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World Vision Development Foundation Inc.

Humanitarian and Emergency Affairs Division (HEA)

Specialized Project Model


For

Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction

January 2014 Version

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Table of Contents
Description
Executive Summary Definition of Terms Introduction 1 Specific child wellbeing outcomes to which the project model will contribute 2 Life cycle stages to which the model contributes 3 Intended target groups 4 Linked strategies, including applicable DADDs 5 Context characteristics under which the project model should and should not be considered 6 National or Sub-national support required to enable implementation of the project at program level 7 Technical intervention(s) 7.1 Stand Alone CFDRR Process at the Community Level 7.2 CFDRR Integration into ADP Programming (Sectoral Interventions) 8 Advocacy Components 9 Recommended Partners 10 How the model will include/ benefit the most vulnerable 11 How the model promotes/ enables child protection 12 How the model promotes gender equity 13 How the model promotes empowerment and sustainability 14 Sponsorship Considerations 15 Recommended Project Timelines 16 Potential roles for WV at different periods in the project timeline Integration of Sectors in CFDRR 16.1 Water and Sanitation 16.2 16.2. Agriculture 16.3 16.3. Education 16.4 16.4. Health 16.5 16.5. Microenterprise and Development 17 Guidelines for adaptation of the model to local situation 18 Recommended goal, outcomes, outputs, and indicators 19 Generic logic model for WVs contribution to the model 20 Critical success factors for the project 21 Risks through the project timeline 22 Guidelines for staffing Guidelines for optimal types and levels of resources needed for implementation through the project 23 timeline 24 Recommended capacity building 25 Guidelines for project management 26 Necessary tools 27 Guidelines on transition Appendices

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Glossary of Acronyms
ADP CBDRM CFDRR CWBO DM DRM DRR EPRF HEA LDRRM NGO NO RO WVDF WVGC UN Area Development Program Community Based Disaster Risk Management Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction Child Well Being Outcomes Disaster Management Disaster Risk Management Disaster Risk Reduction Emergency Preparedness and Relief Funds Humanitarian and Emergency Affairs Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Nongovernmental Organization National office Regional Office World Vision Development Foundation Inc. World Vision Global Centre United Nations

Executive Summary
This project model replaces the existing Community Disaster Preparedness Plan (CDPP) which was focused on early warning and preparedness for disasters. World Vision in the Philippines have been part of the Asian Community Resilience Project last 2008 funded by WV Australia which resulted in the drafting of three (3) CF DRR modules (risk assessment, training module for children, training module for adults). Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction (CFDRR) incorporates the six dimensions of disaster risk management: Early Warning, Preparedness, Prevention, Mitigation, Response, Recovery and Transition. The implementation of CF DRR in the Philippines is in line with the current Republic Act 10121 (Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010) where it employs the Community Based DRM model in building resilience of Filipino communities. The aim of CFDRR is to contribute towards resilient and secure households and communities; ultimately contributing to the integrated ministry goal of sustained well-being of children within their families and communities especially the most vulnerable. The development and implementation of CF DRR Plan is a process of active engagement with different representatives of the community, participation will include children and other members of society deemed most vulnerable. A significant part of the process is that communities will develop a Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan1 (DRRMP) which would include projects, programs and activities to prepare for, prevent and mitigate the effects of a disaster. Critical role of children in this process must be secured by the development facilitator to make sure that rights of the child are raised and their participation heightened.

Definition of Terms
Throughout the whole document, the following terms will be used and are defined as follows based on the current DRRM Law of the Philippines, Republic Act 10121: Capacity - a combination of all strengths and resources available within a community, society or organization that can reduce the level of risk, or effects of a disaster. Capacity may include infrastructure and physical means, institutions, societal coping
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In the Barangay level, the Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan must be integrated into the Barangay Development Plan.

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

abilities, as well as human knowledge, skills and collective attributes such as social relationships, leadership and management. Capacity may also be described as capability. Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management or CBDRRM - a process of disaster risk reduction and management in which at risk communities are actively engaged in the identification, analysis, treatment, monitoring and evaluation of disaster risks in order to reduce their vulnerabilities and enhance their capacities, and where the people are at the heart of decision-making and implementation of disaster risk reduction and management activities. Disaster - a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or a society involving widespread human, material, economic or environmental losses and impacts, which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources. Disasters are often described as a result of the combination of: the exposure to a hazard; the conditions of vulnerability that are present; and insufficient capacity or measures to reduce or cope with the potential negative consequences, Disaster impacts may include loss of life, injury, disease and other negative effects on human, physical, mental and social well-being, together with damage to property, destruction of assets, loss of services, Social and economic disruption and environmental degradation. Disaster Mitigation - the lessening or limitation of the adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. Mitigation measures encompass engineering techniques and hazard-resistant construction as well as improved environmental policies and public awareness. Disaster Preparedness - the knowledge and capacities developed by governments, professional response and recovery organizations, communities and individuals to effectively anticipate, respond to, and recover from, the Impacts of likely, imminent or current hazard events or conditions. Preparedness action is carried out within the context of disaster risk reduction and management and aims to build the capacities needed to efficiently manage all types of emergencies and achieve orderly transitions from response to sustained recovery. Preparedness is based on a sound analysis of disaster risk and good linkages with early warning systems, and includes such activities as contingency planning, stockpiling of equipment and supplies, the development of arrangements for coordination, evacuation and public information, and associated training and field exercises. These must be supported by formal institutional, legal and budgetary capacities. Disaster Prevention - the outright avoidance of adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. It expresses the concept and intention to completely avoid potential adverse impacts through action taken in advance such as construction of dams or embankments that eliminate flood risks, land-use regulations that do not permit any settlement in high-risk zones, and seismic engineering designs that ensure the survival and function of a critical building in any likely earthquake. Disaster Response - the provision of emergency services and public assistance during or immediately after a disaster in order to save lives, reduce health impacts, ensure public safety and meet the basic subsistence needs of the people affected. Disaster response is predominantly focused on immediate and short-term needs and is sometimes called "disaster relief". Disaster Risk Reduction - the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic efforts to analyze and manage the causal factors of disasters, including through reduced exposures to hazards, lessened vulnerability of people and property, wise management of land and the environment, and improved preparedness for adverse events. Disaster Risk Reduction and Management - the systematic process of using administrative directives, organizations, and operational skills and capacities to implement strategies, policies and improved coping capacities in order to lessen the adverse impacts of hazards and the possibility of disaster. Prospective disaster risk reduction and management refers to risk reduction and management activities that address and seek to avoid the development of new or increased disaster risks, especially if risk reduction policies are not put m place. Hazard - a dangerous phenomenon, substance, human activity or condition that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihood and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. Resilience - the ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions. Risk - the combination of the probability of an event and its negative consequences.

