was expanded to providing social events and to form a solid bond between staff and students. Over the years the MV has become a mature society respected by Delft University, the faculty staff and major international companies. The Mijnbouwkundige Vereeniging is a society which was originally only open to students from the Department of Applied Earth Sciences.
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certain people who know the ropes. The board therefore organises a welcome in Het Noorden shortly after the start of the academic year. Company visits to the faculty are also organised by the MV. This is done for students who are a member of the MV. Twice a year, both resource engineering and oil companies will come to the faculty and give a presentation, followed by drinks afterwards. Some will offer interviews at the faculty, while the rest will inform you of their recruiting system and their career opportunities. Attending these presentations is very useful, since it can offer you better chances when applying for a job. The graduation ceremony is another occasion where the bond between the faculty and the MV is apparent. Every member is given a Hckel, a symbol of responsibility when they have graduated, a unique symbol known to many around. Glck Auf!
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Board 2005-2006: Roeland Jan Dijkhuis Hein van Heekeren Lars van Zelm Sanne Brinkman Board 2006-2007: Pieter Sturm Ted Brueren Roel Huneker Claartje Wiggers - President - Secretary / Keeper - Treasurer - Commissioner of Education / Vice-president - President - Secretary / Keeper - Treasurer - Commissioner of Education / Vice-president

6.  Additional information for students with a non-AES BSc degree


General Information General information about the education can be found on: www.ta.tudelft. nl. Here you can find information about the courses, the programme, the schedules, the examination programme, etc. The contact for all your questions about the MSc programme is: Pascal de Smidt Tel: +31 (0)15 27 81068 E-mail: p.desmidt@citg.tudelft.nl Admission Requirements In order to be admitted to the MSc programme, applicants must have a BSc degree in the same or a closely related discipline. Graduates with a Bachelors diploma in a different discipline are eligible for admission if they fulfil additional requirements set by the department. Further information about the general admission requirements and the application procedure can be found on www.studyat.tudelft.nl The admission policy of TU Delft requires that the previous diplomas and additional skills and knowledge of applicants are of high quality and relevant. It is also required that students are highly motivated, strongly interested and have a good command of the English language. A programme selection committee will evaluate each applicants capability to complete the MSc study at TU Delft successfully in two years and will decide whether the applicant can be admitted. The admission decision will be communicated to you in the admission letter. Initial Conditions Introduction When you start your MSc Applied Earth Sciences we expect you to have some basic knowledge. This expected knowledge is mainly the technical knowledge, i.e. the mathematic, physic and the chemic principles. These

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subjects will not be given during the courses of the MSc, but are used as basic principles on which the other courses are based. To give you a better idea of what we expect you to know, we have drawn up this document. In this document, you can check what we regard as basic knowledge. If you feel that you lack some of this knowledge, you can take action yourself, and use the books that are listed in this document. We strongly recommend you to read through these initial conditions carefully, since we expect you to master these subjects. Initial conditions Mathematics 1. Analysis Contents -C  omplex numbers, differential calculus, linearisation, integral calculus, differential equations - Convergence of series, multivariate functions - Differentiability of multivariate functions, multiple integrals - Line integrals, surface integrals, integral theorems Stewart, J.: Calculus, Early Transcendentals, fifth edition, Brooks/Cole Publishing, 1999. Chapters: - App. G, 1.6 (p. 72-74), 3.6, 3.11, 4.2, 5.3, 5.5, 7.1, 7.4-7.6, 7.8, 9.1 (not Eulers Method), 9.3, 9.4, 9.6, 17.1-17.3 - 11.1-11.6 (not square root Cauchy), 11.8-11.12, 12.3, 13.1-13.3, 14.1-14.3 - 14.4-14.7, 15.1-15.5, 15.7-15.9, 12.7 - 16.1-16.9, 12.3, 12.4

2. Differential equations Contents - First and second order differential equations - Linear differential equations with constant coefficients - Systems of first order linear differential equations -  Simple systems of first order non-linear differential equations - Laplace transformations - Fourier series -P  artial differential equations from mathematical physics (wave equation, diffusion, potential, etc.) Boyce, W.E. and Diprima, R.C.: Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 7th edition 2001, John Wiley and Sons.

Book(s)

Practice/Exams Blackboard, this is a second-year BSc course (wi2034).

3. Linear Algebra Contents - - - - - - - - - Systems of linear equations Matrix calculus Determinants Vector spaces Linear projections Eigen values and eigen vectors Scalar product (dot product) Vector product (cross product) Orthogonality

Book(s)

Practice/Exams Blackboard, this is a first-year BSc course (wi1266ta).

Book(s)

Lay, D.C.: Linear algebra and its applications, third edition, Addison Wesley. Chapters: 1.1-1.5, 1.7-1.9, 2.1-2.3, 2.8, 2.9, 3.1-3.3, 4.1-4.7, 5.1-5.4, 5.6, 6.1-6.7.

Practice/Exams Blackboard, this is a second-year BSc course (wi2273ta).

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4. Numerical Analysis Contents Introduction numerical analysis Interpolation Numerical differentiation Numerical methods for initial value problems Numerical methods for boundary value problems Numerical integration Non-linear equations Burden, R.L. and Faires, D.: Numerical Analysis, Brooks/Cole Publishing Company, 7th edition, 2001.

Initial conditions Thermodynamics Contents First and second law thermodynamics Thermodynamic equilibrium Chemical potential Vanderwaals equation, Z-factor

Book(s)

Abbott, M.M. and van Nes, H.C.: Theory and problems of thermodynamics, Schaums Outline Series, McGrawHill book company. Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 (except 4.9) and 5.1 (only text, not problems).

Book(s)

Initial conditions Surface Chemistry Contents - - - - - - - Youngs law Contact angle Laplace formula Capillary pressure Surface tension Vanderwaals attraction Double layer repulsion

Practice/Exams Blackboard, this is a third-year BSc course (wi3097tu). Initial conditions Statistics Contents Variables and Graphs Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion Elementary Probability Theory The Binomial, Normal, and Poisson Distributions Elementary Sampling Theory Statistical Estimation Theory Statistical Decision Theory Small Sampling Theory The Chi-Square Test Curve Fitting and the Method of Least Squares Correlation Theory Multiple and Partial Correlation Analysis of Variance Nonparametric Tests

Book(s)

Hunter, R.J.: Introduction to modern colloid science, Oxford Science publications. Chapter 5: 5.1, 5.2, 5.5, 5.7.

Initial conditions Transport Phenomena / Conservation Laws Contents Laws of Newton, Fourier, Fick Laminar flow, turbulent flow, friction factor Velocity profiles, boundary layers Dimensionless numbers Conservation laws, Navier-Stokes equation R.B. Bird, W.E. Stewart and E.N. Lightfoot, Transport phenomena (2nd ed.), John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2002. Chapters: 0, 1.1, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1-3.5, 3.7, 4.4, 5.1-5.5, 6.1-6.3, 9.1, 17.1

Book(s)

Spiegel, M.: Statistics, Schaums Easy Outline S.

Book(s)

Practice/Exams All chapters and exercises at the end of the book.

Practice/Exams The book of Bird et al. contains a sufficient amount of questions and worked-out problems.

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Initial conditions Computer Skills Contents Text processing (Word) Spreadsheets (Excel) Programming (in any programming language): if-thenelse statements; for loops; do loops; use of subroutines (argument passing); concept of global/local variables; data types, integers, double types, real precision; flow charts Hanselman, D. and Littlefield, B.: The Student Edition of MATLAB, version 5, users guide, The Mathworks, Inc, 1997. Griffiths, D.F.: An introduction to Matlab, version 2.2. Department of Mathematics, University of Dundee. www.maths.dundee.ac.uk/~ftp/na-reports/MatlabNotes.pdf For basic programming knowledge the type of programming language used when you learned how to program is irrelevant. If you want to improve your programming, or if you want to learn additional skills, we advise you to use MATLAB, since we use it here at the university for programming and because the study book is not expensive.

7. MSc specialisations and course descriptions


Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences Specialisation 2006-2007 Core courses for the focus areas: Petroleum Engineering Reservoir Geology First year Period Code 2 AES1310 AES1510 AES1870 3 AES1320 AES1810 4 AES1340 AES1802 AES1820 Subject Rock fluid interaction, part 1 Geologic interpretation of seismic data, incl. practical Sequence stratigraphy Rock fluid interaction, part 2 Production geology Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part I Geological fieldwork (+ EM methods) Reservoir characterisation & development Total 1st year Second year Period Code 1 4 AES2009 AES2005 AES2006 Subject Field development project Colloquium MSc thesis Total 2nd year Total core courses ECTS 9 1 44 54 77 Exams rep./pres. ECTS 4 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 23 Exams exercises .x.x. .x.x. exercises ..xx. oral report ...xx

Book(s)

Note

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Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences Specialisation 2006-2007 Focus area: Petroleum Engineering First year Period 1 Code Subject ECTS Exams 9 3 3 3 4 9 1 3 4 2 6 1 0 2 8 2 Total 1st year 60 oral ..x.x ..x.x ..x.x ..xx. xx... xx... none (3rd period) assignments

Second year Period 1-4 Code Subject Electives Common core Total 2nd year Total PE 1 Also for the focus area Reservoir Geology Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences Specialisation 2006-2007 Focus area: Reservoir Geology First year Period 1 Code Subject ECTS 6 3 3 3 3 9 2 3 4 6 6 8 4 Total 1st year 60 rep./pres. ..xx. report + oral assignment + essay Exams xx... xx... report assignment report + oral ECTS Exams 6 54 60 120

AES1000-9 Convergence courses / electives of hydrocarbons & AES1300 1 Properties oilfield fluids, incl. lab exp. AES1304 Introduction to petroleum engineering AES1330 Drilling & production engineering, incl. lab exp.

WI4012/13 Numerical mathematics Common core 3 AES1330 AES1360 AES1500 Drilling & production engineering, incl. lab exp. Production optimisation Fundamentals of borehole logging incl. lab experiments AES1520-021 Log evaluation Common core 4 AES1303 AES1304 AES1350 Company visits / excursion Drilling experience with NAM Simwell Applied reservoir engineering & simulation, part 2 Common core 1-4 Electives

AES1000-6 Convergence courses / electives AES1300 1 Properties of hydrocarbons & oilfield fluids, incl. lab exp. AES1860-05 Analysis of sedimentological data AES1800 AES1830 Exploration geology (incl. remote sensing) Reservoir sedimentology Common core

AES1520-021 Log evaluation AES1840 AES1850 Advanced structural geology Geological modelling Common core

AES1902

Reservoir geological fieldwork (Huesca) Common core

1-4

Electives

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Second year Period 1-4 Code Subject Electives Common core Total 2nd year ECTS 6 54 60 Total RG 120
1

Exams

Case studies in engin. and environ. geophysics or Total 1st year Second year Period RWTH 1 Geophysics special methods: NMR and spectral IP Geophysical logging and log interpretation Exploration geology Petrophysics Petroleum systems: sedimentary basin modelling Geothermics Introduction to potential MSc thesis topics 2-4 AES2506 AES2005 Thesis Colloquium Total 2nd year 3 4 3 3 3 4 0 40 1 61 Total AG 120 Code Subject ECTS Exams 3 59 Petrophysics special subjects for petroleum studies

Also for focus area Petroleum Engineering

Applied Geophysics Specialisation 2006-2007 First year Period Code Subject ECTS Exams 6 3 4 4 6 2 xx... assignment written exercises written .x.x TU Delft 1 AES1000-6

Convergence courses / Electives AES1010 Computer (Matlab) course AES1540-06 Electromagnetic exploration methods AES1310 AES1560 AES1870 Rock-fluid interaction, part 1 Advanced reflection seismology and seismic imaging Sequence stratigraphy

ETH 3 and 4 Reflection seismology processing (practical) Groundwater for geophysicists Modelling & inversion for applied geophysicists Geophysical field work & processing special Geological and geotechnical engineering or Geophysical special subjects 6 6 6 6 7

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Engineering Geology Specialisation 2006-2007 Period 1 2 3 4 Code Subject AES1630 Engineering geology of soils and rocks AES1640 Environmental geotechnics AES1730 Soil mechanics applications CT5320 Site characterisation, testing and physical modelling AES1650 Shallow depth geophysics CT3300 Use of underground space CT4360 Material models for soils and rocks CT4420 Geohydrology CT5320 Site characterisation, testing and physical modelling AES1650 Shallow depth geophysics AES1660 Subsidence AES1710 GIS applications in Engineering Geology AES1720 Rock mechanics applications CT4360 Material models for soils and rocks CT4390 Geo risk management AES1602 Engineering Geological Fieldwork AES1650 Shallow depth geophysics (field) AES1700 Professional Practice in Engineering Geology Electives Total 1st year 4 3 3 3 2.5 3 2 4 3 2 2 3 4 2 3 11 1.5 1 3 60 ECTS Exams x.... x .... x.... ..... .x..X .x... ..x.. .x... .x... ..x.x ..x.x ..x.. ..xx. ..x.. ..x.. ...x. ...x. ...x. Code AES1800 AES1850 AES1860 AES1902 Code AES1380 AES1390 AES1490 AES1580 Code AES1540-06 Period 1 2 1-4 Code Subject

Second year ECTS Exams 3 4 8 1 44 Total 2nd year 60 Total EG 120 Recommended Electives Elective in the field of Applied Geophysics Subject Electromagnetic exploration methods ECTS 4 x.... .x...

AES1670 Site investigation II CT4420 Geohydrology AES1000-8 Convergence courses / electives AES2005 Colloquium AES2006 MSc thesis

Electives in the field of Petroleum Engineering Subject Petroleum Engineering Special Topics Solution mining Systems Analysis Petrophysics, special subjects Electives in the field of Reservoir Geology Subject Exploration Geology and Remote Sensing Geological modelling Analysis of sedimentological data Geological fieldwork Huesca ECTS 3 4 3 6 ECTS 3 2 2 2

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Electives in the field of Civil Engineering Code OE4624 CT5330 CT5301 CT5300 CT4300 Subject Offshore soil mechanics Foundations and superstructures Theory of consolidation Dredging technology Introduction to Coastal engineering ECTS 2 4 3 4 4 Code Helsinki H/AR H/EX H/MA-04 H/ME-00 H/MM Aachen A/EI-04 A/MV-04 A/OP-05 Exeter E/ED E/PA E/PM Delft D/AL-04 D/CS-04 D/IM-04 D/ME

Specialisation Resource Engineering 2006-2007 Focus Area European Mining Course (EMC) Subject ECTS

Electives in the field of Technology, Police and Management Subject for example: Technical writing Written English for Technologists Technology in Sustainable Development International Business Management www.tbm.tudelft.nl for more courses 2 2 2 2 ECTS

Applied rock mechanics for Hard Rock Mining Excursion Automation and Maintenance of Mining Equipment Mining Technology and Economics Numerical Mine Modelling

3 3 3 3 3

Environmental Issues Mine Ventilation Open Pit Mining

3 6 6

Excavation Design Finance and Project Appraisal Project Management

5 5 5

Alluvial mining & Marine Mining Case Study Industrial Minerals Mineral Economics Total EMC Second year

4 5 3 3 60

Code AES2005 AES2006

Subject Colloquium Graduation thesis Electives

ECTS 1 44 15 Total 2nd year 60 Total MSc-RE 120

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Specialisation Resource Engineering 2006-2007 Focus Area European Mineral Engineering Course (EMEC) Code Delft D/IM-05 D/ME-06 D/HY-05 D/PM D/RE-05 Exeter E/AM E/DA E/MP Aachen A/RM-06 A/WP-06 Helsinki H/CE H/CS H/PA H/PD Subject ECTS

Master AES 2006 MSc AES, Petroleum Engineering & Geosciences Code Course title Convergence courses / electives Computing and plotting with Matlab Rock fluid interaction, part 1 Electromagnetic exploration methods Advanced reflection seismology and seismic imaging Professional practice in engineering geology GIS applications in Engineering Geology Rock mechanics applications Soil mechanics applications Sequence stratigraphy Colloquium Graduation thesis Applied Geophysics Convergence courses / electives Properties of hydrocarbons & oilfield fluids, incl. lab exp. Company visits / excursion Introduction to petroleum engineering and NAM visit Rock fluid interaction, part 1 Rock fluid interaction, part 2 Drilling & production engineering, incl. lab exp. Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part I Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part 2 Production optimisation Fundamentals of borehole logging incl. lab. Experiments Geologic interpretation of seismic data, incl. practical Log evaluation Geological fieldwork (+ EM methods) Production geology Reservoir characterisation & development
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Industrial Minerals Mineral Economics Hydrometallurgy Pyrometallurgy Recycling

2 2 4 4 4

MSc AES, Applied Geophysics 1st year AES1000-6 AES1010 AES1310 AES1540-06 AES1560 AES1700 AES1710 AES1720 AES1730 AES1870 AES2005

Advanced Mineral processing Data Analysis and Sampling Mineral Processing Design

5 5 5

Recycling Metallurgy WEEE Recycling

7 7

MSc AES, Applied Geophysics 2nd year AES2506 AES1000-9 AES1300 AES1303 AES1304 AES1310

Chemical Engineering for EMEC Project work in process automation Basics in process automation Process design Total EMEC Second year

4 3 4 4 60

MSc AES, Petroleum Engineering 1st year

Code AES2005 AES2006

Subject Colloquium Graduation thesis Electives

ECTS 1 44 15 Total 2nd year 60 Total MSc RE 120

AES1320 AES1330 AES1340 AES1350 AES1360 AES1500 AES1510 AES1520-02 AES1802 AES1810 AES1820

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AES1870 WI4012ta WM0916TA AES2005 AES2006 AES2009 AES0101 AES1310 AES1320 AES1340 AES1510 AES1802 AES1810 AES1820 AES1870 AES2005 AES2006 AES2009 AES1000-6 AES1300 AES1310 AES1320 AES1340 AES1510 AES1520-02 AES1800 AES1802 AES1810 AES1820 AES1830 AES1840

Sequence stratigraphy Mathematics, Special Subjects Special topics geotechnology and sustainable development Colloquium Graduation thesis Field development project Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis Rock fluid interaction, part 1 Rock fluid interaction, part 2 Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part I Geologic interpretation of seismic data, incl. practical Geological fieldwork (+ EM methods) Production geology Reservoir characterisation & development Sequence stratigraphy Colloquium Graduation thesis Field development project Convergence courses / electives Properties of hydrocarbons & oilfield fluids, incl. lab exp. Rock fluid interaction, part 1 Rock fluid interaction, part 2 Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part I Geologic interpretation of seismic data, incl. practical Log evaluation Exploration Geology (incl. remote sensing) Geological fieldwork (+ EM methods) Production geology Reservoir characterisation & development Reservoir Sedimentology Advanced Structural Geology
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AES1850 AES1860-05 AES1870 AES1902 AES2005 AES2006 AES2009

