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Amanda McCulloch

Day OBJECTIVES Explain the Calvin Cycle - Sketch the Calvin Cycle - Explain the importance of energy products of light reaction (ATP, NADPH) - Identify the reactant molecule (CO2) that enters the Calvin Cycle from outside - Explain how CO2 gets incorporated into glucose - Observe that every time the carbon molecule is rearranged, energy is used - Explain how glucose composes most of the mass of a plant as starch and cellulose Observe plant stomata - Explain why plants need to take in water - Speculate why plants need to lose water - Observe how the small gas molecules involved in photosynthesis enter (CO2) and leave (O2) a plant leaf - Posit why you find stomata on the bottom of a leaf rather than the top Personalizing Photosynthesis - Food - Energy (firewood, ethanol, coal/oil/natural gas, solar) - Fiber and materials (wood for building, cellulose for paper, cotton for clothing, plastics) - Liberating oxygen - Consuming carbon dioxide Extension Activity - Review carbon cycle - Calculate and analyze carbon footprints - Compare individual carbon footprint to school foot print to world foot print - Discuss options for carbon offsetting Discussion of Carbon Footprint & Ecological Footprint OR Geoengineering article Calorimetry (marshmallow vs. cheese curl) - Photosynthesis - Review of macromolecules - Introduction to cellular respiration Review for Exam F 3.15 Exam

9th Grade Biology Week of 03.10.14


MATERIALS HW Due

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7
NOTES TO SELF

M 3.11

Inspire presentation, Plant leaves, Clear fingernail polish, Clear of Objective cellophane tape (clear package Review sealing tape), Microscopes, Microscope slides

T 3.12

Inspire presentation, worksheet, laptops, http://www.meetthegreens.org/fe atures/carbon-calculator.html (includes a discussion of carbon offsetting)

Analyzing Data p. 213

W 3.13
DAY

Inspire presentation, data, questions,

Article & Questions Finish Objective Review

T 3.14

Presentation, calorimeter, marshmallows, cheese curls

Exam

Study for Exam

Amanda McCulloch 9th Grade Biology Calvin Cycle/Stomata Observation MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 OVERVIEW/ RATIONALE Discussion of Calvin Cycle completes discussion of the reactions of photosynthesis. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 50 minutes

The Calvin Cycle produces sugars in photosynthesis; small molecules (CO2, H2O) enter plants through stomata.

GOALS/OBJECTIVES Students will be able to - Sketch the Calvin Cycle - Explain the importance of energy products of light reaction (ATP, NADPH) (energy is needed every time the developing sugar molecule is rearranged) - Identify the reactant molecule (CO2) that enters the Calvin Cycle from outside - Explain how CO2 gets incorporated into glucose - Explain how glucose composes most of the mass of a plant as starch and cellulose - Explain why plants need to take in water - Speculate why plants need to lose water - Observe how the small gas molecules involved in photosynthesis enter and leave a plant leaf - Posit why you find stomata on the bottom of a leaf rather than the top STANDARDS MATERIALS Inspire presentation, Plant leaves, Clear fingernail polish, Clear cellophane tape (clear package sealing tape), Microscopes, Microscope slides PROCEDURES OPENER 5 minutes REVIEW Why do plants need water? Be specific! Why do plants need carbon dioxide? Be specific! BODY OF THE LESSON Lecture Sketch the Calvin Cycle - start with six (6) five (5) carbon sugars - then CO2 enters the cycle - extra carbon allows twelve (12) three (3) carbon molecules to form - add energy to rearrange atoms (you are breaking and reforming bonds requires energy!) - 12 ATP - 12 NADPH - energized twelve (12) three (3) carbon molecules - two (2) of these molecules become glucose - other ten (10) carbon molecules get activated by energy (6 ATP) - rearrange to make six (6) five (5) carbon sugars Discuss how gases (CO2, O2, H2O) get into and out of plant leaves CLOSURE View stomata, record observations ACCOMODATIONS Hands-on activity

