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The Cornerstone Experience: Fostering Successful Integration and Goals Clarification Among First-Year Students

Presented at The Chair Academy's 23rd Annual International Leadership Conference Dr. Denis Wright, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Edison State College Dr. Eileen DeLuca, Dean of College and Career Readiness and QEP Director, Edison State College

Quick Survey of Audience

Colleges which have a First Year Experience Course?

Academic Affairs or Student Affairs?

2 year colleges or 4 year colleges?

Edison State College

Open access, baccalaureate-granting state college.


19 Associate Degrees 10 Bachelors Degrees 10 Certificate Programs (computer science, health professions, fire science, EMT, etc.)

Residence Hall on main campus Five-county service district comprises three counties along Floridas southwestern Gulf coast, and two inland counties.

Service Area for Edison State College

Edison State College Students: Fall 2013


Headcount 15,800 Full-Time 33.9%; Part-Time 66.1% 65.4% of students are 24 years old or younger 34.6% of students are over the age of 24 Female 60.1%; Male 39.9%

58.2% White; 26.7% Hispanic/Latino 12.4% African American 2.7% other minorities

16% credit hours are online

Achieving the Dream Risk Factor Data: AY 2011-2012


Five risk factors from the July 2009 Achieving the Dream report (July/August 2009, Data Notes) were applied to Edison State College FTIC students.

Source: Edison State College Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness (2012). Focal Point.

Achieving the Dream Risk Factor Data: AY 2011-2012

Source: Edison State College Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness (2012). Focal Point.

Edison State College Faculty

180 Full-time Faculty

376 Adjunct Faculty


Edison State College Faculty Federation Union (Chapter of United Faculty of Florida)

Foundations of Excellence: Where We Began

Fall 2008 Identification of critical student learning issues 2009-2010 Foundations of Excellence Study (FoE) Committees formed for each of the nine dimensions

7 out of 9 committees chaired or co-chaired by faculty (committees composed of 38%-73% faculty)


Approximately 120 faculty and staff participants on all committees

FOE RECOMMENDATIONS
120 FOE RECOMMENDATIONS DIVIDED INTO 6 COMPONENTS

TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT

STUDENT LEARNING

COMMUNICATION

STUDENT SUPPORT

ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION

ORIENTATION

FYE COURSE/QEP
STUDENT LEARNING
STUDENT LEARNING

FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE COURSE / QUALITY ENHANCEMENT PLAN

Finding a Path-FOE/FYE/QEP

2011-Steering Committee (QEP/FYE) Co-chaired by a Faculty Member and Administrator

Six-subcommittees with faculty participants on all committees:


Student Learning (with a Lead Faculty identified) Student Support Training and Development Orientation Communication Evaluation and Assessment

Spring 2012 Initial implementation Cornerstone Experience Course.


Fall 2012-Full Implementation of the Cornerstone Experience Course and FYE Program.

The Cornerstone Experience

Student Learning Outcomes based on Frameworks


Critical Thinking assists students in developing the skills of analysis and evaluation to improve thinking and guide attitudes and behavior. Apply the intellectual traits, standards, and elements of reasoning in the context of their personal and academic lives Demonstrate intellectual rigor and problem-solving skills by analyzing and evaluating information, generating ideas, and resolving issues Explore how background experiences impact their values and assumptions and explain how they influence personal relationships Applied Learning enables students to reinforce skills learned in Cornerstone Experience by applying them in other classes and settings. Enhance their awareness of the larger diverse community both inside and outside Edison State College Apply one or more skills learned in the FYE course to other academic endeavors

Student Learning Outcomes based on Frameworks


Relevancy promotes student engagement in learning activities that connect course content to each students own academic and career objectives. Through purposeful connections and meaningful experiences, students will be guided toward successful completion of educational goals. Construct a plan for a successful path into and through completion of a degree or certificate Evaluate student-to-student and student-to-faculty interactions, and reflect on their relationship to academic, career, and social development Reflect on the General Education competencies at Edison State College and articulate their application to academic and career goals Success Strategies help students achieve their personal and educational goals, acquire skills and knowledge, become more mature in their thinking, assume greater responsibility for their own lives and learning, and develop understanding of diversity and multiculturalism in preparation for the professional world. Develop strategies for effective written and verbal communication, use of technology, listening, reading, critical thinking and reasoning

(continued)

Demonstrate independence and self-efficacy through effective personal management, use of college resources and the development of positive relationships with peers, staff and faculty

QEP Goal and Program Outcomes


The primary goal of Edison State Colleges QEP is: to enable first-time-in-college students to become selfreliant learners imbued with critical thinking skills. 1. The QEP will facilitate an increase in student retention rates, rates of persistence, and graduation rates. 2. The QEP will foster increased rates of student satisfaction and student engagement. 3. Faculty will apply newly obtained knowledge to their practices to promote critical thinking and enhance the likelihood of success for first-year students. 4. Staff and administrators will apply practices that promote critical thinking and success to their interactions with first-year students. .

Cornerstone Experience Five-Year Implementation Timeline


Cornerstone Experience Implementation Timeline 2012 2017 Initial Implementation All FTIC degree-seeking students testing into 2 or more developmental Beginning Spring 2012 courses will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course Open sections for students electing to enroll in an SLS course YEAR 1 2012 - 2013 YEAR 2 2013 2014 YEAR 3 2014 - 2015 YEAR 4 2015 2016 YEAR 5 2016 - 2017 All FTIC degree-seeking students testing into 2 or more developmental courses will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course All FTIC degree-seeking students testing into any number of developmental courses will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course All FTIC degree-seeking students will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course All FTIC degree-seeking students will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course All FTIC degree-seeking students will be required to enroll in Cornerstone Experience course

Navigating the Path: Training Module Completers

As of January 2014, 111 faculty and staff have completed the ten Cornerstone Instructor Training Modules. 87 staff and administrators have completed five required Staff/Administrator modules. 602 faculty, staff and administrators have attended one or more QEP Cornerstone Modules.

All departments are encouraged to set training completion goals in the 2013-2014 Unit Plans.