Geological modelling Analysis of Sedimentological Data Sequence stratigraphy Reservoir Geological Fieldwork (Huesca) Colloquium Graduation thesis Field development project

Electives (2 ECTS) MSc AES, Petroleum Engineering 2nd year

MSc AES, Reservoir Geology 2nd year

MSc AES PE & Geoscience Joint Programme MSc AES, Resource Engineering Code EMC-A/EI-04 EMC-A/MV-04 EMC-A/OP-05 EMC-D/AL-04 EMC-D/CS-04 EMC-D/IM-04 EMC-D/ME EMC-E/ED EMC-E/PA EMC-E/PM EMC-H/AR EMC-H/EX EMC-H/MA-04 EMC-H/ME-00 EMC-H/MM AES2005 AES2006 EMEC-A/RM-06 EMEC-A/WP-06 EMEC-D/HY-05 EMEC-D/IM-05 Course title Environmental issues Mine ventilation Open pit mining Alluviale & Mariene Mijnbouw Case study Industrial minerals Mineral Economics Excavation Design Finance and Project Appraisal Project Management Applied rock mechanics for hard rock mining Excursion Automation and Maintenance of Mining Equipment Mining Technology and Economics Numerical Mine Modelling Colloquium Graduation thesis Recycling Metallurgy WEEE Recycling Hydrometallurgy Industrial Minerals
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MSc AES, EMC 1st year

MSc AES, Reservoir Geology 1st year

MSc AES, European Mining Course 2nd year

MSc AES, European Mineral Engineering Course (EMEC) 1st year

EMEC-D/ME-06 EMEC-D/PM EMEC-D/RE-05 EMEC-E/AM EMEC-E/DA EMEC-E/MP EMEC-H/CE EMEC-H/CS EMEC-H/PA EMEC-H/PD AES2005 AES2006 Code AES1602 AES1630 AES1640 AES1650 AES1660 AES1700 AES1710 AES1720 AES1730 CT3300 CT4360 CT4390 CT4420 CT5320

Mineral Economics Pyrometallurgy Recycling Advanced Mineral processing Data Analysis and Sampling Mineral Processing Design Chemical Engineering for EMEC Project work in process automation Basics in Process Automation Plant Design Colloquium Graduation thesis Course title Engineering Geological Fieldwork Engineering properties of soils & rocks Environmental geotechnics Shallow depth geophysics Subsidence, incl. practicals Professional practice in engineering geology GIS applications in Engineering Geology Rock mechanics applications Soil mechanics applications Use of underground space Material models for soil and rock Geo risk management Geohydrology 1 Site characterisation, testing and physical model

AES1630 AES1640 AES1650 AES1660 AES1661 AES1700 AES1710 AES1720 AES1730 CT3300 CT4360 CT4390 CT4420 CT5320 AES1000-8 AES1610 AES2005 AES2006 CT4420 CT4130 CT4350 CT4353 CT4360 CT4380 CT4390 CT5142 CT5320 WM0312CT CT4130 CT4360 CT4380 CT4390

Engineering properties of soils & rocks Environmental geotechnics Shallow depth geophysics Subsidence, incl. practicals Subsidence, practicals Professional practice in engineering geology GIS applications in Engineering Geology Rock mechanics applications Soil mechanics applications Use of underground space Material models for soil and rock Geo risk management Geohydrology 1 Site characterisation, testing and physical model Convergence courses, electives, etc. Site Investigation I Colloquium Graduation thesis Geohydrology 1 Probabilistic Design Numerical soil mechanics Continuum Mechanics Material models for soil and rock Numerical modelling of geotechnical problems Geo risk management Computational Methods in Non-linear Solid Mechanics Site characterisation, testing and physical model Philosophy, technology assessment and ethics for CT Probabilistic Design Material models for soil and rock Numerical modelling of geotechnical problems Geo risk management
79 STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

MSc AES, European Mineral Engineering Course (EMEC) 2nd year

MSc AES, Geo-Engineering

Geo-Engineering, Engineering Geology 2nd year

Geo-Engineering, Geomechanics

Geo-Engineering, Engineering Geology Geo-Engineering, Engineering Geology 1st year AES0101 AES1000-4 AES1602 Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis Convergence courses, electives, etc. Engineering Geological Fieldwork

Geo-Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

CT5305 CT5320 CT5330 CT5350 WM0312CT CT4130 CT4360 CT4380 CT4390 CT4780 CT5320 CT5330 CT5740 WM0312CT

Bored and immersed tunnels Site characterisation, testing and physical model Foundation and construction Design and construction by geo-synthetics in civil and marine eng Philosophy, technology assessment and ethics for CT Probabilistic Design Material models for soil and rock Numerical modelling of geotechnical problems Geo risk management Underground space technology, special topics Site characterisation, testing and physical model Foundation and construction Trenchless Technologies Philosophy, technology assessment and ethics for CT

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES0101 none

Course title: Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis

ECTS: 0

2nd Education Period J.G. van Meel; E-mail: J.G.vanMeel@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl one and a half day of computer-aided practical exercises; two students share one computer Explanation of image analysis principles and techniques; practical exercises using applications from applied earth sciences, by means of a specialised computer programme

Geo-Engineering, Underground Space Technology

Study Goals

The goal is that after the course the student - becomes aware of the possibilities of Image Analysis as universal technique for solving various technical and scientific problems,- is able to insert this technique in the list of possible solutions to problems during his graduate research work and in a future job, - understands and is able to apply the typical image analysis way of thinking.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

handout Introduction to Quantitative Image Analysis

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1000-4

Course title: Convergence courses, electives, etc.

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1000-6

Course title: Convergence courses / electives

ECTS: 6

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. G.G. Drijkoningen; E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi; E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. G.G. Drijkoningen; E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi; E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl

Education Method Judgement

Lectures, assignments, and a field trip of four days duration ECTS credits: 9 for all topics together, credits for separate modules in contents Failure in any sub-topic at the examination requires retaking that part even if the overall grade is satisfactory.

Education Method Judgement

Lectures, assignments, and a field trip of four days duration ECTS credits: 9 for all topics together, credits for separate modules in contents Failure in any sub-topic at the examination requires retaking that part even if the overall grade is satisfactory.

Course Contents

For MSc-Students Petroleum Engineering this course consists of the following parts: 1) Introduction to geology (......) (4 ECTS); 2) Geological field trip (Drs. J.C. Blom) (1 ECTS); 3) Introduction to reflection seismics (Dr G.G. Drijkoningen) (1 ECTS); 4) Introduction to image analysis (Drs. K.H. Wolf) (AES0101); 5) Petroleum geology (Prof. Dr S.M. Luthi) (TA3820) (3 ECTS). These courses are designed to give the petroleum engineering students a basic knowledge in those Earth sciences topics that are relevant for following the subsequent courses in the MSc program in Petroleum Engineering. They are all at a beginners level, i.e. they do not require previous courses in the field, but it is assumed that the student be familiar with general scientific and engineering concepts. The students are expected to do considerable self study and they will be given assignments in some of the courses.(for detailed course description: see chapter , page of this course guide)

Course Contents

For MSc students Petroleum Engineering this course consists of the following parts: 1) Introduction to geology (........) (4 ECTS); 2) Geological field trip (Drs. J.C. Blom) (1 ECTS); 3) Introduction to reflection seismics (Dr G.G. Drijkoningen) (1 ECTS); 4) Introduction to image analysis (Drs. K.H. Wolf) (AES0101); 5) Petroleum geology (Prof. Dr S.M. Luthi) (TA3820) (3 ECTS). These courses are designed to give the petroleum engineering students a basic knowledge in those Earth sciences topics that are relevant for following the subsequent courses in the M.Sc. program in Petroleum Engineering. They are all at a beginners level, i.e. they do not require previous courses in the field, but it is assumed that the student be familiar with general scientific and engineering concepts. The students are expected to do considerable self study and they will be given assignments in some of the courses.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior

To attain a basic level of knowledge in Earth Sciences Several basic textbooks (to be announced in the various courses)

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

To attain a basic level of knowledge in Earth Sciences Several basic textbooks (to be announced in the various courses)

This course is intended for students with no background in Earth Sciences

This course is intended for students with no background in Earth Sciences

knowledge Remarks

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1000-8

Course title: Convergence courses, electives, etc.

ECTS: 8

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1000-9

Course title: Convergence courses / electives

ECTS: 9

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. G.G. Drijkoningen; E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi; E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. G.G. Drijkoningen; E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi; E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl

Education Method Judgement

Lectures, assignments, and a field trip of four days duration ECTS credits: 9 for all topics together, credits for separate modules in contents Failure in any sub-topic at the examination requires retaking that part even if the overall grade is satisfactory.

Education Method Judgement

Lectures, assignments, and a field trip of four days duration ECTS credits: 9 for all topics together, credits for separate modules in contents Failure in any sub-topic at the examination requires retaking that part even if the overall grade is satisfactory.

Course Contents

For MSc-Students Petroleum Engineering this course consists of the following parts:1) Introduction to geology (.....) (4 ECTS); 2) Geological field trip (drs. J.C. Blom) (1 ECTS); 3) Introduction to reflection seismics (dr. G.G. Drijkoningen) (1 ECTS); 4) Introduction to image analysis (drs. K.H. Wolf) (AES0101); 5) Petroleum geology (Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi) (TA3820) (3 ECTS). These courses are designed to give the petroleum engineering students a basic knowledge in those Earth sciences topics that are relevant for following the subsequent courses in the MSc specialisation Petroleum Engineering. They are all at a beginners level, i.e. they do not require previous courses in the field, but it is assumed that the student be familiar with general scientific and engineering concepts. The students are expected to do considerable self study and they will be given assignments in some of the courses.

Course Contents

For MSc-Students Petroleum Engineering this course consists of the following parts:1) Introduction to geology (.......) (4 ECTS); 2) Geological field trip (drs. J.C. Blom) (1 ECTS); 3) Introduction to reflection seismics (dr. G.G. Drijkoningen) (1 ECTS); 4) Introduction to image analysis (drs. K.H. Wolf) (AES0101); 5) Petroleum geology (Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi) (TA3820) (3 ECTS). These courses are designed to give the petroleum engineering students a basic knowledge in those Earth sciences topics that are relevant for following the subsequent courses in the M.Sc. program in Petroleum Engineering. They are all at a beginners level, i.e. they do not require previous courses in the field, but it is assumed that the student be familiar with general scientific and engineering concepts. The students are expected to do considerable self study and they will be given assignments in some of the courses.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior

To attain a basic level of knowledge in Earth Sciences Several basic textbooks (to be announced in the various courses)

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

To attain a basic level of knowledge in Earth Sciences Several basic textbooks (to be announced in the various courses)

This course is intended for students with no background in Earth Sciences

This course is intended for students with no background in Earth Sciences

knowledge Remarks

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1010 none

Course title: Computing and plotting with Matlab

ECTS: 3

Course

Code: AES1300

Course title: Properties of hydrocarbons & oilfield fluids, incl. lab exp.

ECTS: 3

1st Education Period Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method The course runs parallel with the course Advanced Reflection Seismology and Imaging. First the most common Matlab rules and functions are introduced for computing and visualization. Several examples from EM methods are discussed. Then the different forward and inverse problems, which are treated in the theoretical course, are discretized and given in terms of problems to the students. Judgement Course Contents Dr.ir. E.C. Slob; E-mail: E.C.Slob@tudelft.nl 6 afternoons of practicals of 4 hours each. The other hours are used for self-study and preparation for the exam.

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. P.L.J. Zitha; E-mail: P.L.J.Zitha@tudelft.nl 7 x 2 hours lectures, 4 x 2 hours exercises/practical work Physical, chemical properties of hydrocarbons (oil, gas, condensate) and other petroleum fluids (drilling fluids, emulsions, polymer and gels, foams, etc.); classification of hydrocarbon systems encountered in oilfield operations; elementary volumetric and phase behaviour; fluid flow and thermodynamics; z-factors, P-T diagrams, prototype reservoir and production engineering calculations. Rheology of complex oilfield fluids; drilling fluids, emulsions polymers and gels, foams; basic rheology concepts; rheological models and applications

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Getting hands-on experience with numerical manipulation of theoretical representations of wave phenomena using Matlab. Practical notes and exercises Study Goals

Provide the students with knowledge on the most important physical chemical properties of hydrocarbons and other oilfield fluids to allow them to perform reservoir and production engineering calculations.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes by P.L.J. Zitha and textbooks

Knowledge of basic petroleum engineering, classical thermodynamics and calculus.

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1303

Course title: Company visits / excursion

ECTS: 1

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1304

Course title: Introduction to petroleum engineering and NAM visit

ECTS: 3

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Project Short visits to companies involved in the oil and gas industry: producing companies and companies providing equipment and expertise.

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Prof.bsc.msc.ph. P.K. Currie; E-mail: P.K.Currie@tudelft.nl G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. P.L.J. Zitha; E-mail: P.L.J.Zitha@tudelft.nl

Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Project Lectures and exercises (first week). Lectures and field visits (second week). An introduction to the upstream oil industry, with one week spent in Delft working on group exercises and the second week spent in Assen at the NAM office. The first week introduces the basic concepts of the oil production process and the second week gives insight into the operation of a producing company, the philosophy of the company and the challenges faced by management.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Orientation on the industrial practice within the field of petroleum engineering. <>

Study Goals <>

- To obtain an overview of the key elements of the petroleum lifecycle- To obtain awareness of the industrial practice of an oil- and gas company.- To be confronted with the entrance level requirements for the MSc Petroleum Engineering

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Handouts Optional: 1) Jahn, F., Cook, M. and Graham, M.: Hydrocarbon Exploration and Production Elsevier, 1998. None The obligatory reports of the internship at the NAM will be assessed. For more information about the organization contact the instructor.

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1310

Course title: Rock fluid interaction, part 1

ECTS: 4

Study Goals

The main purpose of this course is to understand the fluid rock interaction involved in transport through porous media. The student learns the characterisation and quantification of pore morphology and textures and its relation to transport in porous media. The student also learns find an optimal choice of input parameters for reservoir simulation. In addition he learns to formulate the relevant transport problems and solve simple 1-D and 2-D problems with a computer programme of his choice e.g. Excel or Matlab as an experimental tool to study the effect of input parameters on oil recovery. The course forms the basis for the applied courses in the second year.

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. J.H.L. Voncken; E-mail: J.H.L.Voncken@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. J. Bruining; E-mail: J.Bruining@tudelft.nl

Education Method

The course consists of 14 lectures of 3 hours and 20 half days of practical work. The exercises include 3 half days on image analysis, 3 half days laboratory work and 14 half days of computer exercises. Literature and Study Materials

Lecture notes, papers, Dynamics of Fluids in Porous Media by J. Bear, Dake, L.P., Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering, Elsevier (1978). (lecture notes provided with E-mail). Reference literature: Stauffer, D. and Aharony, A., 1992, Introduction to Percolation Theory, Taylor & Francis, London, Washington, DC., Sahimi, M., Applications of percolation theory, Taylor & Francis, Patankar, S.V., Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid flow, Series in Computational Methods in Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, London (1980)

Judgement Course Contents Block 1 (J. Bruining): (4 ECTS)A: Single phase incompressible flow: Darcys law revisited; flow calculations in the pressure and stream function formulation using the finite volume or finite area method; upscaling permeability fields: averaging, effective medium approximation, homogenisation; effect on cumulative oil recovery. B: Multi-phase flow: surface chemistry and wetting phenomena; thermodynamics of capillary pressure; residual oil and connate water; Brooks-Corey relative permeabilities and capillary pressures; Buckley-Leverett and interface models for two-phase flow in porous media; three phase flow in porous media using Stone relative permeability models. C: Contaminant transport in porous media: relation between contaminant spreading and heterogeneities; Gelhars relation of the dispersion coefficient and its relation to permeability heterogeneity Block 2 (Wolf and Bruining): (3 ECTS)A: Morphology: introduction to geometry of grains and pores; texture and structure prediction; the use of image information to estimate 2D- porosity, permeability and capillary pressure relations. B: The use of percolation theory to derive relative permeability and capillary pressures; concepts of residual oil and connate water revisited; pore-scale trapping mechanisms; comparison between Brooks-Corey and percolation theory derived constitutive relations. C: single phase compressible flow: transient pressure- diffusion-equation; the use of pseudo pressures in highly compressible media; Stehfest algorithm and Laplace inversion; superposition and pressure build-up;. application to well testing; semi-steady state flow and the derivation of the productivity index. Applications Understanding input files for reservoir simulation and its limitations. To discern important physical mechanisms that have a large impact on oil recovery. Interpretation of laboratory experiments e.g. for obtaining constitutive relations.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Basic mathematics and statistics: WI1266ta, WI1228ta, WI1229ta,WI1230ta, WI1231ta, WI1275t, WI2034ta TA2090, chemieTA1200, Numerical analysis WI3097, Phys. Transport phenomena TN4780tu, wi2273ta, ta3000, image analysis introduction Remarks Examination: Homework assignments and summary of lecture notes in combination with an oral exam about the assignments. The homework assignments must be accomplished not later than one month after finishing the course parts. The marking is primarily based on an oral examination in which the homework assignments are discussed. The homework assignments must be marked as sufficient. Every student must make his own homework assignments, but programming work may be accomplished in teams of two persons or exceptionally three persons. The laboratory work and the image analysis will be separately marked.