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Risk Assessment - a methodology to determine the nature and extent of risk by analyzing potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that together could potentially harm exposed people, property, services, livelihood and the environment on which they depend. Risk assessments with associated risk mapping include: a review of the technical characteristics of hazards such as their location, intensity, frequency and probability; the analysis of exposure and vulnerability including the physical, social, health, economic and environmental dimensions; and the evaluation of the effectiveness of prevailing and alternative coping capacities in respect to likely risk scenarios. Vulnerability - the characteristics and circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible to the damaging effects of a hazard. Vulnerability may arise from various physical, social, economic, and environmental factors such as poor design and construction of buildings, inadequate protection of assets, lack of public information and awareness, limited official recognition of risks and preparedness measures, and disregard for wise environmental management.

Introduction
World Visions understanding of disaster risk management is that it has six dimensions. We refer to these dimensions as (1) Early Warning, (2) Preparedness, (3) Mitigation, (4) Response, (5) Recovery, and (6) Transition. It is understood that these dimensions, although defined by their own distinctiveness or definitions do not always, or even generally, occur in isolation or in precise order. Often phases of the cycle overlap and the length of each phase greatly depends on the severity of the disaster. In the Philippines, based on the current Law, the achievement of Safer, adaptive, and disaster resilient Filipino communities towards sustainable development will be through reinforcing the four distinct priority areas: (1) Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, (2) Disaster Preparedness, (3) Disaster Response, and (4) Disaster Recovery and Rehabilitation. These priority areas are also not autonomous from each other and are not viewed as a cycle. The long term goals of the four priority areas of the Act are the following2: Priority Areas Prevention and Mitigation Long Term Goals Avoid hazards and mitigate their potential impacts by reducing vulnerabilities and exposure and enhancing capacities of communities. Objectives 1. Reduce vulnerability and exposure of communities to all hazards 2. Enhance capacities of communities to reduce their own risks and cope with the impacts of all hazards 1. Increase the level of awareness of the community to the threats and impacts of all hazards, risks and vulnerabilities 2. Equip the community with the necessary skills to cope with the negative impacts of a disaster 3. Increase the capacity of institutions 4. Develop and implement comprehensive national and local disaster preparedness policies, plans and systems 1. To decrease the number of preventable deaths and injuries 2. To provide basic subsistence needs of affected population 3. To immediately restore basic social services 1. To restore peoples means of livelihood and continuity of economic activities and business 2. To restore shelter and other buildings/installation 3. To reconstruct infrastructure and other public utilities; 4. To assist in the physical and psychological rehabilitation of persons who suffered from the effects of the disaster.

Preparedness

Establish and strengthen capacities of communities to anticipate, cope and recover from the negative impacts of emergency occurrences and disasters.

Response

Provide life preservation and meet the basic subsistence needs of affected population based on acceptable standards during or immediately after a disaster. Restore and improve facilities, livelihood and living conditions and organizational capacities of affected communities, and reduced disaster risks in accordance with the building back better.

Rehabilitation and Recovery

Based on the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan of the Philippines

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

To achieve the above objectives and long term goals, WVDF will help and support the government through Child Focused DRR, which will be programmed at the community level; this will be WVDFs approach to Disaster Risk Reduction and Management.

I | Specific child wellbeing outcomes to which the project model will contribute
This project model will be able to contribute to the following child well being outcomes below: A. Enjoy Good Health Will help children, parents and caregivers to better manage threats to health through reducing the risk and effects of disasters Managing the effects of shocks that can have a major impact on health and wellbeing of children. CF DRRM planning will strengthen positive community coping mechanisms and equip them with more external partnerships that can be used to reduce the impact of disasters on the lives of children and their peers as well as protecting health gains. Protecting communities from the effects of disasters will help to protect children from infection, disease and injury. Access to essential health services may become stretched by increased demand during times of disaster. Reducing the likelihood of increased demand and helping to prepare for surges in demand will be part of ensuring access to essential health services for children. B. Educated for Life Childrens roles in the CF DRR will enable them to further develop the skills needed to apply their education and make a positive contribution to their communities. Involving children in the formation of the CF DRR will help to equip them to make good judgments, protect themselves, manage information and communicate ideas. This is particularly the case where they have a role in the communitys plan to identify, manage and respond to risks and disasters in their local area. Part of education is equipping children for a healthy life. The CBDRM will provide an opportunity for children to apply their knowledge in community processes. Children become agents of change and peer educators. Reducing the impact of disasters in communities will help to protect economic opportunities for adolescents and maintain the conditions needed for them to succeed. C. Love God and their neighbors as themselves CFDRR processes and plans help communities to better care for each other by reducing risks and better helping those impacted by disaster. This will strengthen positive relationships and give children an active role in making this happen. The CFDRR process therefore helps to strengthen existing social capital thus contributing to the overall sustainability of livelihoods. This is important because social cohesion often fails during major disasters. Children will be better placed to understand and share Gods love if they are involved in practically looking out for and caring for the vulnerable in their communities. The CBDRM process will help them to identify the vulnerable, understand the risks they face and how best to support them in an emergency. This will be true across most religions especially those that believe in an omnipotent God. Capacitating communities collectively to help each other prepare for, prevent, mitigate and respond to risks and disasters will help to strengthen the positive relationships that children have with peers, family and community members. D. Cared for, Protected and Participate A positive, safe family and community environment for children is one where the risks of disaster are being reduced and communities are well prepared to respond if they do. Recognizing the specific needs of children and other vulnerable groups before, during and after a disaster strikes. Improved knowledge of risks and actions facilitate community led child protection processes.
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

During disasters basic needs are catered for, as a rights based response this will include shelter, nutrition, protection and education. Reestablishment of livelihoods is vital for communities and families to provide for children. The participatory nature of CBDRMs provides a forum for children to be listened to and participate in decisions that affect their lives.

2 | Life cycle stages to which the model contributes


Girls and Boys from birth to 5 years old as they are the most vulnerable in the event of disasters Girls and boys. Children ranging in age from 5 to 11. Adolescents/ youth. Adolescents range in age from 12 to 18 and youth from 19 to 24. Adults. This group considers those aged from 25 and beyond.

3 | Intended target groups


Who WV National Leadership Local Government Units Faith/ Church Leaders Private Sector Community Based Organizations Schools International/ Local NGOs What Knowledge and commitment to CF DRR Provision of technical, functional, and resource support to the development facilitator Full engagement in the CFDRR processes and planning. Willingness to engage Willing to accept identified roles and responsibilities determined in the plan. Identified children within the community to be targeted. Using schools to create awareness amongst children. Children are well able to carry their learning to parents and the wider community. Level National Level

Community Level

Community level Children School age Girls may have different vulnerabilities than boys depending on context. Role of girls tailored to cultural acceptance. Community level Adults & Children Must include women, the disabled and other vulnerable groups in the processes and roles and responsibilities.

