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EMIL KUNIN

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Book I
A PRACTICAL COURSE IN JAZZ IMPROVISATON ON THE VIOLIN

2010

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

About the author


Emil Kunin was born to a family of musicians in Moscow, Russia. His father was a prominent violinist who was well known for his jazz compositions and arrangements. His mother was a pianist and music teacher. Kunin graduated from the Violin class at the Moscow School of Music and received training on the piano from his mother. After completing high school Kunin entered an Institute for Higher Education in Electronics and Radio Physics and graduated with a diploma of Engineering. Following this he worked for many years at the Institute of Scientific Research in the fields of aeronautical and spatial technical devices. His experience in science and his knowledge of oscillatory and radio wave physics allowed him to create a unique method for the development of melodies and of rhythm in music, particularly within jazz. From the age of 16 Kunin was studying jazz violin under the direction of one of the foremost jazz musicians in Moscow graduated from the violin class at the Moscow School of Jazz. He went on to quit his engineering career altogether and dedicated his time solely to music, later he was admitted to the Moscow Culture Academy and graduated with the institution diploma, Leader of a Jazz Orchestra. Kunin has since worked in several Moscow educational music institutions as a jazz violinist teacher and jazz melody, rhythm and harmony teacher. He has also lectured on the history and aesthetics of Jazz music. In Moscow he was the leader of the String Jazz Band and a number of other ensembles which performed in Moscows best known clubs and other venues. He has also won first prize at a number of Russian Jazz Festivals. Kunin has previously published two textbooks, Violinist in Jazz and Rhythm Secrets in Jazz, Pop and Rock Music as well as a series of theoretical articles dedicated to the problems inherent to teaching jazz. Kunin now lives in Israel where he follows his true passion of composing, arranging and teaching jazz music.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Foreword
This book is aimed at musicians who which to enter the world of Jazz music by ear and bypass the complicated rules of jazz rhythm, melody, harmony and styles. This book will guide the student in how to perform jazz music, how to improvise in a variety of styles and also prepare you for more advanced jazz studies. Before beginning the course it is required that the student has undertaken several years of classical violin study. Teaching music, in particular jazz, has much in common with the teaching of other skills where the aural transmission of knowledge is at the core of good teaching, in fact, the basic principle of Do as I do lies at the heart of this course. This method works by the student understanding and reproducing the musical material and through this step by step, continuous repetition of the teachers performance the student will slowly absorbed the methodologies involved. There are twelve compositions by the author which make up the musical content of this book. Each of the pieces demonstrates a different aspect of jazz including the Most commonly repeated passages and Harmonic patterns.

Composition Structure
Each piece consists of a theme and several choruses of improvisations which are designed to illustrate the specifics of one style or another. Each piece is included in both the keys of C and Bb along with the authors comments and instrumental accompaniments of the study. The authors comments are aimed to resolve the problems present by each tude and its unique educational features. The compositions are presented in order of their melodic and harmonic complexity beginning with the simplest ones.

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JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Supplemental CD
The author of this book has recorded each piece on a CD which comes as a supplement to the book. The CD also contains accompaniment tracks for all the pieces. *********************************************** Although this book is primarily aimed at violinists, virtually any musician on any kind of instrument, including scat singers can use the material presented to their benefit. The book can be of great value to music teachers as well as composers and arrangers. The author hopes that this book will facilitate the study of jazz music for many musicians.

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JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Table of Contents
About the Author Foreword Composition Structure Supplemental CD Table of Contents Introduction Basic Jazz Traditions Jazz Violin Problems & Recommended Solutions Fingering Intonation Articulation Rhythm Improvisation Method of Study Comments on the Supplemental tudes Specific Features of Each tude tude No. 1 tude No. 2 tude No. 3 tude No. 4 tude No. 5 tude No. 6 tude No. 7 tude No. 8 tude No. 9 tude No. 10 tude No. 11 tude No. 12 i ii ii iii 1 2 3 4 4 6 6 6 6 7 9 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 13 13 13 14 14 14

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Introduction
Jazz as a genre of music originated at the beginning of the 20th century and the use of the violin as a solo instrument within jazz arose within the first few decades of the century. At first the development of the violin as a solo instrument within jazz took some time, mainly due to the prominence of more traditional jazz solo instruments such as the trumpet, clarinet, trombone, saxophone, piano etc. However, the 1920s saw the formation of the first jazz orchestras which began to include some string sections. Shortly after this a number of world famous and superb improvising violinists emerged such as Eddie South, Joe Venuti, Stuff Smith, Stphane Grappelli and many others. This group of prominent violinists created a bright violin style based on the New Orleans Jazz style and on the swing style. During the 50s and especially during the 60s and 70s of the last century a new generation of jazz violinists came to the stage, players like Harry Lookofsky, Jean-Luc Ponty, Michael Urbaniek, Didier Lockwood, David Goloschekin, Jerry Goodman and many others, who played in more contemporary jazz styles such as bebop, jazz-rock, modal jazz, etc Today the violin is accepted as an integral part of jazz music all over the world, this is despite the fact that it is used less in concerts that many other jazz instruments. Despite a fairly rich history, the violin as a jazz instrument, with its vast array of expressive musical possibilities still awaits its full realisation as a jazz instrument

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Basic Jazz Traditions


The major jazz repertoire is based on approximately 600 jazz themes called Jazz Standards or Evergreen hits. They were written at different times, by popular and famous jazz composers, mainly Americans. These themes are available on collected albums from any major music store or from the internet. The traditional structure of a jazz piece is as follows: Introduction Presentation of the Theme Improvisation on the theme and its harmonic structure, with the lead instruments taking turns. Repetition of the Theme and code. On occasion some prearranged passages may be inserted. It must be remembered that the texture in jazz music took its origin from brass and wind instruments: trumpet, clarinet, saxophone etc. For these instruments it is most comfortable to play in the flat keys. Therefore the majority of jazz standards are usually written in C (major or minor), F, Bb, Eb, Ab or Db. Occasionally a standard will be found written in G or Gb very rarely in D. Other keys do appear but only in exceptional cases. Usually a jazz musician will perform a Jazz standard in his own appropriate key (the great Stphane Grappelli would play pieces in keys which he found most comfortable, however, not everyone can do this). Jazz tempos range from = 60 (in slow pieces like ballards) up to = 260 in faster pieces. It is rare to find tempo changes within a piece and when they do occur it is only when the tempo doubles or halves, never with gradual accelerando or rallentando. For the violin it is most comfortable to play between 120 and 170 BPM (Beats Per Minute). The average duration of a jazz standard is about 3 to 6 minutes but of course many more possibilities do exist. A typical small jazz band consists of double bass or bass guitar, guitar, piano, drams and solo instruments such as saxophone, trumpet or for us, violin.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Jazz Violin Problems & Recommended Solutions Fingering


