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Experiment 1

1 OBJECTIVES

Uncontrolled Single-phase rectifiers (AC/DC converters)

1- Become familiar with different uncontrolled rectifier topologies 2- Get introduces to the power diode and its characteristics and the power electronic load unit. 3- Learn how to use the isolation amplifier with the oscilloscope

2 TYPES OF AC/DC CONVERTERS


AC/DC converters can be mainly divided into 2 main categories, controlled and uncontrolled rectifiers and are further divided into Half-wave and full wave rectifiers. Half-wave circuits conduct only during half of the AC period. In full-wave circuits, current flows during the full AC period. Midpoint circuits: are half-wave circuits in which the DC-side connections of the main branches are interconnected to form a DC connection. The second connection forms the midpoint of the AC system. Bridge circuits are full-wave circuits. They are built up of pairs of branches. Each AC connection is connected to the midpoint of a branch pair.

The output voltage of a rectifier is a pulsating DC voltage, and is thus made up of a DC voltage with superimposed AC voltage. Although this voltage is not a pure DC quantity, it is nevertheless generally known as DC voltage.

3 POWER ELECTRONIC SWITCHES


Both uncontrolled and controlled switches in rectifiers block when reverse voltage is applied (The cathode's potential is more positive than the anodes). A positive anode voltage causes the uncontrolled rectifier to conduct (anodes potential is more positive than the cathode). Controlled switches in rectifiers block even with a positive anode voltage, unless a control signal is present. It only conducts when a control signal is applied. Silicon diodes are the the main switch used in uncontrolled rectifiers, while thyristors are the main switch used in controlled rectifiers. Both thyristors and diodes conduct is one direction (single quadrant switches), TRIACS on the other hand conduct in both directions.

4 PROCEDURE
4.1 SINGLE-PULSE RECTIFIER (HALF-WAVE RECTIFIER M1)
Also known as single-pulse midpoint circuit

Part 1) Connect one of the transformer phases (45V) as the input Set the load to 33 Ohms (3 parallel 100 Ohms) Obtain a snapshot of the output voltage and current Measure the input voltage and current along with the output current and voltage. (RMS and average values (DC)). Measure the ripple RMS value (set the probe setting to AC) Part 2) Keep the same set-up as part 1 and add a 50mH inductor in series to the load then obtain the same readings as part 1 along with snap shots to see the effects of inductive loading.

4.2 TWO-PULSE MIDPOINT CIRCUIT (M2)

Part 1) Connect one of the transformer phases (45V) as the input Set the load to 33 Ohms (3 parallel 100 Ohms) Obtain a snapshot of the output voltage and current Measure the input voltage and current along with the output current and voltage. (RMS and average values (DC)). Measure the input voltage and current for one of the individual diodes Measure the ripple RMS value (set the probe setting to AC) Part 2) Keep the same set-up as part 1 and add a 50mH inductor in series to the load then obtain the same readings as part 1 along with snap shots to see the effects of inductive loading.

4.3 TWO-PULSE BRIDGE CIRCUIT (B2)

Part 1) Connect one of the transformer phases (45V) as the input Set the load to 33 Ohms (3 parallel 100 Ohms) Obtain a snapshot of the output voltage and current Measure the input voltage and current along with the output current and voltage. (RMS and average values (DC)). Measure the input voltage and current for one of the individual diodes Measure the ripple RMS value (set the probe setting to AC) Part 2) Keep the same set-up as part 1 and add a 50mH inductor in series to the load then obtain the same readings as part 1 along with snap shots to see the effects of inductive loading.