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GE4202 REMAKING THE GLOBAL ECONOMY (2013/2014, Semester 2) MODULE OUTLINE Module Code Module Title Semester Modular Credits Faculty Department Timetable Module Facilitators Weblinks Tags GE4202 REMAKING THE GLOBAL ECONOMY Semester 2, 2013/2014 5 Arts & Social Sciences Geography Timetable/Teaching Staff
Created: 30-May-2013, Updated: 29-Nov-2013

PROF Neil Coe


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Lecturer

Aim s & O bjectives (Learning O utcom es) | Prerequisites (W hat should I k now?) | Teaching Modes | Schedule

| Synopsis | Syllabus | Assessm ent | Preclusions | W ork load

AIMS & OBJECTIVES (LEARNING OUTCOMES) Top This module examines the interrelationships between transnational corporations (TNCs) and regional development in an era of global economic restructuring. The module seeks to achieve a mixed blend of theory and practice of TNCs and regional development. It provides students with not only description and explanation of TNC operations, but also practical knowledge in analysing the impact of TNCs on regional development. In addition to regular readings, students are expected to conduct specific case studies on the role of TNCs in regional development. PREREQUISITES (WHAT SHOULD I KNOW?) Top Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80MCs and for GE and SN majors. Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed at least 80MCs, including 28MCs in GE, or 28MCs in SN, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours Track. TEACHING MODES Top The module comprises 12 three-hour seminars on each Thursday morning from 16th January 2014 onwards (with one recess week between seminars 6 and 7). With the exception of the first and last two classes, each session will take the form of an introductory lecture and a discussion of the weekly reading materials led by a pre-arranged group of students. There will be ample time for discussion and debate of the key issues in each seminar. Each student will take responsibility for preparing a research paper (3000 words) and presenting it at the end of the module. All students are also expected to study the readings in advance of the class and play the role of discussion leader at least once during the module. SCHEDULE
Week 1: Introduction: Themes, Questions, Debates (16th January 2014) Week 2: The Emergence of the Contemporary Global Economy (23rd January 2014) Week 3: Theorising the Transnational Corporation (30th January 2014) Week 4: Global Commodity Chains (GCCs)(6th February 2014) Week 5: Global Value Chains (GVCs)(13th February 2014) Week 6: Global Production Networks (GPNs) (20th February 2014) Top

Recess week
Week 7: Varieties of Capitalism, Variegated capitalism (6th March 2014) Week 8: Economic Development in a Global Economy (13th March 2014) Week 9: Labouring in GVCs/GPNs (20th March 2014) Week 10: East Asia: from Developmental States to GPNs (27th March 2014) Week 11: Presentation of Research Papers (3rd April 2014) Week 12: Conclusion: After the Crisis New Contours of Growth (10th April 2014)

No class in week 13 SYNOPSIS SUMMARY


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This module examines the nature of contemporary global economic integration, with specific attention to the emergence of global value chains/production networks as key organizational structures within the global economy. Starting from the changing nature of the transnational corporation, it will explore different theoretical frameworks for interpreting global economic change and processes of economic development therein. The module seeks to not only provide students with general explanations of the roles of firms, states and global production networks in economic development, but also practical knowledge of analyzing the mechanisms of regional development, especially in the context of East Asia.

AIMS
1. To develop an in-depth understanding of the key actors driving contemporary global economic change, in particular, transnational corporations and nationstates. 2. To explore the evolving organizational architecture of the global economy, in particular the emergence of global value chains/global production networks. 3. To provide an advance foundation for students planning to take up careers or postgraduate courses in international business, regional and global studies, and economic geography.

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OBJECTIVES
By the end of the module, students should have a sound understanding of: 1. The evolving geographies of the global economy; 2. The basic functions of, and interactions between, firms, states and markets in the process of economic development and global integration; 3. The complex relationships that exist between transnational corporations and other institutions (e.g. nation states and national firms) as they seek to enhance their relative positions in a highly competitive and volatile global economy; 4. The emergence and development of global value chains/production networks as the key organizational form in the contemporary global economy; 5. The economic, social and political implications of global production networks for different specific national and regional contexts, especially in Asia; 6. The role of economic crisis in wider restructuring of the global economy.