Amanda McCulloch 9th Grade Biology Calvin Cycle/Stomata Observation MONDAY, MARCH 10, 2014 ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION Stomata observations Personal reflections / notes 3rd period

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 50 minutes

A very respectful student asked me today Ms. McCulloch honestly WHY do we need to know this? I had a short discussion with her about how often we use photosynthesis every day (Food, Energy (firewood, ethanol, coal/oil/natural gas, solar), Fiber and materials (wood for building, cellulose for paper, cotton for clothing, plastics), Liberating oxygen Also discussed with her how understanding how the natural world works helps scientists and engineers to develop new technologies (like GM-food, solar energy, etc.) Would it have been more useful to have this discussion at the beginning of the unit? 4th period one student very upset, she lost her iPod Started answering the warm up got a vague answer from a student asked students to discuss with a partner about other details they could add; used that 1 minute interlude to talk with student who looked upset Overall, good responses to warm up review; all on task with stomata observations

Amanda McCulloch Personalizing Photosynthesis

9th Grade Biology TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 50 minutes

OVERVIEW/ RATIONALE It is important to contextualize photosynthesis. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS We require photosynthesis for food, energy, materials, oxygen, and reduction of greenhouse gases. GOALS/OBJECTIVES Students will be able to - Explain how photosynthesis influences their everyday lives (food, energy, materials, O2, GHG) - Review the carbon cycle - Calculate carbon and ecological footprints - Discuss the role of photosynthesis in carbon sequestration STANDARDS MATERIALS Inspire presentation, laptops, worksheets OPENER 5 minutes PROCEDURES REVIEW

What have you done today that requires photosynthesis? BODY OF THE LESSON Discussion 10 minutes Personalizing Photosynthesis - Food - Energy (firewood, ethanol, coal/oil/natural gas, solar) - Fiber and materials (wood for building, cellulose for paper, cotton for clothing, plastics) - Liberating oxygen - Consuming carbon dioxide/reducing greenhouse gases (carbon cycle) Extension Activity - 35 minutes - Review Carbon cycle - Calculate footprint - Discuss carbon offsetting CLOSURE Finish carbon footprints, collect ACCOMODATIONS Group work ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION Collect worksheets Personal reflections / notes Website did not work when all students were trying to access it! Had to change the assignment (website AND re-write worksheet) during 2nd period prep! Easy to do since I had my objectives in mind Galeet helped (turn the pledges into a competition try to get students to figure out how to decrease 5 tons of CO2 without spending much/any money)

Name _________________________________________ Period ____ Date __________ Whats Your Footprint? Part I: Introduction The term carbon footprint is often used as shorthand for the amount of carbon (usually in tonnes) being emitted by a person, an activity, or organization. It is important to know your carbon footprint since excess carbon (in the form of green house gases carbon dioxide and methane gases) contributes to global warming. For this activity, you will use the CoolClimate Carbon Footprint Calculator website to calculate your carbon footprint as well as investigate possible reductions you can make. Part II: Calculate your carbon footprint. Google: CoolClimate Carbon Footprint Calculator Click on the first website to open up it. Next, write in your zip code. Choose how many people live in your household. If you know your household income, include it. If not, just leave that tab as Average. Scroll to the bottom of the page and record your results: Average footprint for zip code _____________________: _______________ tons of CO2/year

From the bar graph at the bottom of the page, where do most household CO2 emissions come from?

Part III: Investigate possible reductions. Return to the top of the page. Click on the Take Action tab. You will see a long list of possible Pledges an individual can make to reduce their carbon footprint. Why do we care so much about CO2 emissions?

Identify the three most expensive (up front) pledges you could make and the equivalent CO2 saved. Pledge _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ Cost (upfront) _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ Tons of CO2 Saved ______________________ ______________________ ______________________

As high school students, you probably do not have the time or resources to make such expensive pledges! However, there are other options in the list that you could implement in your daily lives. Your challenge: identify enough pledges that you could actually do to reduce your carbon footprint by: 5 tons of CO2/year Identify them on the next page (you may not need to use all the spaces)

Name _________________________________________ Period ____ Date __________ Pledge _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ _________________________________________ Cost (upfront) _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ _______________________ Tons of CO2 Saved ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ ______________________

Part III: Carbon Offsets To counterbalance our green house gas emissions, individuals and companies can purchase something called carbon offsets, which help fund credible projects that minimize the impact of emissions. One specific offset is the planting of trees. Explain why tree planting is a carbon offset option.