Generally speaking it is not very comfortable playing jazz on the violin due to the fingerings involved. There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, the difference in tuning of a fifth between each violin string causes the each of the left hands finger s to find themselves in at least two positions. This causes the loss of a clear connection between the pitch that is heard and the position of the finger on the fingerboard (unlike the double bass where the string are tuned a fourth apart and a connection between pitch and finger position is easier to develop). It is essential that an improviser has this connection, as during a solo they will have no time to think about finger position. Secondly, as mentioned previously, the vast majority of jazz standards are written in flat keys. However, throughout its history, the violin has been considered an instrument more suited to sharp keys, especially if there are not too many sharps as the fingers will then be in a natural position on the fingerboard. It is inherently uncomfortable to play and improvise in flat keys on the violin, especially in a key with many flats. Therefore to improvise and play in these keys the player must have absolute control over the technical skills required to play in half positions. Due to the complex structure of melody lines in jazz music the task can become extremely labour consuming. This can be considered the main reason that the violin is not very widely used within jazz music. It is worth remembering that some of the great masters such as Stphane Grappelli avoided this issue by playing standards that were generally in the keys of C or G and avoiding pieces with complicated harmonies that require switching to half position. There are at least three possible solutions to these problems: The first is obvious; simply spend enough time working on the techniques needed in order to play in half position so that the playing feels as natural as in first position. In the next book of this Jazz Violin Method the author will include a system of exercises which should lead to mastery of the half position. The second solution is much more radical, re-tune the violin a tone lower resulting in strings (from the lowest to highest) of F, C, G, D. Tuned this way the violin is more similar to a Bb pitched instrument such as the clarinet, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and trumpet which are the most popular jazz instruments. One could name it a Bb Violin. This steps name is the scordatura (the alternative tuning of strings to different pitches). It will solve most of the fingering problems and the few which remain are rather easy to deal with.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD


However, the scordatura does have a number of acoustical and psychological consequences. The greatest difficulty, which sometimes cannot be solved, will appear in violinists with perfect (or absolute) pitch. It is worth them attempting to play with a re-tuned violin however, it may not work and they should spend their time working on playing in the half-position. For those with relative pitch the retuning of strings general world well and after a few weeks of exercise the new pitches seem natural. Of course, the acoustics of the instrument will change. The retuned instrument has a rather soft, quiet warm sound without bright high harmonics. This is not necessarily a bad thing as the sound is quite characteristic of many jazz violinists (most of which use a light mute to achieve that effect). For those playing with an acoustic pick up or a mike the change of volume and timbre does not matter as it is electronically compensated for by the regulators. For others it all depends on the quality of the strings and the instrument itself. On the other hand, strings which are not as tight are far more response to the slight nuances of touch and contact with the fingers, this allows the player to vary the colour much more and not only sing but also speak or even whisper to the hearts of the listeners. The author highly recommends trying this method. Because of this all pieces in this book are presented for both the C Violin and the Bb Violin. In both cases the chords of the pieces are given in concert pitch, i.e. how they should be played on the piano. The third option is to play in higher positions like guitarists. In this case the fingering does not depend on the position; the same passages are played in different keys with the same fingering. However, there are problems here, one loses the option to play on open strings and it is also much more difficult to play precisely in tune.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Intonation
In jazz precision of intonation is more important that in classical music. This is due to the melodies in jazz being based on complicated harmonies, with many complex chords and dissonances. This is why one should only practise with a harmonic accompaniment all the whilst listening as an outsider to check for tuning problems.

Articulation
Jazz music requires highly expressive articulation, precise and bright attack with a clear release of the sound or instantaneous drop in volume. To achieve this one must hold the bow tighter than in classical music and press it against the string with more force. The left hand is responsible for effects such as intonation shifts during a note, glissandos, slow deep vibrato or a quick trill, all of which requires a very light touch on the fingerboard. To achieve this, the left hand must not be supporting the violin. It must be held firmly between the chin and shoulder.

Rhythm
Rhythm in jazz is the main medium of expression and is characterised by the feeling of swing. One can play on the beat or slightly after the beat but never before it. Therefore, the first recommendation is not to hurry, do not speed the tempo up. The second recommendation is to sharpen triples slightly is usually played as means that the quarter note in the triplet is played slightly longer than it should be. The third recommendation is to listen to the great masters of swing such as Stuff Smith. this

Jazz rhythms are a complicated and vast field. Subsequent books of the Jazz Violin Method will look at the theory of jazz music specifically from the point of view of violin techniques.

Improvisation
Musical improvisation is creating music whilst performing; composing it just a fraction of a second before it must sound. This is quite similar to the way we formulate our thoughts just before articulating them. Improvisation is based upon mastery of the musical language and on some qualities of the melodic and harmonic ear. These qualities can be trained and techniques to achieve this are explained later. In this book it is recommended that the technique widely used along language students, that is memorising standard wordings and language used in speech, is applied, in this case the memorisation of standard musical passages.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Method of Study
The main goal of this book is to root into the students subconscious memory some complex reflexes, feelings and knowledge based upon the existing basic jazz norms seen from the point of view of the violins specific features. It is suggested that notated music is avoided at all costs (like black New Orleans musicians once did at the beginning of the jazz era, who were often not even acquainted with notes), and that it is referred to only in extreme circumstances only for the most complicated or difficult passages. The main learning technique for working with the given music material is to memorise it by ear from the supplied recording together with the book, to sing it with accompaniment (naming the note that is sung as is often done in sight singing). Only after that, can one proceed to play the melodic material on the violin, trying to copy the tune, and using the printed notes only in order to verify the fingering and the neatness of the selected piece. The following procedure is suggested: 1) Listen several times to the chosen piece from beginning to the end. 2) Listen to the accompaniment repeatedly, in order to memorize its chord progression 3) Return to the notated violin part of the piece, listen to the first phrase of the violin solo (usually two bars) and try to sing it. It is normal for it to take as many as twenty attempts before a good result is obtained. 4) Move to the second phrase and learn it in a similar way. 5) Join those two phrases together. Then, the resulting passage should be sung repeatedly with the accompaniment, using the supplemental CD. 6) Using the same techniques sing the whole chorus and later the whole piece which will help you to memorise it. 7) After this, take the violin and begin to work with it. Take the first phrase again and play it by memory on the violin. Check yourself against the sheet music pay particular attention to tuning and fingering. Then repeat and play again and again until you have learnt this phrase by heart. 8) Afterwards learn the whole chorus in a similar way one phrase at a time. Then repeat the whole piece on the violin many times. This whole process should only be done with the accompaniment. It is important to resist the temptation of learning the whole piece by looking at the sheet music. This is a very important basic principle: aside from memorising the tune itself, one needs to form the reflex, which connects the imagined (anticipated) pitch heard by the inner ear to the finger positions on the fingerboard, and not the position of the notes on the page to the positions on the fingerboard. This will be unavoidable if one learns the whole piece at once straight from the page: this effect is well known in psychology - the first impression is immediately registered in the subconscious.
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JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD


Undoubtedly at first such a routine will seem long, boring and tiresome to the student. Yet it will be rewarding, because by preparing the piece in this way, after some time and practise it shall flow out of the subconscious into the conscious of the student as though it was his own, possibly with some changes and most likely altered in accordance with the individual musical personality of the student. This is the safe path towards personal improvisation. This method guarantees positive results. However, there is nothing to stop students from adopting a more creative approach. For example, some may prefer doing the sight singing whilst accompanying themselves on the piano (of course they should write out a chord chart and practise very slowly at first). Other electronic keyboards with different autoaccompaniment features may also be used.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Comments on the Supplemental tudes


This section is dedicated to musicians who are already acquainted with the basics of jazz music. Others may skip this section and proceed directly to the study of the TUDES. Improvisation ability relies upon an absolute knowledge (on the subconscious level) of chord progressions, upon which improvisations are based. By this, it is understood that one should hear in the inner ear all the notes which any ordinary chord is comprised of as well as to anticipate chord-by-chord the moments of transitions. The great majority of jazz standards use the very same short chord modules, which are called "standard chord progressions", and these "standard chord progressions" can be found in various tunes in various combinations. There are not many "standard chord progressions", and that is why learning them and therefore imprinting their sound into the subconscious, is not as difficult as it may first appear. There are two ways to solve this problem: the first method is analytical which gives thorough results. The second is a practical method, with the help of specific examples. The analytical method shall be returned to in the next book whilst the practical method forms the content of this book. Each tude deals with one or two "standard chord progressions". The melodic line of each of the improvisations is built in such a manner that it will expose, with as much accuracy as possible, the characteristic features of the chords and of the chord combinations. By and large, the tudes cover all the keys that jazz is played in. The notation of each tude, both the theme and the improvisations, is presented on one staff. Whilst on the subject of notation of jazz music it is important to remember that a dotted rhythm is played as a triplet .