SYLLABUS Lecture outline and readings (* indicates required readings)

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Week 1: Introduction: Themes, Questions, Debates * Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 1. Elms, D.K. and Low, P. (eds.) (2013) Global Value Chains in a Changing World, World Trade Organization, Geneva. Milberg, W. and Winkler, D. (2013) Outsourcing Economics: Global Value Chains in Capitalist Development, CUP, Cambridge, Chapter 2. UNCTAD (2011) World Investment Report 2011: Non-Equity Modes of International Production and Development, United Nations, New York. * UNCTAD (2013) World Investment Report 2013: Global Value Chains: Investment and Trade for Development, United Nations, New York (especially
Chapter 4). WTO and IDE-JETRO (2011) Trade Patterns and Global Value Chains in East Asia: From Trade in Goods to Trade in Tasks, World Trade Organization and Institute of Developing Economies, Geneva and Tokyo.

Week 2: The Emergence of the Contemporary Global Economy


Baldwin, R. (2013) Global supply chains: why they emerged, why they matter, and where they are going, in D.K. Elms and P. Low (eds.) Global Value Chains in a Changing World, World Trade Organization, Geneva, 13-60. * Coe, N.M. (2011) Unpacking globalization: changing geographies of the global economy, in Leyshon, A., Lee, R., McDowell, L. and Sunley, P. (eds.) The Sage handbook of economic geography, Sage, London, 89-101. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 2. * Frbel, F., Heinrichs, J. and Kreye, O. (1980) The New International Division of Labour, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, Chapter 2. Gordon, D.M. (1988) The global economy: new edifice or crumbling foundations? New Left Review, I/168, 24-64. Hamilton, G.G. and Petrovic, M. (2011) Introduction, in G.G. Hamilton, M. Petrovic and B. Senauer (eds.) The Market Makers: How Retailers Are Reshaping the Global Economy, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1-30. Hirst, P., Thompson, G. and Bromley, S. (2009) (3rd edn.) Globalization in Question, Polity Press, Cambridge, Chapter 2 (second edition also fine). Kaplinsky, R. (2005) Globalization, Poverty and Inequality, Polity Press, Cambridge, Chapter 1. Kitson, M. and Michie, J. (1995) Trade and growth: a historical perspective, in J. Michie and J. Grieve Smith (eds.) Managing the Global Economy, OUP, New York, 3-36. Kozul-Wright, R. (1995) Transnational corporations and the nation state, in J. Michie and J. Grieve Smith (eds.) Managing the Global Economy, OUP, New York, 135-171. Mittelman, J.H. (2000) The globalization syndrome: transformation and resistance, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, Chapter 2. Thrift, N.J. (1989) The geography of international economic disorder, in R.J. Johnston and P.J. Taylor (eds) A World in Crisis: Geographical Perspectives, Blackwell, Oxford, 16-79.

Week 3: Theorising the Transnational Corporation


* Dicken, P. (2000) Places and flows: situating international investment, in G.L. Clark, M.A. Feldman and M.S. Gertler (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 275-91. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 5. Jones, A. (2005) Truly global corporations? Theorizing organizational globalization in advanced business-services, Journal of Economic Geography, 5(2), 177-200. Malecki, E.J. and Moriset, B. (2008) The Digital Economy, Routledge, London, Chapter 4. Faulconbridge, J. R. (2008) Managing the transnational law firm: a relational analysis of professional systems, embedded actors and time-space sensitive governance, Economic Geography, 84(2), 185-210. Forsgren, M. (2008/2013) Theories of the Multinational Firm. Edward Elgar, Cheltenham (dip into to get a sense of the six different perspectives). ONeill, P.M. and Gibson-Graham J.K. (1999) Enterprise discourse and executive talk: stories that destabilize the company, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 24, 11-22. Schoenberger, E. (1997) The Cultural Crisis of the Firm, Blackwell, Oxford (dip into). * Taylor, M.J. and Asheim, B.T. (2001) The concept of the firm in economic geography, Economic Geography, 77(4), 315-328. Whitley, R. (2001) How and why are international firms different? The consequences of cross-border managerial coordination for firm characteristics and behaviour in G. Morgan, P.H. Kristensen and R. Whitley (eds) The Multinational Firm: Organizing Across Institutional and National Divides, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 27-68. Wrigley, N., Coe, N.M. and Currah, A. (2005) Globalizing retail: conceptualizing the distribution-based TNC, Progress in Human Geography, 29, 437-457. Yeung, H.W-C. (2005) The firm as social networks: an organizational perspective, Growth and Change, 36(3), 307-28.