Use the following website to calculate the amount of money and number of trees you need to offset your carbon production: http://treescharlotte.org/support-us/carbon-offset-calculator/ Use your carbon footprint (tons of CO2) from Meet the Greens;. On the trees charlotte website, type in the tons of CO2 into the calculator. Click calculate. Record data:

Amanda McCulloch Photosynthesis & C Sequestration

9th Grade Biology WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 25 minutes

OVERVIEW/ RATIONALE It is important to contextualize photosynthesis. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS We require photosynthesis for food, energy, materials, oxygen, and reduction of greenhouse gases. GOALS/OBJECTIVES Students will be able to - Discuss the role of photosynthesis in carbon sequestration - Define carbon footprint - Illustrate the carbon cycle - Investigate geoenegineering practices STANDARDS MATERIALS Inspire presentation, laptops, worksheets OPENER PROCEDURES REVIEW

Do plants need to take in CO2 to make O2? Explain Write down one question you have or one interesting observation you made from the activity yesterday. BODY OF THE LESSON Discussion of questions and observations

Amanda McCulloch Photosynthesis & C Sequestration

9th Grade Biology WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 2014 CLOSURE ACCOMODATIONS ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 25 minutes

Participation Personal reflections / notes 3rd Period Tried a hands-off approach to discussion focused on getting student ideas Probably about 1/3 of class full engaged and excited! But 2/3 of class disengaged/zoning off Tried to focus on getting students participating and listening to each other hard to do 4th Period I stepped in to guide discussion more asked a starter question, tried to get more students to build on each others answers students are really just answering the teacher, however, How to scaffold discussion so that students discuss with fellow students and not just answering teacher? Is this type of discussion something that has to be scaffolded from the beginning of the year onward? How would this look in my classroom in the future? Professional Development 3 budgets on the table More lay offs? More school closings (transition to Renaissance charters)? Whats happening at the end of the school year? Science department: Bio olympics Competition within classes other ideas? March 21 - Soph Hop (Romanos Notheast) March 14 & 15 - Robotics Competition Springside Chestnut Hill March 22 & 23 - Robotics Competition Lenape Seneca H.S. (Jersey) March 25 - The Sum of Its Parts - private pre-screen with Q&A - Bossone Center, Drexel (5:30) 1st week of April - Physics Bowl Dr. Donnell New Cosmos Sunday at 8:00 PM on Fox Cheltenham Elementary School - Women in Science (science fair projects, presentations, etc.) Monday (3/17) after school - AP tests