The accompanying chords are written above the staff line in Roman numeral notation. If one chord is marked above the bar it means that it is played on the first beat of the bar. If two chords are marked, then they are played on the first and the third beat. If there is no chord above the bar, then it means that the chord from the previous bar is being repeated.

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD


For those who would like to accompany him/herself on the piano or on an electronic keyboard, it is worth a quick reminder of how to read chord notation. The lower note of the chord (bass) is marked with English alphabet letters.

Chords are marked in the following manner (in this example each chord is built upon the note C):

To mark a chord progression that is not in a particular key degrees of the scale are used. For example Im would signify a minor chord built on the first degree of the scale that the tude is in.

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11

JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD

Specific Features of each tude


TUDE # 1
Key: C major
Tempo: = 120

Basic chord progression:

IIm7 - V7 - Imaj
This tude presents the most common chord progression and the simplest way of building an improvisation - development of the theme with the help of additional melodic figurations. The study consists of three independent themes. Each one of these themes has its corresponding improvisation.

TUDE #2
Key: F major Tempo: = 110 Basic chord progression: IIm7 V7 - Imaj The chord progression is similar in its use to the previous tude. Although at first, the improvisation is developed around the theme, it later moves much further away from the theme than in the previous tude. A more complex musical language is used as well as a more intricate rhythmic structure.

TUDE #3
Key: Eb major Tempo: = 130 Basic chord progression:

I6 - III7 - VI7 - II7


Here the improvisation deviates radically from the theme and is based only upon the chord progression.

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JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD


TUDE #4
Key: Bb major Tempo: = 140 Basic chord progression:

I6 - VI7 - II7 - V7
As in the first two tudes, at first the improvisation is musically linked to the theme, but later it is developed independently. Attention must be paid to the more flexible
articulation here, compared with the previous tudes.

TUDE #5
The key: = F major
Tempo: 170 Basic chord progression:

I6 - VII7 VIIb7 - VI7 -...etc


It is rather difficult to improvise on descending chromatic chord progressions of this type, since every chord transition completely changes the feeling of the left hands grip and requires from the violinist a completely different approach to fingering. Use this tude to learn the difference in the precise sensations of the first position to those of the half position.

TUDE #6
Key: Db major Tempo: = 140 Basic chord progression:

I6 - VIIb7 IIIm7 - VI7


This is a very uncomfortable key for the violin and has to be played in half position. Nevertheless, this key is highly popular in jazz. Please pay attention to the fact that it is much more comfortable to play in the key Db major on a violin tuned to `Bb' than on a violin in `C'. This chord progression (regardless of the key) is far more elegant than the previous one, however it is more difficult to master.

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VIOLIN METHOD
TUDE # 7
Key: Ab major Tempo: = 90 Basic chord progression:

I-IIIb7-I-VI7
This is an uncomfortable key. It is difficult however, the jump at the beginning of the chord progression sounds fresh and interesting.

TUDE #8
Key: G major Tempo: = 140 Basic chord progression:
b 7 I - IIbdim IIm7 III dim IIIm

This chord progression was extremely popular in the 30' s. Easy and pleasant to memorise

and improvise upon.

TUDE #9
Key: D major Tempo: = 120 Two basic chord progressions:

Imaj II7alt Ivm7 IIb7 - Imaj


and

IIIm7 - VI7 - IIIbm7 - VIb7 -IIm7 - V7 - Imaj

From all points of view this is probably the most difficult TUDE of them all.

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JAZZ VIOLIN METHOD


TUDE #10
Key: C major

Tempo: = 170
Basic chord progression:

| I6 | I 6 | I 6 | I 7 | | IV7 | IV7 | I6 | I6 | | IIm7 | V7 | I6 | I6 |


This is one of the simplest and most popular blues chord progressions scheme. It has been arranged in the style of the 30's.

TUDE # 11
Key: C minor Tempo: = 125 Basic chord progression: | Im7 | Im7 | Im7 | Im7 | | IVm7 | IVm7 | Im7 | Im7 | | VIbm7 | VIbm7 | Im7 | Im7 | This is one of the variations of the minor blues. It is arranged in the style of the 80's - 90's.

TUDE # 12
Key: Bb major Tempo: = 140 Basic chord progression: | I6 | IV7 | I6 | I7 | | IV7 | IV7 | I6 VII7 | VIIb7 VI7| | IIm7 | V7 | I6 VI7 | IIm7 V7 | This tude is composed in the form of the classic blues, one of the most widely practiced forms of blues. Improvising with small durations (in the 4th and 5th choruses) always creates a real complication for the violinist: it is not so difficult to think of the "music" itself, but it is difficult to manage in time to which fingers to play it with. This is why in difficult situations one must resort to use "prepareds" i.e. pre-learned passages and phrases composed and memorised beforehand.

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16

Etudes in C

17
In C

Etude #1
Intro

&4 4 &

Theme I

Gm7

Dm7

G7

# #
B 7

C7

C maj


C maj

F maj

& . b . &
C maj

Fm7

b b b . b

. . w
A7 D7

. #.
G7

Impr. I

# #
C7

G7

# #
3

Dm7

Dm7

Gm7

& . . #. #. . # . & .
C maj F maj
3 r b . #. # 3

3
3

Fm7

. b .
D7

B 7

b 3 3 b b
3

b . . b #. & . .
A7
3 3

G7

# w & #
Dm7 C maj

Theme II
Dm7

G7

. .
F maj

& .
Fm7

B 7

Gm7

. .
C maj

C7


A7

b & . b . . b

. .
D7

18
Dm7 G7

Impr. II

&w
Gm7

Dm7

. . . . # . . . . . # .
G7 C maj C7 F maj

. . b . . b . . & . . . . . b 3 . & . b . b. . . . . . b
Dm7 G7 Fm7 B 7

b .
3 3

C maj

A7

Theme III
Dm7

D7

. b # . . #
G7

&

# . # . . .
Gm7

C7

. r r . . # .
F maj

& . # . . & . .
Fm7

C maj

. b

. . . . . . R # R .
C maj A7 D7

w . b. . . . # . . R .
B 7

. r # .

r . . . & . . # . b w .
Dm7 C maj Gm7

Impr. III
Dm7

G7

. . r . #. # . # .
G7 F maj

& . b . . # n . . . b
Fm7

b . . .# . . . . R R # .
C7 B 7

. & . . . . . R b. . b . . . . b
C maj D7

# . #. n
A7 C6

Coda

&

. r . # . . .

G7

r . .

# . .

19
In C

Etude #2
F - dur

&4 4

Theme I


Dm7

Gm7

. .
C7

. R
Gm7

C7

F maj

. .
C7

r . w & & #
F maj

# . .
F maj

. r # . .
Impr. I

.
C7

r . w

F maj

Gm7

. .

& . r . .
Dm7

. r . . . .
Gm7

. R . . .

& . . . . . . # & . . .
F maj C7

. . .
F maj

. . . . .
C7

. . . . . . . .
Impr. II
Gm7

. . .

r & . . #. # . &
F maj

. .