Week 4: Global Commodity Chains (GCCs)


Bair, J. (2005) Global capitalism and commodity chains: looking back, going forward, Competition & Change, 9(2), 153-80. * Bair, J. and Gereffi, G. (2001) Local clusters in global chains: the causes and consequences of export dynamism in Torreon's blue jeans industry, World Development, 29(11), 18851903. Birch, K. (2008) Alliance-driven governance: applying a global commodity chains approach to the U.K. biotechnology industry, Economic Geography, 84(1), 83 103. Clancy, M. (1998) Commodity chains, services and development: theory and preliminary evidence from the tourism industry, Review of International Political Economy, 5(1), 122-148. Fold, N. (2002) Lead firms and competition in bi-polar commodity chains: grinders and branders in the global cocoa-chocolate industry, Journal of Agrarian Change, 2(2), 228247. * Gereffi, G. (1994) The organization of buyer-driven global commodity chains: how U.S. retailers shape overseas production networks, in G. Gereffi and M. Korzeniewicz (eds.) Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism, Praeger, Westport, CT, 95-122. Gereffi, G., Korzeniewicz, M. and Korzeniewicz, R.P. (1994) Introduction: global commodity chains, in G. Gereffi and M. Korzeniewicz (eds.) Commodity Chains and Global Capitalism, Praeger, Westport, CT, 1-14. Gereffi, G. (1999) International trade and industrial upgrading in the apparel commodity chain, Journal of International Economics, 48(1), 37-70. Kogut, B. (1985) Designing global strategies: comparative and competitive value-added chains, Sloan Management Review, 26(4), 15-28. Patel-Campillo, A. (2011) Transforming global commodity chains: actor strategies, regulation, and competitive relations in the Dutch cut flower sector, Economic
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Geography, 87, 79-99. Porter, M.E. (1985) Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Performance, The Free Press, New York (dip into).
Topik, S. (2009) Historicizing commodity chains: five hundred years of the global coffee commodity chain in J. Bair (ed.) (2009) Frontiers of Commodity Chain Research, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 37-62.

Week 5: Global Value Chains (GVCs)


Gereffi, G. and Fernandez-Stark, K. (2010) The Offshore Services Industry: A Global Value Chain Approach, Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness, Durham, NC (available online). * Gereffi, G., Humphrey, J. and Sturgeon, T. (2005) The governance of global value chains, Review of International Political Economy, 12(1), 78-104. Ivarsson, I. and Alvstam, C.G. (2010) Upgrading in global value-chains: a case study of technology-learning among IKEA suppliers in China and Southeast Asia, Journal of Economic Geography, 11(4): 731-752. Milberg, W. (2008) Shifting sources and uses of profits: sustaining US financialization with global value chains, Economy and Society, 37(3), 42051. Nadvi, K. (2008) Global standards, global governance and the organization of global value chains, Journal of Economic Geography, 8(3), 323-44. Neilson, J. (2014) Value chains, neoliberalism and development practice: the Indonesian experience, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). Oro, K. and Pritchard, B. (2010) The evolution of global value chains: displacement of captive upstream investment in the AustraliaJapan beef trade, Journal of Economic Geography, 11(4), 709-729. * Ponte, S. and Ewert, J. (2009) Which way is up in upgrading? Trajectories of change in the value chain for South African wine, World Development, 37, 16371650. Ponte, S. and Gibbon, P. (2005) Quality standards, conventions and the governance of global value chains, Economy and Society, 34(1), 1-31. Ponte, S. and Sturgeon, T. (2014) Explaining governance in global value chains: a modular theory-building effort, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). Sturgeon, T.J. (2002) Modular production networks: a new American model of industrial organization, Industrial and Corporate Change, 11(3), 451-96. Sturgeon, T.J. (2009) From commodity chains to value chains: interdisciplinary theory building in an age of globalization, in J. Bair (ed.), Frontiers of Commodity Chains Research, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 110-35.