90

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1320

Course title: Rock fluid interaction, part 2

ECTS: 3

Study Goals

The main purpose of this course is to understand the fluid rock interaction involved in transport through porous media. The student learns the characterisation and quantification of pore morphology and textures and its relation to transport in porous media. The student also learns find an optimal choice of input parameters for reservoir simulation. In addition he learns to formulate the relevant transport problems and solve simple 1-D and 2-D problems with a computer programme of his choice e.g. Excel or Matlab as an experimental tool to study the effect of input parameters on oil recovery. The course forms the basis for the applied courses in the second year.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. J.H.L. Voncken; E-mail: J.H.L.Voncken@tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Dr. J. Bruining; E-mail: J.Bruining@tudelft.nl

Education Method

The course consists of 14 lectures of 3 hours and 20 half days of practical work. The exercises include 3 half days on image analysis, 3 half days laboratory work and 14 half days of computer exercises. Literature and Study Materials

Lecture notes, papers, Dynamics of Fluids in Porous Media by J. Bear, Dake, L.P., Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering, Elsevier (1978). (lecture notes provided with E-mail).Reference literature: Stauffer, D. and Aharony, A., 1992, Introduction to Percolation Theory, Taylor & Francis, London, Washington, DC., Sahimi, M., Applications of percolation theory, Taylor & Francis, Patankar, S.V., Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid flow, Series in Computational Methods in Mechanics and Thermal Sciences, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, London (1980)

Judgement Course Contents Block 1 (J. Bruining): (4 ECTS)A: Single phase incompressible flow: Darcys law revisited; flow calculations in the pressure and stream function formulation using the finite volume or finite area method; upscaling permeability fields: averaging, effective medium approximation, homogenisation; effect on cumulative oil recovery. B: Multi-phase flow: surface chemistry and wetting phenomena; thermodynamics of capillary pressure; residual oil and connate water; Brooks-Corey relative permeabilities and capillary pressures; Buckley-Leverett and interface models for two-phase flow in porous media; three phase flow in porous media using Stone relative permeability models. C: Contaminant transport in porous media: relation between contaminant spreading and heterogeneities; Gelhars relation of the dispersion coefficient and its relation to permeability heterogeneity Block 2 (Wolf and Bruining): (3 ECTS)A: Morphology: introduction to geometry of grains and pores; texture and structure prediction; the use of image information to estimate 2D- porosity, permeability and capillary pressure relations. B: The use of percolation theory to derive relative permeability and capillary pressures; concepts of residual oil and connate water revisited; pore-scale trapping mechanisms; comparison between Brooks-Corey and percolation theory derived constitutive relations. C: single phase compressible flow: transient pressure- diffusion-equation; the use of pseudo pressures in highly compressible media; Stehfest algorithm and Laplace inversion; superposition and pressure build-up;. application to well testing; semi-steady state flow and the derivation of the productivity index. Applications Understanding input files for reservoir simulation and its limitations. To discern important physical mechanisms that have a large impact on oil recovery. Interpretation of laboratory experiments e.g. for obtaining constitutive relations.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Basic mathematics and statistics: WI1266ta, WI1228ta, WI1229ta,WI1230ta, WI1231ta, WI1275t, WI2034ta TA2090, chemieTA1200, Numerical analysis WI3097, Phys. Transport phenomena TN4780tu, wi2273ta, ta3000, image analysis introduction Remarks Examination: Homework assignments and summary of lecture notes in combination with an oral exam about the assignments. The homework assignments must be accomplished not later than one month after finishing the course parts. The marking is primarily based on an oral examination in which the homework assignments are discussed. The homework assignments must be marked as sufficient. Every student must make his own homework assignments, but programming work may be accomplished in teams of two persons or exceptionally three persons. The laboratory work and the image analysis will be separately marked.

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1330

Course title: Drilling & production engineering, incl. lab exp.

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1340

Course title: Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part I

ECTS: 2

2nd Education Period, 3rd Education Period 2nd Exam Period, 3rd Exam Period G.M. Sigon; E-mail: G.M.Sigon@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.bsc.msc.ph. P.K. Currie; E-mail: P.K.Currie@tudelft.nl Lectures, exercises, computer simulations, laboratory experiments and site visits. This course discusses the design, construction and operation of the wells and surface facilities through which oil and gas is produced. The emphasis is on practical and operational aspects, especially safety, during drilling and production. Guest lecturers from the industry give some of the lectures. Laboratory experiments on drilling fluids form part of the course, together with the writing of a report on these experiments. A one day visit is made to a drilling rig and other facilities. Computer simulators are used to explain and design drilling operations, well completions and surface facilities, including a one-day exercise with a realistic well-control simulator.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period T.E.H. Esmaiel, MSc; E-mail: T.E.H.Esmaiel@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. D. Du; E-mail: D.Du@tudelft.nl Lectures, homework exercises and computer exercises Examination: Based on exercises and an oral examination Credits: Part 1: 2 ECTS & Part 2: 2 ECTS Material Balance, Determination of Oil Water contact; Well testing, Productivity Index; Water flooding; EOR; Reservoir Simulation; Black Oil Model; Numerical Control; Well Models;

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials

To develop the reservoir engineering toolkit that is required to understand the operation of a petroleum reservoir Lecture notes, papers and information provided on Blackboard. Recommended: Mattax & Dalton, SPE Monograph Volume 13Reference literature Various SPE papers (available via Blackboard)Mattax & Dalton, SPE Monograph Volume 13.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Partial differential equations, Rock and Fluid Interaction

Study Goals

1. Understanding of methods of construction of wells and surface facilities, and safety issues.2. Theoretical prediction of the most important factors in the design of wells and surface facilities.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes

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APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1350

Course title: Applied reservoir eng. & simulation, part 2

ECTS: 2

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1360

Course title: Production optimisation

ECTS: 3

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period T.E.H. Esmaiel, MSc; E-mail: T.E.H.Esmaiel@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. D. Du; E-mail: D.Du@tudelft.nl Lectures, homework exercises and computer exercises Examination: Based on exercises and an oral examination Credits: Part 1: 2 ECTS & Part 2: 2 ECTS Material Balance, Determination of Oil Water contact; Well testing, Productivity Index; Water flooding; EOR; Reservoir Simulation; Black Oil Model; Numerical Control; Well Models;

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Dr.ir. J.D. Jansen; E-mail: J.D.Jansen@tudelft.nl Lectures and computer practicals Optimisation of the production from oil and gas wells. Topics include: Optimisation objectives and constraints, systems analysis, properties of reservoir fluids, well bore flow, inflow performance, oil well productivity, and one or two of the following: gas well productivity, gas-lift optimisation, pipeline network analysis, smart wells. Six afternoons of computer practical form an obligatory part of the course. Topics covered include MATLAB exercises on multiphase flow in wells, and oil and gas wellbore flow optimisation. One afternoon will be spent on the generation of lift tables as preparation for ta4031 Field Development Project.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials

To develop the reservoir engineering toolkit that is required to understand the operation of a petroleum reservoir Lecture notes, papers and information provided on Blackboard. Recommended: Mattax & Dalton, SPE Monograph Volume 13Reference literature Various SPE papers (available via Blackboard)Mattax & Dalton, SPE Monograph Volume 13. Study Goals

- Obtain awareness of traditional and emerging applications of optimisation techniques in oil and gas production.- Deepen knowledge of multiphase flow models for well bore flow. - Deepen knowledge of hydrocarbon phase behaviour in wells and facilities.- Deepen knowledge of near-well reservoir flow. -  Obtain skills in applying cash flow analysis to optimisation problems. - Obtain skills in applying nodal analysis techniques to optimise wellbore flow. - Obtain skills in selected optimisation topics (gas lift, pipeline networks).- Obtain skills in the analysis of simple physical systems with the aid of MATLAB.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Partial differential equations, Rock and Fluid Interaction

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Printed lecture notes. Reference literature Recommended additional reading: Brill & Mukherjee Multiphase Flow in Wells, SPE Monograph Vol. 17, SPE, 1999. AES1300/ta 3410 Properties of hydrocarbons and oilfield fluidsAES1330/ta 3430Drilling and production engineering Basic skills in MATLAB programming

96

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

97

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1500

Course title: Fundamentals of borehole logging incl. lab. Experiments

ECTS: 4

Course

Code: AES1510

Course title: Geologic interpretation of seismic data, incl. practical

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Dr. C.J. de Pater; E-mail: C.J.dePater@CiTG.tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.M.J. Smeulders; E-mail: D.M.J.Smeulders@CiTG.tudelft.nl <> Measurements in boreholes to determine petrophysical parameters comprise several disciplines. We can distinguish between such techniques as: Density logging (porosity assessment)- Sonic logging (porosity) - Gamma ray (shale volume) - Neutron, pulsed neutron (porosity) - Resistivity (saturation, Archies law) - Spontaneous potential (shale volume) - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Underlying physical principles are within the fields of acoustic and electromagnetic wave theory and solid state physics (radioactivity and relaxation phenomena). More specifically, wave equations for acoustic, elastic and poro-elastic media will be treated. Boundary conditions and reflection and transmission coefficients. Biot-Gassmann theory. Tortuosity and formation factor. Tube waves and Stoneley waves and their relation to formation permeability. The relation between acoustic and EM wave theory and the principles of MRI will be treated. Course Contents Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Prof.dr.ir. R.J. Arts; E-mail: R.J.Arts@citg.tudelft.nl Block of lectures and practicals: Lectures and practical exercises are given interchangeably. The exam will be taken twice a year. The students understanding of all practical aspects of seismic interpretation is tested as well as the overview of the different types of interpretation tools, and their role in the whole sequence of data processing, reservoir exploration, exploitation and management. Attendance at the lectures and practicals is compulsory. Students are not allowed to participate in the exam if more than a single practical session is missed. The course intends to introduce seismic interpretation techniques, with specific reference to workflows and techniques in subsurface interpretation as applied in the oil-industry. Knowledge of the seismic method, including acquisition and processing techniques is assumed to be present and will only be refreshed briefly. Techniques will be presented along the lines of a generic seismic interpretation workflow, starting with understanding the information of the seismic signal and calibrating the seismic data to wells, followed by interpretive processing techniques to cleanup seismic data and highlight specific features. Best-practice techniques for event identification, fault/horizon interpretation and velocity modelling for depth conversion will be discussed and rehearsed in the practical exercises. Participants will be made aware of techniques for the prediction of reservoir quality and hydrocarbon fill, covering geological techniques such as seismic stratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy, as well as geophysical techniques such as seismic modelling, seismic inversion and time-lapse seismic for reservoir monitoring. -T  o provide an understanding of the nature of seismic information in the context of an integrated and multidisciplinary working environment as in the oil- and gas exploration- and production industry. - Being able to use seismic information for geological and/or exploration/production goals. Lecture notes, handouts.

Study Goals

This course is designed to teach the student the fundamentals of acoustic borehole logging in the way that the physical principles are understood and can be applied to borehole logging practice and related disciplines (VSP, seismic surveys, EM).

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

TA3520

98

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

99

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1520-02

Course title: Log evaluation

ECTS: 2

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1540-06

Course title: Electromagnetic exploration methods

ECTS: 4

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Dr. C.J. de Pater; E-mail: C.J.dePater@CiTG.tudelft.nl Lectures and (computer) exercises The student will learn how to interpret various types of borehole logs. The course consists of a series of literature topics and related exercises to understand the methods and procedures which are needed to calculate the contents of, among others, rock pores and the rock matrix.

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period, 2nd Exam Period Dr.ir. E.C. Slob; E-mail: E.C.Slob@tudelft.nl 7 lectures are given of 4 hours each. The geo-electrical and geo-electromagnetic exploration methods are uniformly described as a two-port system. This description relates to the imposed electric potential and/or currents of the source and the potential and/or currents measured by the receiver, directly to the electromagnetic contrasts in the subsurface compared to a chosen background model. On the basis of this description, practical measurement principles, of DC-resistivity, Induction tools and ground-penetrating radar are discussed and an introduction to data processing techniques are given.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

<> Course notes and literature delivered by the lecturer during the course Reference literature Lecture notes and Blackboard Pages of TA3500 Schlumberger handbooks Study Goals AES1300, AES1310, AES1500 The lecturer is thinking of a test at the beginning of the course. This is to be sure that at the start the knowledge of TA3500 is satisfactory. Examination: For the time being a practical test at the entrance and a test at the end of the course. Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

This course gives an overview of the existing geo-electrical and geo-electromagnetic exploration methods as used for the characterization of the shallow subsurface. After successfully completing this course, the student will be able to determine which combination of different methods will be most suitable for a specific application, and how to process the acquired data.

100

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

10 1

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Code: AES1560

Course title: Advanced reflection seismology and seismic imaging

ECTS: 6

Course Education Period Exam Period

Code: AES1602

Course title: Engineering Geological Fieldwork

ECTS: 11

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period A. Mulder; E-mail: Arno.Mulder@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Dr. J.E.A. Storms; E-mail: J.E.A.Storms@tudelft.nl Ing. W. Verwaal; E-mail: W.Verwaal@tudelft.nl

Prof.dr.ir. C.P.A. Wapenaar; E-mail: C.P.A.Wapenaar@tudelft.nl

Instructor

Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Project <> The fieldwork in Spain contains: 1. Two weeks for the preparation of an engineering geological map of an area, with the assessment of the geotechnical properties of the rock and soil units distinguished and the assessment of hazards present in relation to given construction projects2. A site study of a hazardous slope of several days3. Excursion visits among others to construction sites

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge

To apply the knowledge gained in the field of engineering geological site investigation. Manual fieldwork procedures

Geological Fieldwork, Site characterisation and testing (CT5320), Engineering geology of soils and rocks (AES1630), GIS for engineering geology (AES1710), Rock mechanics applications (AES1720), Soil mechanics applications (AES1730)

Remarks

102

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

10 3

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1610

Course title: Site Investigation I

ECTS: 4

Literature and Study Materials

- Lecture notes AES1610/ta3730 (D.G. Price 1991);- Blyth, F.G.H. & M.H. de Freitas (1984). A geology for engineers. Edward Arnold, London. ISBN 0 7131 28828. Classical book, contents overlap the course subjects;- Manual rock and soil tests (available on blackboard site for AES1610);- Handouts. Reference literature Clayton, C.R.I., M.C. Mathews, N.E. Simons, 1995, Site Investigation Blackwell Science, Oxford ISBN 0 632 02908 0Waltham, A.C., 1994, Foundations of Engineering Geology. Blackie Academic & Professional, London. ISBN 0 75140071 8Fookes, P.G., 1997, -Geology for engineers; the geological model, prediction and performance, The Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology, 30, Part 4; Pages 293-424.

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period A. Hommels; E-mail: A.Hommels@tudelft.nl A. Mulder; E-mail: Arno.Mulder@tudelft.nl Ing. W. Verwaal; E-mail: W.Verwaal@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl

Education Method

A combination of lectures, readings and practicals (field and lab work, site investigation exercises and games) is proposed. A schedule concerning subjects, dates, places and lecturers is handed out at the beginning of the course. In the written examination, the knowledge of different site investigation techniques (type of apparatus, how it works, what it does, which its limitations are) as well as the aptitude to analyse a problem in a way similar to that of the games are assessed. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks This course deals with the set up and execution of site investigations for civil engineering projects, both on land and offshore, with an emphasis on geological factors that can be of influence on the realisation of the projects. Attention will be paid to basic techniques to collect geotechnical data and to the problems that some specific soil and rock types can give. In the accompanying laboratory practical, a number of important soil and rock tests are carried out. The games are a series of realistic exercises in which site investigations are simulated.

Good knowledge of geology (as given in the first three years at TA) and the necessary skills to interpret geology maps and geological information

Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

This course forms the basis for the education of engineering geologists. The basic knowledge is summarised in the book of Blyth & De Freitas. Every engineering geology student must have this knowledge ready. The goal of this course is to develop the ability to analyse engineering geological situations and problems and design the site investigation accordingly.

10 4

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

10 5

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1630

Course title: Engineering properties of soils & rocks

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1640

Course title: Environmental geotechnics

ECTS: 3

1st Education Period Differently to be announced M.S. Rosenbaum; E-mail: M.S.Rosenbaum@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Lectures, worksheet practicals The course will be run as 2 blocks, each comprising 5 days of tuition based broadly on three hours of lectures each morning and three hours of lectures and/ or practicals each afternoon. The 2 blocks are as follows:1 Soils: Engineering geology of soils and sediments2 Rocks: Engineering geology of rocks: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary This course is primarily intended to provide an overview of the engineering geological characteristics of the major types of soils and rocks, and their impact on engineering design and construction. The ways the source materials, the agents responsible for their formation and the climatic conditions in which they were formed govern their mineralogy and fabric, and thus their behaviour, are highlighted. This course addresses the following issues:- how the engineering properties of soils and rocks vary according to the geological conditions governing their deposition and their subsequent stress history- how the behaviour of some geological materials deviate from those of textbook soils and rocks- how geological properties impact on engineering behaviour To provide an overview of the engineering geological characteristics of the major types of soils and rocks, and their impact on engineering design and construction. AES1630 lecture notes available on Blackboard TEXTBOOKS Bell, F.G., 2000. Engineering Properties of Soils and Rocks. Blackwell Science (4th edition), 482 pp. Fookes, P.G., Lee, E.M. & Milligan, G., 2005. Geomorphology for Engineers. Whittles Publishing, 851 pp. PERIODICALS Fookes, P.G., 1997. The First Glossop Lecture. Geology for Engineers: the Geological Model, Prediction and Performance. Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology, 30, 293-431. [http://fbe.uwe.ac.uk/public/geocal/scripts/ totalgeology/home.plx]The following are the principal periodicals in the field of Engineering Geology, and should be regularly consulted: Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology & Hydrogeology Geological Society of London Engineering Geology Elsevier Geology for engineers

1st Education Period Differently to be announced Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl During a time period of 7 weeks, a lecture is given of 4 hours a week. Presence of the lecture and regular study of the contents form the basis for a successful exam.

Judgement Course Contents The course is lectured by Gerard van Meurs (Geodelft, g.a.m.vanmeurs@geodelft.nl).The origin of soil contamination is given. An overview is given for:- the types of contamination- the mechanisms which govern fate and transport of soil contaminants- risk assessment and risk management related with soil contamination- Type of contamination and mechanisms have consequences for: - techniques for site investigation, recent developments and pitfalls are addressed - concepts to deal with risks - concepts to control and to manage the risks- concepts to design a cost-effective remediation - application of passive as well as active barriers to prevent migration - remediation technologies - monitoring to verify behaviour and to check migration Study Goals The goals of the lecture are:- understanding of the principles of fate and behaviour of soil contamination- ability which concept for site investigation and which technology is convenient to meet the objective- ability to identify risks and to manage risks related with soil contamination- ability to judge which concept of remediation is the most suitable one- ability to judge which technology fits best to the local circumstances Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Transport phenomena, basic knowledge of organic and anorganic chemistry, basic knowledge of geohydrology and partial differential equations. Lecture notes and handouts (cases)

Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

106

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

10 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1650

Course title: Shallow depth geophysics

ECTS: 6

Study Goals

Geophysics is rarely included in site investigation programs designed by Dutch engineering geologists and/or civil engineers despite the general feeling that geophysics should lead to a better lateral definition of the shallow depth subsurface. In order to be able to wisely implement geophysics in site investigation, i.e., to select for given site conditions, the best technique or a combination of them, to calculate the depth of penetration and the resolution of the chosen techniques, our engineering geology students must have a better understanding of the following matters:- the request by civil engineers for a better model of the shallow depth subsurface than the one obtained using traditional techniques such as CPTs, boreholes and geological knowledge, - the physics of soils and rocks which are used in geophysics to be able to translate geophysical measurements into ground properties or contrasts in ground properties, - the theory behind seismic, electromagnetic, magnetic, resistivity and borehole logging techniques,- the acquisition and processing of geophysical signals.- the imaging of the subsurface The program of this course in geophysics designed for engineering geologists is ambitious. At the end of the course, the average engineering geologist student should at least understand very well the jargon used by geophysicists. He should be able to work in collaboration with a geophysicist and to assess the usefulness of a geophysical investigation. He should also feel comfortable in using a mathematical presentation of the physical properties of the materials that he knows well.