Children

Community Leadership Traditional School teachers Existing groupings New groupings established for example disability groups

Participation and action in all processes. Establish feedback mechanisms for accountability

4 | Linked strategies, including applicable DADDs


Sector DADDs with additional focus required for Resilient Development Practice (RDP) The RDP strategy governs WVs work in Climate Change Adaptation, Community Resilience and Disaster Risk Reduction. At its heart, the RDP strategy is simple; WV assists communities to reduce risk and vulnerability and to build resilience, so that development gains are sustained over successive generations. This necessarily involves some organizational change, including how WV addresses the fundamental issues which undermine the drivers of well-being, how effectively we use our resources, including funding, whether we preserve and build natural resources for the coming generations, and how we partner with communities, especially children. The RDP strategy ensures that development gains are not lost due to external shocks and emerging trends in climate and the natural environment.
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Source: Sector and Theme Do-Assure-Don't Do Frameworks (DADDs), March 2012 version

Strategy for resilient development practice (FY 11-13) The preferred futures of the RDP include: 1| The programming context - Community, national, regional and global level programming will be strengthened through approaches and adaptive strategies that effectively reduce disaster risk and the impacts of climate change, and build resilient communities such that development gains are retained and grown sustainably for future generations. 2 | The WV organizational context - Adaptive organizational capacities and systems are operationalised to provide professional and strategic development practice that is responsive to the continually changing external context. 3 | The external policy and market context - Strategic partnerships are in place that enhance the resilience of development practice globally, influence and shape macro policies that protect people so that they are not at risk and mobilize innovative resource streams to shape an effective and enabling environment for sustainability of development gains.
Source: Strategy for Resilient Development Practice, November 2010

5 | Context characteristics under which the project model should and should not be considered
The implementation of a CFDRR must be appropriate to context. Disasters can strike at any time and in any context - in those communities which are stable, as well as in those communities in an unstable condition are both susceptible to disasters. Factors such as climate change, food shortages and other disasters leave children, because of their age and dependency on others, as the most vulnerable group in society. In sudden-onset disasters with forced rapid displacement, children can become separated from their families. This can lead to heightened risks; physical harm, psychological distress and gender-based violence. In addition, women, people with disabilities, and elderly may be excluded in decision making in a given community and during disasters. Special attention must be placed on the protection of these vulnerable groups. Urban and rural communities in ADP areas and in all contexts can be equally served through CFDRR. World Vision views operational contexts through different lenses of: 1. 2. 3. 4. Chronic Livelihoods mostly rural subsistence, fragile resource base; fragile livelihoods Tendency for rapid onset disasters such as floods and earthquakes Complex contexts conflict and political in security where the rights of the population are not or cannot be upheld by the duty bearers, i.e. The State Humanitarian Space do the conditions allow for WV to operate without compromising the principles of impartiality, neutrality and independence and safety both for staff and partners.

[In complex and or fragile contexts a greater analysis of the operating environment both nationally and locally must be done. A tool entitled Making sense of Turbulent Contexts provides a higher level analysis of complexity. The analysis of the contexts 3 and 4 will reveal if the project model should be considered within any operational constraints.]

6 | National or Sub-national support required to enable implementation of the project at program level
The project model will operate at the programming level (ADP) where WV has a medium to long term presence. The CFDRR process will engage with local government in most environments and contexts. In complex situations there may be cases where the need to specifically engage with local government and regional entities within an advocacy strategy. The development of a CFDRR plan will require technical input from the regional, national or field office HEA representative. The national office will be involved through the establishment of an Emergency Relief Fund (NOEPRF), which can be drawn
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

down upon for the different stages of the disaster management dimensions; effective pre-positioning of emergency supplies and mobilization of technical support, contingency plans, etc.

7 | Technical intervention(s)
The project model of CFDRR can be equated to the CBDRM process, but highlighting the importance of participation of children and acknowledging their rights towards a safer community. With this, WVDF will be using the CFDRR approach in building community resilience in communities, starting from the Barangay, then Municipality, up to the Provincial level. This approach is bottom up, acknowledging the different capacities of communities to build safer communities with the help of Regional or National Government agencies in the process. This project model can be a standalone CFDRR implemented at the community level, ADP or non-ADP area. Another area is through integration of CFDRR into sectoral interventions of health and nutrition, education, livelihood, economic development, etc. The sections below will show the technical interventions that may serve as guide to staff in the implementation of CFDRR. 7.1 | Stand Alone CFDRR Process at the Community Level The CFDRR process is parallel to the CBDRM process of Disaster Risk Management. According to ADPCs handbook on CBDRM for Field Practitioners, they have outlined the seven step process in the diagram below:

Please find below an excerpt from ADPCs CBDRM Handbook. It is important to note that even though, the CFDRR process is based on the generalized CBDRM process, the utmost stress on the rights nd participation of children will be considered in all seven steps. [In the CBDRM Process, a thorough assessment of the communitys hazard exposure and analysis of their vulnerabilities as well as capacities is the basis for activities, projects and programs to reduce disaster risks. The community should be involved in the process of assessment, planning and implementation. This approach will guarantee that the communitys real needs and resources are considered. There is more likelihood that problems will be addressed with appropriate interventions, through this process. The CBDRM process has seven sequential stages, which can be executed before the occurrence of a disaster, or after one has happened, to reduce future risks. Each stage grows out of the preceding stage and leads to further action. Together, the sequence can build up a planning and implementation system, which can become a powerful disaster risk management tool.

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

The following are the seven steps in the disaster risk management process. These steps are further elaborated in the resource packs contained in this handbook. 1 Selecting the Community | This is the process of choosing the most vulnerable communities for possible assistance on risk reduction using a set of criteria. 2 Rapport Building and Understanding the Community | This is basically building the relationship and trust with the local people. As relationship is established, general position of the community in terms of social, economic, political and economic aspects is understood. Deeper appreciation of the community dynamics will happen later, when participatory risk assessment is undertaken. 3 Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment (PDRA) | This is a diagnostic process to identify the risks that the community faces and how people overcome those risks. The process involves hazard assessment, vulnerability assessment and capacity assessment. In doing the assessments, peoples perception of risk is considered. 4 Participatory Disaster Risk Management Planning | This follows after the analysis of the results of participatory risk assessment. People themselves identify risk reduction measures that will reduce vulnerabilities and enhance capacities. These risk reduction measures are then translated into a community disaster risk management plan. 5 Building and Training a Community Disaster Risk Management Organization (CDRMO) | Disaster risks are better managed by a community organization that will ensure that risks are reduced through implementation of the plan. Therefore it is imperative to build a community organization, if there is none yet or strengthen the current one, if there is any. Training the leaders and members of the organization to build their capacity is important. 6 Community-Managed Implementation | The CDRMO should lead to the implementation of the community plan and motivate the other members of the community to support the activities in the plan. 7 Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation | This is a communication system in which information flows amongst all the people involved in the project: the community, the implementing staff and the support agency, concerned government agencies and donors.
Source: ADPC CBDRM Field Practitioners Handbook

HEA will be developing the tools needed for the steps 3,4, and 5 to better support ADPs or even non-ADP areas in the CFDRR process. Children will always be considered in these essential steps. 7.2 | CFDRR Integration into ADP Programming (Sectoral Interventions) The integration of CFDRR into ADP programming is better shown in the World Vision DRR Toolkit developed through the Community Resilience Project. The Toolkit has 4 tools namely the following, see picture:

The aims of the toolkits are to: 1. Raise the awareness of World Vision staff to the natural hazards, vulnerabilities and capacities of communities they serve, and; 2. Provide guidance to World Vision staff on the how tos of integrating DRR CCA into the ADPs.