Week 6: Global Production Networks (GPNs)


Coe, N.M. (2009) Global Production Networks, in R. Kitchin and N. Thrift (eds.) The International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Elsevier, Oxford, Volume 4, pp. 556-562. Coe, N.M. (2012) Geographies of production II: A global production networks A-Z, Progress in Human Geography, 36(3), 389-402. Coe, N.M., Dicken, P. and Hess, M. (2008) Global production networks: realizing the potential, Journal of Economic Geography, 8(3), 271-295. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 3. Glassman, J. (2011) The geo-political economy of global production networks, Geography Compass, 5(4), 154-164. * Henderson, J., Dicken, P., Hess, M., Coe, N.M. and Yeung, H.W-C. (2002) Global production networks and the analysis of economic development, Review of International Political Economy, 9(3), 436-64. Hess, M. (2004) Spatial relationships? Towards a reconceptualization of embeddedness, Progress in Human Geography, 28(2), 165-86. Johns, J. (2006) Video games production networks: value capture, power relations, and embeddedness, Journal of Economic Geography, 6(2), 151-180. Levy, D.L. (2008) Political contestation in global production networks, Academy of Management Review, 33(4), 943-63. * Murphy, J. T. and Schindler, S. (2011) Globalizing development in Bolivia? Alternative networks and value-capture challenges in the wood products industry, Journal of Economic Geography, 11(1), 61-85. Neilson, J. and Pritchard, B. (2009) Value Chain Struggles: Institutions and Governance in the Plantation Districts of South India, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford (dip into). Rutherford, T. and Holmes, J. (2008) The flea on the tail of the dog: power in global production networks and the restructuring of Canadian automotive clusters, Journal of Economic Geography, 8, 519-544.

Week 7: Varieties of Capitalism, Variegated capitalism Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapters 6 and 7. Gertler, M.S. (2010) Rules of the game: the place of institutions in regional economic change, Regional Studies, 44(1), 1-15. Hall, P. and Soskice, D. (2001) Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage. Oxford University Press, Oxford (Chapter 1
is long, but worth skimming). * Lane, C. (2008) National capitalisms and global production networks: an analysis of their interaction in two global industries, Socio-Economic Review, 6, 227260. Morgan, G. (2009) Globalization, multinationals and institutional diversity, Economy and Society, 38(4), 580-605. ONeill, P. M. (1997) Bringing the qualitative state into economic geography, in R. Lee and J. Wills (eds.) Geographies of Economies, Arnold, London, 290-301. Peck, J. and Theodore, N. (2007) Variegated capitalism, Progress in Human Geography, 31(6), 731-772. Springer, S. (2010) Neoliberalism and geography: expansions, variegations, formations, Geography Compass, 4(8), 1025-1038. Tipton, F.B. (2009) Southeast Asian capitalism: history, institutions, states, and firms, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26, 401434. Whitley, R. (1999) Divergent Capitalisms: the Social Structuring and Change of Business Systems. Oxford University Press, Oxford (dip into). Zhang, J. and Peck, J. (2013) A variety of capitalism . . . with Chinese characteristics? Journal of Economic Geography, 13(3), 357-396. * Zhang, X. and Whitley, R. (2013) Changing macro-structural varieties of East Asian capitalism, Socio-Economic Review, 11, 301-336.

Week 8: Economic Development in a Global Economy


Amin, A. and Thrift, N. (1992) Neo-Marshallian nodes in global networks, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 16, 571-87. * Coe, N.M., Hess, M., Yeung, H.W-C., Dicken, P. and Henderson, J. (2004) Globalizing regional development: a global production networks perspective, Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 29(4), 468-84. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 14. Frederick, S. and Gereffi, G. (2011) Upgrading and restructuring in the global apparel value chain: why China and Asia are outperforming Mexico and Central America, International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development, 4(1-3), 67-95. Gereffi, G. and Sturgeon, T. (2013) Global value chain-oriented industrial policy: the role of emerging economies, in D.K. Elms and P. Low (eds.) (2013) Global Value Chains in a Changing World, World Trade Organization, Geneva, 329-360. Horner, R. (2013) Strategic decoupling, recoupling and global production networks: Indias pharmaceutical industry, Journal of Economic Geography, 13. Humphrey, J. and Schmitz, H. (2002) How does insertion in global value chains affect upgrading in industrial clusters? Regional Studies, 36(9), 1017-27. MacKinnon, D. (2012) Beyond strategic coupling: reassessing the firm-region nexus in global production networks, Journal of Economic Geography, 12(1), 227-45. Pietrobelli, C. and Rabellotti, R. (2011) Global value chains meet innovation systems: are there learning opportunities for developing countries? World Development, 39(7), 12041212. Porter, M. (1998) Clusters and the new economics of competition, Harvard Business Review, Nov-Dec, 77-90. Yang, C. (2013) From strategic coupling to recoupling and decoupling: restructuring global production networks and regional evolution in China, European Planning Studies, 21(7), 1047-1063. * Zhu, S. and Pickles, J. (2013) Bring in, go up, go West, go out: upgrading, regionalization, and delocalization in Chinas apparel production networks, Journal of Contemporary Asia, DOI: 10.1080/00472336.2013.801166.