2nd Education Period, 3rd Education Period, 4th Education Period 2nd Exam Period, 3rd Exam Period, 4th Exam Period Dr.ir. G.G. Drijkoningen; E-mail: G.G.Drijkoningen@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. R. Ghose; E-mail: R.Ghose@tudelft.nl Prof.dr. D.G. Simons; E-mail: D.G.Simons@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. E.C. Slob; E-mail: E.C.Slob@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl

Education Method

Lectures and practicals are scheduled during the second and third periods. The field work takes place in the fourth period. A minimum mark of 4 for the theoretical examination is requested to take part to the field work.

Judgement Course Contents Course organized in modules: Introduction by D. Ngan-Tillard and expert from the industry: Integration of geophysical studies in site investigation to better characterize the shallow subsurface- 2 hours Module I: Theoretical background of seismic techniques often used by engineering geologists and environmental engineers as a black box by R. Ghose & G. Drijkoningen - 2.5 ECTS- Theoretical recap on signal processing and Fourier transforms- High resolution seismic for on shore shallow exploration- Linking seismics to borehole seismic and geotechnical data- Off shore shallow depth geophysics (Boomer, Chirp)Module II: Electromagnetism (electrical resistivity, magnetism and GPR included) by E. Slob- 1 ECTS- What can you do with these techniques?- Conceptual theory related to survey design, resolution and sensitivity to electric parameters, which relates to the sensibility of using geophysical techniques in different circumstances- Demonstration of equipment (GPR, multiple electrodes resistivity, em31, em34,em43)Module III: Guest lecturers - 1 ECTS - advantages and limitations of geophysical surveys when determining the engineering properties of ground, the existence of discontinuities, irregular boundaries and gradual boundaries, extent of pollution in specific ground or geological conditions in presence of man-made or environmental obstacles - real examples of investigations for tunnels, dams, foundations, offshore projects and building materials integrating geophysics Module IV: Field work by D. Ngan-Tillard- Site to be selected- 1.5 ECTS- design of geophysical survey integrating geological and geotechnical data- data acquisition, processing and interpretation- reporting

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge

AES1650 - Shallow Depth Geophysical Investigation lecture notes (theoretical part), articles Contents of TA3520 Introduction seismics are required before AES1650 can be taken.TA3520 is offered as a convergence MSc course. To be able to follow TA3520 and the subsequent geophysics courses, knowledge on Systems and signals (Fourier analysis) is required.

Remarks

10 8

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

10 9

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES1660

Course title: Subsidence, incl. practicals

ECTS: 2

Study Goals

After having followed this course students should be able to: - describe the different types of natural subsidence phenomena;use the techniques to predict subsidence for long wall coal mining, salt, water, gas and oil extraction;- estimate damage and to propose measures to reduce this damage;- evaluate the collapse potential of a room and pillar mine using a spreadsheet;- do a site investigation related to subsidence hazards and should be able to report the results in an environmental impact statement;- develop an independent, and synthesizing approach of subsidence phenomena.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period R.F. Bekendam; E-mail: R.F.Bekendam@citg.tudelft.nl R. Bekendam; E-mail: geocontrol@planet.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl

Education Method

The course will be given as a series of lectures in combination with exercises. The students must carry out the exercises of the practical, AES1661, independently. Literature and Study Materials Subsidence is the reaction of the earths surface to the extraction of solids, fluids or gases from the subsurface by different mining techniques like long wall mining, room and pillar mining, solution mining, oil, gas and water production; problems occur as well with abandoned workings and mineshafts. This surface reaction is only in certain cases predictable and may happen suddenly without any forewarning. More often, subsidence develops as the result of an interaction of different mechanisms developing in time and space. For some cases, a straightforward relation exists between human activity and subsidence at the surface. This enables making reasonable predictions. No economic planning of mining ore or hydro-carbons is possible without giving attention to the resulting subsidence. Natural subsidence occurs more often in an unpredictable way. By means of site investigation, hazard maps can be made to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Summary course description:- General theories of mining subsidence- Subsidence due to long wall mining- Prediction of trough subsidence (NCB-method, influence functions)- Working techniques to reduce or prevent subsidence- Subsidence due to extraction of salt- Subsidence due to pumping of oil, water and gas- Reduction of subsidence from oil, water and gas extractionDamage resulting from subsidence- Prevention of damage- Mining subsidence resulting from old mine workings (e.g. room and pillar mines)- Foundation design in undermined areas- Site investigation for subsidence areas Remarks Contact Expected prior knowledge

Judgement Course Contents

Lecture notes Subsidence and handouts, Blackboard.

AES1610Basic knowledge is required of rock mechanics, engineering geology and site investigation. The students should also have the ability to make neat drawings, spreadsheets and reports.

11 0

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

111

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1661

Course title: Subsidence, practicals

ECTS: 0

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1700

Course title: Professional practice in engineering geology

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period R.F. Bekendam; E-mail: R.F.Bekendam@citg.tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Practicum Three exercises have to be carried out independently. Staff is available for advise. Related to the course AES1660 exercises are carried out with the prediction of subsidence. Starting point is the prediction of subsidence caused by long wall coal mining. An evaluation is carried out of the collapse potential of a room and pillar mine. For an environmental impact statement a map will be made of a certain area, with the subsidence hazards.

1st Education Period, 4th Education Period 1st Exam Period, Differently to be announced Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Lectures, individual projects. The course is given in the 3rd period of the 1st year of the MSc programme (1 ECTS) and the 1st period of the 2nd year (2 ECTS). During the first part, guidelines for interpreting remotely sensed data and preparing professional documents (letters, reports, PowerPoint) are provided (6 hours in total). A first case is studied. Other cases are presented during the 2ndpart of the course. 6 contact hours per case are scheduled during which the case is introduced, support is provided, results are presented and feedback is given. In addition, the students are expected to invest 10 hours per case. Ir. Joost van der Schrier, Royal Haskoning, (j.vanderschrier@ royalhaskoning.com)shares his professional expertise with the students during the course. Geological and geotechnical information is analysed in the context of a variety of construction projects and a contrasting range of environments. These could include: a road tunnel and cutting in weathered granite rocks in SE Asia, a motorway and its associated works in the Western Europe, redevelopment of an urban area in the Netherlands (e.g. Maastricht), a marine dredging project in hard soils/weak rocks in West Africa, the construction of dikes around salt pans in the Middle East. Students assess ground risks related to construction projects based on analysis and deduction of real data including: (hydro)geological maps, aerial photographs, geophysical records, borehole logs and laboratory test results. The students then have to present their conclusions in the role of a junior engineering geologist working for a contractor or a consultant (as appropriate) to a senior engineer or engineering geologist. The students will have to provide the context, propose as appropriate a preliminary geotechnical design, recommendations for further site investigation, and raise awareness of potential geo-hazards and how these might be mitigated. Senior engineers or engineering geologists will then provide feedback and expose their own solution. Assessment of real data and subsequent reporting in a professional engineering environment. Hand-outs

Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

- Gaining experience in subsidence prediction for long wall coal mining. - Obtaining experience in the evaluation of the collapse potential of a room and pillar mine. - Developing insight in the making of an environmental impact statement by making a map of the subsidence hazards.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

3 exercises

AES1660Knowledge is expected of the relevant parts of the lecture notes Subsidence. Spreadsheets have to be used. Neat drawings have to be made.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

11 2

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

113

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1710

Course title: GIS applications in Engineering Geology

ECTS: 3

Literature and Study Materials

Lecture notes available on Blackboard Reference literature: Bonham-Carter, G.F., 1994. Geographic information systems for geoscientists. Elsevier, 398 pp. Burrough, P.A. & McDonnell, R.A., 1998. Principles of Geographical Information Systems, 2nd edition. Oxford University Press, 333 pp. Culshaw, M.G., 2005. From concept towards reality: developing the attributed 3D geological model of the shallow subsurface. Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology, 38 (3), 231-284.Fookes, P.G., 1997. The First Glossop Lecture. Geology for Engineers: the Geological Model, Prediction and Performance. Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology, 30, 293-431. [http://fbe.uwe.ac.uk/public/geocal/scripts/totalgeology/home. plx]Griffiths, J.S., 2001. Land surface evaluation for engineering practice. Geological Society Engineering Geology Special Publication No.18, 248 pp. Isaaks, E.H. & Srivastava, R.M., 1989. Applied geostatistics. Oxford University Press, 561 pp. Lee, E.M. & Jones, D.K.C., 2004. Landslide risk assessment. Thomas Telford, 454 pp.

3rd Education Period Differently to be announced M.S. Rosenbaum; E-mail: M.S.Rosenbaum@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Lectures, worksheet practicals. The course will be run as 3 blocks, each comprising about 3-4 mornings of tuition based on two one hour lectures followed by a2-3 hour hands-on worksheet using GIS software on a PC. The 3 blocks are as follows:1. Geo-hazards: General principles of engineering geology in the context of hazard identification and mapping; management of spatial data2. Spatial Analysis: Interpolation and geostatistics3. Modelling and Decision Support: Probability and fuzzy sets; weights of evidence.

Judgement Course Contents This course is primarily intended to provide a working knowledge of how GIS maybe used to manage and analyse spatial information concerning engineering geology. Examples will be drawn from the experience of the Principal Instructor in the fields of ground investigation and geo-hazard assessment. The principles are equally applicable to other geotechnical situations where spatial controls are important. There will be a contribution by Brecht Wassing (Guest Lecturer) on the use of GIS and geostatistics for engineering geological problems: ground water settlement problems and the tunnel works. Study Goals To provide an introduction to the ways in which GIS (Geographical Information Systems) can be used within engineering geology. The course concentrates on a PC-based system (Idrisi for Windows), and emphasises the raster (cell- or pixel-based) GIS data structure. It includes an overview of hazard assessment and risk analysis using GIS databases and is supplemented by a practical project in which geo-hazards will be identified and assessed using basic engineering geological information. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

114

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

115

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1720

Course title: Rock mechanics applications

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1730

Course title: Soil mechanics applications

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period, 4th Exam Period Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl Lectures, guess lectures, exercises, laboratory tests, case studies, 3 days fieldwork Properties and testing of intact rock and construction materials. Characterisation and properties of discontinuities in rock. Characterisation and properties of discontinuous rock masses. Large and small scale testing and monitoring of discontinuities and discontinuous rock masses. Mechanical and physical behaviour of rock masses. Principles of flow through discontinuities and discontinuous rock masses. Weathering and susceptibility to weathering of discontinuous rock masses. Methods and influence of excavation methods. Dredgeability, wear and performance of cutting tools. Influence of blasting and other vibrations. Influence of stress and stress changes. Rock mass classification systems. Possibilities for analytical and numerical modelling of discontinuous rock masses. Principles of slope, tunnel, dam and foundation design. Case histories. Exposure to hard soils/weak rocks, karst formations, excavations, slopes and slope reinforcement in discontinuous limestone during fieldwork in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands. Know-how to describe rock masses. Complete understanding of the mechanical and physical behaviour of discontinuous rock masses and the interaction between engineering structures and discontinuous rock masses. Familiarity with rock mechanics aspects relevant to the dredging industry. Know-how to design tunnels, dams and pile foundations in/on rock masses.

1st Education Period Differently to be announced Prof.dr.ir. F.B.J. Barends; E-mail: F.B.J.Barends@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl 3 practicals (laboratory and test data interpretation) of 3 hours each and 19 hours lectures and exercises. The course reviews basic aspects of soil mechanics such as stresses and strains, deformation and strength and ground water flow. It covers a wide range of applications of soil mechanics in construction: prediction of settlements due to consolidation, calculation of bearing capacity of shallow and deep foundations, calculation of earth pressure for retaining structures (dikes, sheet pile wall, quay wall), analysis of slope stability, principles of soft ground tunnelling and ground improvement techniques. Practical laboratory work supports the theory of consolidation. Permeability and oedometer tests are conducted and results are interpreted using the Kopjan, Bjerrum and a, b, c methods.

Study Goals

This course is tailored for (engineering) geology students, road and railway and offshore engineering students who have no knowledge of soil mechanics and geotechnical engineering. It is organized at the start of the MSc to ensure all students are optimally prepared to follow the courses of their core programme and select electives focussing on geotechnical engineering.

Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

- Hand-outs Applied Soil Mechanics written by Frans Barends Soil tests manual- Soil mechanics by A. Verruijt, 2001All available in digital format on blackboard.

Literature and Study Materials

Book Introduction to rock mechanics, Goodman, 2nd edition, hand-outs. Reference literature: Practical Rock Engineering, Hoek, edition 2000 (http://www.rocscience.com/hoek/PracticalRockEngineering.asp)Engineering Rock Mechanics, John Harrison and John Hudson- An introduction to Principles, 1997- Illustrative worked Examples, 2000

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

11 6

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

11 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1800

Course title: Exploration Geology (incl. remote sensing)

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1802

Course title: Geological fieldwork (+ EM methods)

ECTS: 3

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Dr. W Visser; E-mail: w.visser@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl Lectures and assignments The basic geological concepts required to predict the occurrence of hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins are treated and a range of exploration tools are discussed, including gravity, magnetics, remote sensing, seismic, geochemistry, modelling. The origin and evolution of sedimentary basins, and their exploration potential will be discussed in terms of a petroleum system, made up of a source rock, reservoir rock, seal rock, and overburden rock, and comprising the processes of trap formation, as well as the generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons.

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period H.W. Frikken; E-mail: hwfrikken@tiscali.nl Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl Excursion The outcrops to be studied are in quarries, and for each outcrop a comprehensive programme of assignments is set up. This includes a description of the sedimentological setting, characterization of permeability baffles and conduits and the design of optimal well trajectories. The participants will write a short field course report about all these assignments (learning points only). Prior to the course the participants will carry out a literature study and write a summary report about this literature.

Judgement Course Contents The new outcrop training course will be held in Germany. The course will lead the participants through outcrop equivalents of all relevant reservoirs in the subsurface of The Netherlands and their specific development aspects. These comprise: fluvial reservoirs of the Carboniferous (including coals as source rock for gas), Rotliegend (proximal conglomerates, Aeolian and distal playa lake deposits), shallow marine carbonate reefs of the Zechstein, anhydrite cap rock, Jurassic oil source rock, Lower Cretaceous shallow marine classic Bentheim Sandstone (including oil source rock and cap rock) and Upper Cretaceous Chalk. Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks TA2910, TA2911, TA2920, TA2921, TA3942, TA3610, AES1810, AES1820 <> Excursion guidebook will be handed out.

Study Goals

To gain an understanding of the geological factors that govern the accumulation of hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins, and to identify exploration targets.

Literature and Study Materials

Handouts Reference literature J. Gluyas & R. Swarbrick, 2004. Petroleum Geoscience. E.A. Beaumont & N.H. Foster (Eds.), 1999, Exploring for oil and gas traps. P.A. Allen & J.R. Allen: Basin Analysis ~ Principles and Applications

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Guest lectures on Remote Sensing Tools and Applications for Exploration and Exploration Economics will be part of the program. BSc in Applied Earth Sciences or similar BSc + AES1000

118

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

119

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1810

Course title: Production geology

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement

Code: AES1820

Course title: Reservoir characterisation & development

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Drs. K. Elewaut; E-mail: K.Elewaut@citg.tudelft.nl Dr. J. Noad; E-mail: J.noad@citg.tudelft.nl The course includes 14 hours of lectures and 7 afternoon practicals. Written examination of 3 hours duration. Performance during practicals is taken into account for the final grade.

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Drs. K. Elewaut; E-mail: K.Elewaut@citg.tudelft.nl Prof.dr. S.M. Luthi; E-mail: S.M.Luthi@tudelft.nl The course includes 14 hours of lectures and 7 afternoon practicals. An self-study assignment is also done. Examination: Written examination of 3 hours duration. Performance during practicals and of the assignment is taken into account for the final grade.

Judgement Course Contents Production geology includes those geological studies necessary between discovery and abandonment of an oil or gas field. The course consists of a lecture and practicals. In the lecture, the essential working tools of the production geologist are discussed. These include: geological interpretation of seismic lines, well log analysis, core data analysis, mapping, zonation, well correlation, construction of cross sections, sequence stratigraphy, facies analysis and volumetric calculations. These tools are used to obtain structural, sedimentary, diagenetic, and petrophysical models of the reservoir. Emphasis is put on minimizing the error in the resulting model by making an optimum use of the combination of all tools available to the production geologist. Newer technologies such as nuclear magnetic resonance logging, logging-whiledrilling, directional drilling, and reservoir monitoring are also discussed in the course, and their contribution to better geological models and more efficient field developments are illustrated. The practicals focus on applying these methodologies to select realistic field examples. This course illustrates the importance of proper data acquisition and analysis in order to make a proper assessment of a fields potential. Petroleum engineers and geophysicists need to know how to make maps of reservoirs, and how to assess the oil and gas reserves in a field. Furthermore they need to know how to estimate the uncertainties in these estimates, and what methods can be used to reduce these uncertainties. All presentations are on Blackboard. Reference literature Petroleum Geoscience by J. Gluyas and R. Swarbrick, Blackwell Publishing, 359 p. (This book is also the reference literature for the course AES1820/ta4560) Courses in geology, geophysics, reservoir and production engineering, petroleum geology Course Contents

Reservoir development is the follow-up course on production geology and prepares the student for the field development study. It discusses how geological models are used to make field development decisions: Where to drill development/infill wells; how to determine well productivity; how to assess block connectivity in field; where to complete a well; how to determine cumulative probability estimates from the combination of geological uncertainties; how to prepare data for input into reservoir simulation; and how to develop a field in an economic viable way. The lectures often include a guest speaker from the oil industry.

Study Goals

Petroleum engineers need to know how to develop a field in an economically sound way, including proper data acquisition, interpretation and uncertainty assessment of relevant field parameters.

Literature and Study Materials

All lecture presentations are available on Blackboard. Reference literature: Book: Petroleum Geoscience by J. Gluyas and R. Swarbrick, Blackwell Publishing, 359 p. (this book is also used in courses AES1800 and AES1810)Reference literature Book: Petroleum Geoscience by J. Gluyas and R. Swarbrick, Blackwell Publishing, 359 p. (this book is also used in courses AES1800 and AES1810)

Study Goals

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Courses in geology, reservoir and production engineering; petroleum and production geology.