Faculty Teaching Cornerstone Course Required Modules Through TLC: QEP Course Overview and Objectives QEP Course Assignments and Assessments Universal Design Strategies Understanding the First-Year Student Diversity on the College Campus and Beyond The Way I Learn Introduction to College Services, Programs, Support Constructivist Pedagogy and the Student-Centered Classroom Critical Thinking Discipline Paradigms and Career Goals

Faculty Teaching Companion Courses


Required Modules Through TLC:

Staff and Administrator Training

Required Modules Through TLC:

QEP Course Overview and Objectives QEP Course Assignments and Assessments Universal Design Strategies Understanding the First-Year Student Critical Thinking

QEP Course Overview and Objectives Understanding the First-Year Student Diversity on the College Campus and Beyond Introduction to College Services, Programs, Support Critical Thinking

Additional In-House Training Understanding the First Year Student This annual summer conference is held at ESC and open to all faculty, staff and administrators. The content is similar to the module for teaching faculty, but presented as a half or full-day seminar and conducted by a nationally-known expert.

Framework

Critical Thinking Applied Learning Relevancy Success Strategies Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking This annual summer conference is held at ESC and is open to all faculty, staff and administrators.The content is similar to the module for teaching faculty, but presented as a one or two-day seminar and conducted by a nationally-known expert.

Communities of Practice Communities of Practice are open to participation by all faculty, staff and administrators for SLS 1515 Cornerstone Experience and occur twice a month throughout the academic year.

Critical Thinking Applied Learning Relevancy Success Strategies

Professional Conferences

Framework

International Critical Thinking Conference


A contingent of faculty and QEP administrators attend this conference annually.

Critical Thinking

Annual Conference on the First-Year Experience A contingent of faculty and appropriate staff attend this conference annually.

Critical Thinking Applied Learning Relevancy Success Strategies

Section Coverage

Fall 2012
# Taught by fullTotal # time faculty of Sections or staff

Spring 2013 Summer 2013


# Taught by fulltime faculty or staff % Taught by fulltime Total # faculty of or staff Sections # Taught by fulltime faculty or staff

Fall 2013

Spring 2014
# Taught by fulltime faculty or staff % Taught by fulltime faculty or staff

% Taught by fulltime Total # faculty of or staff Sections

% # Taught Taught by fullby fulltime Total # time faculty of faculty or staff Sections or staff

% Taught by fulltime Total # faculty of or staff Sections

30

15 50% 17

11 65% 11

18% 55

36

65% 37

31 84%

Enrollment
SLS 1515 Enrollment Semester
*Spring 2012
Campus Charlotte
Sections

*Summer 2012

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

Summer 2013

Fall 2013

Spring 2014

Enrollme Enrollment Sections Enrollment Sections Enrollment Sections Enrollment Sections Enrollment Sections Enrollment Sections nt

1 3

24 58

1 2

17 35

3 6

43 124

1 4

29 64

1 2

13 30

5 13

113 347

74

Collier

10 157

Hendry Glades

1 11

7 126

1 7

6 108

1 20

15 430

1 11

19 191

1 7

19 138

2 34

52 902

40

Lee College Total

20 379

16

215

11

166

30

612

17

303

11

200

54 1414 36 650

Sample Syllabus Topic Outline


Date 1/6/14 (M) Class Activities and Topics Homework Assignments

1/8/14 (W)

Introduction Activities: Divide and Find Like People; Define me by my things Directions for accessing syllabus and completing homework assignment. Your favorite teacher? Syllabus Q&A Think-Pair-Share: Why are you here? What do you want from college? Inventory (pp.33-34) The value of a college education.CCTDI Pre-test-Meet in Lab SmarterMeasure Pre-test Explore Canvas in lab Journal Entry 1 Due! Group Share: Smarter Measure Results Think-Pair-Share: Who is responsible for your success in this class? Optimist vs. Pessimist Activity (p. 10)

Read Syllabus/Schedule and respond to survey. Complete bio to be included in your company, school, business newsletter

Read Chapter 1 Work on Journal Entry 1 (Due 1/15): Reflect and analyze why you are attending college. What motivated you to enroll? What goals do you hope to achieve? Response must be a minimum of 200 words. Read Chapter 2 Work on Journal Entry 1 (Due 1/15) Continue Reading Chapter 2 Work on Journal Entry 2 (Due 1/22): Using your SmarterMeasure and California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) results, identify your strengths and reflect on how these strengths will contribute to your success. Discover and outline your challenges by listing specific skills that you will improve during the next fourteen weeks. Response must be a

1/13/14 (M) 1/15/14 (W)

1/22/14 (W)

Journal Entry 2 Due! Video: Stuck on an Elevator Internal or External Locus of Control activity (p. 15) Open Sort and Closed Sort: Ten Habits of Successful College Students Whats your passion? Finding your passion in a career. Type Activities (p.44-51) Get in Type groups and review occupations (pp. 57-69). Is there a match? Group Activity: Personality Types (Home, School, Work, Play) Careers and Salaries (p. 70) Field Trip to Career Center

Read Chapters 3 & 4

1/27/14 (M)

Continue Reading Chapters 3 & 4 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities Continue Reading Chapters 3 & 4 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/12): Based upon your Personality Type report, identify three possible career choices that are suitable for you, and explain how one of those relates to your personality type, personal values, career interests and success factors. Response must be a minimum of 200 words. Read Chapters 3 & 4 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/12)

Looks, Yells, Runs Activity Learning Style Inventory (pp. 103- 104) Learning Techniques (pp. 82-83) Group Activity: Learning Styles and Study Techniques Personality and Learning Styles

Read Chapter 5 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/12)

Video Clip-What do you remember? Taking Notes-What our own tricks? Styles of note taking: Cornell, Outline, Mind Maps (pp. 266-268) Group Activity: Work in a group to prepare notes from a text. Note taking checklist (p. 287) Journal Entry 3 Due! Think-Pair-Share: Share your worst test-taking experience. Test-taking Strategies (pp. 294-297) Jigsaw: Cornell Notes Reducing Test Anxiety Special Guest Speaker