C7 m # . # . R . b . . b . b. b n .

. b #. . . b . . . b. n . . . . . R
Dm7
3

3 & #. n . . # . b 3 3 3
Gm7
3 3 3

C7

. b . b . b . . # n . . . . . & R . . . . . 3
F maj C7 F maj

20

Impr. III
Gm7

& . . .
F maj

. .
Dm

. # n . . # n . #. 3 & . . . . . # n . . 3 3
Gm7

. r

C7

. .

. r

. & . . . # .
C7

Impr. IV

& . . . . . .
C7

F maj

Gm7

b b b .
Gm7

. . R # . . . . . . # . .

F maj

C7

& &

b n b # b w 3 3
3

F maj

. . . . r . . . . b n b

Dm7

# b #
F maj

& b n b # # b n
C7

C7

3 3 3 3

& b
3 3 3

F maj

F maj

. r # . . . r . . .
Gm7 Dm7

Theme II

. . . r . # n . . # . . . . . . & .# . . 3
C7

& . . . # . . .
F maj

Gm7

b n b

. . . J
F maj

C7

b n

&

. # n .
3

C7

r . . #. . .

21
In C

Etude #3
E b - dur

4 &4 &

Theme

C7

3 #

E 6

b b .

b
F7

n . r . b .
G7

. r . . b . b .
B 7 Gm7

b.
C7

& b

Fm7

b . b . . . R
E 6

b .
Fm7

. b b .

b # b &
B 7 G7

b bw

B 7

b . r # . b .
Impr. I
E 6 C7

. b R

& n. . b . . . . b & n. b . . . b . . & . . . . . .


B 7 Gm7 C7 Fm7 F7

. .

b b .
B 7

Fm7

b.

b . . . b b. . b

# b .

B 7

b b . n. n bw b.
G7

E 6

Impr. II b b . n b. E b6 . b b & . R

. n b. b . . . b .
3

& . . b . b . b b & . .

. b b. . . . b . . . . . 3 b Gm7 Fm7 B 7 . b b # . . b . . . b

C7

F7

22

C7

&

. .

Fm7

b E b6 , 3 . . b . . . . b . # & # . b . . b .
Impr. III
B 7

B b7 E b6 . . b . b . . # . #. . b b

. b . bR

. b. #. . . b . . . & . . #. . . . . . b 3 F7 Fm7 B b7 . b. . r b . b . . r b . & . b . . b. . b .


G7 C7

& . . . b . b . . b b E b6 b b b . &
B 7
3 3 3 3

Gm7

C7

Fm7

b b
3 3 3 3

Impr. IV b E b6 . b . #. . n # . b . . . #. R
B 7

. b . b . . . b b n . . & . . b . . b # . #
G7

n. b . b. n . & . . b . b . Fm7 B b7 Gm7 r & . . b . . # b. . . b Fm7 B b7 3 3 b & b b


C7

F7

. . b . . b . b . #
C7

r b. b. n. . b . b . #. b w
3

E 6

B 7

. b

&

B b7 #

E 6

b . b R . b n .

b .

23
In C

Etude #4

3

&4 4
C7

C7

1 A1 Theme
B 6

. r
C7

G7

F7

. b

w .
C7

C7

&

b.

r & .
A2 B 6

+5 F7

w
Dm7

Cm7

b
G7

G7

# . b

& .
Gm7

b b

F7

. r
C7

w
F7

& b # . . w
G7

B 6

Cm7

b
+5 F7

Dm7

&

C7

G7

F7

b bw

2 Impr. I A1 B 6

C7

. & . . . . . . C7 F7 . b b . . . & . . b # . b . b . . . b & R .


Cm7

. . # .
Gm7

b .

# b
G7

+5 F7

Dm7

b b . & b . . b .
G7

b . . b n. . . . . b 3 b A2 B 6 . b. . . b

& . . . . . . #

#. b

C7

b . n b
3

24

# . . # . . . b & . b
G7 C7 F7

Cm7

b
B 6

F7

b 3 # & 3 3 Impr. II A1 B b6 G7 . b. b n. b . b . . . . . & . b. . . 3 b . . r & # . b # . b . n b. . . b. F7 ^ . # . 3 . . . . r . R &


Dm7 G7 Cm7 C7 C7 Gm7 C7 C7

+5 b F7 . b . . # n . b . n . R

. b . . b .

Dm7

. #.
+5 F7

w . r #
3

. . . . b. # . . . b . b . . b . b &
A2 B 6

F7

b . b . &
3

b .
3

G7

. .