Literature and Study Materials

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

120

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

12 1

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: AES1830

Course title: Reservoir Sedimentology

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1840

Course title: Advanced Structural Geology

ECTS: 3

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Dr. M.E. Donselaar; E-mail: M.E.Donselaar@citg.tudelft.nl The course is given as a tutorial. The students study selected papers on the different aspects of the subject. In regular sessions the contents of the studied material will be discussed. The students write an essay on each of the topics (modules, see below) of the literature study. At the end of the course a two days visit is planned to NAM in Assen, where selected cores of a producing fluvial reservoir will be studied. The literature is subdivided in the following modules:1. Fluvial sedimentology2. Fluvial sequence stratigraphy3. Fluvial reservoirs.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Drs. J.C. Blom; E-mail: J.C.Blom@tudelft.nl The course includes lectures, presentations given by the students and an excursion Structural geology is the study of deformation of the Earths crust. During this course, special emphasis will be placed on the role of structures with respect to the presence and structure of reservoirs. Basics include general principles of structural geology and rock mechanics. Structural geology can be applied on large scale, when looking at different structural styles of deformation in the Earths crust. Extension, compression, wrench tectonics and inversion all lead to different forms and distributions of reservoirs. On a medium scale, structures such as folds, fractures and faults greatly influence the size of the reservoir. On a small scale, they can also influence reservoir characteristics as porosity and permeability, as well as production. Structural modelling, both analogue and digital, is important in validating interpretations of reservoir size, geometry and production characteristics.

Judgement Course Contents The subject of the course is the complex reservoir architecture (= spatial arrangement) of fluvial sedimentary systems, and its impact on our thinking about optimum recovery. Study Goals The aim of the course is to gain a thorough understanding of the complexity of fluvial reservoirs, and of the geological factors that determine this complexity. The course serves as a solid basis for the Huesca Reservoir Geology Fieldwork (ta4921). Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks BSc course (= convergence course) Applied Sedimentology TA2910 Literature will be posted on Blackboard course site Study Goals

Reservoir geologists need a thorough understanding of the different tectonic settings in which reservoirs can occur. They also need to understand the different deformation processes that play a role in the deformation of rocks, and the way these influence the distribution and production of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, they need to be able to asses the geometries of possible reservoirs. presentations will be available on Blackboard. Reference literature Will be announced during the course General/ structural geology

122

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

12 3

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1850

Course title: Geological modelling

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1860-05 1st Exam Period

Course title: Analysis of Sedimentological Data

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Dr.ir. I. Overeem; E-mail: I.Overeem@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl lectures, computer practicals and assignments. (1) Introduction: classes of models, purposes, needs; Models as input to reservoir simulators; Stand-alone models: visualisation, sensitivity analysis: STOIIP/reserves, connected volumes, well spacing studies; Classic layered 2D models; Stochastic shales, tight streaks, Kv reduction;(2) Geostatistical models: Kriging, Gaussian Random, Sequential Indicator Simulation, Fractals, Sequential Gaussian Simulation, Markov chains;(3) Deterministic/Geocellular 3-D models: Object-based models: Boolean models, fluvial/channel models, geometric stratigraphic models; (4) Process-based models: General overview and examples, DUT BARSIM; computer practical;(5) Fault modelling: restoring fault planes from fault polygons, juxtaposition diagrams, calculation of transmissibilities through faults.

1st Education Period Dr. G.J. Weltje; E-mail: G.J.Weltje@tudelft.nl Lectures and practicals (including visit to core lab) Introduction to analysis and interpretation of common sedimentological data (outcrops, cores, logs, thin sections) Basic understanding of sedimentological data acquisition and interpretation To be announced

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Sedimentary geology at introductory level

Code: AES1870

Course title: Sequence stratigraphy

ECTS: 2

Study Goals

To develop a working knowledge of the various quantitative tools available for building and constraining static geological models for reservoir simulations.

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Prof.dr. S.B. Kroonenberg; E-mail: S.B.Kroonenberg@tudelft.nl 2 lectures a week during one trimester Principles of interpretation of seismic, outcrop and well log data from different sedimentary environments in terms of accommodation (tectonics, sea level) and sediment supply (tectonics, climate)

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

handouts

Courses 1st year MSc RG, PE or AG

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Provide the student with an understanding of the structure of sedimentary sequences as a tool for hydrocarbon exploration Book Sequence Stratigraphy, by D. Emery and K.J. Myers (1996, Blackwell, ISBN 0-632-03706-7, 297 pp.); lecture notes BSc Applied Earth Sciences or equivalent

12 4

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

12 5

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES1902

Course title: Reservoir Geological Fieldwork (Huesca)

ECTS: 6

Remarks

Veldwerk met inleidende colleges. Het veldwerk vindt plaats gedurende drie weken in de provincie Huesca, Spanje, ten zuiden van de gelijknamige provinciehoofdstad. Er wordt in teamverband gewerkt om een complete data set op te nemen bestaande uit sedimentologische, spectrale gamma-ray- en permeabiliteitslogs. De data dienen in het veld gecorreleerd te worden. Aan het eind van het veldwerk wordt een voorlopig verslag ingediend. In de week aansluitend op het veldwerk wordt dit verslag in Delft nagekeken. Bespreking vindt plaats in de week daaropvolgend, en op basis hiervan wordt het definitieve verslag geproduceerd. De deadline voor inlevering van dit definitieve verslag is 1 september van hetzelfde jaar.

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Dr. M.E. Donselaar; E-mail: M.E.Donselaar@citg.tudelft.nl Project Prior to the field training course the participants should familiarize with the specific geological setting of the target areas, and with the potential heterogeneities in analogue reservoir settings. The theoretical background, necessary to make this intensive short-duration training course successful, is presented in a number of lectures. The participants will receive a compilation of the relevant literature on the subject to accompany the introductory lectures. The aim of the field training course is to give insight in reservoir architecture and to assess the influence of permeability baffles on flow. The field training course comprises the construction of a 3-D deterministic geological model for a reservoir-equivalent outcrop setting. The various aspects of stratigraphical setting, basin development, relation of reservoir architecture and sequence stratigraphy, geometry and internal heterogeneities of the reservoir elements, will be studied in detail. Emphasis is on: variability of facies associations, shape and extent of permeability baffles, production of synthetic well logs, correlation possibilities and problems. Thin slides and microscopes will be available for the on-site determination of the mineralogy of permeability baffles. Course Contents Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Education Period

Code: AES2005

Course title: Colloquium

ECTS: 1

2nd Education Period, 3rd Education Period, 4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Project Examination: The grade for this exam is based on both the performance of the presentation and during the defence in the closed session. The graduation committee will give an advice about the grade but the professor will define the definite grade. The colloquium consists of a public presentation of the graduation thesis (see AES2005) by means of a 45 minute lecture, after which questions can be posed. Next to the presentation, the candidate will be examined on his thesis by the graduation committee in a closed session.

Study Goals

Gaining insight in reservoir sedimentology, -architecture and -modelling, correlation methods, integration of sedimentological, petrophysical and geophysical data. Exercising the carrying out of a project, independently and in a team. Gaining insight in the study methods of oneself and of others. Study Goals

The graduate student displays the knowledge and skills obtained during his specialization by convincingly presenting the results of his research.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge

Relevant literature will be handed out.

Literature and Study Materials Contact

<>

to be announced

Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Knowledge gained throughout the years. See Graduation Phase Rulings (part of the Course and examination regulations Masters degree)

126

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

12 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: AES2006

Course title: Graduation thesis

ECTS: 44

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: AES2009 none

Course title: Field development project

ECTS: 9

2nd Education Period, 3rd Education Period, 4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Project Each individual programme will be concluded with an individual graduation thesis: a research project of ca 9 months reported in a graduation thesis. The research results will also be presented in public to the graduation committee (see course ta5091 - the colloquium). The subject of the graduation project is to be decided jointly by the graduation coordinator of the specialization and the student. Usually, the topic is part of a Ph.D. research, in which case the Ph.D. student concerned will supervise the graduation project. The graduation research project can also take place at an external company or research institute. In any case, the graduation coordinator remains responsible for the quality requirements of the project and the supervision. The graduation subject will be within the area of the specialization.

1st Education Period Dr. J. Noad; E-mail: J.noad@citg.tudelft.nl Drs. K.H.A.A. Wolf; E-mail: K.H.A.A.Wolf@tudelft.nl Prof.bsc.msc.ph. P.K. Currie; E-mail: P.K.Currie@tudelft.nl

Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Project, working in teams On the basis of real field data, the whole field development process will be passed through from appraisal to full field development. Specific knowledge acquired in earlier courses(geophysics, petrophysics, geology, reservoir technology, drilling and production technology) will be used to set up and execute a field development program using seismic, petrophysical and reservoir data. A field development plan will be developed and presented to a management panel.

Study Goals

The application of acquired knowledge on a realistic field study.Gaining an overview of the interaction between the specialist disciplines in petroleum engineering.- Learning to deal with inaccuracy and uncertainty.- Working in a multidisciplinary team

Study Goals

The graduate student learns to apply the skills and knowledge gained in the preceding study in a research project he/she has to carry out independently. Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge The 2nd year programme has to be completed in before the student can work on the graduation thesis The 2nd year programme has to be completed in before the student can work on the graduation thesis. Remarks

Handouts and lecture notes of previous courses and Reference literature AES1500, AES1510, AES1340 (ta4430)

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

To be selected in consultation with the thesis supervisor.

12 8

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

12 9

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Code: AES2506

Course title: Graduation thesis Applied Geophysics

ECTS: 40

Course Education Period Exam Period

Code: CT3300

Course title: Use of underground space

ECTS: 3

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Ir. G. Arends; E-mail: G.Arends@tudelft.nl Prof.ir. J.W. Bosch; E-mail: J.W.Bosch@tudelft.nl Lectures. Excursion. Course content Overview Introduction to soil science Introduction to subsurface management Basements and special constructions Tunnels Safety and risk management Decision making process Multiple use of land Small infrastructure, trenchless technologies Legal aspects Site visit to major project

Dr.ir. E.C. Slob; E-mail: E.C.Slob@tudelft.nl

Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

Students obtain basic knowledge of the multidisciplinary aspects of the use of underground space. Based on knowledge about the characteristics of several construction technologies they are able to asses their applicability in different situations. They have insight in complex decision making processes and are able to define an integral approach.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Underground Space Technology, available at Bookshop. Hand outs available at Black Board.

13 0

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

131

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: CT4130

Course title: Probabilistic Design

ECTS: 4

Introduction to scheduling uncertainties; Influence of corrective measures on duration and costs; Maintenance; Introduction to maintenance strategies; Effect of maintenance on risk; Influence of inspections. Application areas; Structural safety of buildings, dikes, offshore platforms, bridges, etc; Maintenance and management; Quality assurance; Safety management; Geostatistics; Reliability of software. Study Goals After the course, the student has to be able to do Level I, II and III calculations, risk-based optimisations and system probability calculations. Literature and Study Materials obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): Probabilistic Design Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. recommended other materials: Practice exams Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering, also on blackboard. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks <>

1st Education Period, 2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period, 4th Exam Period Dr.ir. P.H.A.J.M. van Gelder; E-mail: P.H.A.J.M.vanGelder@tudelft.nl Prof.drs.ir. J.K. Vrijling; E-mail: J.K.Vrijling@tudelft.nl Prof.ir. A.C.W.M. Vrouwenvelder; E-mail: A.Vrouwenvelder@citg.tudelft.nl Ir. M.A. Burgmeijer; E-mail: M.A.Burgmeijer@tudelft.nl

Education Method Judgement

Lectures, Exercise, participation is voluntary. Half point bonus for exam, when exercise is passed sufficiently. one mark, based on written exam and a voluntary exercise. Half point bonus for exam, when exercise is passed sufficiently. This bonus is valid for one year.

Course Contents

Objectives of probabilistic design of civil structures. Probability Calculus; Steps in a Risk Analysis; Inventory of possible unwanted events, effects and consequences; Determining and evaluating the risk. Decision-making based on risk analysis; Decision-making under uncertainties; Probabilistic analysis of the decision problem; Frame of reference concerning safety; Current Dutch safety standards; Generally applicable safety standards. Reliability of an element; Limit state functions, strength and load; Ultimate and serviceability limit states; Strength of concrete, steel, timber, soil, etc; Loads of traffic, wind, waves, water, earthquakes, precipitation, ice, etc; Time dependence. Reliability calculation methods; Level III methods; Numerical integration; Monte Carlo method; Level I methods; Non-linear limit state functions; Non-normally distributed variables; Dependent random variables; Comparison of different calculation methods. Failure probability and life span; Deterioration processes; Risk calculation of systems with a variable rate of failure; Non availability; Markov processes; Load combinations. Strength calculation with level I method; Linking the level I method to the failure probability calculation; Standardisation of alpha-values; Load combinations for level I strength calculations. Reliability of systems; Probability of failure of the serial system; Probability of failure of the parallel system; FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis); FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis); Event tree; Fault tree; Cause consequence chart; Reliability of correctable systems. Scheduling the realisation of activities;

13 2

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

133

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4350

Course title: Numerical soil mechanics

ECTS: 4

Study Goals

The students develop an insight in the way geomechanical and numerical aspects are combined in order to achieve numerical predictions of the behaviour of geomechanical structures both by F.E. code and industrial F.E. software.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Prof.dr.ir. F. Molenkamp; E-mail: F.Molenkamp@tudelft.nl lectures; case study; exercise; instruction The aim of this teaching module is to clarify the process behind the composition of industrial finite element software. Starting from the differential field equations, boundary and possibly initial conditions the corresponding integral equation for finite element analyses are composed using among others Galerkins method. These integral equations are implemented in numerical code and the resulting output of that code is interpreted using computer graphics. These processes are considered in details for four types of geomechanics problems. Finally the industrial finite element packages Plaxis and Diana are discussed. Rather than remaining black boxes, in this way the capabilities and limitations of industrial software become better appreciated. The following five topics are taught: Introduction of programming in Fortran95. Formulation and programming in Fortran95 by means of Finite Elements of the following 4 topics: Foundations on elastic bedding. The distributions of the settlement of the foundation and the bending and shear forces in the foundation are derived. This formulation is also considered for lateral soil-pile interaction. Plane deformation and failure of elasto-plastic solid with MohrCoulomb failure criterion. The plastic failure criterion is satisfied by means of a visco-plastic numerical iteration scheme. The factor of safety is estimated on the basis of a series of analyses with reduced strength parameters. The finite element analysis is compared to the classical slope stability analysis using slip circles. Ground water flows through embankment, involving both a free surface and a seepage surface. Consolidation of elastic 1-dimensional and plane-strain compression with drainage at the upper surface due to ramp type of loading on the upper surface. The accuracy of the numerical solution is demonstrated, both by comparing to analytical solutions and by considering numerical solutions with both spatial and temporal refinements. The same problems are also analysed by means of the industrial finite element package Plaxis. To assess the students performance reports are requested on five assignments, concerning: Hands-on Fortran95 Beam on elastic foundation Slope stability Groundwater flow Consolidation Literature and Study Materials

syllabus: Available at the first lecture. obligatory lecture note(s)/ textbook(s): Lecture notes by prof.dr.ir. A. Verruijt o-n Numerical GeomechanicsAvailable at Bookshop Civil Engineering.Course book by I.M. Smith, D.V. Griffiths, Programming the finite element method, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons (1998), ISBN: 0-471-96543-Xavailable at: VSSD, Poortlandplein 6 te Delft

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

134

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

135

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4353

Course title: Continuum Mechanics

ECTS: 6

1st Education Period, 2nd Education Period 1st Exam Period, 2nd Exam Period Prof.dr.ir. F. Molenkamp; E-mail: F.Molenkamp@tudelft.nl Lectures, exercise Final mark consists 70% of mark of examination and 30% of mark of assignments The module starts with the solution of linear equations, matrix algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors and polar decomposition. Then vectors and Cartesian tensors are considered, including dyadic products, invariants, isotropic and deviatoric tensors, spectral representation of tensors, skew-symmetric and orthogonal tensors. Also tensor calculus is discussed and some common integral theorems are introduced. Next the kinematics of deformable bodies is considered, including the Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions of the material time derivatives of material vectors and tensors. Particle paths, streamlines and streak lines are described as well. Then rigid body motion is considered. The larger topic concerns motion and deformation. This starts with the deformation and velocity gradient tensors and the deformation of material lines, surfaces and volumes and their rates of change. Then the polar decomposition of the large deformation tensor, the principal stretches and their direction and the large strain and material rotation tensors are discussed. Also the principal strain space is introduced to facilitate the illustration of the strain history. For small deformation the infinitesimal strain and rotation tensors, the conditions of strain compatibility and the displacement gradient circle are described. Finally the strain rate, spin and vorticity tensors are considered. Next the stress tensor is introduced, including traction and stress components, principal stresses and their directions, isotropic and deviatoric stress tensors, the principal stress space for the illustration of the stress history, the stress circle and various simple stress states. Additionally other stress tensors and their related strain measures are reviewed. Finally co-rotational material time derivatives of vector and tensor fields are described and their physical significance is clarified, including the Jaumann stress rate. Then the rates of change of integrals along material curves, surfaces and volumes are derived and applied to the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. Also flow of heat and the physical principle of non-negative internal dissipation are introduced.

These laws are also expressed with respect to a general reference volume, thus facilitating application in analyses of large deformation and flow. Next some basic constitutive equations are considered, including isotropic linear and non-linear elasticity and viscous-elasticity, Newtonian viscous fluids and some general aspects of material modelling, plasticity and visco-plasticity, including geomechanical constitutive concepts as stress-dilatancy and state of ultimate deviatoric deformation. Also transverse anisotropy is considered. The concepts of material instability and the controllability of constitutive models, the parameter range of uniqueness and the occurrence of bifurcations into localized deformation modes are described. Finally the basic laws of physics for two- and three-phase materials (among others saturated and unsaturated geomechanics) are formulated. The same physical laws are deployed for each phase of the multi-phase continuum, inclusive of interaction terms. Then constitutive laws for each of the phases and their interactions are discussed. Finally the stiffness and strength of the solid phase, the interaction with the liquid and air phases and the flow of the pore fluid, the pore air and the heat are formulated in general terms. Assignments hands-on fortran95 eigenvalue analysis of 3*3 symmetric matrix polar decomposition of 3*3 non-symmetric matrix stress-strain paths (in the principal spaces) Study Goals Understanding and usage of tensor calculus Calculation and interpretation of both large deformation and rotation of materials and stress in materials Understanding of the combined application of the laws of physics and constitutive relations in order to:- measure, interpret and formulate the properties of continuum materials- formulate engineering problems in continuum mechanics Understanding of the background of the mechanics and physics of multi-phase continuum materials in large deformation and flow, among others. as applied for saturated and unsaturated geomechanics Eglit, M.E., Hodges, D.H., Continuum Mechanics via problems and exercises, Part 1: Theory and Problems, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd, 1996, ISBN:981-02-2962-3. Part 2: Answer and Solutions, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd, 1996, ISBN: 981-02-2963-1. Haupt, P., Continuum Mechanics and theory of materials, Springer-Verlag, 2000, ISBN: 3-540-66114-x.

