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Power point

The counts are intended to prevent a common surgical risk: retained foreign bodies. RFID
is a proven technology that s been around since at least the !"#$s. %p to now& it s been too e'pensive and too limited to be practical for many commercial applications. (ut if tags can be made cheaply enough& they can solve many of the problems associated with bar codes. The most common applications are payment systems )*obil +peedpass and toll collection systems& for instance,& access control and asset -s the technology becomes standardi.ed& it will be used more and more to track goods in the supply chain. The aim is to reduce administrative error& labor costs associated with scanning bar codes& internal theft& errors in shipping goods and overall inventory levels. RFID to improve efficiency on its production line

Industry representatives estimate that about /$$ hospitals are using RFID technology )page& ! or !0 /$$1, to protect patient from potential mistakes in surgical procedures. The primary goal of RFID is to improve patient care by reducing medical errors, potential lawsuits, cost, and most importantly the time not spent on patient since now more than ever patient are choosing their hospital. RFID is an enabling technology that can be applied across many health-care applications. In this session, our panel discusses three real-world applications of the technology that can save health-care providers money, boost operating efficiencies, reduce liabilities and improve patient safety. 2ur hospital has been fre3uently recogni.ed for providing a 3uality work environment& as well as demonstrating a commitment to 3uality care by implementing processes& procedures& and technology to reduce errors& and increase patient safety to improve the 3uality of patient care., and we can do this by implementing RFID technology for application of patient safety identification& assets tracking that will prevent common surgical errors.
The benefits of ensuring positive patient identification to reduce medical errors are obvious. Information gleaned& particularly with active RFID tags& will m RFID can help with a wide variety of problems in healthcare from the fact that !$4 of patients suffer an 5adverse event56 7$4 of patients take their medication incorrectly and up to !74 of hospital assets by value are lost or stolen every year

Implementation of technology& upgrades and breakthroughs promise better performance& more efficiency& faster service& and less cost. RFID has been around for a
long time& one of its original uses being the identification of aircraft during the +econd 8orld 8ar. %ntil recently it was viewed as being too e'pensive and too limited in functionality for many commercial applications. -dvances in technology have both reduced the cost of individual system components and provided increased capabilities& to the point where numerous organi.ations are either using or considering using RFID technology. RFID tags are small and can be embedded into9onto ob:ects and documents without the knowledge of the individual who obtains those items During the past decade& patient safety and high;3uality patient care have increasingly become the focus for healthcare organi.ations across the country. The costs can be significant& particularly at this stage when the industry is very immature -t this time& no significant barriers have emerged that would prevent implementing and using RFID technology in a variety of applications - passive RFID tag has no internal power supply and uses the energy

provided by the reader to respond. Passive tags are relatively small and ine'pensive6 each tag costs between <$.7$ and <!. -n active RFID tag& which can cost <=$ to <0$ Three t=T=es of problems in the operating room in which implementations of RFID can make a profound impact are patient safety& inventory management&

and asset tracking. %se of RFID in these areas can& among other beneficial outcomes& lead to fewer medical errors& reduction of cost& and increased efficiency. we show the following e'amples of resources& which if tagged& would benefit the operating room. -lthough most assets tagged are e'pensive items& some relatively ine'pensive items that could create an e'pensive delay or a critical patient safety event if not available are also worth tracking. +ignificant privacy issues could result with RFID if it is not carefully controlled. RFID provides a remarkable opportunity to help patients receive a 3uality care e'perience in a safe and healing :ourney through the health care system These costs include obtaining tags& applying tags to e3uipment or patients& purchasing tag readers& developing software programs and database systems& and integrating and maintaining the systems -s hospitals seek to reduce costs& it is important that patient satisfaction is not adversely affected.
The digital display includes the patient s name& weight& age& gender and the procedure he or she is undergoing RFID tags for marking sponges used during operations and ID tags for the operating team itself. It lists critical information such as allergies& precautions and special needs. The device also displays a checklist of procedures that must be carried out before that specific patient can progress through to the ne't stage of the surgical process >ew RFID technology approved by the Food and Drug -dministration last >ovember is starting to help some patients rela' and doctors and surgical staff to be more secure that the correct operation is about to be performed on the right person and on the correct place on the body. 5?@-A2 Bthe ?oint @ommittee on -ccreditation of Aealthcare 2rgani.ationsC is reporting five to si' wrong site surgeries per month&5 said Debbie *urphy& a life sciences e'pert at Debra Technologies& -lthough such mistakes are rare in the thousands of operations that take place in the %nited +tates each day& they do happen. Eovernment estimates indicate that five to eight wrong;site surgeries occur each month. providing a means to rapidly