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

The objectives and intended users of the 4 toolkits as shown in the diagram below are discussed:

Toolkit 1 | This is to be used during the LEAP Assessment, the first phase of the process. The aim of this tool is to assist the ADP Program Officer to determine the general disaster risk in the program area, within a limited time. This understanding will enable the ADP Program Officer to consider DRM in the programming and project development. This tool provides a methodology to collect information for the assessment through secondary data, primarily government data, and key informant interviews (KII). Toolkit 2 | This tool is used to acquire a better understanding of the disaster risk issues which threaten both the community and the gains of development programs and projects. This tool aims to assist the ADP Program Officer and Field Staff responsible for conducting in depth surveys to determine the nature and extent of disaster risk in the area. The survey is subsequently used as a basis for developing disaster risk management measures to protect the communities. Toolkit 3 | This tool requires basic knowledge on disaster risk management and is used by the National Office and Support Office staff in assessing the integration of disaster risk considerations and measures found in the PDD (Project Design Document). The Tool examines whether DRR has been adequately considered in the ADP design. It can also be integrated into World Visions Document Review Tool. Toolkit 4 | This tool is for the use of the ADP Program Officer, national Office, and Support Office in monitoring and evaluating the integration of DRR and CCA measures in the project. This tool is also intended to track risk changes within the project area.

8 | Advocacy Components
Advocacy plays a large part in CFDRR. It is important that after the participatory risk assessment and planning, and with a comprehensive CFDRR/ DRRM Plan as a result of the planning, such plan, whether short-term, medium-term or long-term must be institutionalized through the approval of a local resolution or policy as follows: Policy on the institutionalization of the DRRM Plan integrated into the Communitys Development Plan
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Resolution on the creation of a local search and rescue group, or a DRRM committee Policy regarding a local environmental law Policy regarding land use Local building codes Others as needed With the new Act on DRRM, advocacy and local policy initiatives will pave the way for the full implementation of disaster risk management in the Philippines.

9 | Recommended Partners
At the Community Level: Local government institutions Faith Leaders, Churches Businesses CBOs Community Leadership Schools, teachers and pupils INGOs Community based persons with disabilities organizations Womens groups Within World Vision: National or International HEA/ DRR expertise National or International Technical expertise Area Development Program Staff Advocacy expertise The different sectors and themes health and nutrition, education, economic development, protection. At the National Level: Government ministries Church leaders UN bodies INGOs The private sector. They may have a direct influence and interest on issues that either reduce or exacerbate risk

Others: Groups outside of the community that have influence on the implementation of the disaster risk management plan. Examples of these include research institutions and bodies, the meteorological centers, universities and research institutes (could provide technical solutions to community issues). Rebel groups and the military should be engaged in disaster management discussions especially where security and protection issues are identified as the most significant sources of risk. However engagement with military must follow strict guidelines so that the principles of humanitarian space are not compromised. More information on this is contained in the tools and standards section WV Civil-Military-Police Operations Manual

10 | How the model will include/ benefit the most vulnerable


The model encourages inclusive processes across the dimensions of disaster risk management. Gender, children, age and disability perspectives are important to consider in planning and implementing CFDRR. Perspectives also highlight the special vulnerabilities that they face and the role that all can play regardless of position in society. During disasters particularly sudden onset and depending on context it is helpful reminder to have examples of the particular vulnerabilities faced by children, women and the disabled. Risks to Vulnerable Groups Vulnerable Groups Special Vulnerabilities Disability Physical Impairment Visual Impairment Hearing Impairment Intellectual Impairment Difficulty Escaping Difficulty in Protection (communities and women
in particular)

Children

Risk Factors
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Loss of livelihood Exposure to Sexual based gender Violence Forced return/ refoulement Uprooting, displacement Armed conflict

Child Abandonment Involuntary Separation Difficulty Escaping Difficulty in understanding instructions and

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

understanding/seeing/ hearing instructions and expressing themselves Difficulty in accessing relief Increased risk of being abused

Breakdown of community &family structures Power differential

expressing themselves Difficulty in accessing relief Increased risk of being abused Enforced child soldiers Child Labor Trafficking Child headed households Psychological trauma Children in Institutions

11 | How the model promotes/ enables child protection


The model is inclusive of children within the context of families and communities. During the CFDRR process, it is recognized that there are often gender and age differences in perception so it is important to include women and children representatives in all of the risk assessment and planning dimensions. Unconstrained poverty can lead to hopelessness in a society and acts of abuse occur with impunity. Involvement in CFDRR planning where people not only define their risks but analyze their capacities and outline roles that individuals and institutions play throughout the process will raise hopes for better outcomes.

12 | How the model promotes gender equity


This model recognizes the holistic participation of the community people, and is sensitive to the different roles being played by men and women in the development of the community. The model understands that there are different needs based on gender, and this will be reflected in the different processes in CFDRR, giving equal space to men and women in all processes, from risk assessment, planning and implementation of the DRR measures.

13 | How the model promotes empowerment and sustainability


The model is community based, community owned and facilitated by World Vision. Accountability is vital to empowerment and sustainability. The four steps to accountability in community based disaster risk management are: Providing Information: ensuring that relevant program information is made available and intentionally provided to beneficiaries and communities in a timely, accessible and accurate manner. Consulting with Communities: commitment to the principle of informed consent and ensuring that beneficiaries and communities are aware of, understand and agree with key decisions relating to our intervention. Promoting Participation: purposely empowering beneficiaries and building community capacity to ensure their meaningful participation in all components of the LEAP project cycle. Collecting and Acting on Feedback and Complaints: implement beneficiary and community feedback and complaints procedures that are accessible, safe and effective. These procedures will sensitize beneficiaries and communities on their rights to good service delivery and our adherence to the Red Cross/ Red Crescent and NGO Code of Conduct.
---Link to the programming accountability framework

14 | Sponsorship Considerations
CFDRR is an integrated approach to ministry in sponsorship and in non sponsorship programming. WV promises that Child sponsorship establishes a relationship between a sponsor and a child in a way that personalizes the challenges of poverty and development. The sponsor makes a direct contribution to the community's goal of improving life for the child

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

As disasters undermine development CFDRR has a direct contribution in the development process and community resilience and should be considered as part of integrated programming. In all programs a percentage of sponsorship funding should be set aside for disaster risk management.

15 | Recommended Project Timelines


The CFDRR process should be implemented during the ADP design and re-design process. All designs need to begin with risk assessment that leads to awareness of risk and vulnerabilities and the available capital. This analysis can be done alongside the critical path. Building on this process and part of the overall programming planning CFDRR will be initiated. It is important that the development of a CFDRR plan is an integrated process involving the development facilitator; and advocacy and Christian Commitments staff to facilitate and also to learn from the process.