Literature and Study Materials

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

13 6

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

13 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4360

Course title: Material models for soil and rock

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4380

Course title: Numerical modelling of geotechnical problems

ECTS: 3

2nd Education Period, 3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Dr.ir. R.B.J. Brinkgreve; E-mail: R.B.J.Brinkgreve@tudelft.nl - Lectures- Assignments (exercises, as a part of the exam) Average of assignments and test. The course deals with backgrounds of different constitutive models to describe deformation behaviour of soils and rock (stress-strain relationships). The models are formulated on the basis of elasticity and plasticity theory. A part of the course is devoted to parameter determination and the use of constitutive models in the finite element method.- Introduction to continuum mechanics - Stress and deformation tensors - Hookes law - Influence of pore pressures - Simulation of standard tests (triaxal tests, oedometer tests) - Drained and undrained behaviour - Hardening, softening, hysteresis, dilatancy - Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion - Parameter selection - Non-linear elastic and pseudo-elastic models - Plasticity theory, yield function, plastic potential function- Yield functions of Mohr-Coulomb, Tresca, Drucker-Prager, Von Mises - Advanced soil models - Cam-Clay, Soft-Soil model, Hardening-Soil model, Creep model - Application of models in the finite element method. To provide knowledge about:- Backgrounds and theoretical aspects of constitutive models for soil and rock- The possibilities and limitations of constitutive models - The selection of model parameters - The application of constitutive models Obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): Sitters C.W.M. (1996). Material Models for Soil and Rock. Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. recommended other materials: - Sitters C.W.M. (1996). Continuum Mechanics.- Molenkamp, F. (2003). Continuum mechanics (see Blackboard). (Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering)- Brinkgreve R.B.J. (1994) Geomaterial Models and Numerical Analysis of Softening. Dissertation. Delft University of Technology.- Brinkgreve R.B.J., Broere, W. (2004) PLAXIS Finite Element Code for Soil and Rock Analysis, Version 8 (available at www.plaxis.nl).

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Dr.ir. O.M. Heeres; E-mail: O.M.Heeres@tudelft.nl Lectures During the last decades, the numerical modelling of geotechnical problems has become increasingly important in geotechnical practice. This course focuses on the numerical modelling of geotechnical problems, and consists of the following modules: construction excavations, embankments, tunnelling, groundwater flow and pollution transport, dynamics, installation of foundations, 3d modelling, inverse modelling, discrete elements, and the use of finite elements within the framework of standards, such as the Euro code. As much as possible, the modules are based on engineering examples. Starting from engineering experience, rules of thumb and basic approaches, modelling aspects are discussed. The choice of appropriate numerical techniques and soil models is addressed. Attention is given to parameter determination. Capabilities and limitations of the various analysis types and techniques are discussed, and the numerical formulations are given. Emphasis is put on interpretation, checking, and judging the numerical results.

Study Goals

Study Goals

During the last decades, the numerical modelling of geotechnical problems has become increasingly important in geotechnical practice. This course provides the student with knowledge to perform numerical analyses of geotechnical problems, and interpret and judge the results.

Literature and Study Materials

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Reader and hand-outs

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

138

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

139

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4390

Course title: Geo risk management

ECTS: 3

methods with various risk profiles, parking garages, construction pits, interaction with existing structures, external risks e.g. vibration and noise, use of experience data and GeoBrain. Ground risk management and dikes: Mechanics of ground, stability and risk, dealing with proven strength, advisors-factor (Bergambacht), relations with failure probability, (un)identified anomalies. Ground risk management and infrastructure projects: Mechanics of ground, settlements and risk, observational method, risks related to vacuum consolidation and other ground improvement techniques, case Betuwe Route : Waardse Alliance. Geo-environmental ground risk management: Impact on building and infrastructure projects during 6 main project phases, processes of (polluted) groundwater flow, dissipation of contamination, geo-biological processes and technical solutions like flexible emission control. Ground risk management and some special issues: Apparent reliability of standards, decision problem offshore projects, sand reclamation projects, . Study Goals After the course the student is aware of the inherent risk of ground within civil engineering and construction, including the impact and difficulties of the human factor. Furthermore, the student is able to apply principles of ground-related risk management during the entire process for a variety of civil engineering constructions. Literature and Study Materials syllabus: Geo Risk Management. required lecture note(s)/ textbook(s): - Uncertainty and Ground Conditions A Risk Management Approach (by Martin van Staveren, published by Elsevier, Oxford, 2006)available at: - Bookshop Civil Engineering. recommended materials: - Risicomanagement voor Projecten - De RISMAN-Methode Toegepast (by D. van Well-Stam, F. Lindenaar, S. van Kinderen and B.P. van den Bunt, published by Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 2003)available at Bookshop Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Prof.ir. J.W. Bosch; E-mail: J.W.Bosch@tudelft.nl lectures One mark, based on written exam. Introduction: Ground-related risk and the construction industry, challenges and opportunities, construction projects, processes and contracts. Geo-bloopers, state-of-the-art construction and a vision towards the future. From uncertainty via risk to geo risk management: The concepts of uncertainty, risk, and ground conditions, introduction of the GeoQ concept with 6 steps and 6 project phases, the link with the RISMAN approach, the position of GeoQ towards soil mechanics, geotechnical engineering, quality management, hazard management and knowledge management. The human factor in ground risk management: Individuals and risk - the concepts of individuals, risk perceptions and how individuals contribute to geo risk management. Teams and risk - the concept of the team, teams and risk communication and how teams contribute to geo risk management. Clients, society and groundrelated risk. The GeoQ ground risk management process: The 6 steps of the GeoQ process : gathering information, identifying risk, classifying risk, remediating risk, evaluating risk, mobilising risk. The 6 project phases of the GeoQ process : feasibility, pre-design, design, contracting, construction and maintenance. Ground risk management tools in 6 project phases: Site classification, scenario analysis, team-based risk identification and classification, risk-driven ground investigations, risk allocation and dealing with differing site conditions, the approach of the Geotechnical Baseline Report, Dispute Review Boards, conventional and innovative contracts, the observational method, the life cycle approach for cost-effective maintenance, an ICT-supported and risk-driven approach for dike safety assessment. Ground risk management and ground properties: Ground layering and properties, geostatistics, dealing with different types of uncertainties and combining different types of information, sampling theories, groundwater related problems. Ground risk management and underground construction: Tunnelling techniques, ground conditions and risk profiles, specialist foundation techniques, interaction with existing structures. Ground risk management and building projects: Projects and construction

14 0

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

141

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT4420

Course title: Geohydrology 1

ECTS: 4

Literature and Study Materials

obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): lecture notes Geohydrology I Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. obligatory other materials: English version Available at the section secretariat. recommended other materials: Foltes, CW ( ); Applied Hydrology Dufour, CF (2000); Groundwater in the Netherlands Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering.

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period C. Maas; E-mail: C.Maas@citg.tudelft.nl Dr.ir. T.N. Olsthoorn; E-mail: T.N.Olsthoorn@citg.tudelft.nl lectures; discussion; exercise; practical The student has to gain insight in the natural groundwater regime, the processes involved and the way the groundwater system can be schematised. The student has to acquire the knowledge and skills to apply suitable techniques in order to solve geohydrological problems. Especially the (side)effects caused by human interference in the geohydrological system is relevant. After an introduction in engineering geology, involving the lithology and stratigraphy, the relevance is made clear of geohydrology for deltaic areas in general and the Netherlands in particular. After this introduction groundwater and its behaviour, both physical and chemical, are being presented. The schematisation of the underground in aquifers and aquitards, (in)homogeneity, (an)isotropy, system parameters, Darcys Law and the law of conservation of mass are described and explained. The general groundwater differential equation for a number of groundwater systems is derived and analytical solutions are presented. In a computer practicum several flow situations are calculated and analysed. Groundwater quality parameters, interaction between infiltration and groundwater, artificial recharge, density driven flow (for instance salt water intrusion) in groundwater and transport of substances in groundwater. Finally management and exploitation and the legal aspects of groundwater are subject of discussion. In the lecture notes a number of exercises are presented and during the lectures groundwater problems are discussed as preparation with respect to the written examination. Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Study Goals Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents Course Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Code: CT4780

Course title: Underground space technology, special topics

ECTS: 4

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ir. G. Arends; E-mail: G.Arends@tudelft.nl Prof.ir. J.W. Bosch; E-mail: J.W.Bosch@tudelft.nl Lectures, cases. Course content: Bored Tunnels, new developments. Soil treatment. Operational Safety (probabilistic/deterministic).Social Safety. Underground storage. New Construction Technology, like sandwich wall (hybrid constructions), grout studs and vertical micro tunnelling. Spatial planning. Multiple use of land; cases, like South axis Amsterdam or other major development. Risk management. Underground Logistic Systems. Case, new tunnel projects in The Netherlands. Students obtain deep knowledge of the latest developments in the use of underground space. Based on this knowledge they are able to study and asses complex circumstances, resulting in integral solutions. New lecture notes to be made. Handouts, available at Blackboard.

Study Goals

The student has to acquire insight in the occurrence and behaviour of groundwater, which processes play a role and how natural groundwater systems can be schematised. Further the student has to acquire knowledge of applicable solution methods in order to be able to solve geo-hydrological problems and to describe the (side-) effects of certain interventions for the groundwater system concerned.

14 2

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

143

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course

Code: CT5142

Course title: Computational Methods in Non-linear Solid Mechanics

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: CT5305

Course title: Bored and immersed tunnels

ECTS: 4

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ing. H.J. Everts; E-mail: H.J.Everts@tudelft.nl Prof.ir. A.F. van Tol; E-mail: A.F.vanTol@tudelft.nl Prof.drs.ir. J.K. Vrijling; E-mail: J.K.Vrijling@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. K.J. Bakker; E-mail: K.J.Bakker@citg.tudelft.nl

Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Dr.ir. L.J. Sluys; E-mail: L.J.Sluys@citg.tudelft.nl lectures Examination mark is final mark. In the lecture series computational techniques for the description of non-linear behaviour of materials and structures will be treated. Topics of the course are: mathematical preliminaries structure of non-linear finite element programs solution techniques for non-linear static problems solution techniques for non-linear dynamic problems plasticity models for metals and soils fracture models visco-elastic and visco-plastic models for time-dependent problems computational analysis of failure and instabilities geometrically non-linear analysis The series provides the student with the basic knowledge to adequately use standard finite element packages that are equipped with the tools for non-linear mechanics.

Education Method

Lectures with illustrations (video, numerical examples). An excursion tunnelling projects, exercise in groups of four students to evaluate a tunnel project and in addition to that to make a design for a tunnel; location, track, construction and structural design.

Judgement Course Contents

One mark, based on design exercise and oral exam The course is closely related to Foundations and construction, CT5330;, lectures are given as combination lectures. There is a combined exercise. On demand however, a separate exercise and exam for CT5330 is possible. The course extensively treats tunnelling methods. A distinction is made between the New Austrian Tunnel Method (NATM), bored tunnels and immersed tunnels. General issues related to tunnel structures. Functional and operational requirements, the longitudinal profile, the cross section and the starting/finishing shaft and/or access and exit road. NATM tunnels and the immersed tunnels. Different types of bored tunnel construction; NATM-method, slurry shield and earth pressure balance shield. Stability during construction; frontal support, settlements during construction. Loads on a tunnel and force distribution in the lining. Start and reception shaft and construction procedures. Requirements concerning the longitudinal and transverse profiles. For immersed tunnels, construction in the dock, transport and immersion. Stability during floating and after the tunnel has been sunk. Special aspects such as ventilation, fire, permeability and explosions. A case study on a tunnel project is done in a group of four students.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials

<> syllabus: Syllabus Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): Dictate Computational methods in non-linear solid mechanics, R. de Borst and L.J. Sluys Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Prerequisite Practical completed

144

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

145

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Study Goals

After the course, the student will be able to: Make a plan for a tunnel; choice of location and track Make a decision on the type of tunnel; bored or immersed Make a choice for the construction method and execution To determine the mechanical boundary conditions for structural design To evaluate structural forces both during construction and as well as for Service conditions To evaluate construction effects; settlements, stability and influences on other structures To design the excavations and related structures for start and reception shafts To evaluate the transport and placing of immersed tunnels To make a design for both constructions.

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor

Code: CT5320 none

Course title: Site characterisation, testing and physical model

ECTS: 6

1st Education Period, 2nd Education Period Dr.ir. W. Broere; E-mail: W.Broere@tudelft.nl A. Hommels; E-mail: A.Hommels@tudelft.nl A. Mulder; E-mail: Arno.Mulder@tudelft.nl Ing. W. Verwaal; E-mail: W.Verwaal@tudelft.nl J.J. de Visser; E-mail: J.J.deVisser@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. D.J.M. Ngan-Tillard; E-mail: D.J.M.Ngan-Tillard@tudelft.nl

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes: Bored and Immersed tunnels Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. Handouts, The exercise on the case study is handed out during one of the lecture hours. CT5305 uses CT3320CT5305 uses CT5330 Design and construction of tunnels for traffic. Functional requirements, determination of boundary conditions, spatial and structional design and construction aspects of bored and immerse tunnel.

Education Method

A combination of lectures, readings and practicals (field and lab work and simulation exercises) is proposed. A schedule concerning subjects, dates, places and lecturers is handed out at the beginning of the course.

Judgement Course Contents This course deals with the set up and execution of site investigations for civil engineering projects, both onshore and offshore, with an emphasis on geological factors that can be of influence on the realisation of the projects. Attention is paid to standard and advanced techniques to collect geotechnical data (walk along survey, laboratory and in-situ testing, monitoring data) and to the problems that some specific soil and rock types can give. In the accompanying laboratory practical, a number of important soil and rock tests are carried out. During field excursions, students are exposed to real ground and the challenges of monitoring the performance of a large construction project such as the North-South Metro Line in Amsterdam. During a game, the design and execution of a site investigation for a tunnel project in the Western Netherlands is simulated. Data is provided, analysed and used to produce a conceptual model of the ground, forecast ground properties relevant to the project and design additional site investigation keeping in mind cost efficiency.2 types of simulation exercises are proposed to students, depending on their specialisation.- Engineering Geology students work on a further series of games which consists of realistic exercises in which site investigations are simulated. A variety of construction projects and geological environments is considered. - Other Geo-Engineering students perform a physical modelling project, involving 1g scale models or centrifuge testing.

14 6

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

14 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Study Goals

The goal of this course is to give an overview of the available laboratory tests and in-situ site investigation techniques, as well as a basic understanding of measurement and control theory. Students will develop the ability to design a site investigation for different geological situations, or to plan and execute a physical modelling test themselves.

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT5330

Course title: Foundation and construction

ECTS: 4

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ing. H.J. Everts; E-mail: H.J.Everts@tudelft.nl Prof.ir. A.F. van Tol; E-mail: A.F.vanTol@tudelft.nl lectures; instruction; case study Description The main topics of the course deal with: soil-investigation; design of scope and interpretation design of appropriate foundations regarding the characteristics of soil and structure the effects of interaction between soil and structure the possibilities of improving foundations the design of building pits shield tunnelling; the analysis of the front stability and prediction of effects on adjacent structures the possibilities of improving soil characteristics; grouting the design of tension piles the design of laterally loaded piles (due to soil deformation or external loads)

Literature and Study Materials

Course material - Lecture notes CT5320-Site characterisation and testing (D.G. Price 1991) - Lecture notes CT5320- Physical modelling (W. Broere, handed out at first lecture)- Manual rock and soil tests (available on blackboard site for CT5320);- Handouts Reference literature- Blyth, F.G.H. & M.H. de Freitas (1984). A geology for engineers. Edward Arnold, London. ISBN 0 7131 2882 8.Classical book, contents overlap the course subjects;Clayton, C.R.I., M.C. Mathews, N.E. Simons, 1995, Site Investigation Blackwell Science, Oxford ISBN 0 632 02908 0Waltham, A.C., 1994, Foundations of Engineering Geology. Blackie Academic & Professional, London. ISBN 0 7514 0071 8- Fookes, P.G., 1997, Geology for engineers; the geological model, prediction and performance, The Quarterly Journal of Engineering Geology, 30, Part 4; Pages 293-424.- D. Muir Wood(2004). Geotechnical Modelling.

Study Goals

The course intends to get the knowledge and the proficiency to identify all relevant aspects concerning the design of buildings pits, tunnels or piled foundations and the interaction between soil and structure.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Literature and Study Materials

syllabus: CT5330 Foundation Engineering and Underground ConstructionCT5740 Trenchless Technology Available at Bookshop Civil Engineering. obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): Lecture notes Available at the Blackboard website. CT5330 uses CT5331 Summary The main topics of the course deal with the interaction between soil and structure in tunnelling, foundations and deep excavations. The content of the lectures will be practised in a realistic case concerning the design of a building pit and the prediction of the effects on neighbouring structures. It is possible to combine this course with the course submerged tunnels (CT5305). In that case the number of ECTS will be 8.