^ ^ b ^ ^

~~~~ . . . b b b . . . & . b . . #. .
C7 Gm9

. . . . . . . & . b +5 B b6 C7 F7 F7 3 3 % bw b b n b n & . . b. n. # 3 3 . .
F7

. .

Dm7

G7

&

Cm7

b w
F7

F7

Dm7

# w
G7

G7

C7

F7

Dm7

G7

b w &
Cm7

Dm7

# w

b
C7

F7

B b6 bw

25
In C

Etude #5
F - dur

&4 4
E7

Impr. I
F6

. .

. . # #
2

&

. R . # # .

. # . b. . . . R E b6 . . b.
D7

b & b . . . # . b . R . b n . # . b . b. # . b . b 3 3 . . . . . #. & . . # #. . R & b & b. b . b . b . r b . b . . b b.


F6
3

D 6

b b b

. R

C7

. r .
B /D

. r

. # . . # . R r # # .
F6 C7

& . b. # . . b o 2 Eb C7/E 3 . b b. 3 . b b . & w . & . & #. #.


D7 E7

Impr. II

.
4

4 . # r . b . .

E 6

b . r .
4

4 3 r . # . . n # . #.

^ ^ ^ . . b .

& #. #. . b. # . # . # . . . 4

# . # . n . n # . .

26

b 2 . b b . b n. . & b b . R . b b . . b b .
D 6 C7

b . b .

& b . . . . . . . . . . . . . b . &
B /D F6

& b n

. . w . R #
E

C7

b
F6

bo 3 # . R

C7/E . . . b . n

Impr. III

E7 # . . . . b . n . & . R # . b . . E b6 . . . . . & #. #. # . . # #. b. .

& b . . . b . . # . b # b n. b . b .
3 3

# . # . # . n. n # . . . #. . # & #. # . # . #. D b6 2 b . b . b b . b b b . b b n . . b . & . b . b . . b .
D7 C7

& &

. .
F6

. . . . . b

. . . . # . . n . #

n
F6

.
3

C7

. . . b n . . . b .

&

^ . . . . #. . . . . .

27
In C

Etude #6
D b - dur

&4 4

Theme I A1 D 6

b b .
B 7

b b
E m7

B7

Fm7

b .
G m6

& b n

b b

D 6

b b b

A 7

b .
D 6

. r b
B m7

b . b bD 6 .
B 7

& . b r b n & & & b


D b6

n
B7

E m7

. b w b
Fm7

A 7

A2

b b

b .

b n

b b

E m7

b b .

b . R
B bm7

G m6

b b .
Impr. I

b n . bR

D b6 . b w

E bm7 A b7 A1 D b6 . r b. b . . b n b . b b.

b . b . . # # . # . # & . # . # . # .
B7 Fm7

. n r

B b7 . . . b . b. b . b . b. . & . b . . . . # b # E m7

b G bm6 . b . b b . & b . b . . . b . b b. n b . b . b .
D b6 . b b. b . b b . & b

b . b #. b . b n b . b. b n . b
A 7

D 6

B m7

b . b .

28

& . b . . b . . b . b. . b. b . b. b
Fm7 w # # #. . . b b . . & # n. # #. b . n B b7 E bm7 3 & b . b . b . b . # b . b . . . b . b b . . . b . G bm7 D b6 A b7 . b b . b . r . b . b b b n b. n b b . . . . b . b. b & b. b B7 D 6

E m7

A 7

A2 D 6

&w
B7

B m7

E m7

A 7

Impr. II A1 D 6

b b . . b. #. b. b. b .
Fm7

#. # & . # #.
B 7

&

b b . b b . b . b . b & . b . 3
G m7 D 6

b .

b .

b b. b . . b . b . . b . . b b. b . .
E m7 D 6

. . # # #

^ ^ ^ b ^ b

& b &

B m7

b . . b

E m7

A 7

A2 D 6

b b

b . b b. n . b b. n . b .
A 7

. . b

# # #
B7 B 7

. b b . b . . . . . b. n b n. b . E bm7 G bm6 b b b . b b . b & b . . b . . b . b . . b . b

Fm7

b b b b &
3

D 6

b .

A 7

b b b
B7

D 6

B m7

A1

b & b & b

b b

E m7

b . b

29

A 7

Theme II

D 6

. . b b

b b

Fm7

E m7

& b
D 6

. . b n . b b . . b . b b
A 7

n . # #. #. . # n B b7 b. . b . . b
Gm6

b
B m7

. . b
E m7

& . b . & b & b bB 7


G m6

b b b

. . b b . b b
B7

D 6

bw b
Fm7

A 7

A2 D 6

b b . . b . b

b b n

. #

# . # . . b
E m7

b b . b . b. b b . b b
D 6

b . . b n . b b
D 6

B m7

b b . b . b. b. b b b b n & b A b7 b b n & . R
E m7 D 6 D 6

b . b

b b bw

A 7

b b. b b
B m7

b bw

b . b

b
A 7

A 7

b b. b b
D 6

D 6

E m7

b A b7 b n . b R

&

b .

b b

b bw

30
In C

Etude #7
A b - dur

4 &4

Theme

r b. . r . . r . . r b
A maj

A1 A

bmaj

b b b b b 3 b b & b b b b 3 b 3 3 3
B7
3

b .

. r . . r . b

B bm7 . 3 b b b . . r . . r & b 3 3 3 F7
3 3 3

b B bm7 3 r r & b . . . r b . . r . . b . . . b b 1 2
G 7 E 7

&

A maj

b b b

E7

b .
E 7

A2 A

bmaj b. . . . . . b . . b R R

b b 4 b 3 b b b 3 & b. b b 3
B7 F7

b . . . . b . b . . . R R R
A maj B m7

3 b 3 3 & b b 3 3

b. b .

B m7

b 3 . . b b b. . b & b b b 3 . b b . b . . b R . b . R R b
G 7 E b7 & .
3

r b n.

A b6

E7

. b n.
3

E b7

Impr. I A1 A maj

. b . r

B7

& b . .

. b b b b. b b . b . b

b F7 3 3 b . b . . . . b b b . b & b . .
A maj
3 3

31

b n &
3 3

b b . . b . b . . b . . R b. b .
B m7

b B bm7 E b7 A bmaj 3 b . b. b b b b & b b b. b . b b . b b n A2 A bmaj E7 E b7 B7 b . b b . . b . b b . b . b . b . & # b . b b. b b b b A bmaj 3 . r . b . b . b . b . . & b


G 7 B bm7 3 3 b . b b . b 3 & . b b 3 3 G b7 3 . b b . b b . b b b . b b. b b . b . b & J . b b. 2 1 F7
3

B m7

& . . b b n
Impr. II A1 A maj

E 7

b.

b b b b #

A maj


B7
3

b b b b

E7

E 7

3 3 r . . r b. b . b b b r . . & b . b b b b . 3

b b b n

&

b n b b . b b . b b . . r . . r . b . b . . 3 3
A maj F7
3

3 b 3 & b 3 3 3

B m7

b. b . b .

32

b 3 & . b b . . . . b b. b b. b b . b b . b . b b . 3
G 7 B m7

& &

E 7
3

b n
3 3

A maj

b E7 E b7 b . b . b . b n # b b
A maj

A2 A

bmaj b

. b . b
3

b . b . b. b b. b b . b b b .
F7
3 3

B7

b n . b . b b
3 3 3 3

. b & . b . b b . . b B bm7 G b7 . 3 b . b b . b b. . b . b . & . b b. . b . 3


3

b A bmaj . b b . bw b. . . & . b b . b b. b b. . . J b
B m7 E 7

& b . b . b . r b . . r . . r . b & b b b b b
3 3 3

E7

E 7

Theme
A maj B7

A maj

B bm7 . r . . r . b . . b b . &

. . b . r . r . b

b b b
3

b
3 3

b b
3 3

b
3

F7

b 3 . b r

# r r r & b . . b . . b . b . . n b b

G 7

B m7

E7

E 7

A maj

b bw

33
In C

Etude #8

&4 4
B

% Theme
G6

.. b
Bm7

bo
D7

Am7

bo & #
1. Am7