Week 9: Labouring in GVCs/GPNs

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Barrientos, S. (2013) Labour chains: analysing the role of labour contractors in global production networks, Journal of Development Studies, 49(8), 10581071. Barrientos, S., Gereffi, G. and Rossi, A. (2011) Economic and social upgrading in global production networks: a new paradigm for a changing world, International Labour Review, 150(3-4), 319-340. * Coe, N. M. and Hess, M. (2013) Global production networks, labor, and development, Geoforum, 44(1), 4-9. Cumbers, A., Nativel, C., and Routledge, P. (2008) Labor agency and union positionalities in global production networks, Journal of Economic Geography, 8(3), 369387. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the Global Economy, Sage, London, Chapter 16. Helfen, M. and Fichter, M. (2013) Building transnational union networks across global production networks: conceptualizing a new arena of labor-management relations, British Journal of Industrial Relations, 51(3), 553-576. * Kelly, P. F. (2009) From global production networks to global reproduction networks: households, migration, and regional development in Cavite, Philippines, Regional Studies, 43(3), 449-461. McGrath, S. (2013) Fueling global production networks with slave labour? Migrant sugar cane workers in the Brazilian ethanol GPN, Geoforum, 44(1), 3243. Phillips, N. (2011) Informality, global production networks, and the dynamics of adverse incorporation, Global Networks, 11(3), 380-397. Riisgaard, L. and Hammer, N. (2011) Prospects for labour in global value chains: labour standards in the cut flower and banana industries, British Journal of Industrial Relations 49(1), 168-190. Rossi, A. (2013) Does economic upgrading lead to social upgrading in global production networks? Evidence from Morocco, World Development, 46, 223233. Selwyn, B. (2012) Beyond firm-centrism: re-integrating labour and capitalism into global commodity chain analysis, Journal of Economic Geography, 12(1), 205-226.

Week 10: East Asia: from Developmental States to GPNs


Bowen, J.T. and Leinbach, T.R. (2006) Global production networks and competitive advantage: air freight services and the electronics industry in Southeast Asia, Economic Geography, 82(2), 147-166. Escaith, H. and Inomata, S. (2013) Geometry of global value chains in East Asia: the role of industrial networks and trade policies, in D.K. Elms and P. Low (eds.) Global Value Chains in a Changing World, World Trade Organization, Geneva, 135-158. Hobday, M. (2001) The electronics industries of the AsiaPacific: exploiting international production networks for economic development, Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, 15(1), 1329. Lee, Y-S., Heo, I., and Kim, H. (2014) The role of the state as an inter-scalar mediator in globalizing liquid crystal display industry development in South Korea, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). Vind, I. and Fold, N. (2007) Multi-level modularity vs. hierarchy: global production networks in Singapores electronics industry, Geografisk Tidsskrift: Danish Journal of Geography, 107, 69-83. Wei, Y. H. D. (2011) Beyond the GPNnew regionalism divide in China: restructuring the clothing industry, remaking the Wenzhou model, Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography, 93(3), 237-251. Yang, C. (2009) Strategic coupling of regional development in global production networks: redistribution of Taiwanese personal computer investment from the Pearl River Delta to the Yangtze River Delta, China, Regional Studies, 43(3), 385408. * Yang, C. (2013) Market rebalancing of global production networks in the post-Washington Consensus globalizing era: transformation of export-oriented development in China, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). Yang, D. and Coe, N.M. (2009) The governance of global production networks and regional development: a case study of Taiwanese production networks, Growth and Change, 40(1), 30-53. Yeung, H. W-C. (2007) From followers to market leaders: Asian electronics rms in the global economy, Asia Pacific Viewpoint, 48(1), 1-25. Yeung, H. W-C. (2009) Regional development and the competitive dynamics of global production networks: an East Asian perspective, Regional Studies, 43(3), 325-51. * Yeung, H. W-C. (2014) Governing the market in a globalizing era: developmental states, global production networks, and inter-firm dynamics in East Asia, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1).