16 | Potential roles for WV at different periods in the project timeline


As the CFDRR is planned and risks are mapped it will be important to determine which technical sectors expertise is required to complete the planning of an effective plan. Integration of Sectors in CFDRR 16.1. Water and Sanitation Activities Building of infrastructure, such as piping from the water source to the community, water tanks, wells, and latrines WASH education and training Socialization for new habits to support or modify culture, e.g. hand washing 16.2. Agriculture Earthquake Activities Distribution of seeds Training to improve
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Provide earthquake resistant farming technology, for example earthquake-resistant drainage systems Build an earthquake-resistant storage facilities or livestock shelters If training is held indoors, make Earthquake Provide earthquake resistant farming technology, for example earthquake resistant drainage systems and reinforced earth method for slope & retaining walls Build an earthquakeresistant storage facilities or livestock shelters If training is held indoors, make sure that the building is earthquakeresistant Flood Build water taps and pipes higher than previous flood levels Floodproof water sources Maintain adequate water pressure to prevent contamination Build flood-free public sanitary facilities Landslide Avoid landslide-prone areas for water infrastructure and piping Use leak proof, waterproof elements & materials in landslide areas Monitor and maintain pipes in the landslide area to prevent leakage Volcanic Eruption Build protective water storage which can withstand a volcanic eruption Provide alternative water sources Choose water sources outside volcanic hazard area Tsunami Construct tsunami resistant water pipes Build intake and water treatment plant outside tsunami-prone area Built redundancy in water distribution system

Drought Provide alternative water sources Develop water retention pond systems

Fire Provide a water resource plan for firefighting, e.g. nearby rivers and ponds, and equipment to retrieve the water

Typhoon Build typhoon/ wind-safe water infrastructure (intake structures, WTP, pipeline, reservoirs, wells, latrines)

Landslide
The variety of distributed seeds should be resistant to landslide hazards (http://bbsdlp.litbang.deptan.go.id) Farming skills training shall also include information on appropriate actions to reduce the vulnerability of landslide susceptibility

Volcanic Eruption
Apart from farming skills training, information regarding volcano hazards is also provided (e.g. its historical profile, volcano early warning system) to avoid

Tsunami
Agricultural field as buffer zone for tsunami protection in coastal areas Saline

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

farming techniques and skills Access to market Access to information regarding buyers price Farming technology Assistance in getting a loan Construction of a market

sure that the building is earthquakeresistant

Farming technology that can reduce the vulnerability of land towards landslide susceptibility is, for example, developing an embung. Embung is an infiltrating water pond permitting the permanent supply of rain water as well as surface water even during dry seasons, adding to the existing ground water capacity. Embung can reduce the risk of landslides in downstream areas. (http://bbsdlp.litbang.deptan.go.id)

planting during intense volcanic activity Develop evacuation route for the community (including farmers) Develop early warning systems

resistant crops Develop early warning system for community (including farmers and fisherfolk)

Flood
The variety of distributed seeds should be resistant from flood hazards Elevated footpaths at the paddy fields Elevated food storage Conduct training on how to improve farming skills and how to deal with flood disasters Develop a planting calendar Develop infrastructure for preventing hazards (i.e. dams, dikes, etc) Develop environmentally friendly farming technology Develop irrigation infrastructure Integrate flood hazard risk reduction information into farming technology training Develop flood early warning systems Develop flood-resistant seeds

Drought
Choose or provide a variety of seeds that are drought-tolerant, i.e. soybeans, ground nuts, rice, etc. (http://bbsdlp.litbang.deptan.go.id) Improved land-use techniques for agriculture and livestock Rainwater storage Develop natural reservoir system (e.g. cascade in Sri Lanka) Drought-resilient strategic water points Develop a planting calendar Farming technology that can deal with drought. The creation of embung helps store rain water as well as surface water that can be used during drought.

Fire
Buffer stock system

Typhoon
The variety of distributed seeds should be resistant to typhoon hazards Buffer stock system Drainage system

16.3. Education Earthquake Activities Increase access and quality of education Focus on early childhood and basic education Non-formal high school education Facilitate the school community to offer innovative learning opportunities (contextual learning schools) Opportunity to integrate DRR into curriculum Access a learning tools, libraries, advocacy with the government Community learning centers (non-formal education) Life skills education: swimming, first aid Nature schools:
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Integrate earthquake hazard information into the local curriculum Integrate earthquake drills into sport curriculum Build or retrofit earthquake resistant schools Life skills education such as first aid training that is given during emergency response Provide simulation equipment regarding earthquake hazards as one of the learning tools Develop school action plans as an extracurricular activity Provide information and resources such as books, games, videos and maps about earthquake hazards at community learning centers Develop school evacuation route/ plans for earthquake hazard

Landslide
Provide information and resources such as books, games, videos and maps about landslide hazard at the community learning center Life skills education such as first aid training for emergency response Integrate landslide hazard and disaster information into science curriculum Provide information through informal education to show what a forewarning looks like Ensure that all education activity itself is not conducted in landslide prone areas

Volcanic Eruption
Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps regarding volcano hazard at the community learning center Life skill education such as first aid training that is given during volcano emergency response Integrate volcano hazard and disaster information into science curriculum Provide information through informal education to illustrate what volcanic activity early warning looks like Provide simulation tools for volcano hazards and their impact to the environment and community

Tsunami
Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps regarding tsunami hazard at the community learning center Life skills education such as first aid training that is given during tsunami emergency response Integrate tsunami evacuation drills into sport curriculum Integrate tsunami hazard and disaster information into science curriculum Provide simulation tools for tsunami hazards

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

integrate topics of climate change, environment protection, how the children can live in their surroundings. Emergency, advocacy, development Strengthen ECCD (Early childhood care and development) as the center basis for CFS (child friendly space) a belong to the community Earthquake-resistant buildings; capacity building of local facilitators/cadres to manage children during emergency situations; earthquake drills, including child protection 16.4. Health

Flood
Integrate flood hazard information into the local curriculum Develop school action plans which include evacuation route during a flood disaster Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps concerning flood hazards at the community learning center Life skills education such as swimming is a critical ability when confronted by a flood Integrate flood hazard and disaster information into science curriculum

Drought
Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps about drought hazards and impact of slow onset emergencies at the community learning center Integrate drought hazard and disaster information into regular science curriculum Develop action plans to face drought as an extracurricular activity Provide information through informal education about drought, its root causes, impact and potential mitigative actions

Fire
Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps regarding fire hazards at the community learning center Life skills education such as first aid training that can be given during a fire emergency response Integrate fire hazard and disaster information into science curriculum Introduce fire drills into sport curriculum

Typhoon
Provide information such as books, games, videos and maps regarding typhoons and destructive wind hazards at the community learning center Integrate the typhoon and destructive wind hazards and disaster information into science curriculum