Read Chapter 5 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

Read Chapter 5 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

General Education Competencies: Open and Closed Sort Think-Pair-Share: What is Critical Thinking? Group Activity: Critical Thinking Definitions Critical Thinking: Blooms Taxonomy Critical Thinking: The Elder Paul Model Critical Thinking: The RED Model Crime and Punishment (p. 381) Tips for Critical Thinking

Read Chapters 8 & 9 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities Continue reading Chapters 8 & 9 Work on Journal Entry 4 (Due 2/26): Edison State College has established the following General Competencies: Communications (COM), Critical Thinking (CT), Technology/Information Management (TIM), Global-sociocultural responsibility (GSR) and Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR) as listed in your syllabus. Please choose TWO and explain how developing each of these competencies will help you achieve academic, and career success. Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

Course Grades Based on


Critical Thinking Journal Group Presentation Final Essay Assignment Edison GPS (Go Picture Scribe) Attendance, Participation, Quizzes Interview Assignment 25% 15% 25% 15% 10% 10 %

Critical Thinking Journal Entries


1.

Reflect and analyze why you are attending college. What motivated you to enroll? What goals do you hope to achieve? Using your SmarterMeasure and California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) results, identify your strengths and reflect on how these strengths will contribute to your success. Discover and outline your challenges by listing specific skills that you will improve during the next fourteen weeks. Based upon your Personality Type report, identify three possible career choices that are suitable for you, and explain how one of those relates to your personality type, personal values, career interests and success factors. Edison State College has established the following General Competencies: Communications (COM), Critical Thinking (CT), Technology/Information Management (TIM), Global-sociocultural responsibility (GSR) and Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR) as listed in your syllabus. Please choose TWO and explain how developing each of these competencies will help you achieve academic, and career success. Identify and discuss strategies for achieving a balanced approach to college. Include how time management and financial responsibility help you successfully complete your college education. Describe how participation in Edison GPS (Go, Picture, Scribe) has helped you develop an appreciation for diversity. What role does diversity play in influencing your academic, social, and career success? You have learned many social and personal study techniques this semester and have engaged with a diverse population of students at the college. What advice would you give to a new student, such as note taking, time management, career development, social engagement, working in groups, and studying for an exam?

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Edison GPS (Go, Picture, Scribe)


The purpose of this activity is to engage and connect you to Edison State College. ESC offers many great activities and resources. To be a successful college student requires that you utilize the resources to enhance your overall college experience. To successfully complete this assignment the student will participate in the following: 1. Workshop requirements: Attend TWO workshops at Edison State College in your area of interest, and/or an area needing improvement such as FYE, Academic Success, Student Life, Career Center, and Financial Aid Workshops. 2. Academic Advising: Schedule and meet with an academic advisor prior to registering for classes for the next term. 3. Academic Support and Peer Tutoring Centers: Utilize ASC for math, reading, writing or oral communications assistance. 4. Choose 6 from other resources: FYE social events, Service Saturday, Student Life activities/events, use of the library services, use of the Tech Help Center, attendance at art events, plays, and any Edison student or community event or activity. (any service event which lasts all day counts as 2) A minimum of TEN activities must be included in a digital media representation. Each activity needs to include date, description, and purpose. Students can utilize video, Prezi, PowerPoint or a combination of any media. Creative deviations are encouraged; please consult your professor.

Quantitative and Qualitative Measures of Success


Within course completion rates Term-to-term and Year-to-year retention reports

Cohort graduation reports.


Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE) weighted scores Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) weighted scores

Mean scores on the Student Instructional Report (SIR II)


Critical Thinking Journal assessment scored with the faculty-designed rubric

Quantitative and Qualitative Measures of Success


Results of the Final Essay Assignment scored with the faculty-designed rubric Pre and Post-test scores on the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) Pre and post-test scores on the Scores Smarter Measure Learning Readiness Indicator

Results of the Success Strategies presentation scored with the faculty-designed rubric
Student self-report on the Success Strategies Survey Qualitative data from student focus group sessions Professional Development Surveys completed by faculty, staff and administrators

Success Strategies Survey


Table 1 Percentage of Respondents Reporting Utilization of Cognitive and Goal Attainment Strategies Fall 2012 92.5% 47.5% 40.0% Spring 2013 94.6% 55.4% 60.7% Summer 2013 82.0% 54.0% 58.0% Fall 2013 85.0% 32.8% 47.2%

Support Service Academic Success Centers Career Services Peer Mentoring

Peer Tutoring FYE Staff or Academic Coaching


Advising Staff Financial Aid Staff Library Staff

27.5% 40.0%
55.0% 50.0% 60.0%

37.5% 75.0%
69.6% 60.7% 67.9%

34.0% 62.0%
76.0% 72.0% 66.0%

22.2% 49.4%
63.9% 48.3% 48.3%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 2 Percentage of Respondents Reporting Participation in Campus Engagement Activities Activity Type FYE Activities Student Life Activities Academic Success and FYE Workshops Clubs Service Saturday Intramural sports Career Events Lighthouse Commons Activities or Events Fall 2012 38.2% 67.6% 44.1% 26.5% 35.3% 5.9% 58.8% 11.8% Spring 2013 78.9% 61.4% 63.2% 29.8% 26.3% 7.0% 29.8% 21.1% Summer 2013 68.8% 64.6% 89.6% 10.4% 0.0% 4.2% 6.3% 20.8% Fall 2013 74.1% 74.1% 69.3% 16.9% 15.7% 4.2% 21.1% 9.6%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 3

Percentage of Respondents Reporting Improvement in Goal Attainment Strategies Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Fall 2013

Success Strategy

Time Management
Goal Setting Organizational Skills Persistence Avoiding activities and behaviors that may make me unsuccessful

87.5%
87.5% 82.1% 82.5%

85.2%
87.0% 85.2% 83.3%

84.1%
84.1% 81.8% 84.1%

77.1%
77.6% 75.1% 73.5%

82.5%

70.4%

72.7%

70.6%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 4 Percentage of Respondents Reporting Improvement in Communication Strategies Success Strategy Communication and Listening Skills Considering opinions different from my own Relating to people that are different from me Working in a small group to complete a task or assignment Forming a social network with other students *Item did not appear on survey Fall 2012 76.9% Spring 2013 83.3% Summer 2013 86.4% Fall 2013 77.7%