Week 11: Presentation of Research Papers Week 12: Conclusion: After the Crisis New Contours of Growth
* Cattaneo, O., Gereffi, G. and Staritz, C. (2010) Global value chains in a postcrisis world: resilience, consolidation, and shifting end markets, in O. Cattaneo, G. Gereffi and C. Staritz (eds.), Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective, World Bank, Washington, DC, 3-20. Coe, N.M. (2014) Missing links: logistics, governance and upgrading in a shifting global economy, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). * Gereffi, G. (2014) Global value chains in a post-Washington Consensus world: shifting governance structures, trade patterns and development prospects, Review of International Political Economy, 21(1). Kaplinsky, R. and Farooki, M. (2010) Global Value chains, the crisis, and the shift of markets from North to South, in O. Cattaneo, G. Gereffi and C. Staritz (eds.), Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective, World Bank, Washington, DC, 125-54. Sturgeon, T.J. and Kawagami, M. (2010) Global value chains in the electronics industry: was the crisis a window of opportunity for developing countries?, in O. Cattaneo, G. Gereffi and C. Staritz (eds.), Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective, World Bank, Washington, DC, 245-302. Van Biesebroeck, J. and Sturgeon, T.J. (2010) Effects of the 200809 crisis on the automotive industry in developing countries: a global value chain perspective, in O. Cattaneo, G. Gereffi and C. Staritz (eds.), Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective, World Bank, Washington, DC, 209-244.

ASSESSMENT Top The final mark will be derived from module work (50%) and an end-of-semester examination (50%). The module work will comprise:
1. Participation in seminar discussions (20%). You will be evaluated (a) on the quality of your contributions to all the seminars and (b) your effectiveness in leading the discussion (in a small group) in at least one specific seminar. For each week you will be expected to read the two core readings that will form the basis of discussion and, ideally, one or two others from the reading list. In the week where you are leading the discussion, you and your group will introduce and contextualize the two key readings, provide an initial critique that makes links between the readings as appropriate (you should NOT summarise and repeat the articles we will all have read them), provide two or three questions to start the discussion, and chair the ensuing discussion to a given timeframe. At the end, you will need to summarise the key conclusions of the discussion for your fellow students. 2. One 3,000-word individual research paper to be presented during, and handed in after, Week 11 (30%). Deadline: Friday 4th April 4pm. The presentation will be worth 10%, while the written paper will account for 20%. The topic for the presentation and research paper is as follows:

A theoretically informed case study of an Asian TNC within wider global production networks.
You will be expected to choose an Asian transnational corporation that now occupies a significant role within wider global production networks. Your analysis should cover the following aspects: Introduce the TNC, its activities and its historical development; Position the TNC firm within wider global production networks and show how its role has evolved over time;

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Explain how it is embedded in relationships of control and coordination within global production networks; Profile the firms relationships with state actors at different spatial scales and other non-state actors as appropriate; Offer an assessment of the developmental impacts of the firm through its involvement in global production networks. IMPORTANT: the paper should not be merely a company history written as an isolated case study, but rather should be analytical and set firmly within the broader context of global competition and the literatures which we have studied in the course.

No two individuals are allowed to write on the same Asian TNC. The choice/allocation of firms will be finalized by week 7. PRECLUSIONS
GE3880B Top

WORKLOAD
0-3-0-0-9.5
Workload Components : A-B-C-D-E A: no. of lecture hours per week B: no. of tutorial hours per week C: no. of lab hours per week D: no. of hours for projects, assignments, fieldwork etc per week E: no. of hours for preparatory work by a student per week

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Aim s & O bjectives (Learning O utcom es) | Prerequisites (W hat should I k now?) | Teaching Modes | Schedule

| Synopsis | Syllabus | Assessm ent | Preclusions | W ork load

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