Earthquake Activities Establish health center at local level plus management and administrative training to run it effectively Provide nutrition training Communicable disease risk prevention
Provide information regarding hazardous material or objects that can be dangerous during earthquake hazard, beside the information regarding nutrition in the training, so the officer can identify and secure the hazardous objects Strengthen and retrofit the health center at local level Protect equipment in the health center from the earthquake hazard Disseminate information regarding earthquake hazard when there is activity in the health center Develop health facilities evacuation route/plan for earthquake hazard Provide earthquake drill and information during health training

Landslide
The location of the health center at local level should be safe from potential landslide hazards Health center staff and volunteers should be well informed regarding landslide hazards and early warning signals Prioritize mothers for education of early warning so they have the ability to quickly mobilize their families if necessary

Volcanic Eruption
The location of health facilities should be in a place protected from potential volcanic hazards. Mothers and members of health center should be well informed regarding the early warning of volcano hazard so they can evacuate before the volcano erupts Provision of information regarding the evacuation route if the volcano will erupt. The participants are expected to provide and disseminate to other community members information regarding early warning system and evacuation route Develop contingency plan for volcano hazard

Tsunami
The location of health center at local level should be far from the beach, at higher place and safe from tsunami hazard The mothers and members of health center should be well informed regarding the early warning of tsunami hazard and know how to respond to the warning, so they can evacuate immediately Provision of information regarding evacuation route if there is warning of tsunami hazard. This information is expected to be disseminated to other community members

Flood
Provide information about communicable diseases common after a flood during training sessions, include preventive actions, treatment & care, and remedies Provide health emergency response training for health officers The location of the local health center should be higher than the flood level - ensure that the health

Drought
Nutrition training should include information about drought-generated diseases and their treatment Include information on medicines and remedies which may be necessary in the event of a droughtinduced emergency situation Mothers who bring their children to the health center can be educated on

Fire
A fire extinguisher should be provided as a primary piece of equipment in the local level health centers, and staff need to know how to use them Develop standard operating procedures for fire hazards; ensure these are understood and posted in staff areas Conduct fire drills for health center staff

Typhoon
Durable construction of the health center should be resistant to typhoons and destructive wind force Provide information about the impacts of typhoons and destructive winds, and risk reduction actions which can be taken

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

facility is not situated within the flooding area Equipment in the local health center should be placed/stored in high places Mothers who bring their children to the health center can be educated about floods and how to deal with such an emergency. Provide information and health training activities on first aid and emergency response targeted for mothers Include information on medicines and treatments which may be necessary in the event of a flood emergency situation

droughts and how to plan and deal with such an emergency

16.5. Microenterprise and Development Earthquake Build an earthquake Activities Economic development module with a strong DRR focus
resistant shopping/market structure Focus on developing savings or insurance schemes Provide evacuation routes to enable safer access to/ from the market when an earthquake occurs

Landslide
Focus on developing savings or insurance schemes Identify how to proactively protect livelihood sources Construct alternative routes to the market when primary roads are blocked due to landslides

Volcanic Eruption
Understand volcanic hazard areas and their characteristics Build secure emergency shelters Focus on developing savings or insurance schemes Identify how to proactively protect livelihood sources

Tsunami
Secure shelter Focus on developing savings or insurance schemes Protection of livelihood sources Avoid to build the market by the beach

Flood
Build both individual and/or group savings programs to recover from emergency situations and help return to normal conditions Construct alternative routes to the market when primary roads are blocked due to floods Develop early warning systems Ensure that building local markets are not in the flood-prone area Develop an evacuation route and plan for community
Source: World Vision DRR Toolkit

Drought
Focus on developing savings plans and educate on the need for long term planning Avoid business operations which require intensive water use

Fire
Ensure appropriate insurance is held Identify how to proactively protect livelihood sources Provide fire extinguishers in the market place, and that shopkeepers know where they are and how to use them

Typhoon
Build sufficiently secure shelters Focus on developing savings or insurance schemes Identify how to proactively protect livelihood sources Build a typhoon-resistant shopping/ market structure

17 | Guidelines for adaptation of the model to local situation


In this document, sectors of Natural Environment and Climate Issues (NECI) and the Resilient Development Practice (RDP) will be used as guideline for the adaptation of the model. Natural Environment and Climate Issues (NECI) At the earliest stage possible in an ADP lifecycle, assess and understand the state of the local environment (how and why it is changing, where it is vulnerable, how it affects child and community well-being) and create a baseline of the state of health of the natural environment Set goals and create the plan with the community for environmental protection, restoration and use that supports child well-being.
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Do

Assure

Dont Do

Monitor implementation of the plan and change against the baseline over time. Harness innovative funding and financing mechanisms for required programming. At all levels, understand and monitor WVs own impact on the environment and climate. Internal WV interventions support the protection and restoration of the natural resource base Sustainable programming that reduces negative impacts and promotes the restoration and protection of natural systems Address environmental and climate hazards and vulnerabilities to build resilience and sustainable wellbeing Advocate at all levels to address critical problems of environmental degradation and climate change, externally using the lens of childrens food security and nutrition, and household energy External Access to appropriate methodology and management techniques for: Soil and water conservation and quality Agroforestry and trees Forest, pasture and grassland, and watershed management, protection and rehabilitation Air quality indoor and outdoor Biodiversity Fishing and aquaculture Sustainable sources of energy Create dependence on WV or other unsustainable external resources Promote unsustainable agricultural or natural resource management practices Promote food displacing biofuel production or use Undermine the protection, restoration or management of the communitys natural resource and economic base Undermine the ability of future generations to sustain and profit from the use of their natural resources Use banned or toxic chemicals Resilient Development Practice (RDP) Understand the level of risk, vulnerability and capacity, and establish baseline with local and national stakeholders. Set goals and create plans with communities for reducing risk and building resilience. Monitor change against baseline and implementation of plans. Integrate risk analysis into the design phase of all community-level programme interventions. Carry out regular context monitoring / early warning analysis with communities and other local stakeholders. Develop community-owned interagency disaster preparedness plans for effective relief response. Prioritise core and ADP funding, seek innovative funding and financing mechanisms for required risk mitigation programming. Carry out a seasonal and geographical mapping exercise to establish where and when cyclical natural hazards occur. Identify the potential impacts of natural hazards on livelihoods and design programmes to mitigate impact. Strengthen collaborative risk reduction interventions with local government and civil society to enhance local ownership. Develop livelihood interventions that promote the enhanced productivity of land and other assets and that do not inadvertently exploit the natural resource base of the community Design all disaster relief and rehabilitation programmes to contribute to developmental aims and to reduce future disaster risk. Understand and monitor organisational impact on the risk, capacity and vulnerability of the community and environment (e.g., growing maize on degraded hillsides, income generation causing deforestation). Develop and apply research and learning activities. Advocate at all levels to address critical problems of risk reduction and resilience Internal Development interventions do not inadvertently increase vulnerability to disaster in all sectors: social, physical, economic and environment Development interventions do not inadvertently exacerbate conflict within communities, thus increasing vulnerability. Sectoral interventions incorporate resilience and adaptation Tools, frameworks, models, dynamic monitoring systems are integrated into IPM processes; capacities are
Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Do