87.2%
* * *

81.5%
* * *

86.4%
86.4% 97.4% 97.4%

82.1%
73.7% 72.5% 64.7%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 5 Percentage of Respondents Reporting Application of Communication, Goal Attainment, and Cognitive Strategies

Success Strategy Note-taking


Critical Thinking Study Skills Creating a schedule Creating a budget Test-taking strategies Forming study groups

Fall 2012

Spring 2013

Summer 2013

Fall 2013

74.4%
84.6% 71.8% 69.2% 56.4% 79.5% 43.6%

80.8%
86.5% 76.9% 78.8% 59.6% 86.5% 46.2%

81.8%
86.4% 88.6% 90.9% 70.5% 72.7% 68.2%

75.2%
81.2% 81.2% 72.5% 51.7% 73.2% 42.3%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 6 Percentage of Students Reporting Application of Communication and Goal Attainment Strategies

Success Strategy
Choosing a major Choosing a career goal Forming relationships Changing study habits Communicating with others Researching professors for future classes Appreciating diversity

Fall 2012 69.2% 59.0% 66.7% 79.5% 71.8% 56.4% 61.5%

Spring 2013 56.9% 68.6% 72.5% 80.4% 80.4% 64.7% 78.4%

Summer 2013 83.7% 88.4% 76.7% 81.4% 83.7% 67.4% 81.4%

Fall 2013 63.3% 64.6% 57.1% 72.1% 68.7% 61.2% 65.3%

Success Strategies Survey


Table 7 Percentage of Respondents Reporting Substantial Improvement in Goal Attainment, Communication, and Cognitive Strategies Success Strategy Arriving to class on time Attending class Reviewing the course schedule Using the calendar or lists Working on large projects incrementally Using small group communication skills Participating and asking questions when appropriate Forming a relationship with other students Meeting with the professor outside of class for help Thinking critically about texts and lectures Fall 2012 5.0% 10.0% 10.3% 17.5% 22.5% 35.0% 22.5% 20.0% 10.3% 35.9% Spring Summer Fall 2013 2013 2013 7.3% 6.3% 6.3% 7.3% 4.2% 6.9% 20.4% 18.8% 12.6% 25.9% 25.0% 20.1% 27.3% 20.8% 18.3% 52.9% 25.0% 21.3% 52.9% 24.1% 27.8% 38.9% 26.7% 22.2% 20.0% 20.0% 20.6% 18.3% 21.9% 19.0%

QUESTIONS?

Connect with the Cornerstone Experience

http://www.edison.edu/cornerstone http://www.edison.edu/fye/qep
Connect with us via social media Facebook: Edison FYE Twitter:@EdisonFYE Blog: Edisonfye.blogspot.com Pinterest: Edison FYE Instagram: Edison FYE

SB 1720 and College Admissions


During the spring 2013 Florida Legislative Session, the Florida Senate introduced Senate Bill 1720 which included revising requirements for the common placement test to assess basic computation and communication skills of students who intend to enter a public postsecondary education degree program. SB 1720 and subsequently, some of its components, were realized in section 1008.30(4)(a) Florida Statute.

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt

Meta-Majors
a set of broad content areas that students choose upon enrollment at a postsecondary institution. A meta-major includes a set of courses that meet academic requirements that are common across several disciplines and specific programs of study. Enrollment and completion of meta-major courses guide students through initial academic requirements and into programs of study (Joint Statement, 2012, p. 2).

Meta Majors Gateway Courses

Arts, Humanities, Communication, and Design


Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Industry/Manufacturing and

Construction

Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Public Safety
Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Business
Gateway Courses = MAC 1105, STA 2023

Science, Technology,

Education
Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Engineering, and Mathematics

Gateway Courses = MAC 1105

Health Sciences
Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Social and Behavioral Sciences

and Human Services

Gateway Courses = MGF 1106, MGF 1107, MAC 1105, STA 2023

Spring 2014 Career Interest by Meta-Major

References
Allen, J., & Robbins, S. B. (2008). Prediction of college major persistence based on vocational interests, academic preparation, and first-year academic performance. Research in Higher Education, 49(1), 62-79.

Ash, S. & Clayton, P. (2009). Generating, deepening, and documenting learning: The Power of critical reflection in applied learning. Journal of Applied Learning in Higher Education. Vol. 1, pp. 25 48.
Association of American Colleges and Universities. (AAC&U) 2002. Greater expectations: A New vision for learning as a nation foes to college. http://www.greaterexpectations.org/ Barton, A., & Donahue, C. (2009). Multiple assessments of a first-year seminar pilot. The Journal of General Education, 58(4), 259-278.

Charles A. Dana Center, Complete College America, Inc., Education Commission of the States, Jobs for the Future (2012). Core Principles for Transforming Remedial Education: A Joint Statement.

Coughlin, K, and DeLuca, E. (2014). The Impact of a First-Year Experience Course on the Retention and Academic Achievement of Students with Remedial Needs. Manuscript in preparation. DeLuca, E. and Coughlin, K. (February 26, 2013). Using Mixed Methods to Assess the Efficacy of a First-Year Experience Course and Program Presented at the Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience Orlando, Fla.

Derby, D. C., & Smith, T. (2004). An orientation course and community college retention. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 28(9), 763-773.
Edison State College. (2012). Cornerstone Experience: Building the Foundation for Success, A Quality Enhancement Plan Prepared for the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Revised-April, 2012 (http://www.edison.edu/assets/pdf/fye/QEP%20FINAL%20with%20Bookmarks.pdf)

Edison State College Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness (2012). Focal Point.
Engberg, M. E., & Mayhew, M. J. (2007). The influence of first-year" success" courses on student learning and democratic outcomes. Journal of College Student Development, 48(3), 241-258.

Hunter, M. S. (2006). Fostering student learning and success through first-year programs. Peer Review, 8(3).
Jenkins, D. and Cho, S. (2012). Get With the Program: Accelerating Community College Students Entry into and Completion of Programs of Study. CCR Working Paper No. 32.