Name _________________________________________ Period ____ Date __________

Commentary: Healing the planet through photosynthesis and carbon sequestration


By MARK HERTSGAARD Maine Sunday Telegram - July 7, 2013 WASHINGTON - Eating meat is bad for the planet, right? That hamburger you're contemplating for lunch comes from a cow that, most likely, was raised within the industrial agriculture system. Which means it was fed huge amounts of corn that was grown with the help of petroleum, the carbon-based substance that has helped drive Earth's climate to the breaking point. In industrial agriculture, petroleum is not only burned to power tractors and other machinery used to plant, harvest, and process corn -- it's also a key ingredient in the fertilizer employed to maximize yields. Eating beef is particularly environmentally damaging: Cows are less efficient than chickens or pigs at converting corn (or other feed) into body weight, so they consume more of it than other livestock do. As a result, the industrial agriculture system employs 55 calories of fossil fuel energy to produce 1 calorie of beef. Meanwhile, livestock production is responsible for much of the carbon footprint of global agriculture, which accounts for at least 25 percent of humanity's annual greenhouse gas emissions, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Despite its large carbon footprint, the agricultural sector is invariably overlooked in climate policy discussions. The latest example: In his 50-minute speech on climate change last week, President Obama mentioned agriculture only once, in a half-sentence reference to how farmers will have to adapt to more extreme weather. Perhaps no one has been more influential in popularizing the environmental critique of industrial agriculture than Michael Pollan. His 2006 best-seller, "The Omnivore's Dilemma," revealed how corporate profits, misguided government policies and an emphasis on convenience have given Americans food that is cheap but alarmingly unhealthy for those who eat it, not to mention the soil, air and water used to produce it. These days, however, Pollan is delivering a deeper yet more upbeat message. Now, instead of just exposing the faults of the industrial agricultural system, Pollan is suggesting radical new ways to make agriculture work for both people and the planet. With the right kind of technology, Pollan believes that eating meat can actually be good for the planet. That's right: Raising livestock, if done properly, can reduce global warming. "Depending on how you farm, your farm is either sequestering or releasing carbon," says Pollan. Currently, the vast majority of farms, in the United States and around the world, are releasing carbon -- mainly through fertilizer and fossil fuel applications but also by plowing before planting. "As soon as you plow, you're releasing carbon," Pollan says, because exposing soil allows the carbon stored there to escape into the atmosphere. One method of avoiding carbon release is no-till farming: Instead of plowing, a tractor inserts seeds into the ground with a small drill, leaving the earth basically undisturbed. But in addition to minimizing the release of carbon, a reformed agriculture system could also sequester carbon, extracting it from the atmosphere and storing it -- especially in soil but also in plants -- so it can't contribute to global warming. Sequestering carbon is a form of geoengineering, a term that covers a range of human interventions in the climate system aimed at limiting global warming. Last month, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere passed 400 parts per million, its highest level since the Pliocene Epoch 2.6 million years ago. Meanwhile, human activities, from driving gas-guzzlers to burning coal, are increasing this 400 ppm by roughly 2 ppm a year. According to Pollan, photosynthesis is "the best geoengineering method we have." It's also a markedly different method than most of the geoengineering schemes thus far under discussion -- like erecting giant mirrors in space or spraying vast amounts of aerosols into the stratosphere to block the sun's energy from reaching Earth. Whether any of these sci-fi ideas would actually work is, to put it mildly, uncertain. By contrast, we are sure that photosynthesis works. Plants inhale CO2 and turn it into food for us, even as they exhale the oxygen we need to breathe. What does all this have to do with eating meat? Here's where Pollan gets positively excited "When you have a grassland, the plants living there convert the sun's energy into leaf and root in roughly equal amounts. When the ruminant (e.g., a cow) ... grazes that grassland, it trims the height of the grass from, say, 3 feet tall to 3 inches tall. The plant responds to this change by seeking a new equilibrium: it kills off an amount of root mass equal to the amount of leaf and stem lost to grazing. The (discarded) root mass is then set upon by the nematodes, earthworms and other underground organisms, and they turn the carbon in the roots into soil. This is how all of the soil on earth has been created: from the bottom up, not the top down." The upshot, both for global climate policy and individual dietary choices, is that meat eating carries a big carbon footprint only when the meat comes from industrial agriculture. "If you're eating grassland meat," Pollan says, "your carbon footprint is light and possibly even negative."

Name _________________________________________ Period ____ Date __________


Answer the following questions. You will need to refer to the article and your notes from class. 1.) Define carbon footprint:

2.) Earlier this year, we studied the carbon cycle. Review your notes from class and illustrate the carbon cycle below:

3.) Identify all carbon sources and carbon sinks in your diagram. 4.) Using your notes from earlier this year, explain how excessive greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4) cause global warming.

5.) According to the article, are farms typically carbon sources or carbon sinks? Explain.

6.) Using information from the article, define geoengineering:

7.) What does Pollan think is the best geoengineering method we have? Explain how this method limits global warming.