148

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

149

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course

Code: CT5350

Course title: Design and construction by geo-synthetics in civil and marine eng

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: CT5740

Course title: Trenchless Technologies

ECTS: 3

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Ir. G. Arends; E-mail: G.Arends@tudelft.nl Dr.ir. W. Broere; E-mail: W.Broere@tudelft.nl lectures paper The course covers the use of trenchless technologies, which is a versatile installation method for small infrastructure (gas, water, sewers, etc). It is meant as an addition to other specialist courses and the topics studied here can also be applied in other courses. Next to the installation process and the design of the linings, the organisation of a TT project will be discussed also. Content of lectures: Basic aspects of: - Renovation of existing pipelines - The technique of Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) - The technique of Micro-tunnelling- Geology and geotechnics in relation to boring techniques and bore fluids- Equipment - Boring equipment - Measuring equipment - Steering equipment- Technical calculations for HDD and Micro-tunnelling- Research on trenchless technology- Design and construct- Risks and innovative applications- Case discussion

Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ir. J.P. Oostveen; E-mail: J.P.Oostveen@tudelft.nl oral lectures, case study or literature study Design and construction of civil engineering constructions in geotechnic, hydraulic and road engineering by geo-synthetics1. Insights into the relation between material properties at product level and the raw material, the half manufactured product and the underlying structures as well as the production methods - Strength, stiffness/flexibility, creep/relaxation - Permeability, permittivity and impermeability - Soil tightness - Durability - Others2. Insights into the relation of the material properties of geo-synthetics and the relevant soil properties and the related applications3. Insights into the phenomena of importance concerning the interaction between soil and geo-synthetics in relation to several applications - Soil reinforcement - Reinforcement of road foundation - Reinforcement of asphalt - Partitioning of soil - Partitioning of water - Filter- and drainage construction4 Computing and design processes - Norms and directives - Rules of thumb - Conceptual modelling en calculation methods (analytical respectively. numerical)o New developments in computing5 Insights in developing alternative constructions by the use of geosynthetics. - New developments in geo-synthetic design and construction. Design and construction of civil engineering constructions in geotechnic, hydraulic and road engineering by geo-synthetics Sub goals:1. Insights into the relation between material properties at product level as depending on the raw material, the half manufactured product and the underlying structures in combination to the production methods2. Insights into the relation of the material properties of geo-synthetics, the relevant soil properties, the interface properties and the related applications.3. Insights into the phenomena of importance for the interaction soil and geosynthetics in relation to the several applications4. Computing and design processes, involving Norms and directives, rules of thumb, conceptual modelling en calculation methods (analytical respectively numerical), new developments in computing.5. Insights in developing alternative constructions by the use of geo-synthetics and new developments in geo-synthetic designs. lecture notes literature

Study Goals

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

<> obligatory lecture note(s)/textbook(s): Reader Trenchless Technology Available at TUD Civil Engineering Bookshop

Summary Multidisciplinary course for Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Earth Sciences. The course covers the use of trenchless technologies (drilling, tunnelling, and renovation techniques). These techniques are widely and more and more used by installation and renovation of tunnel-, pipe- and cable systems for the small infrastructure (oil, gas, water, sewerage). The course offers basic theoretical and practical knowledge of the techniques and used materials. Legal, administrative aspects and innovation will form an integral part of the course.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

15 0

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

151

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-A/EI-04 2nd Exam Period

Course title: Environmental issues

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-A/MV-04

Course title: Mine ventilation

ECTS: 6

2nd Education Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures and Exercises Recultivation, reclamation, landscape modelling, environmental protection, landfills, waste management, waste statistics, backfill of contaminated masses, legal basics. Tailing dam management, Tailing dam construction, Acid mine Drainage Underground waste disposal/backfill: legal basics, waste amount, different waste types, evaluation of waste, safety concepts, host rocks, deposit characteristics, cavity types, transportation techniques, backfilling technology, operational safety, case study: backfill planning in a gypsum mine.

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures, Laboratory Group Work, Survey Project Physical Properties of Mine Air, Mine Air Composition, Mine Air Flow, Ventilation methods, ventilation control, loss of pressure, ventilation circuit, fans and their operating Mode and characteristics, Mine Air Distribution, Mine Ventilation Networks, Mine Ventilation Network surveys, methods and equipment for gas measurement, methane formation, absorption, release and determination/methane control, utilisation and ignition. Methane prediction, influences on methane production, natural heat sources, self consolidation, steam content. Heading and Auxiliary ventilation: planning, construction, requirements on pressure and quantity, determination of supplements based on pressure losses. Ventilation planning: Assessment of measurements on air flow and pressure, computer based ventilation planning. Air conditioning: Climatic areas, air control by ventilation and air cooling, productivity control.

Study Goals

Overview, basics and methods of underground waste disposal and backfilling. Overview, basics and methods of recultivation in open pit mining. Basic knowledge in tailing dam management and their construction, basic knowledge of the Environmental Impact due to Acid mine Drainage

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Handouts and sheets Study Goals

Gaining Basic Knowledge in Mine Ventilation ; Calculation and Design of Mine Ventilation Networks, Capability to consider Mine Ventilation Requirement sin Underground Mine Planning, Capability to control Ventilation Networks by Surveys. Basic knowledge of Methane Occurrence and Prediction of Methane Degassing in Underground Coal Mines. Basic Knowledge in mine climatisation.

General Mining, Legal Basics, Chemistry

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Handouts / Slides

Thermodynamics, Physics, General Mining, empirical fluid mechanics

15 2

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

153

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-A/OP-05

Course title: Open pit mining

ECTS: 6

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: EMC-D/AL-04 4th Exam Period H van Muijen

Course title: Alluvial & Maritime Mining

ECTS: 4

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures, exercises and field trips The course will give an overview of the mining methods in surface mines, open pits and quarries, with an emphasis on lignite mining. Continuous and discontinuous mining methods will be presented. Lectures are integrated with project work and field trips. The project starts with characterising different types of deposits, the best suitable mining equipment as well as the right position for the opening cut. Subsequently the optimum lay-out of the mine will be determined. Loading (bucket wheel excavators, bucket chain excavators, wheel loaders, hydraulic excavators and rope shovels) and transport equipment (articulated trucks, off road trucks, conveyor belts) will be calculated and selected. The lectures and exercises in dewatering methods show, how wells are dimensioned etc. and which difficulties have to be taken into consideration, when dewatering a large surface mine in unconsolidated material. Another topic is Computer Aided Engineering. Aspects of mine planning with commercial programmes are discussed with special reference to SURPAC, which will be used in the project work.

4th Education Period

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> After a general overview of the geological origin and deposit forming of important alluvial (placer) and marine deposits, this course will emphasize on typical exploration, exploitation, dredge mining, deep sea mining and processing methods of these deposits and their related minerals. EEZ (Economic Exclusive Zones) jurisdiction and mining possibilities will be highlighted. Some general exploration methods will be discussed with special emphasis on sampling methods, exploration models, reserve estimation and deposit evaluation. Worldwide exploitation will be explained with mining operations of gold, tin, diamonds, heavy minerals and sand & gravel and typical commodity related topics like market price, history and future, etc. The most important dredge mining techniques will be discussed, explaining on selection criteria, equipment lay-outs and typical operational data as well as important environmental aspects. Processing methods will be highlighted with respect to the influence on alluvial and marine mining methods; some special unit operations will be mentioned. As important tools slurry transportation and centrifugal pumps will be reviewed separately. Several excursions will be arranged to highlight some of the typical course topics mentioned above. Study Goals Main goal of this course is to present the student with a general overview on important topics of alluvial and marine mining and several specific points in more detail. The student should be aware of the different criteria determining feasibility of the different deposits, proper selection of equipment and typical problems related to this type of mining operations. Literature and Study Materials Contact Handouts on course topics together with copies of articles highlighting these topics; copies of the presentations by the students Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

Lecture: Overview, basics and methods of open pit mining and computer aided engineering: to enhance professional knowledge; Tutorial: planning steps for lignite projects: to work in a group, to present complex facts verbal, to use and entrust methodology, written project report

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Course material will be handed out

none

154

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

155

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Expected prior knowledge Remarks

General knowledge of mechanical engineering, physical transport phenomena, physical separation technologies (gravity), geology, dry-earth moving, mineral economics The course will be lectured as an integrated course in the English language. The program has a logic structure covering all important aspects. In principle students should be present during all course days. Besides introductions by lecturer, a lot of videos will be used to explain certain topics in more detail. The course material will be lectured in an interactive way, inviting students to participate in discussions and preparing answers to raised questions. Elective course for AG, PE, RG and EG-students. Code: EMC-D/CS-04 Course title: Case study ECTS: 5

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-D/IM-04 4th Exam Period

Course title: Industrial minerals

ECTS: 3

4th Education Period Dr. B. Ding; E-mail: B.Ding@citg.tudelft.nl Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> Occurrence, processing, economics and applications of nonmetallic minerals. Salt, soda ash & choler-alkali; magnetite, brucite & magnesia; glass; bauxite & alumina; pigments & fillers; high-tech ceramics; limestone & dolomite; dimension stone; cement; gypsum; wollastonite; rare earths, phosphates; borates. Excursions to production and mineral processing plants

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Dr. B. Ding; E-mail: B.Ding@citg.tudelft.nl Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> The said case is an integrated steel project from mine to hot rolled steel product or from pit to plate. The property is an abandoned surface iron mine in North America. with remaining reserves for at least thirty years of production containing an ore with quality suitable for direct reduction iron process. Extensive basic information will be provided. Participants are requested to prepare a preliminary bankable feasibility study and conclude the case exercise with a presentation of the project to representatives of the steel industry and financing house. Participants will co-operate in teams; each team being independent and responsible for the final results. During the course various work meetings will be held for discussion and monitoring progress. Main goal of this course week is to present the student with an idea on how to perform feasibility studies and what kind of important topics are involved in a proper execution of such a feasibility study. Handouts of typical details on feasibility studies, case history details, general handbooks, equipment brochures etc. Course on mineral economics, feasibility studies Study Goals

Rationale: Fundamental understanding of mining and processing aspects of industrial minerals Learning outcomes: To familiarize students with the role of industrial minerals in modern society. To give students an insight into factors governing the use of a number of the economically more important minerals and the market for these minerals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Course notes and references listed in course notes

Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

15 6

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

15 7

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-D/ME

Course title: Mineral Economics

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: EMC-E/ED

Course title: Excavation Design

ECTS: 5

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> After an introduction about the needs for economical analysis tools, the concept of cash flows and its various items is dealt with, including the difference between cash and non-cash items and tax matters. Subsequently the present value concept is introduced emphasising the influence on the profitability of the project. The next subjects are the definition and use of profitability indicators, like Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. Finally the effect of inflation and exchange rate fluctuations is introduced, as well as sensitivity analysis techniques. The final goal is that the student must be able to evaluate mineral projects and operations by calculating and comparing the economical parameters of these projects and operations. The student must first be able to calculate the cash-revenues using production and sales data, loan-capital and working-capital. Subsequently the cash-expenses must be calculated from operating & capital cost and tax information available. Depreciation and depletion, being non-cash costs, will have to be calculated using straight-line, decline balance and depletion methods. The student will be able to calculate the resulting cash surplus/deficit through the construction of a spreadsheet in Excel. The student will be able to calculate the present value of cash surplus/deficit over the life of the project. The student must be able to calculate the cash surplus/deficit in Estimate Date Money, Money of the Day, Constant Value Money end Present Value Money. The final goal is that the student will have to calculate the Internal Rate of Return and Net Present Value and has to carry out sensitivity analyses for at least three changing items of the cash-flow. Using the model in Excel the student should now be able to determine the most feasible option of the various alternative of the project(s) or operation(s). Course notes and references listed in course notes

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl There are several design-based assignments included in the module. As far as possible examples are based on real projects. Surface excavation module includes visits to active major quarrying operations (e.g. slate, granite, gabbro, china clay). Depending on time and weather also visits to coastal slope (failure).

Judgement Course Contents The lecture gives a brief and general overview of drilling technology used in the oil and gas industry. It aims at adopting the participants knowledge to the topic and gives them a theoretical background to understand basic drilling processes as rock-bit interaction or the influence of formation fluids. In detail these processes will be studied in an exercise phase. With the help of a simulation software the influence of technical, operational and geological factors on the success of a drilling project (i.e. the drilling costs) can be experienced. The course is completed by a field trip. The participants where informed about drilling projects in Germany, special drilling techniques and the tasks of drilling engineers in the oil and gas industry. Study Goals To become aware of the key issues involved in designing underground or surface excavations. To understand how to approach excavation design in a systematic manner in accordance with availability and quality of data. To develop an understanding of risk-based methods of excavation design, and the use of sensitivity analyses. Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Course handouts and assignments. Selected text books and papers.

Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

General knowledge of chemistry, Raw materials technology Since industrial minerals are functional materials, the development of the necessary functionality by the correct choice of mineral or selection process route is of primary importance

Remarks

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-E/PA

Course title: Finance and Project Appraisal

ECTS: 5

Literature and Study Materials

Lecture Notes, Topic Worksheets, Microsoft Excel Worksheets, Accounting Software INDICATIVE BASIC READING LIST Vause, B. 1997. Guide to Analysing Companies. The Economist Books. Begg, D. et al., 1991. Economics (3rd or later editions). McGraw-Hill. Drury, C., 1992. Management and cost accounting(3rd edition). Chapman and Hall. Kernot, C., 1991. Mining Equities: evaluation and trading Woodhead Publishing: Cambridge. Gentry, D.W. and ONeil, T.J., 1984. Mine investment analysis American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers: New York.

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures; Computer demonstrations; Graded problems on topic worksheets Written Exam 60%, Coursework 40% Financial Accounting: Financial accounting principles; duality, ledgers and trial balances; depreciation and taxation; position statement; income statement; funds flow analysis and the cash flow statement; ratio analysis and interpretation of accounts; capital structure. Shares and share trading. Microeconomics: Demand, supply and the market; short term supply decision for the firm; law of diminishing returns; long term supply decision for the firm; analysis of market structure; monopolistic markets. Management Accounting: Asset valuation, capital and operating cost estimation, cost classification and levels of confidence; by product costing; budgets and variance analysis. Income, working capital and cash flow; enhanced cash flow model; project value measurement; capital allowances; taxation in cash flow models; inflation in cash flow models; computer implementation; sensitivity and scenario analysis; financial risk and its assessment. Students should understand fundamental accounting postulates and the distinction between financial and management accounting. Students should be able to produce a set of annual financial statements given a set of accounts (Position, Income and Cash flow Statements). Students should be able to adequately understand a given set of annual financial statements and analyse them to produce a reasonable objective assessment of company performance. Students should be able to conduct reasonable financial feasibility studies for proposed projects at various stages in project development. This is to include adequate capability in cost estimation methods and methods to appraise the value of the project. Students should understand the types of finance available for projects and to be able to engineer adequate balance of equity and debt funding suitable for, or typical of, the industrial sector concerned. Students should understand the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and be able to apply these concepts competently to guide marketing studies for existing and new projects. Students should be able to understand sources of financial risk and take adequate measures to mitigate them. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-E/PM

Course title: Project Management

ECTS: 5

3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures; Computer demonstrations; Graded problems on topic worksheets Lecture Topics (Approximately one hour each).Project planning, Project control, Queuing & load balancing, Linear programming, Optimisation of assignment & transportation projects, Simplex method, Inventory Control, Project decision analysis, Variance reducing simulation techniques, Forecasting methods, Cost estimation, Budget allocation, Variance analysis, Resource optimisation for projects, Project process simulation. Individual behaviour in a working environment, Formal and informal groups, Motivation, Project Organisational Structure, Analysis of Project Management, Synthesis of Project Management. Computer Workshops (Approximately one hour each). CPA/ PERT, Load balancing with M/M/c model, Optimisation of the cost of pollution reduction measures, Decision analysis, Quantitative Assessment of Risk using Variance Reducing Techniques, Process Simulation.* The balance of the available contact hours will be used for tutorials designed to assist students with the module assignments and for group discussion of the module materials.

Study Goals

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Study Goals

At the end of the module students should be able to use their skills to underpin typical project management duties. Specifically, these are: conducting project network formulation and analysis methods; design of production and work systems using queuing theory; design and analysis of inventory systems; implementation of process, production and transportation optimisation tasks; use of quantifiable decision analysis strategies including control of costs. In addition to being able to optimally assign individuals to work tasks, it is intended that candidates should have introductory understanding of individual, group and organisational behaviour.

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-H/AR

Course title: Applied rock mechanics for hard rock mining

ECTS: 3

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures. Computer use: Stability analysis, demonstrations on numerical methods Stope and pillar design in underground hard rock mining, rock stress and rock stress measurements, rock reinforcement, mechanised rock bolting, cable bolting,shot creting. Mine visit.

Literature and Study Materials

Lecture Notes, Topic Worksheets, Microsoft Excel Worksheets, Project Management Software INDICATIVE READING LIST Hillier F.S., and Lieberman, G.J., 1995. Introduction to Operations Research (6th edition) McGraw-Hill. Winston, Wayne L.1991, Operations research: applications and algorithms (2nd edition) PWS-KENT Publishing Company, Boston. Williams, H.P., 1993. Model building in mathematical programming (3rd edition) John Wiley: Chichester. Press, W.H., et al. 1992. Numerical Recipes in C, The Art of Scientific Computing, (2nd edition) Cambridge University Press. Harr, M.E., 1987. Reliability-Based Design in Civil Engineering, McGraw-Hill. Cole, G.A., 1996, Management, Theory and Practice, 5th Edition, Letts Educational Handy, C.B., 1986 Understanding organizations (3rd edition) Penguin. Gray, [and later editions]. Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Study Goals

To gain a basic knowledge on hard rock behaviour in mining situations <>

General knowledge of rock mechanics Laboratory of Rock Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology HUT-code: Rak-32.317, HUT-credits: 2Requirements: compulsory exercises and final examination Language: English

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

162

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-H/EX

Course title: Excursion

ECTS: 3

Course

Code: EMC-H/MA-04

Course title: Automation and Maintenance of Mining Equipment

ECTS: 3

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> Several operating hard rock mines are visited. Their operation processes are studied and compared. Students give presentations on selected subjects after the tour. Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents 1st Exam Period

1st Education Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures. Production automation and maintenance as an elementary part of highly mechanised mines total economy. Operational re-liability of production machinery. Effects of automation on process planning and maintenance. Requirements: compulsory exercise and final examination

Study Goals

Students see different ways to process concentrates from ore deposits, and learn to critically compare them and relate them to varying production environments.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Material obtained from the mines

Study Goals

To give a basic understanding of the critical aria of automation and maintenance and their impact on the total economy of the mining operation. Maintenance will be treated with special reference to mechanized and automatic systems used in mines.

Literature and HUT-code: Rak-32.113HUT-credits: 2 Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes, articles from journals and magazines dealing with maintenance and automation none Requirements: compulsory exercise and final examination HUT-code: Rak-32.253, HUT-credits: 2

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMC-H/ME-00 1st Exam Period

Course title: Mining Technology and Economics

ECTS: 3

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement

Code: EMC-H/MM 1st Exam Period

Course title: Numerical Mine Modelling

ECTS: 3

1st Education Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures. Computer use: Demonstrations, calculations with spreadsheets. Mine as an economical project, different feasibility studies, mining production planning parameters, strategic planning, financing and management, case studies. Mine visit.

1st Education Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Demonstrations and practical work: rock mechanics, mine design and geological modelling

Course Contents

The course covers the cycle of mine modelling from exploration to design and production. The main topics are: management of investigation data, data analyses, visualization, geological and geotechnical modelling, rock mechanical analyses, open pit and underground mine design. The course includes both examples and practical work using rock mechanical software and geological and mine design software.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Technical and economic overview of a feasibility study concentrating on underground hard rock metal mining. lecture notes Study Goals General knowledge of ore reserve evaluation, mining engineering and economics Helsinki code: Rak-32.341Helsinki credits: 2Requirements: compulsory exercises and final examination Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

To give an introduction to abilities and limitations of computer aided mine design. Lecture notes

Applied Rock Mechanics for Hard Rock Mining Helsinki code: Rak-32.321Helsinki credits: 2

166

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents Study Goals

Code: EMEC-A/RM-06 3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period

Course title: Recycling Metallurgy

ECTS: 7

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-A/WP-06 3rd Education Period 3rd Exam Period

Course title: WEEE Recycling

ECTS: 7

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Short lectures (10%) and practical courses (90%) in the IME laboratory Basis principles of non-ferrous metals production (Al, Cu, Ti, Pb, Zn) and recycling. Including mass flow analysis, key figures etc. Giving an overview about production and recycling of the main non-ferrous metals. Calculation and evaluation of mass- and energy balance of a process-chain, mass-flow-management in metal recycling, selective oxidation/reduction by fundamental principles of thermodynamics, improvement of practical skills in metal practice

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> Within the framework of a case study electronic scrap from dismantled household appliances mechanically will be processed in order to recover metals like copper and aluminium. In order to complete the process chain, the copper enriched product from the mechanical recycling process subsequently will be treated in metallurgical processes. Various excursions will deliver insight of industrial scale recycling as well as primary raw material processes.