Assure

18

Dont Do

there to use them Required funding is in place Dynamic context monitoring and disaster risk information management systems are in place and utilized Standards for safety and health which directly affect children (building codes, water quality, etc.) are in place and utilized Advocacy and education involves children in resilience and adaptation processes and promoting their role as agents of change DRR and environment and climate resilience component of all education curricula in WV programme areas Ongoing communication and education with internal stakeholders External Strong enabling environment for risk reduction Technical interventions Access to innovative funding streams Research partners are engaged Policy environment is in place to support reducing risk and building resilience Partners for implementation of global agreements are in place (local and national) Dont Do Strategic Plan ADPs without doing context and risk assessment Create dependence on WV or unsustainable external resources Dont Do Poor practice Undermine resilience through WV interventions Undermine the communitys coping capacities

Source: Sector and Theme Do-Assure-Don't Do Frameworks (DADDs)

18 | Recommended goal, outcomes, outputs, and indicators for these


Project Goal To contribute towards resilience and secure households and communities; ultimately contributing to the goal of sustained well-being of children within their families and communities especially the most vulnerable. Objectives 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Reduce vulnerability and exposure of communities to all hazards. Enhance capacities of communities to reduce their own risks and cope with the impacts of all hazards. Increase the level of awareness of the community to the threats and impacts of all hazards, risks and vulnerabilities. Equip the community with the necessary skills to cope with the negative impacts of a disaster. Increase the capacity of institutions. Develop and implement comprehensive local disaster preparedness policies, plans and systems.

Compendium of Indicators Evidence that participatory Disaster Risk Assessment are done at the Barangay level (e.g. document Community Disaster Risk Profile) Evidence that Barangays have comprehensive DRRM Plans integrated into their Barangay Development Plan (participatory process) Evidence that preparedness activities are being done at the Barangay level (e.g. Drills, Early Warning systems, Preparedness Plans, etc.) Evidence that Barangays have Contingency Plans (multi-hazard) Evidence of a functioning Barangay DRRM Committee (BDRRMC) Evidence that prevention and mitigation activities are being done at the Barangay level/ Municipal level Evidence that DRRM Plans have budgets and are being implemented

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

19 | Generic logic model for WVs contribution to the model


Resources
Human Resource Expertise
Development Facilitator (CDF and PO) Advocacy Community and local level representation Regional HEA National HEA/DRR Christian Commitments Regional HEA CB Technical Sectors

Activities
Risk Assessment and DRRM Planning
Disaster Risk Assessment by children and adults (using the tools in the modules) DRRM Planning with Children and Adults

Outputs
Child focused BDRRM Plans integrated into the Barangay Development Plans Organized BDRRM Committee Organized BERT (Barangay Emergency Response Team) Hazard specific Contingency Plans Community Disaster Preparedness Plan Community participation in regular drills Early warning systems in place No. of children and adults involved in community awareness activities Integration of DRR measures into ADP sectoral projects

Short term outcomes


Vulnerability and exposure of communities to all hazards are reduced. Capacities of communities to reduce their own risks and cope with the impacts of all hazards are enhanced. Level of awareness of the community to the threats and impacts of all hazards, risks and vulnerabilities are increased. Communities are equipped with the necessary skills to cope with the negative impacts of a disaster. Capacity of institutions are strengthened. Comprehensive local disaster preparedness policies, plans and systems are developed and implemented.

Goal
To contribute towards resilience and secure households and communities; ultimately contributing to the goal of sustained well-being of children within their families and communities especially the most vulnerable. Evidence that the CBDRM processes and actions Do no harm Create harmony in the communities Mitigate against the effects of disaster Save lives and livelihoods Contribute to the development process

DRRM Institutionalization in the Community


DRRM Plan institutionalized in the Barangay/ Mun/Prov Creation of Community Emergency Response Teams and DRRM Committee Continuous updating and review of the DRRM Plan

Functional (i.e. finance, HR, sponsorship mgt etc.)


Funding from Sponsorship NOEPRF Grants

Preparedness Activities
Contingency/ Preparedness Planning Workshops Disaster Drills Setting up of Early Warning Systems

Community Awareness Activities


CF DRR Modular Sessions for adults and children IEC Materials Dissemination Film Showing CF DRR in Education Initiatives Celebration of Natl Disaster Cons Month/ IDDR Day

Reduce Underlying Risk Factors


DRR integrated into sectoral programs of ADP (health, food, agriculture, livelihood, education, etc.)

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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

20 | Critical success factors for the project


That CFDRR is integrated into community programming and not seen as special add on. That all partners assume responsibility for pre defined roles That technical advice is available for the Development facilitator That systems and resources are in place at the national office and the community level that enable scale up in the event of a crisis or disaster Community that vulnerabilities are continually being addressed throughout the development processes

21 | Risks through the project timeline


Some of the possible risks throughout the project timeline are the following: Risk 1. Availability of staff who would be involved in the CFDRR process at the ADP level. Barangays/ municipalities/ provinces are not supportive of the CFDRR process. Technical know-how of staff of the CFDRR process and implementation. Non-cooperation of the community throughout the whole process, and ownership of the results of the activities. Likelihood
(Low, Medium, High)

Consequence
(Fatal, Serious, Manageable)

Management Assigning a focal person at the ADP level as to who will implement the CFDRR process. Close coordination with the local government units and advocacy of the importance of CFDRR process. Regular conduct of CFDRR Training of Trainers for WV staff as needed. Advocacy and continuous awareness raising at the community level of the benefits of conducting CFDRR.

Low

Manageable

2.

Low

Manageable

3. 4.

Medium Low

Manageable Manageable

22 | Guidelines for staffing


Development facilitators (DF) should facilitate or lead the CFDRR process if necessary. Their role is to be facilitators of the process with the community taking ownership for the development and implementation of the plan. HEA, Advocacy, CWBP sectoral specialists, and Christian Commitment staff should participate in the CFDRR planning to give input and to learn through the processes. Depending on risk and vulnerability analysis technical expertise should be available to the DF. This could include technical areas such as WASH, Health and Nutrition, Accountability, Livelihoods, Shelter, etc.