Jamelske, E. (2009). Measuring the impact of a university first-year experience program on student GPA and retention. Higher Education, 57(3), 373-391. Lang, D. J. (2007). The impact of a first-year experience course on the academic performance, persistence, and graduation rates of first-semester college students at a public research university. Journal of the First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 19(1), 9-25.

Karp, M. M., Hughes, K. L., & O'Gara, L. (2010). An exploration of Tinto's integration framework for community college students. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 12(1), 69-86.
Miller, J. W., Janz, J. C., & Chen, C. (2007). The retention impact of a first-year seminar on students with varying pre-college academic performance. Journal of the First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 19(1), 47-62. Murray, J., & Summerlee, A. (2007). The Impact of Problem-Based Learning in an Interdisciplinary First-Year Program on Student Learning Behaviour. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 37(3). Porter, S. R., & Swing, R. L. (2006). Understanding how first-year seminars affect persistence. Research in Higher Education, 47(1), 89-109.

Potts, G., & Schultz, B. (2008). The freshman seminar and academic success of at-risk students. College Student Journal, 42(2). Ryan, M. P., & Glenn, P. A. (2004). What Do First-Year Students Need Most: Learning Strategies Instruction or Academic Socialization?. Journal of College Reading & Learning, 34(2). Tuckman, B. W., & Kennedy, G. J. (2011). Teaching learning strategies to increase success of first-term college students. The Journal of Experimental Education, 79(4), 478-504.

EDISON STATE COLLEGE


Division of College and Career Readiness First Year Experience/Academic Success

COMMON COURSE SYLLABUS PROFESSOR: Eileen DeLuca H-205 After class and by appointment PHONE NUMBER: E-MAIL: 239-985-3498

OFFICE LOCATION: OFFICE HOURS: I.

ecdeluca@edison.edu Spring 2014

SEMESTER:

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE, CATALOG DESCRIPTION, CREDITS: SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 CREDITS) The Cornerstone Experience course at Edison State College is an integrative and interdisciplinary course designed to help first-year students acquire critical thinking and decision-making skills that promote academic success. In this course, students will learn about college resources and requirements, explore career objectives and programs of study, establish relationships with mentoring faculty and develop a support group among peers. This course is a College requirement for First Time in College (FTIC) students. To successfully complete this course, a minimum grade of C or better is required.

II.

PREREQUISITES FOR THIS COURSE: None CO-REQUISITES FOR THIS COURSE: None

III.

GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION: Topic Outline. Learning to Apply Critical Thinking Skills to be Successful Academically, Personally and Professionally (The Elder Paul Critical Thinking Model) Critically Assessing Your Readiness for College (Time Management, Learning Styles, Emotional I.Q., Using technology) Thinking Critically About Success Strategies (Study skills, Test Taking Strategies, Effective listening, Note-taking Methods, Working Effectively in Groups) Locating and Accessing Resources and Managing the Information Highway to Become a SelfReliant Learner (Locating and accessing resources on campus, information literacy) Thinking Critically About Choosing A Career (Occupational Outlook, Work Ethic, Selecting a Career Choice based on Personality, Interviewing Skills, Resume Writing, Cover Letter, How to Dress For Success) Thinking Critically About Your Education Plan (General Education Competencies, Student Learning Outcomes and Rubrics, Long term Education Plan) Thinking Critically About Diversity and Social Justice ( Appreciating College and Community Diversity, Raising Awareness to Combat Insensitivity, Advocating For Social Justice) Page 1

VPAA: Revised 2/24/12, 3/23/12, 1/25/13

SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE

IV.

LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENT: GENERAL EDUCATION COMPETENCIES: General education courses must meet at least four out of the five following outcomes. All other courses will meet one or more of these outcomes. Communication (COM): To communicate effectively using standard English (written or oral). Critical Thinking (CT): To demonstrate skills necessary for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Technology/Information Management (TIM): To demonstrate the skills and use the technology necessary to collect, verify, document, and organize information from a variety of sources. Global Socio-cultural Responsibility (GSR): To identify, describe, and apply responsibilities, core civic beliefs, and values present in a diverse society. Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR): To identify and apply mathematical and scientific principles and methods. ADDITIONAL COURSE COMPETENCIES: At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the following additional competencies: LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENTS Students will complete journal entries that will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric to demonstrate their ability to apply the Elder-Paul model of critical thinking in their personal and academic lives. Students will take the California Critical Thinking Skills Test after completing the critical thinking module of the course and again near the end of the Cornerstone Experience. Students will participate in a final group presentation assignment (How to Succeed in College) and will be evaluated using a rubric designed to assess the following skills: time management, small group communication skills and problem-solving skills. GENERAL EDUCATION COMPETENCIES CT

Apply the intellectual traits, standards, and elements of reasoning in the context of their personal and academic lives

Demonstrate intellectual rigor and problem-solving skills by analyzing and evaluating information, generating ideas, and resolving issues

VPAA: Revised 2/24/12, 3/23/12, 1/25/13

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SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE

Explore how background experiences impact their values and assumptions and explain how they influence personal relationships

Evaluate student-to-student and student-to-faculty interactions, and reflect on their relationship to academic, career, and social development

Students will complete a Myers-Briggs type personality profile to increase self-awareness. They will reflect upon how their profiles influence personal relationships, career choices and success skills in their critical thinking journal. Entries will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric. Students will participate in a final group presentation project in which they will apply effective group communication skills. Students will reflect upon the lessons learned from this experience and relate them to their academic, career and social development in their critical thinking journal entry which will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric.

COM, CT

CT

Reflect on the General Education requirements at Edison State College and articulate their application to academic and career goals

Enhance their awareness of the larger diverse community both inside and outside Edison State College

Students will engage in career exploration assignments and will learn how to develop an education plan to help them achieve their career goals. They will critically reflect upon suitable career choices and how to develop an education plan to accomplish their career aspirations in a critical thinking journal entry which will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric. Students will engage in a variety of classroom assignments including a passport activity to enhance awareness of the diverse community inside and outside Edison State College to encourage an appreciation of diversity. They will critically reflect upon how valuing diversity will contribute to success in their personal life, academic success and obtaining future career goals in a critical thinking journal entry which will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric.