Study Goals

The practical course provides the application of different processing steps thus allowing the students to gain competent skills in recycling techniques. Moreover, various analytical measures are employed in order to demonstrate methods for the determination of combination and separation efficiencies.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Scriptum will be delivered in the first lectures.

Literature and Working clothes and shoes (no sport shoes or high heels) must be worn. Safety equipment (goggles, jacket) will be provided. Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Detailed lecture notes concerning scrap processing techniques

Basic knowledge of mechanical processing in recycling systems Chair of Processing and Recycling of Solid Waste Aachen University of Technology (RWTH) Wullnerstr. 252062 Aachen

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-D/HY-05 1st Education Period 1st Exam Period

Course title: Hydrometallurgy

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-D/IM-05

Course title: Industrial Minerals

ECTS: 2

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures, industrial visits, assignments Part I Theory: Thermodynamics, electrochemical and kinetic aspects of solubilizing valuable metals from minerals, intermediate and waste products, purification of the leach liquors and recovery of both the metal(s) and lixiviate. In purification of the leach or waste liquors special attention is given to precipitation, SX, IX and membrane techniques. Part II Application and Process Design: Zn- Conventional RLE process; iron problem in Zn processing; pressure leaching. Au - Cyanide process; CIP/CIL; heap leaching; refractory gold ores - roasting, pressure and biooxidation; cyanide chemistry and control. Cu - Leaching of oxide ores; Solvent extraction and electrowinning. Al - Bayer process for alumina; tube digestor. Ni - Nickel laterite processing; Ni/Co solvent extraction.

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> Occurrence, processing, economics and applications of nonmetallic minerals. Salt, soda ash & chllor-alkali; magnetite, brucite & magnesia; glass; bauxite & alumina; pigments & fillers; high-tech ceramics; limestone & dolomite; dimension stone; cement; gypsum; wollastonite; rare earths, phosphates; borates. Excursions to production and mineral processing plants

Study Goals

Rationale: Fundamental understanding of mining and processing aspects of industrial minerals Learning outcomes: To familiarize students with the role of industrial minerals in modern society. To give students an insight into factors governing the use of a number of the economically more important minerals and the market for these minerals

Study Goals

Rationale: To develop an understanding of the thermodynamic, electrochemical and kinetic principles of hydrometallurgy and to illustrate the application of these principles and unit operations in common industrial hydrometallurgical processes. Learning outcomes: An understanding of the theoretical principles of hydrometallurgy, application in process design, including environmental considerations and constraints. Knowledge of the current hydrometallurgical processes used for the production of important metals such as Zn, Au, Cu, Al and Ni

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Course notes and references listed in course notes

Literature and Study Materials

Jackson E. Hydrometallurgical Extraction and Reclamation. Habashi F. A Textbook of Hydrometallurgy. Yannopoulos J.C. The Extractive Metallurgy of Gold. Biswas A.K & Davenport W.G. Extractive Metallurgy of Copper.

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Basic university chemistry, thermodynamics, liquid/solid separation processes

170

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-D/ME-06 1st Education Period

Course title: Mineral Economics

ECTS: 2

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-D/PM

Course title: Pyrometallurgy

ECTS: 5

1st Education Period 1st Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> Pyrometallurgical processing forms important components of metals extraction, refining and recycling. The following topics will be covered in the course: (1)Fundamentals of pyrometallurgy with references to industrial practice: unit operations - roasting, oxide reduction, sulphide (matte) smelting, halide metallurgy, fire-refining, molten salt electrolysis, re-melting and refining of scrap, metallurgical thermodynamics, slag chemistry, slag - metal interactions, metallurgical reaction kinetics, molten salt theory. (2) Process description and modern technologies of iron making and steel making; pyrometallurgical processing of nonferrous metals (e.g. Cu/Ni, Pb/Zn, Al/Mg/Ti) and ferroalloys; recycling of typical nonferrous metals - aluminium, lead and zinc.(3) Furnaces technology and energy supply: fluidised bed roasters, rotary kilns and rotary furnaces, blast furnaces, reverberatory furnaces, smelting furnaces, BOF/LD converters, ladle furnaces, (submerged) electric arc furnaces.(4) Environmental issues: treatment of off-gases and slugs.

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> After an introduction about the needs for economical analysis tools, the concept of cash flows and its various items is dealt with, including the difference between cash and non-cash items and tax matters. Subsequently the present value concept is introduced emphasising the influence on the profitability of the project. The next subjects are the definition and use of

Study Goals

The final goal is that the student must be able to evaluate mineral projects and operations by calculating and comparing the economical parameters of these projects and operations.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes

Study Goals

This course is a counterpart of Hydrometallurgy, and will provide more insights into pyrometallurgical processes: both fundamentals and processes of common metals production. It will also lay the basis for recycling metallurgy. At the end, students will gain a complete picture of pyrometallurgical processes as important part of metals production and recycling.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Compilation of review articles and book chapters of various sources. Handout.

172

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-D/RE-05 1st Education Period 1st Exam Period

Course title: Recycling

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-E/AM

Course title: Advanced Mineral processing

ECTS: 5

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> (a) Process and equipment developments in mineral processing Comminution: impact and high pressure rolls crushers, autogenous mills, fine grinding equipment, testing of grinding media, methods of circuit control. Gravity concentration: centrifugal separators, spiral concentrator design. Magnetic separation: super conducting magnetic separation. Flotation: anionic and cationic flotation systems, electrochemical nature of sulphide flotation; collectorless flotation and the importance of Eh, methods of evaluating surface reactions in flotation. Methods for recovery of ultra fine particles; selective flocculation, shear flocculation and oil agglomeration. (b) Surface phenomena in mineral processing Stability of particle suspensions - DLVO theory, measurement of zeta potential, the gas-liquid interface, surface tension and contact angle measurement, physical adsorption of flotation collectors, modelling and scale-up of the flotation process.(c) Application of mineral processing techniques Influence of mineralogy, process flow sheet options. A range of metalliferous and industrial minerals will be.(d) Laboratory techniques in mineral processing Sizing and classification, mass balancing techniques, production of partition curves for the hydrocyclone, ore sorting experiments, froth flotation. This course has been designed to develop the basic knowledge of the unit processes into a deeper understanding of the current developments in mineral processing. INDICATIVE BASIC READING LIST Burt, R.O.,1984. Gravity concentration technology, Elsevier. Finch, J.A. and Dobby, G.S., 1990. Column flotation, Pergamon Press. Mular, A.L., Halbe, D.N. and Barratt, D.J., 2002. Mineral Processing Plant Design, practice and Control, Vols 1 and 2, SME. Napier-Munn, T.J., Morrell, S., Morrison, R.D. and Kojovic, T., 1996. Mineral Comminution Circuits, JKMRC, Hall&Jones, Brisbane. Svoboda, J., 1985. Magnetic methods for the treatment of minerals, Elsevier. Wills, B.A., 1992. Mineral Processing Technology, 5th edition, Pergamon Press. A range of recent journal publications will be provided to cover the developments in mineral processing.

Dr.ir. T.P.R. de Jong; E-mail: T.P.R.deJong@tudelft.nl Dr. P.C. Rem; E-mail: P.C.Rem@tudelft.nl <> Material resources, recycling engineering and the strategic importance of recycling. Economics and environmental aspects of recycling. Unit operations for the mechanical recycling of postconsumer products. The course offers an introduction into liberation by size reduction (e.g. shredding) and physical separation techniques (e.g. heavy-medium separation, gravity separation, eddy current and magnetic separation) as well as automatic sorting. The course deals in a greater detail with separation techniques on which international literature is scarce, e.g. eddy current separation, automated sorting , etc. Furthermore, the course gives an overview on emerging techniques in mechanical separation, such as separation using X-ray transmission, inverse jigging of plastics and Magnus separation of metals. In a more or less separate part of the course, material cycles are dealt with - partly by experts from industry - for glass, steel and nonferrous metals, as well as methods of secondary processing of aluminium, copper, zinc and lead.

Study Goals

Study Goals

To provide students with an overview of the technological, economic and legislative aspects of recycling. Learning outcomes: Understanding the theory and practical application of unit operations in recycling, such as liberation, mechanical separation and metallurgical processing. Literature and Study Materials

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Course notes and articles referenced in the course notes

General raw materials technology. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-E/DA

Course title: Data Analysis and Sampling

ECTS: 5

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-E/MP

Course title: Mineral Processing Design

ECTS: 5

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Dr.ir. HJ Glass <> This module is assessed with two written examinations: one on Data Analysis (50%) and one on Sampling (50 %). Data Analysis: The following techniques will be described and their application to real problems illustrated with examples: a) Principal Component Analysis (PCA): when multiple parameters influence the data, PCA can help to identify the most significant parameters. b) Fuzzy Logic: when data is sparse, fuzzy logic can be used to reach answers. c) Neural Networks: when much data is available, neural networks can be trained to handle very complex interrelations between parameters. Sampling: The practice of obtaining, preparing and analysing representative samples will be discussed, highlighting potential sources of error. Students will learn how to determine the minimum sample size, choose the correct sampling strategy and make appropriate inferences based on sample analyses.

2nd Education Period 2nd Exam Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl <> The module is assessed 100% using the Coursework assignments 1). Introduction: The design of test work programs. Mineralogical data and its importance to process selection. Prediction of plant performance using partition curves derived from Ep values.2-4). Comminution circuits: Overall design of comminution circuits, including methods for selection and standard ore testing procedures. Sizing and selection of crushers, screens, grinding mills and hydrocyclones.5). Gravity concentration: The use of heavy liquid analysis in the design of gravity processes (HMS). Economic analysis using smelter contracts and separation performance.6). Flotation: Design of test work programs. Selection of a flotation circuit from plant data.

Study Goals

The course has been designed to enable students to evaluate plant and laboratory data and to select and size individual items of equipment.

Study Goals

This module aims to familiarize students with numerical techniques used to model data and to provide students with an appreciation of the inherent variability of data obtained from sampling, preparation and analysis.

Literature and Study Materials

INDICATIVE BASIC READING LIST Mular, A.L. & Jergensen, G.V. 1982 Design and Installation of Comminution Circuits, AIME, N.Y. Mular, A.L., Halbe, D.N. and Barratt, D.J., 2002. Mineral Processing Plant Design, practice and Control, Vols 1 and 2, SME. Napier-Munn, T.J., Morrell, S., Morrison, R.D. and Kojovic, T., 1996. Mineral Comminution Circuits, JKMRC, Hall &Jones, Brisbane. Weiss, N.L. (Ed)1985 SME Mineral processing Handbook Kingsport Press, TN.

Literature and Study Materials

INDICATIVE BASIC READING LIST Davis, J.C. (1986) Statistics and Data Analysis in Geology, Wiley and Sons, 2nd edition. Demicco, R. and Klir, G. (2003) Fuzzy Logic in Geology, Elsevier Science. Gy, P. (1998) Sampling for analytical purposes, CRC Press. Joliffe, I.T. (1986) Principal Component Analysis, Springer Verlag. Pitard, F.F. (1993) Pierre Gys Sampling Theory and Sampling Practice, CRC Press, 2nd Edition. Swan, A.R.H. and Sandilands, M. (1995) Introduction to Geological Data Analysis, Blackwell Science. Wills, B.A. (1997) Mineral Processing Technology, Elsevier Science, 6th Edition. Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

176

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Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: EMEC-H/CE

Course title: Chemical Engineering for EMEC

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period

Code: EMEC-H/PA 4th Exam Period

Course title: Basics in Process Automation

ECTS: 4

4th Education Period Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Project work. PC-, PLC- and soft-PLC-based control systems, system configuration, PLC programming, user interface design. Course includes presentations from visiting lecturers from industry.

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl

Instructor Education Method Judgement

Introduction to the calculation of processes and unit operations. Mass and energy balances, principles of momentum, heat and mass transfer, introduction to unit operations.

Course Contents

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents The aim of this course is to provide a practical experience of process control with a PC-based control system. Topics include PC-, PLC- and soft-PLC-based control systems, system configuration, PLC programming, user interface design. Course includes presentations from visiting lecturers from industry Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks Course notes distributed during lectures Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Lectures, Project work Code: EMEC-H/CS Course title: Project work in process automation ECTS: 3 Course Geankoplis: Transport Processes and separation Process Principles, 4. p., Prentice Hall, 2003, as applicable.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

The aim of this course is to provide a practical experience of process control with a PC-based control system. Course notes distributed during lectures

Code: EMEC-H/PD

Course title: Plant Design

ECTS: 4

2nd Education Period Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Ir. J.J. de Ruiter; E-mail: J.J.deRuiter@tudelft.nl Exam, exercise participation and accepted home work. The course presents fundamentals of process design and development. Topics such as process concept selection, flow sheet development & drawing, control strategy selection, equipment design, materials selection, layout design, cost & profitability analysis and safety & environmental studies are presented. A case study on an inorganic process design is given. Exam, exercise participation and accepted home work.

Study Goals Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

17 8

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

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STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents

Code: WI4012ta

Course title: Mathematics, Special Subjects

ECTS: 4

Course Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method

Code: WM0312CT

Course title: Philosophy, technology assessment and ethics for CT

ECTS: 4

2nd Education Period Exam by appointment M.B. van Gijzen; E-mail: M.B.vanGijzen@tudelft.nl Lectures and computer assignment A number of partial differential equations will be discussed that are of interest in technical applications. The Laplace equation will be treated as an example of an equilibrium in incompressible ground water flow. Examples of time dependent problems that will be discussed are the wave equation, the convection-diffusion equation and the transport equation. As discretization techniques the Finite Difference, Finite Volume and Finite Element Method will be treated.

4th Education Period 4th Exam Period, 5th Exam Period Dr. L.M. Kamp; E-mail: L.M.Kamp@tudelft.nl Dr. G.J.C. Lokhorst; E-mail: G.J.C.Lokhorst@tudelft.nl lectures Philosophy Module: Introduction to and illustration of the courses aims: what is philosophy (methodology/ethics); illustration of the coherence of the three modules: What is science, and what is technology? Brief overview of their history; positions on the influence of science and technology on society - The fact/ value distinction; logic and argumentation theory - Analysis of the notion of causality in relation to, on the one hand, scientific explanations and, on the other hand, the responsibility of engineers and; the notion of probability; statistics - Methodology: foundations of scientific and technological knowledge; construction of models and their limitations; predictability of consequences Technology Assessment Module: Why does technology fail? Technology Assessment as bridging the gap between society and the engineering community : Introduction to TA-methods and traditional forecasting: extrapolations, experts interview and the common sense-method, scenarios, scenario workshops - Drivers of technological change, the relation between technological change and society - Constructive Technology Assessment, participatory technology development - Practice of TA; politics, steering technological innovation of Sustainable Development Ethics Module- Introduction to moral dilemmas in engineering practice - Analysis of moral dilemmas in engineering practice and their backgrounds; professional codes of conduct and conflicting loyalties; legal rights and duties of engineers - Ethics, i.e. the foundation of judgements about good and bad / responsible and irresponsible acts - Responsibility of corporations and the law; ethical foundations of liability legislation; division of responsibility within organisations - Collective decision making / public choice and the role of the expert - Integration of the above, and inventory of available solution strategies

Judgement Course Contents

Study Goals

To understand and to be able to apply the discussed numerical methods and to estimate the error in the calculations. To be able to assess the quality of a numerical simulation.

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

Lecture notes, available via Blackboard

18 0

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

181

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007

Study Goals

Philosophy: - Insight in the nature of philosophical and methodological problems - Insight in the nature of scientific and technological knowledge (difference science-technology, science versus pseudo-science) - Knowledge of how scientific and technological knowledge are founded (truth/reliability; nature and limitations of models) - Knowledge of positions on the interaction between science, technology and society - Insight in the distinction between facts and values, which in practice are often intertwined - Elementary knowledge of logic and argumentation theory Technology Assessment:- Ability to recognize patterns of interaction between technological and societal change - Ability to assess the value and limitations of TA-methods and -results - Ability to apply some TA-methods to concrete situations Ethics:- Familiarity with and insight in problems of responsibility of engineers that arise in their professional practice - Knowledge of and insight in the relevant background to these problems: ethics, law, public choice, functioning of organisations, historical development of all the foregoing - Ability to reason consistently and solutionoriented about moral problems in professional engineering practice, including insight in available solution strategies (both at individual and collective level)

Course

Code: WM0916TA

Course title: Special topics geotechnology and sustainable development

ECTS: 2

Education Period Exam Period Instructor Education Method Judgement Course Contents In the first and second quarter of the course year a series of lectures will beheld around the theme of geotechnology and sustainable development. The series will start with a kick off meeting, informing students on sustainable development and geotechnology and the possibility to obtain a certificate for a specialization in sustainable development. See also Graduation specialization in sustainable development elsewhere in this MSc course guide. Students are given the possibility to follow these lectures and write an essay on one of the subjects of the lectures. In the essay a certain technology and the relation of the technology to sustainable development and society will have to be discussed, paying close attention to the technical issues, but also to cultural (habits, informal rules, etc.) and structural (formal rules, laws, institutions, etc.) issues. The topics of the essay can vary from CO2 injection in coal layers or empty gas fields to the use of the shallow subsurface for heat and cold storage. After taking this course:-The student is able to describe the relation of sustainable development with the different topics discussed during the series of lectures- The student can identify sustainability issues within the several technology topics- The student is able to analyse technological issues, but also issues regarding to culture of production and use, and issues regarding the structure of rules, infrastructure, actor network, etc.- The student can suggest a direction for solution of a problem with this technology to contribute to sustainability, taking all aspects into account- The student can put the suggested solution into a broader perspective of sustainable development Guest lectures sheets Ir. D.J. Peet; E-mail: D.J.Peet@tudelft.nl Lecture sequence. The student will have to attend all lectures and write an essay individually

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

reader Philosophy, Technology Assessment and Ethics for Civil Engineering Study Goals

Literature and Study Materials Contact Expected prior knowledge Remarks

18 2

APPLIED EARTH SCIENCES MSC

183

STUDY GUIDE 2006/2007