# n

#
2. Am7

E7

#
G6

b &
Impr. I
G6

D7

j .. b b n J J
Am7

end

&

bo bA
3

#
Am7


D7

bo

b b
G6

b b b

Bm7

E7

& n
A

# #

b w

o bo Am7 Bb b b n b &

n
Impr. II

&

b b n
E7

Am7

#
D7

G7

G6

o bo Am7 Bb Bm7 b b n # # & b b b n # b b


A

> > > # &


E7 Am7

D7

G6

# #

34

o bo Am7 Bb b b n b n b b b & #
A

Bm7

Impr. III

n # n b # & # b n
E7 Am D7 G6 A

G6


Bm7

&

# b b # b b b n
E7 Am7 D7 G6

bo

Am7

bo

> > > # # # & # # # > bo j b & b b


A Bm7 E7 Am7

Am7

# b b J
D7

# n # # b n b b n b &

35
In C

Etude #9
A1

&4 4

Theme
D maj

.
E 7

E 7alt

b
A2 D maj

#.

Gm7

E 7

& b & b
E 7alt

D maj

j #

b b n b
D maj

b .

Gm7

b b
C9

E 7

D7

B G maj69

& #
F m7sus

b b #
B7 B7

& .
Fm7

# 3 # j # b
F m7 B 7
3

b
B 7
3

F m7sus

b E m7sus Em7 3 3 3 3 # # b b # # & # n # b


3 3 3

B 7

& w
Gm7

A7

A3 D maj

w b
E b7 #w

b .
D maj

E b7 w

E 7alt

b .
Impr. I A1 D maj

&

#w

j
E 7

& b

E 7alt

b b J b b

Gm7

b b n

36
D maj E 7

&w &
B G maj69

A2 D maj


E 7


D maj

E 7alt

b b
3

Gm7

b 3 b b b b
3

j j # # #
C7

D 7alt

& #
F m7sus

j# j #
F m7 B7

C 7(add11,13)

j#

# B7 # # # & # # # # #w
Fm7 B 7

F m7sus

b b
Em7

&
B 7

b b
A7

B 7

E m7sus

# #
E 7alt

& #w b & b
Impr. II
Gm7

A3 D maj

.
E 7

# # #

b b

b D maj B b7 b j # b b b b #
3

&
C7

15

j # b b # # b # #
3 4

G maj

& #

b b b # b b 4 b 1 4
3

F m7

37

b b b & b n
4 3 0 3 Fm7

B7 1

4 2 # # # # n # n # # # # # # # 3 4 1 1 2

& b b

b b b b
Em7

B 7

b b b #

b # b b &
A7 b # b b & b b B 7

D maj

b w

# J
E 7

b b &
E 7alt

Gm7

E 7

D maj

Coda

&

D maj

b b

E 7alt

w
E 7

Gm7

E 7

#w w

b
E 7alt

D maj

&w &
Gm7

# j
E 7

D maj

b
D maj

#w

dim. poco a poco

E 7

38
In C

Etude #10
12
Impr. I
C6

&4 4
F7

# . #.
G7

# . .
C6

# n
C6

#. . # . . r # .

&
Dm7

& . . . . . . . # n. # . . .
Impr. II
C6

# . . # n . # . . & #. #. n . # . . . b . # .
3 b . b . . b . . . . . & # # . . n . # . . # #

F7

C6

. . # . # &
Dm7

G7

C6 . . # . # . . b . # . . #. # . . n . #
3

3 3 3 & . . # . n . # . . # . # b # n #

Impr. III

C6

b . b . . b . . # . b. n . b . # . . n # . # . n &
F7 C6

. #. . . b n . . . . . . & . . . # . . . b n
Dm7 G7 C6

Impr. IV
C6

&

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

. . . b. . . b . . . . n . & . . . . # . # . . b . # . . #. & . .
Impr. V
C6 3
3 3 3 3 3

r . . . . . . .

# & # b n # 3 3 3 3 3 3 & &


C6

#
3 3

F7

3 3 b 3 # b b # b # b 3 3 3 3 3

#
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Dm7


3 3 3 3

# # & # 3 3 3 3
G7 C6
3 3 3

Impr. VI

. . . . . . . . . . . . & . . . . . . . . . . . .
F7
3 3 3 3

C6

C6
3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 & b b n

Dm7
3 & 3

. . . . & & . #.

C6 . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . G7

Theme

F7

b
G7

. #. S
C6

C6

Dm7

b n

cresc.

40
In C

Etude #11

8

&4 4

C - moll

.. b
Fm7

Cm7

b b b
Cm7

b b b & b & b & b b

b b b b
3 3

b
Cm9

A m7

Impr. jI
Cm7

b b b b b b

b b b

n b


Fm7

& b b n b #
Cm7

b b & b b A bm7 Cm7 b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b & b & b & b &


Impr. II
Cm7

b b b b
Cm7 Fm7

b b

b b b b & b b b b b
A m7

41

b b b b b

Cm7

&

Impr. III
Cm7

b b b b b
Fm7

b &

b b b b b A bm7 Cm7 b b b & b b b b b 3 b b b


Impr. IV

b b b b 3 b b &
3

Cm7

b b
Cm7

b
3

Cm7

& b b
Fm7

b b b

& & & & &

b b b b b b

b b b b b b

A m7

b b b b b b b b b b b b

b b b b b
Cm7

b
3

b
3

..

A m7

b b b b b b
3 3

Cm7

n b n b
Cm7

b b w

A m7

b b b b b b
3 3

Cm7

A m7

b b b b b b
3 3

42
In C

Etude #12
B b - dur

&4 4

B 6

B 7

& b . . b
A 7

b 4 # . #. n
Theme

E 7

Cm7

E 7

# . . b n . .
F7

b. b .

b #. # . n .
B 6 B 6

.
4 3

b G7 & b . b . b
Impr. I
B 6

# . # . n

b E b7 & # # . n . b . b . . b
E 7

B b6 G7 r . # . # . n b . . b B 6

b . b . .

#. # . .
Cm7

A7

F7

& . . b . . . b. . b . # . #. . . b . b . Cm7 F7 B b6 G7 Cm7 F7 . . # n # b n b . # . b . # . b & # # . n b . 3


4 3

b B b7 ^ . r b . # . n . b b # . # . . b
A7 A 7

B 6

G7

b E b7 B b6 B b7 . . # . . & b b . # b b . . bR #. . b . n b. b
Impr. II
B 6 B b6 A7 . b 3 . . b . b b . . & b b . b . . . b E 7
3

&

A 7

b 3 E b7 b 3 3 b # # 3 b b n & . #. . #. b # n 3 b 3 3
Impr. III
B 6 Cm7 F7
3

b n b b .

G7

Cm7

B b6 G7 . b . . r # . b . b . . . . . b . . F7

43

b B b7 3 3 3 b # b 3 & # b # # b 3 3
B 6
3

E 7

b 3 b b 3 3 b b b 3

b A7 3 A b7 3 G7 3 3 3 & 3 b b n b n # b # # b b b n 3
B 6
3 3

& b

Cm7

. . b . n
F7
3

F7

Impr. IV
B 6

. r #.

B 6
3 3

G7

b E b7 3 3 3 3 3 3 b b & b b # b
Cm7
3 3 3 3 3

b n #
3 3

b B b7 3 3 3 b 3 3 b & b b # 3
B 6

E 7

b b b
3 3 3 3

&

b b
3


3 3

B 7

b n b
3

b G7 3 3 b 3 b n b # b # 3
A7 A 7 3 B 6

Cm7

& b
Theme
B 6

F7

b . # . R . # . b
G7
3 3

Cm7

F7 b .

b & #. # . n & #. . b n & #. . n #


Cm7 E7

E 7

b . b . b . b
F7

B 6

b # . #. n
B 6

B 7

b. b .

b A7 A b7 G7 b. b . #. #. . #. b
B 6

. # r . n b . . . # # b .

w w

44

Etudes in B b

45
In B b

Etude #1
Intro

&4 4 &

Theme I

Gm7

Dm7

# #
B 7

G7

#
C maj

C maj

C7

F maj

. & b .
Fm7

b b . n

. # . w
A7 D7

# . # . # #
G7

& #
C maj

Dm7

#
Gm7

Impr. I
Dm7

# #
C7

#
G7

