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Drexel University

Dept. of English & Philosophy

English 102, Winter 2014 --------------------------------------------------------- Dr. Jan Armon Assignment III ---------------------------------------------------- Reflective analysis + portfolio
Length of reflective analysis -------------------- Maximum of 1,000 words, plus Works Cited Create an iWebfolio account, using instructions I have posted--------------------------- a.s.a.p. Upload your selected writings on iWebfolio------------------------------------ Friday 14 March Upload reflective analysis on Turnitin; worth 15 points --------------- Monday 17 March Upload the same reflective analysis on iWebfolio ------------------------by Tuesday 18 March Introduction Your Writing Portfolio is an online space where you gather several of your writings. You will write a separate essay to assess whether those writings achieve a First-year Writing Program (FWP) Outcome. The Outcomes are listed the Syllabus and repeated below. The essay is known as your reflective analysis. Only the reflective analysis will be scored. FWP Outcomes pick one 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Use writing and reading for inquiry, thinking, and communicating Craft messages for different kinds of rhetorical situations and purposes Use research to develop, support, and enhance your ideas Understand writing and revision as processes Critique your own and others works Use writing technologies to address a range of audiences Cite sources correctly using documentation styles such as MLA format Understand and use correct grammar and mechanics

Reflective analysis Reflective analysis involves measuring writing against the assignment that led to it, and against your own standards for what constitutes good writing of that sort. Recollect the decisions you made while writing, and evaluate how effective they turned out to be. Reflective analysis helps you to make an evidence-based argument about yourself. In your personal, academic, and professional life, it will be important to establish and reflect on goals, to periodically examine what you have accomplished, and to ask critical questions: What did I hope to accomplish? Did I grow as a person, scholar, or professional? What evidence do I have for such growth? How does that growth prepare me for what comes next? In many contexts, you will be asked to discuss, either in person or in writing, what kind of student or employee you will be. In these contexts, it is reflective analysis that will allow you to examine your experience for the evidence you need to construct honest answers for yourself and others. As you move through the FWP sequence, the Writing Portfolio will give you practice
Instructions for Reflective Analysis Dr. Jan Armon 3/2/14 printing Page 1 of three

Drexel University

Dept. of English & Philosophy

with reflective analysis. You may learn that the term writer applies to yourself and your peers. You shall use writing to embrace complexity and think about open-ended questions. Based on the specific writings you include, you make larger claims about your writing abilities. Reflective Analysis for English 102 In this culminating assignment of the course, you will use your iWebfolio account to display at least four writings and a reflective analysis that explains how those writings provide evidence for your development as a writer. You will use one of the FWP Outcomes as a basis for analysis. Upload your reflective analysis on Turnitin before you upload it on iWebfolio. Write your reflective analysis as a letter. Write the letter to a person whom you trust, or to a person who influenced you, or even to yourself in the past or in the future but not to me. Make an argument about your writing development, with an honest assessment of both achievement and backsliding. The thesis of the argument should be built on one of the FWP Outcomes. If you select Outcome 1, you may decide to use only part of it. I suggest that you not select an outcome that is irrelevant to what we have done in this class. Use your own writing as evidence for your argument. Specifically, you should integrate four writings thats 4 as sources in your analysis: a. From English 101, the final version of a major assignment or project; b. From English 102, the final version of Assignment II in English 102, or Assignment I Part 2 or Assignment I Part 4; c. Two less formal writings, to be selected from the following: any draft or quiz or annotated bibliography or discussion thread from English 101 or 102; or from English 102, Assignment I Part 1, Assignment I Part 3, or your oral presentation; d. Optional: any composition you would like to use from another class to support your thesis. Conduct meta-analysis of those writings. Meta-analysis is your examination of your own work; you are writing about your writing. How to fail this assignment: Use less than four writings in your reflective analysis. Citing your own writings In your essay, provide proper in-text citation of your sources, just as you would with any other source in a composition. In this case, however, your sources are your own compositions; so youll be citing yourself. Here is an example: In Assignment II of English 101, I discuss the impact of drafting on my writing development: I have always drafted because I have been required to. But I
Instructions for Reflective Analysis Dr. Jan Armon 3/2/14 printing Page 2 of three

Drexel University

Dept. of English & Philosophy

really wanted to reflect analytically on how the process of drafting actually impacted my overall writing development. Was I becoming a better writer? (Drafting and Development 3). Then include full citations in a Works Cited. A Works Cited should be in alphabetical order by authors last name. Where there is more than one piece by the same writer, as in the current assignment, alphabetize by author and then title. The Words Cited should be doublespaced, with no extra space between entries. Here is a format to follow: Works Cited Last name, First name. Title that You Gave to the Assignment. Course Title. Dr. Jan Armon (or other professor). Name of Department, Drexel University (or other institution). Date assignment was submitted. Form of Media (e.g., Print, Web, Interview). ---. Title that You Gave to the Assignment. (And so forth.) Please note. The three dashes mean: same author or authors as in the preceding citation. Include full citations to any articles or other sources mentioned in the essay. Uploading your writings onto iWebfolio 1. Create each writing as an ITEM in iWebfolio. Add a preface to the ITEM in which you explain its original context: when it was written, in what situation, and for what purpose or in response to what sort of assignment, e.g., interview; exploratory essay. Note: In iWebfolio, ITEMS are different than FILES, for ITEMS are created to be viewed within the portfolio, while FILES must be downloaded by the reader. Many readers, such as I, wont download a document. That is why you must use the ITEM feature of iWebfolio. 2. Within your Drexel Writing Portfolio, add your writings to the English 101 Category of your portfolio using Add Attachment. You may select ITEM in the pull-down menu to view ITEMS youve created. 3. Add your reflective analysis to the main body of the English 101 area of the portfolio using the Edit feature. Avoid puffery & fluffery No puffery: Unlike a reflective analysis that you might submit to a prospective co-op or employer, this reflective analysis should not paint an entirely glowing picture. Wherever your writing fell short of a goal, admit as much and explain it. No fluffery: Your reflective analysis is not a place to make your teacher feel good.
Instructions for Reflective Analysis Dr. Jan Armon 3/2/14 printing Page 3 of three