Amanda McCulloch Calorimetry/Exam Review

9th Grade Biology THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014

Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 50 minutes

OVERVIEW/ RATIONALE This lesson will transition students from discussion of photosynthesis to cellular respiration. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS Photosynthesis makes food to store energy; cellular respiration breaks down food to release energy GOALS/OBJECTIVES Students will be able to - Summarize photosynthesis - Review previous knowledge of macromolecules - Explain the purpose of cellular respiration STANDARDS MATERIALS Presentation, calorimeter, marshmallows, cheese curls PROCEDURES OPENER REVIEW Warm up BODY OF THE LESSON Calorimetry Demonstration 20 minutes - Where does the energy in the marshmallow come from? Sugar photosynthesis - Will a cheese curl have more or less energy? - Burn and compare - Discuss energy storage of carbohydrates vs. lipids - Our bodies burn food using cellular respiration Exam review 20 minutes - Worksheet (from Galeet) CLOSURE Review for exam, answer questions, do worksheet ACCOMODATIONS ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION Collect worksheets Personal reflections / notes How to make worksheet review more engaging? Some students always answering, some students need the review 3rd period - asked to be able to pass around the fluffy microbes; made review more engaging but are they paying attention? - used it for the first 13 questions, then just called on students

Amanda McCulloch 9th Grade Biology Periods 1, 3, 4, 7 Calorimetry/Exam Review THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014 50 minutes th 4 period - extra credit points only last for so long - lots of students eventually spacing out; should I have used cold-calling? Should I have called on names then read questions then asked for answer? - noticings: Eric and Brandon talking a lot (about worksheet? Tried to listen in as I reviewed); Sara was reading her book (not sure about Kaitlin, she usually is as well); Rametrius sleeping; Ahmaad was spacing out (did not know where we were when I called on him, but then he participated a lot more); same students answering - what to do when students totally just give up and sit there and do not raise their hands (doesnt happen all that often) Overall realized I do not like teaching this way! But I think it was a good review Many students asked for this type of review sheet more often (some, instead of objective reviews) what will I use next year for chapter/test review? dont want to just have students memorize for the test, want them to work through the objectives and make connections Keeping attention when they know it while still attacking things they do not know - popsicle stick - finish 1st page, then review; finish 2nd page, then review;

Name____________________________________________________________________________________ Date ___________ Period________ PHOTOSYNTHESIS 1. Molecules that collect light energy are called _P_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ . 2. _C_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ is the main light absorbing pigment found in green plants. 3. Plants look green because chlorophyll _R_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ green light. 4. Organisms, like green plants, that can make their own food using energy from the sun are called _A_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __. 5. The gel-filled space inside the chloroplast surrounding the thylakoid stacks is called the S_ __ __ __ __ __. 6. During the light dependent reactions, H+ ions build up in the _T_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ space when W_ __ __ __ __ molecules are split. 7. The enzymes for the light dependent reactions are found in the _T_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _M_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ , while the Calvin cycle happens in the _S_ __ __ __ __ __. 8. The stacks of thylakoids found inside chloroplasts are called _G_ __ __ __ __ . 9. The light independent reactions are also called the _C_ __ __ __ __ __ _C_ __ __ __ __. 10. Carbon and oxygen from _C_ __ __ __ __ __ _D_ __ __ __ __ __ __ end up as part of a G_ __ __ __ __ __ __ molecule following the Calvin cycle. 11. _A_ __ __ and _N_ __ __ __ __ are made during the _L_ __ __ __ __ dependent reactions and carry energy and high energy electrons that are used during the Calvin cycle to produce _S_ __ __ __ __ __, like glucose. 12. The O in H2O is given off as_O_ __ __ __ __ __ gas to the atmosphere when water is split during the light dependent reactions. 13. Orange and yellow colored pigments called _C_ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ absorb different wavelengths of light and help chlorophyll use more of the suns energy. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ENERGY AND LIFE: CIRCLE ALL THE STATEMENTS THAT ARE TRUE OR COMPLETE THE STATEMENT. THERE MAY BE MORE THAN ONE CORRECT ANSWER. Which molecule stores more than 90 times the energy in an ATP molecule? A. ADP B. water C. glucose D. adenine

All organisms get the ENERGY they need to regenerate ATP from __________________________ A. phosphates B. foods like glucose C. organelles D. ADP Which of the following are TRUE about ATP? A. ATP consists of ribose sugar, adenine, and 3 phosphate groups B. ADP forms when ATP loses a phosphate and releases energy. C. Used ATP is discarded by the cell as waste. D. ATP provides energy for active transport in cells.