23 | Guidelines for optimal types and levels of resources needed for implementation through the project timeline
The CFDRR approach is an integrated function of ADP/ community work and is a critical part of on-going design and implementation. It should be funded from the project budget i.e. sponsorship, SMC, non sponsorship, private, long term grants. Preparedness and response activities can be funded from the National Office Emergency Preparedness and Response Funds (NOEPRF). Time spent at discussion meetings Provision of facilities and meals for participants Transport to engage the various stakeholders and institutions Stationery for documenting, monitoring and reporting progress
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Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Contingency planning and positioning of logistical equipment, such as transport Provision of local or international technical expertise

24 | Recommended capacity building


The CFDRR Staff Capacity Building Program will be the CF DRR 101 Course. Such course must include topics of: All Hazards Contingency Planning DRM Concept RA 10121 Climate Change concept and Adaptation Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment and Planning Early Warning System Emergency Response Management Relief and Sphere Standards Do no Harm in Emergencies Children in Emergencies, and Other subjects as necessary

25 | Guidelines for project management


The CFDRR is an integrated function of ADP/ community work and is a critical part of on-going design and implementation. Ensure annual updates of the plan in light of: Changing risks Roles and responsibilities Capacity Experiences and lessons

26 | Necessary tools
Tools developed by World Vision Development Foundation, Inc. Training Manuals for Communities: CFDRR Module for Children and CFDRR Module for Adults Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment and Planning, Tools for Children Participatory Disaster Risk Assessment and Planning, Tools for Adults Other tools and modules are for conceptualization - Tools for Organizing Community DRRM Committees and Response Teams, Tools for Community Disaster Contingency Planning Other Tools from World Vision International
1.

COVACA - (Community Owned Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment) WVIs tool for facilitating the communitys determination,
through discussion, data gathering, and data analysis, of their areas of capacity and vulnerability, with a goal of enabling them to determine their aspirations and needs, and how to best achieve results that they desire in both. The focus of the COVACA is ensuring that quality vulnerability and capacity assessment is a product of its rightful owner, the community. The COVACA is available in the Disaster Management Manual and from the PHREE-Way Portal Easy Access DRR Library; it consists of a description of the back ground and rationale for development of the tool, as well as a comprehensive instruction manual for implementing the assessment activities. FSAU IPC (Food Security Analysis Unit Integrated Phase Classification Tool) The IPC, a product of the Somalia Food Security Analysis Unit, is a means to classify varying stages of food security and humanitarian situations based on outcomes on lives and livelihoods, drawing together multiple indicators of human welfare and livelihoods to guide consistent and meaningful analysis. This tool, fully described at http://www.methodfinder.com/wfpatlas/userimages/file3.pdf is the basis of a tool currently being produced by WVI to assist us in better responding to slow onset emergencies. (see also Slow Onset Tool) ERDM Risk and Capacity Tool This is an Excel based mapping tool for organizing and classifying a number of risk factors and response capacities in a clear, simple presentation form. (Adapted from PHREE way library description) 22 Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

2.

3.

4.

MSTC (Making Sense of Turbulent Contexts) This methodology aims at capturing both the economic agendas in war and the social dynamics (eg around class, gender, identity, history, belief systems) leading to violence. MSTC was designed to dovetail with the Do No Harm approach. It provides for detailed contextual information at the meso- and macro-level, on which Do No Harm can then build. The MSTC analysis uses specially designed, practical tools to peel away the political, economic and socio-historic layers of complex conflicts.

27 | Guidelines on transition
For transitioning ADPs, development facilitators must make sure that respective DRRM plans at the Barangay, Municipal or Provincial level are existing, together with their Disaster Response Plans and hazard-specific Contingency Plans. Please refer to the below memorandum from the Department of Interior and Local Government as to the responsibilities and functions of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils or Committees:

dilg memo circ re ldrrm councils.pdf

Appendices
Appendix 1 | The Humanitarian Imperative In addition to WVs core documents WV has subscribed to a set of external standards of behaviors and technical guidance. The overarching statement to describe these is fulfillment of the Humanitarian Imperative which is: The right to receive humanitarian assistance, and to offer it, is a fundamental humanitarian principle which should be enjoyed by all citizens of all countries. As members of the international community, we recognize our obligation to provide humanitarian assistance wherever it is needed. Hence the need for unimpeded access to affected populations is of fundamental importance in exercising that responsibility. The prime motivation of our response to disaster is to alleviate human suffering amongst those least able to withstand the stress caused by disaster. When we give humanitarian aid it is not a partisan or political act and should not be viewed as such. The principles underscoring these are described in the Red Cross/Red Crescent and NGO Code of Conduct. Appendix 2 | Key International Standards to which WV subscribes Terms Humanitarian Charter Descriptor This is based on humanitarian law and includes principles such as: the right to life with dignity; those affected have rights to protection and assistance.

Red Cross/Red Crescent and NGO Code of Conduct

1. The Humanitarian imperative comes first. 2. Aid is given regardless of the race, creed or nationality of the recipients and without adverse distinction of any kind. 3. Aid will not be used to further a particular political or religious standpoint. 4. We shall endeavor not to act as instruments of government foreign policy. 5. We shall respect culture and custom. 6. We shall attempt to build disaster response on local capacities. 7. Ways shall be found to involve program beneficiaries in the management of relief aid. 8. Relief aid must strive to reduce future vulnerabilities to disaster as well as meeting basic needs. 9. We hold ourselves accountable to both those we seek to assist and those from whom we accept resources. 10. In our information, publicity and advertising activities, we shall recognize disaster victims as dignified human beings, not hopeless objects.

Local Capacities for


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"Do No Harm" and "Local Capacities for Peace" (LCP) often interchangeably describe the tool to analyze

Specialized Project Model for Child Focused Disaster Risk Reduction | World Vision Philippines

Peace

whether influxes of aid (food, shelter, training, etc.) build communities' unity or contribute to conflict and violence. It is a descriptive tool that: 1. Identifies the categories of information that have been found through experience to be important for understanding how assistance affects conflict; 2. Organizes these categories in a visual lay-out that highlights their actual and potential relationships; and 3. Helps predict the impacts of different programming decisions

Equality requires mutual respect between members of the partnership irrespective of size and power. Participants must respect each other's mandates, obligations and independence and recognize each other's constraints and commitments. Mutual respect must not preclude organisations from engaging in constructive dissent. Transparency is achieved through dialogue (on equal footing), with emphasis on early consultations and early sharing of information. Communications and transparency, including financial transparency, increase the level of trust amongst organisations. Results-based effective humanitarian action must be reality-based and action-oriented. This requires result-oriented co-ordination based on effective capabilities and concrete operational capacities. Responsibility requires humanitarian organizations to recognize their ethical obligation to each other to accomplish their tasks responsibly, with integrity and in a relevant and appropriate way. They must make sure they commit to activities only when they have the means, competencies, skills, and capacity to deliver on commitments. Decisive and robust prevention of abuses committed by humanitarians must also be a constant effort. Complementarity results when diversity of the humanitarian community is utilised as an asset, to build on comparative advantages and complement each others contributions. Local capacity should be a primary focus of such asset-building, indicating resources to enhance and protect. Whenever possible, humanitarian organizations should strive to make local capacity an integral factor in emergency response and in measuring outcomes. Language and cultural barriers must be overcome.

UN/NGO Principles of Partnership

Appendix 3 | Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010

phil drrm act of 2010.pdf

Appendix 4 | Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan 2011 2028

national drrm plan 2011-2028.pdf

--- End of Document ---

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