CT

CT

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SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE

Apply one or more skills learned in the FYE course to other academic endeavors

Develop strategies for effective written and verbal communication, use of technology, listening, reading, critical thinking and reasoning

Students will complete journal entries demonstrating how two or more of the skills learned in the FYE course apply to assignments in other courses. Entries will be evaluated based upon the course critical thinking rubric. Students will demonstrate their ability to engage in critical listening as they learn to utilize a researched-based note taking method. Students will explore the use of technology to research databases for college assignments, complete assessments in SMARTERMEASURE, and to navigate MyEdisonState Portal and/or the learning management system adopted by the college. Students will write an essay in which they reflect upon the journals entries completed throughout the course and extract those ideas that they found most influential or important. Students will then create a new plan for achieving success in college and for establishing positive relationships with peers, staff and faculty. The essay will be evaluated using the course critical thinking rubric.

CT

COM

Demonstrate independence and self-efficacy through effective personal management, use of college resources and the development of positive relationships with peers, staff and faculty

COM, CT

V.

DISTRICT-WIDE POLICIES: PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Edison State College, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the colleges guiding principles, offers students with documented disabilities programs to equalize access to the educational process. Students needing to request an accommodation in this class due to a disability, or who suspect that their academic performance is affected by a disability should contact the Office of Adaptive Services at the nearest campus. The office locations and telephone numbers for the Office of Adaptive Services at each campus can be found at http://www.edison.edu/adaptiveservices.

VI. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE STUDENTS: Cornerstone Experience: Critical Thinking Journal The purpose of the Critical Thinking Journal assignment is to reflect upon the 7 topics below by connecting your ideas to the following outcomes: a) Clarity and Logic; b) Accuracy; c) Relevance; and d) Significance.

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SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE It is our expectation that all college written work will be submitted using Standard English grammar and mechanics. Journal Entries

1. Reflect and analyze why you are attending college. What motivated you to enroll? What goals do you hope to achieve? 2. Using your SmarterMeasure and California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) results, identify your strengths and reflect on how these strengths will contribute to your success. Discover and outline your challenges by listing specific skills that you will improve during the next fourteen weeks. 3. Based upon your Personality Type report, identify three possible career choices that are suitable for you, and explain how one of those relates to your personality type, personal values, career interests and success factors. 4. Edison State College has established the following General Competencies: Communications (COM), Critical Thinking (CT), Technology/Information Management (TIM), Global-sociocultural responsibility (GSR) and Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR) as listed in your syllabus. Please choose TWO and explain how developing each of these competencies will help you achieve academic, and career success. 5. Identify and discuss strategies for achieving a balanced approach to college. Include how time management and financial responsibility help you successfully complete your college education. 6. Describe how participation in Edison GPS (Go, Picture, Scribe) has helped you develop an appreciation for diversity. What role does diversity play in influencing your academic, social, and career success? 7. You have learned many social and personal study techniques this semester and have engaged with a diverse population of students at the college. What advice would you give to a new student, such as note taking, time management, career development, social engagement, working in groups, and studying for an exam?
(Minimum word requirements: All journal entries should be no less than 200 words for each topic)

Group Presentation The purpose of this assignment is to reflect upon what it takes to be successful at Edison State College in order to build a foundation for lifelong learning. Groups must analyze, evaluate and demonstrate what it takes for a student to be successful at Edison State College. This includes applying effective success strategies, developing higher level communication, and utilizing critical thinking skills. The conclusions drawn by the group must be shared with the whole class in a final project. Brainstorming is the first step demanded for a successful group project. Some of the best projects have been creative/outside the box and based on students' personal experiences. Think Critically! Final Essay Assignment The purpose of this assignment is to write an essay in which to reflect upon the main themes that emerged from all the class topics and discussions and extract those ideas that you found most influential or important. Then create a new plan for achieving success in college and for establishing positive VPAA: Revised 2/24/12, 3/23/12, 1/25/13 Page 5

SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE relationships with peers, staff and faculty. The essay will be evaluated based on the following outcomes a) Clarity & Logic, b) Accuracy, c) Relevance, and d) Significance. It is our expectation that all college written work must abide Standard English grammar and mechanics. (Minimum 500 word count) Edison GPS (Go, Picture, Scribe) The purpose of this activity is to engage and connect you to Edison State College. ESC offers many great activities and resources. To be a successful college student requires that you utilize the resources to enhance your overall college experience. To successfully complete this assignment the student will participate in the following: 1. Workshop requirements: Attend TWO workshops at Edison State College in your area of interest, and/or an area needing improvement such as FYE, Academic Success, Student Life, Career Center, and Financial Aid Workshops. 2. Academic Advising: Schedule and meet with an academic advisor prior to registering for classes for the next term. 3. Academic Support and Peer Tutoring Centers: Utilize ASC for math, reading, writing or oral communications assistance. 4. Choose SIX from other resources: FYE social events, Service Saturday, Student Life activities/events, use of the library services, use of the Tech Help Center, attendance at art events, plays, and any Edison student or community event or activity. A minimum of TEN activities must be included in a digital media representation. Each activity needs to include date, description, and purpose. Students can utilize video, Prezi, PowerPoint or a combination of any media. Creative deviations are encouraged; please consult your professor. Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (pre & post test) The CCTDI is specifically designed to measure the disposition to engage problems and make decision using critical thinking. It is administered with a preset time of 30 minutes and test takers are asked to indicate the extent to which they agree or disagree (6 point Likert scale) with 75 statements. No educational preparation is required and items can be easily read by the late adolescent and adult population. The CCTDI measures the attitudes and values that influence a test takers capacity to learn and to effectively apply critical think skills, disposition towards: truth-seeking or bias, anticipating possible consequences or being heedless of them, proceeding in a systematic of unsystematic way, being confident in the powers of reasoning or mistrustful of thinking, being inquisitive or resistant to learning, mature and nuanced judgment, and rigid simplistic thinking. An overall thinking disposition score is also calculated. Smarter Measure (pre & post test) SmarterMeasure is a web-based learning readiness tool which indicates the degree to which an individual student possess the attributes, skills and knowledge that contribute to success in higher education. The six major assessment components measure: On-screen reading rate and recall Technical competency Individual attributes Life factors Preferred learning styles Typing speed and accuracy VPAA: Revised 2/24/12, 3/23/12, 1/25/13 Page 6

SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE

SmarterMeasure helps students to recognize their strengths and provides resources to strengthen their weaknesses. VII. ATTENDANCE POLICY: Attendance is required and critical in this course and directly tied to the participation grade. We will be completing a majority of the assignments in the class. All the lessons are critical to your success in this course. Your attendance will count as 10% of your overall class grade. Please demonstrate professional behavior and arrive on time and stay for the entire class. Withdrawal Policy: 1. After two unsuccessful attempts at any course, a student must pay an extra tuition penalty in order to register in that course for a third time. Therefore, it is important for students who decide immediately that they don't wish to remain in a course to file a Course Withdrawal Form in the Registration Office by 4:00 pm, January 13, 2014. By meeting this deadline, a student will not be recorded as having "attempted" the course, will not receive any course grade and will be eligible for a full tuition refund. Students who withdraw after the deadline are not eligible for tuition refund and will be recorded as having attempted the course.

2. Students who find, after a time, that they are not able to attend class meetings should process a "Course Withdrawal" form as soon as possible. Instructors are not permitted to initiate these forms; the action must be initiated by a student (or family member in the case of emergency or illness) in person. Withdraws cannot be done on-line. Important warning: Course Withdrawal forms must be processed before the last withdrawal deadline of 4:00 pm, March 21, 2014, or the student's grade for the course becomes an automatic F.
VIII. GRADING POLICY: Each assignment is listed below along with how your score will impact the percentage of your total grade. Critical Thinking Journal Group Presentation Final Essay Assignment Edison GPS (Go Picture Scribe) Attendance Standardized Assessments and Homework Your final grade will be based upon the following Scale: 90 - 100 80 - 89 70 - 79 60 - 69 Below 60 = = = = = A B C D F 25% 15% 25% 15% 15% 5%

(Note: The incomplete grade [I] should be given only when unusual circumstances warrant. An incomplete is not a substitute for a D, F, or W. Refer to the policy on incomplete grades.) IX. REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS: Cornerstone Experience. A customized version of College and Career Success by Marsha Fralick. Dubuque: Kendall Hunt, 2011. Page 7

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SLS 1515 CORNERSTONE EXPERIENCE

X.

RESERVED MATERIALS FOR THE COURSE: The course textbook is available on reserve in the Library. CLASS SCHEDULE: See attached schedule. ANY OTHER INFORMATION OR CLASS PROCEDURES OR POLICIES: Technology Policy: When class is in session, you, the student, are expected to be alert, attentive, and actively engaged. Technology such as cell phones, tablets, notebooks, etc. should be put away unless for class use. If you plan to take notes on a tablet or notebook, the wireless facility should be turned off. Syllabus: The professor reserves the right to change this syllabus at any time. If changes are made, students will be notified in class and through email. Class Engagement: Bring textbook, writing utensil and paper to each class. I suggest you use a three-ring binder or folder to keep all classwork and handouts. Canvas: Students will submit Critical Thinking Journals, the GPS, the Group Project, Career Project, and the Final Essay through Canvas (an online Learning Management System). Students requiring technology support are encouraged to consult with a Peer Architect in the Frist Year Experience Office (Building Q Room 127).

XI.

XII.

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SLS 1515- Cornerstone Experience Tentative Course Schedule


*All assignments must be submitted to Canvas by 11:59 p.m. on the due date. Exception: Final Essay due by 9:00 p.m. on the due date.

Date 1/7/14 Tuesday

1/9/14 Thursday

Class Activities and Topics Introduction Activity: Something We Couldnt Guess by Looking at You Directions for accessing syllabus and completing homework assignment. Letter to your future self Syllabus Q&A Think-Pair-Share: Why are you here? What do you want from college? Inventory (pp.33-34) The value of a college education. CCTDI Pre-test-Meet in Lab, Q-128 SmarterMeasure Pre-test Explore Canvas in lab Journal Entry 1 Due! Group Share: Smarter Measure Results Think-Pair-Share: Who is responsible for your success in this class?

Homework Assignments Read Syllabus/Schedule and respond to survey. Complete letter to your future self

Read Chapter 1 Work on Journal Entry 1 (Due 1/16):


Reflect and analyze why you are attending college. What motivated you to enroll? What goals do you hope to achieve? Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

1/14/14 Tuesday 1/16/14 Thursday

Read Chapter 2 Work on Journal Entry 1 (Due 1/16) Continue Reading Chapter 2 Work on Journal Entry 2 (Due 1/23):
Using your SmarterMeasure and California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) results, identify your strengths and reflect on how these strengths will contribute to your success. Discover and outline your challenges by listing specific skills that you will improve during the next fourteen weeks. Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

1/21/14 Tuesday

Optimist vs. Pessimist Activity (p. 10) Group Activity: Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic motivation Journal Entry 2 Due! Video: Stuck on an Elevator Internal or External Locus of Control activity (p. 15) Open Sort and Closed Sort: Ten Habits of Successful College Students Whats your passion? Finding your passion in a career. Type Activities (p.44-51) Get in Type groups and review occupations (pp. 57-69). Is there a match? Group Activity: Personality Types (Home, School, Work, Play) Careers and Salaries (p. 70)

Work on Journal Entry 2 (Due 1/23)

1/23/14 Thursday

Read Chapters 3 & 4

1/28/14 Tuesday

Continue Reading Chapters 3 & 4 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

1/30/14 Thursday

Continue Reading Chapters 3 & 4 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/13):


Based upon your Personality Type report, identify three possible career choices that are suitable for you, and explain how one of those relates to your personality type, personal values, career interests and success factors. Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