and accurately verify information concerning patient allergies& prescription history& etc. to prevent surgical errors,. The new rules& which took effect ?uly !& re3uire surgeons and nurses to clearly mark a
patientFs surgery site and to take a documented Gtime outH for a final check that it is the right patient& procedure& and operative site before cutting. This monthFs new ?@-A2 standards come after the agency found last year that an average of five to eight wrong;person& wrong;site or wrong procedure surgery mistakes were being reported each month in the %nited +tates. Aello& my name is ton3uita davis and I am the product champion reporting to e'ecutive before I begin with my proposal I will like to give you some insight into my business. 8hat rfid is the advantages it have over barcode the benefit we can get for using it they types of mistakes it can prevent in our surgical department and Recommendations for its uses to receive the beneftit prevent the problem which will enchance overall 3uality of patient care in our surgical units. (ut the fact is wrong site surgery is unacceptably high. The ?oint @ommission reports that they occur at a rate of 7 to 0 per month in its voluntary reporting program and is increasing. (etween five and eight surgical errors are reported to ?@-A2 every month. Therefore& ?@-A2 mandated that a universal protocol to prevent wrong;site& wrong;procedure& and wrong;person surgery be implemented by ?uly /$$I. Title: Medical

Error Reduction: Building a Safer

Healthcare Environment
Author -drianne J. -villion& D.Jd.& R.>. !""# $t. %etersburg &ollege. All rights reserved. http:99www.onlinece.net9courses.aspKcourseL/77MactionLview >ew RFID technology approved by the Food and Drug -dministration last >ovember is starting to help some patients rela' and doctors and

surgical staff to be more secure that the correct operation is about to be performed on the right person and on the correct place on the body. -lthough such mistakes are rare in the thousands of operations that take place in the %nited +tates each day& they do happen. Eovernment estimates indicate that five to eight wrong;site surgeries occur each month. This monthFs new ?@-A2 standards come after the agency found last year that an average of five to eight wrong;person& wrong;site or wrong procedure surgery mistakes were being reported each month in the %nited +tates. The new rules& which took effect ?uly !& re3uire surgeons and nurses to clearly mark a patientFs surgery site and to take a documented Gtime outH for a final check that it is the right patient& procedure& and operative site before cutting.

Noung& Donna. GPittsburgh hospital combines RFID& bar codes to improve safety.H American journal of Health-system pharmacy. 1=./I Dec. /$$1: /I=!& /I=7. @I>-AO with Full Te't. !" >ov. /$$. E-OIOJ2.
8hen RFID tags are used on caregiver badges& +chaeffer said& nurses and other caregivers can more 3uickly and conveniently authenticate their identification with the medication administration system. G >urses appreciate any time savings and convenience that can be applied to their workflow&H he said. (y adding RFID to patient wristbands& +chaeffer said& the need for the caregiver to rotate the patientFs wristband into the scannerFs view is eliminated because scanners can read RFID tags through most materials. GIf the patient is wearing a gown or has their arm underneath the covers or something& RFID can pass right through the materials and still pick up the information&H he said. +t. @lairFs combined RFIDPbar code system& -gue said& has saved the facility about <1=$&$$$ annually based on the number of prevented adverse drug events. GThatFs more than enough to pay for a system&H he said. *arcy hospital implemented

RFID to patient wristband and reported& G>urses appreciate the time savings and convenience that can be applied to their workflowH )Noung /I=7,. @lear @ount *edical +olution. GTracking down wayward sponges.H Nursing =1.!$ 2ct /$$1: =7;=7. Aealth source: >ursing9-cademic Jdition. " >ov. /$$#. E-OIOJ2.