# #

# & . . # . . # . .
3 & . r # b # . #. # 3

3 #
3

F maj

Fm7

. b . #
D7

B 7

b 3 3 b
3

b . # . # b n . b # . & #.
C maj A7
3 3

#
G7

Dm7

&

C maj

# # #

# w # #
B 7 Gm7

Theme II
Dm7

G7

. .
F maj

. # #

& # .
Fm7

. .
C maj

C7

#
A7

&

. b

. .

b b

. # . # #
D7

# # .

46
Dm7 G7

Impr. II

&w

Gm7

Dm7

C maj . G7 . # # . . . #. . # . . #.

. . . . . . # . . # & #. . . b 3
C7 F maj

b #.
3

. #. & b . . . #. . . . # b
Fm7 B 7 C maj

A7

D7

#.

# n b.
3

# . b

Theme III

& b . # # # b b . b n . b. n . & . #.
C maj Gm7

Dm7

G7

Dm7

#
C7

. r . . R #.
F maj

G7

. . . . . . R # R # . . r # # .
G7 D7

Fm7 B b7 C maj A7 . # . #. # . w . R b . . . & . # . #

Impr. III

& #. . #.
C maj

. . n # . . b w R
Gm7

Dm7

G7

Dm7

. r . . # . n #. #.
F maj

& . b . .# n . # . . b
Fm7

b #. . . . # . . . R R # #.
C7 B 7

# . . . b. # . . # . . & . b . . # . # R #. . b
C maj A7

Coda

& #

D7

. r # #. . . #.

G7

. . #. . R
C6

47
In B b

Etude #2
F - dur

&4 4


Dm7

Theme I
Gm7

. .

. R
Gm7

C7

# . .
C7

F maj

& . R # #w & # #
F maj

# . .
C7

. r . . #
Impr. I

.
C7

. # R

F maj

w
F maj

Gm7

. .

. . & . r
Dm7

. r # . . . .
Gm7

. R . . . #

& . # . . # . . #.
C7

. . .
F maj

. . . . . # . . .
C7

. . . . & #. #. . . # . . .
Impr. II

r & . . # . # . &
F maj

F maj

Gm7

. .

C7 m . . b . #. # . # . R . .

. #. . . # b . #. R . . # . . # . . .
3

Dm7

3 3 3 & #. n . # . # . 3 3 3

Gm7

C7

. b . . . # # n . . . . . # . . & R . . . . 3 2
F maj C7 F maj

48

Impr. III
Gm7

& . . .
F maj

. .
Dm

& . . .# .

. b # . . b .# # . # .
3 3

. r

C7

. .
3

. r #
Gm7

# b #. .
C7

. . . . # . &
C7

. . R #. #. # . . . # . . . #
F maj

Impr. IV
Gm7

# . . . . . . & #
C7

F maj

# # b
F maj

&
Dm7

# # n #
3 3

b .

. . # . . . r . # . . # b

&

w
3

Gm7

# # #
F maj

& # # n # #
3 & #

C7

# # #
Theme II
Gm7

3 # 3 # 3
3

C7

F maj

r . # . . . r . . .
F maj

Dm7 b . . . # # # . . . . . . . . . # . # . & # . 3 R C7

. . & . #. . #.
Gm7 F maj

. . # . J
C7 F maj

&

#. b . #
C7
3

# . # . . . R #.

49
In B b

Etude #3
E b - dur

4 &4 &

Theme

C7

3 #

E 6

b .


F7

# . r . .
G7

. r #. . . b .
B 7 Gm7

&

Fm7

b . . . . R
E 6

. b
Fm7

C7

. b.

b # &
B 7 G7

b w

B 7

b r . # . .
Impr. I
E 6 C7

. R

& #. . . . . . # b & n. . . . . .
4 3 2 4 F7

. .

b # .
B 7

Fm7

. . . . .

. . & . . . #.
B 7

Gm7

C7

Fm7

# b .

B 7

b . b. n . n w
G7

E 6

Impr. II b b . n . E b6 . & . R

. . . # b . . .
F7

. b . . . . & . # . . . b . . b #. #. . 3 3 Gm7 Fm7 B b7 . # . # . . . . # . & .


C7

50

&

#. .
C7 B 7

Fm7

b E b6 , 3 . b . . . # . . . . # . . #. &
Impr. III
G7

B b7 E b6 . #. n. . . #. # . .

. . R

& &

. .

#. # . # . . # . . # . . # . # . . . #. #. 3
C7

F7

. . .

. .
C7

. r . . b . # r . . b . . b
Fm7

Fm7

B 7

Gm7

& .
B 7

b E b6 . b &
3 3 3 3

. # . . b . . b
B 7

b
3 3 3 3

b E b6 . # . . n # . . . . # . . R
Impr. IV

. b . # . . . . . # n . . # . # . & .
G7

#. . . # . . #. . & . . b . . # . b . . #
C7 F7

& . . .
Fm7

Fm7

B 7

b Gm7 C7 r r b . # . . . . . # . . . b . #. #
B 7 B 7

b E b6 w b b & &

B b7 #

E 6

b .

. R

#.

. #

51
In B b

Etude #4

3

&4 4
C7

C7

Gm7

1 A1 Theme
B 6

. r
C7 C7

G7

. b
F7

w
F7

&

r & .
A2 B 6

+5 F7

w # . .
Dm7

Cm7


G7

G7

# . b

& .
Gm7

.
C7

. r
C7

w
F7

w & #. .
G7

F7

B 6

Cm7


+5 F7

Dm7

&

C7

G7

b w


C7

2 Impr. I A1 B 6

. & . . # . . # . . # o. 1 C7 F7 . . # # . # & . # .
Gm7

. . #.

# . . # n . b . . . b & R

. . # . . # . . # . 3 b Cm7 F7 A2 B 6 . . b . . & . . . .
Dm7 G7

+5 F7

& . . . . # . # . #

G7

#.
C7

. b
3

52

. 3 # . # . . . & .
3 G7 C7

Cm7


B 6

F7

# # 3 & # 3 3 Impr. II A1 B b6 G7 . # n . b n. b . . . . . . . & # . . 3 #. #


F7 C7 . #. . r & #. . . . # . # . . # . +5 ^ F7 F7 . . . . # w r . . . R & # C7 C7 Gm7 C7

+5 b F7 . . . # . n . . # R

. . . .

Dm7

. # . . . b. #. . #. n . # . . n . b &
Dm7 G7 Cm7

F7

A2 B 6

b . b . &
3

b .
3

G7

. .

. r #
3

^ # ^ n ^ ^

. ~~~~ . . . . & . . . . # . .
C7 Gm9 F7 Dm7

G7 . . . # . . . # . . . #. . . b & +5 B b6 1 C7 F7 F7 3 w % b n # & . . . #. # 3 3

& &

Cm7

w
F7

F7

Dm7

# w
G7

G7

C7

F7

Dm7

#G7 w

Cm7

Dm7

# w

C7

F7

B 6

b w

53
In B b

Etude #5
F - dur

&4 4
E7

Impr. I
F6

. .

. .

. . . . . R # . # . .
E 6

# . ~~~ # # # # # # . R & # # . 3

.
D7

. #. . . . # . R & . . # . . b. # . . R D b6 2 . . . . #. # . # b & . R . # #. . & b


3

. b . . b . b . r . b . b .
F6

C7

. r .
4

& . r # # . & b . # . . b
4

4 . # . . # # # . R


B /D

bo C7/E . b . . b . w &
E

r # # # .
Impr. II
F6

C7

b #

r . # . . .
2

. & #. & #. # #. #
D7

E7

E 6

b ^ . ^ ^ . r . #. .

1 1 3 r . #. # . n # . # # . # #

# . # . n . n #. . #. & #. # . # n. # . # . # . . .

54

b 3 3 3 3 2 b . b . . b n2 . b . & R # . b b . # . b . b . b . b
D 6 C7

&

. . . . #. . . . #. . #. . . . . # . w . R
E C7

&
B /D

F6

# n
F6

& # #

bo # . R

C7/E . # . . . #

Impr. III

E7 . . . # # . . . # . & . R # . . 2 4 2 . . . # # . #. #. # # & #. # #. # . # . 2
3

E 6

. .

& . . . . . . # . # n . .
3

# . # . # . n. n #. . # . # . . # . & #. # . # # .
D7

b b b &
D 6 C7