2/4/14 Tuesday 2/6/14 Thursday

2/11/14 Tuesday

2/13/14 Thursday

2/18/14 Tuesday 2/20/14 Thursday

Field Trip-Career Center and Presentation by Dr. Kennedy Looks, Yells, Runs Activity Learning Style Inventory (pp. 103-104) Learning Techniques (pp. 82-83) Group Activity: Learning Styles and Study Techniques Personality and Learning Styles Video Clip-What do you remember? Taking Notes-What our own tricks? Styles of note taking: Cornell, Outline, Mind Maps (pp. 266-268) Group Activity: Work in a group to prepare notes from a text. Note taking checklist (p. 287) Journal Entry 3 Due! Think-Pair-Share: Share your worst testtaking experience. Test-taking Strategies (pp. 294-297) Jigsaw: Cornell Notes Reducing Test Anxiety Guest Speaker: Cal Majure: Developing Financial Literacy General Education Competencies: Open and Closed Sort Think-Pair-Share: What is Critical Thinking? Group Activity: Critical Thinking Definitions Critical Thinking: Blooms Taxonomy Critical Thinking: The Elder Paul Model Critical Thinking: The RED Model Crime and Punishment (p. 381)

Continue Reading Chapters 3 & 4 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/13) Read Chapter 5 Work on Journal Entry 3 (Due 2/13)

Continue Reading Chapter 5 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

Continue Reading Chapter 5 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

Read Chapters 8 & 9 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities Continue reading Chapters 8 & 9 Work on Journal Entry 4 (Due 2/27):
Edison State College has established the following General Competencies: Communications (COM), Critical Thinking (CT), Technology/Information Management (TIM), Global-sociocultural responsibility (GSR) and Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning (QR) as listed in your syllabus. Please choose TWO and explain how developing each of these competencies will help you achieve academic, and career success. Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

2/25/14 Tuesday

Critical Thinking and Digital Literacy Social Media Revolution-RED Model What is real? General Education Competencies: Open/Close Sort Journal Entry 4 Due! Advising Presentation Assign Groups for Group Project Class time to begin Group Project Planning Group Project Planning Template SPRING BREAK

Read Chapter 11 Work on Journal Entry 4 (Due 2/27)

2/27/14 Thursday

Continue Reading Chapter 11 Dont forget to work on GPS Activities

3/4/14

Enjoy the Holiday!

3/6/14 3/11/14 Tuesday

SPRING BREAK Critical Thinking Continued The Case of Jayne-RED Model You are Dismissed-Plus/Delta Successful Failures

Enjoy the Holiday! Continue Reading Chapter 11 Work on Journal Entry 5 (Due 3/20):
Identify and discuss strategies for achieving a balanced approach to college. Include how time management and financial responsibility help you successfully complete your college education. Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

3/13/14 Thursday

Video: Getting Stuff Done! Goal vs. Fantasy Successful Goal Setting T-chart: What I value/How I spend my time Creating a Successful Schedule Estimating Study and Work Time Journal Entry 5 Due! Video: Multi-tasking Time Bandits Activity (pp.189-190) Time to work on Group Project: Revisit Group Project Template: Fill in Steps and Appropriate Timeline How to become a millionaire (p. 194) Think Thrifty! (pp. 194-195) Think-Pair-Share: What does diversity mean to you? Generalizations, Stereotypes Exploring Stereotypes (p. 449) My Groups Activity Diversity Statistics: US and Global Different and the Same Cultural Diversity Profile Metaphors for Cultural Diversity Journal Entry 6 Due! Intercultural Communication Activity: Cultural Conversations Activity: Can you recognize racism? How to Appreciate Diversity: Open and Closed Sort GPS Assignment Due! Communication: Group Communication I-Messages (p. 338)

Read Chapter 6 Work on Journal Entry 5 (Due 3/20)

3/18/14 Tuesday 3/20/14 Thursday

Continue Reading Chapter 6 Work on Journal Entry 5 (Due 3/20): Continue Reading Chapter 6 Work on Journal Entry 6 (Due 4/3):
Describe how participation in Edison GPS (Go, Picture, Scribe) has helped you develop an appreciation for diversity. What role does diversity play in influencing your academic, social, and career success? Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

3/25/16 Tuesday

Read Chapter 13 Work on Journal Entry 6 (Due 4/3)

3/27/14 Thursday

Continue Reading Chapter 13 Work on Journal Entry 6 (Due 4/3)

4/1/14 Tuesday

Continue Reading Chapter 13 Work on Journal Entry 6 (Due 4/3) Continue to Complete GPS Activities (Due 4/8) Read Chapter 10 Continue to Complete GPS Activities (Due 4/8)

4/3/14 Thursday

4/8/14 Tuesday

Continue Reading Chapter 10 Work on group presentations (Due 4/15)

4/10/14 Thursday

Write an I-message to a group member Think-Pair-Share: Rules for Online Communication Nettiquette Group Activity: Write an effective e-mail to respond to scenario Video: Stop it! Stop, Keep, Start Activity! Ladder of Powerful Speaking (p. 340) Continue Reading Chapter 10 Finalize group presentations (Due 4/15) Work on Journal Entry 7 (Due 4/22): You
have learned many social and personal study techniques this semester and have engaged with a diverse population of students at the college. What advice would you give to a new student, such as note taking, time management, career development, social engagement, working in groups, and studying for an exam? Response must be a minimum of 200 words.

4/15/14 Tuesday 4/17/14 Thursday 4/22/14 Tuesday 4/24/16 Thursday *Last Day of Class 4/29/14 Tuesday

Group Presentations Due! View Presentations View Presentations Journal 7 Due! CCTDI and SmarterMeasure Post-tests Meet in Lab, Q-128 Course wrap-up Final Essay Format Read and Discuss Future Me letters GPS Share Plus/Delta Final Essay Assignment Due to Canvas by 9:00 p.m.

Work on Journal Entry 7 (Due 4/22) Work on Journal Entry 7 (Due 4/22) Review Final Essay guidelines (Due 4/29) Work on Final Essay assignment (Due 4/29)

Have a wonderful summer!