Name____________________________________________________________________________________ Date ___________ Period________ What is it called? DESCRIPTION GIVE 2 EXAMPLES Organisms that can make their own food Organisms that obtain energy from the food they eat What is the ultimate source of energy autotrophs use produce their own food? ___________________ NAME THE CHEMICAL COMPOUND SHOWN BELOW THAT CELLS USE TO STORE ENERGY. ________ LABEL THE PARTS THAT MAKE UP THIS MOLECULE: A= _________________________________ B= __________________________________ C=___________________________________ WHAT DOES ATP STAND FOR? A____________________________ T_________________________________________________

HOW MANY PHOSPHATES ARE IN ONE MOLECULE OF ADP? ____________ USE the words: ENERGY STORING and ENERGY RELEASING to label what is happening in the reactions shown below:

_____________________________________ * * * * * * * * *

____________________________________ * * *

PHOTOSYNTHESIS: An Overview. CIRCLE ALL THAT ARE TRUE. Plants gather the suns energy with light-absorbing MOLECULES called __________________. A. thylakoids B. pigments C. chloroplasts D. glucose Chlorophyll absorbs light very well in the _______________ regions of the visible spectrum A. blue-violet B. green C. red D. yellow Most plants appear green because chlorophyll _________________________________________. A. reflects green light B. absorbs green light A student conducts an experiment by collecting the gas given off by a green plant in bright sunlight at room temperature. The gas being collected is probably ___________________. A. ATP B. water vapor C. carbon dioxide D. oxygen Write the complete overall chemical equation for photosynthesis using chemical symbols: ___________ _________________________ + _________________________ _________________________ + _________________________ How many molecules of carbon dioxide (CO2) are used to make 1 molecule of glucose (C6H12O6) ?

Name____________________________________________________________________________________ Date ___________ Period________ 1 2 3 6 12 Name 3 factors that affect the rate at which photosynthesis occurs. 1. _____________________________________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________________________________ MODIFIED TRUE or FALSE: Circle T if the statement is TRUE. Circle F if the statement is FALSE and use the blank provided to correct the underlined word/phrase. T T F F Increasing light intensity decreases the rate of photosynthesis. _____________________ Carbon dioxide molecules enter the light-dependent reactions from the atmosphere. ______________________

T F Photosynthesis uses energy from ATP and high energy electrons from NADPH produced in the light-dependent reactions to make glucose in the Calvin cycle. ___________________ T T T F F F The light-dependent reaction produces ATP, NADPH, and carbon dioxide. _____________ ATP synthase spins like a turbine as H+ ions pass through it to generate ATP. __________ Electrons are energized twice during photosynthesis. __________ USE THE LETTERS IN THE DIAGRAM AT THE LEFT TO IDENTIFY: ______ stroma ______ thylakoid ______ granum

USE WORDS FROM THE WORD BANK TO FILL IN THE CHART COMPARING AND CONTRASTING THE LIGHT-DEPENDENT REACTIONS AND THE CALVIN CYCLE: (You can use them more than once!) in stroma in thylakoid membrane O2 ATP CO2 H2O NADPH require light SUGARS (glucose) LIGHT-DEPENDENT REACTIONS LOCATION REACTANTS PRODUCTS LIGHT? Requires light Doesnt

CALVIN CYCLE

Name____________________________________________________________________________________ Date ___________ Period________ THINK ABOUT IT

Which of these graphs represents the effect of temperature on the rate of photosynthesis? ______ (Hint: Many molecules that help with photosynthesis are enzymes) EXPLAIN YOUR ANSWER. ___________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Which of these graphs represents the effect of light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis? ______ EXPLAIN YOUR ANSWER. ______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ Modified from: http://brookings.k12.sd.us/biology/photosynthesis.htm