. . b . b . b n . b . #. . b . . . b . . . . # # . . b # . . . . #. . n . # #

& . # . # & nF6


F6

. #

C7

. # . . n # . . # . b .

&

^ . . . # . # . . . . . . #
3

55
In B b

Etude #6
D b - dur

&4 4

Theme I A1 D 6

b b . b
D 6

b b
A 7 E m7

B7

Fm7

b .
G m6

& b n

B 7

b b .
D 6

. r
B m7

b b .

& . b r # & & & b


D b6

bB7

. b w b
Fm7

E m7

A 7

A2

bDb6 .
B 7

b b

b .
G m6

b n

E m7

b b .
D b6 . b w

. R
B bm7

b b .
Impr. I

# . b R

E bm7 A b7 A1 D b6 . r b. # . . . b b .

B7 b . . b . . b b b . b. & b. b b . b. Fm7

. r

B b7 . . . b. . & . b. . # . . . b. b . . #

b G bm6 1 . b . b b b . . . . & b b . . . . b b n b . . b
E m7

&

. b . b

. b . b

D 6

b . b . # . # . b . b b n.
A 7

D 6

B m7

b . . #

56

b & . b . # . . . b # . . . . b . . b
E m7 A 7

A2 D 6

Fm7 w # # #. . . . b & # n. # # . B b7 E bm7 3 & . . b. b. . # b. b . . . G bm7 D b6 b . b . b. b . b b b b. . . & b b. . . b. b B7 D 6

. b b . n . b . . .
A 7

. r b . b

&w
B7

B m7

E m7

A 7

Impr. II A1 D 6

b . . b. # . b. . b .
Fm7

. b . b . b & & . .
G m7 B 7

b b . . . b. b . . . . b. b. .
E m7 D 6

. b b . b b

b b b . b . b b . b . . b & . 3
D 6

& b &

B m7

b # . . b

E m7

A 7

A2 D 6

b b

b . b . # . b . # . b .
A 7

. . b

B7

b b

. b . . b . . . b. b. n n . . E bm7 G bm6 b b b . b & b . . b . b. b . . . . b .


Fm7 B 7

b .

&
A1

b b b
3

D 6

b .

A 7

b b
B7

D 6

B m7

E m7

b . b b

57

A 7

b & b & b b & b


D 6

Theme II

D 6

. . b

b b n

Fm7

. . . b

B 7

b . b . . . . . b
E m7

b. b . b . .

E m7

. . . b b . .
A 7

Gm6

b b
B m7

b #

& . b . & b
B 7

2 b

3 bB7 . b

b .

D 6

bw

A 7

A2 D 6

b b . . b .

3 . b . .

Fm7

2 b . . b n . b 4

& &

E m7

b b . b . . b . b
D 6

B m7

G m6

b b . b . .

# b . b b
D 6

b . b

b
2

A 7

b . b b

b
E m7

D 6

b bw

b A b7 b # . & R
E m7 D 6

b . b

b
A 7

A 7

b . b

b
D 6

D 6

b bw

B m7

b A b7 # . b R

&

b .

b bw

58
In B b

Etude #7
A b - dur

4 &4

Theme

r . . r . . r . . r b
A maj

A1 A

bmaj

b b b b b b & b b 3 b 3 3 3
B7
3 3

. . r . . r . b

B bm7 . 3 r . r & . . . 3 3 3 3 3 F7
3

b B bm7 r . . r . . r . r b . . . & . b b n b. n
G 7 E 7

&

A maj

b A2 A bmaj . . b . . # . . . . . R R
E7 E 7

3 bB7 b b b 3 & b b . 3

b . . . . . . b . . R R R
A maj B m7

3 3 & 3 3
F7 G 7
3

b.

B bm7 . 3 . . . b . . b & b b . b b . b . b . R R R
3

&

E b7 .

. r # .

A b6

E7

. #.

E b7

Impr. I A1 A maj

b . b . r

& b . .

. b b b . b b. b . b b 3

B7

b F7 3 . . . . . b. b & b . .
A maj
3 3 3

59

# &
3 3

b . b . b. . . b . . . R .
B m7

b B bm7 3 b . . b b b . b & . b . b
G 7

# b

E 7

A maj

& b &

E7

E 7

b b b
F7

b A2 A bmaj . B7 . . b . . . b . b . b . . b b. b.
A maj

b .

3 r . . b . b . . .

3 3 & . 3 3 3

B m7

b b .
3

G b7 3 b . b . b . b . & J b . b b . . b . b . B m7

Impr. II A1 A maj

& . . b # b

E 7

b b #

A maj

b b b b

E7

E 7

b b b n
4

B7 r r 3 3 r b b b b & . . . . . . b . . b b A bmaj b # n. b . b b . . r . . r . b . . . & 3 3


3 3

3 & 3 3 3
F7
3 3

B m7

. b . b .

60

b 3 . . . b b . b . & . . b b . b . b . b . 3 3 A bmaj B bm7 E b7 E7 E b7 A2 A bmaj 3 b 3 # # # # b & 3


G 7 B7 b . . . b . b . b . & b b b . . b 3 A maj

b n . . b
3 3 3

. & . . . b .
B m7

F7

b . . b . & . b. . b.
3

b 0
3 3 3 3

G 7

b. b . b b . .
3

B bm7 E b7 A bmaj . . . b . bw & b. b b . b. . . b b. . J

& b . b . . r . . r . . r . b b b & b b 3
3

E7

E 7

Theme
A maj B7

A maj

b b b
3

b b
3 3

. . r . . r . b

F7

B bm7 . . . r . . & . . R 3 3

3 3 3 3

. b r

b B bm7 E7 E b7 r . . r . . r b # . . & b b. n
G 7

A maj

b bw

61
In B b

Etude #8

&4 4

%
B

.. # b
G6 Bm7

Theme

bo #

Am7

# n # #
E7

&

bo # #
1.

# n # #

&

# n
Am7

D7

.. # n # # J J J
2.

Am7

D7

G6

end

Impr. I
G6

&

o bA b
3

# #
Am7

Am7

# #
D7

b 1 3
G6

bo

b b b 4 2

Bm7

E7

& n & bo b
A

# # # # b
Am7

# n # w
B

# 2 2 # #

n # # 2 0
Am7 D7

bo

#
Impr. II

&

n b n
E7

# # # 2

G7

G6

o bo 3 Am7 Bb Bm7 2 1 4 b b b n # n b # # # & b b


A E7 Am7 D7 > # > > # # # & G6

# n # n #

62

o bo Am7 Bb b # b n # # b b &
A

Bm7

# #

&

Impr. III
4 1 # # # b # # # # 4 2 # 2 3 4 Am D7 G6 B G6

E7

#
Bm7

bo Am7 2 3 & # # b b n 3
A E7 Am7

# # b b 4 3

bo

D7 G6 > # # # > > > > # # # # # # # & # #

bo b # n b & J
A Bm7 E7

Am7

Am7

b # # J
D7

# # n # b # # b # n # b & #

63
In B b

Etude #9
A1

&4 4

Theme
D maj

#
3

.
E 7

E 7alt

#.

Gm7

E 7

& b &
E 7alt

w
2

D maj

A2 D maj

# b

n # n # n
D maj D7

b .

Gm7

b
C9

E 7

B G maj69

& # # # & .
F m7sus

# J # n #
B7 B7

J
3

F m7 3

# # # b
B 7

F m7sus

b B b7 3 E m7sus Em7 3 3 3 3 3 # # # # # & # n # # b 4 4


Fm7
3 3

B 7

&w
Gm7

A7

A3 D maj

#w
E b7 bw

n .
D maj

E b7

E 7alt

# n .
Impr. I A1 D maj

&

bw

Gm7

# J
E 7

& # n

E 7alt

b J # b

b #

64
D maj E 7

&w

Gm7

A2 D maj

# .
E 7

E 7alt

b # b
3

# &
B G maj69

b D maj D 7alt 3 b b # j # # n # j
3

& # #
F m7sus

j# # j # #
F m7 B7

C 7(add11,13)

C7

j#

# B7 # # # # # & # # # # # # # #w 3
4

F m7sus

b
Em7

&
B 7

Fm7

B 7

b b

B 7

b .

E m7sus

# # # # # 4 2 2
E 7alt

b A7 & #w b # b &
Impr. II
Gm7

A3 D maj

# . 3

# # # # 2

# b

E b7 D maj B b7 b # # # # b J 3

&
C7

15

j b b # b #
F m7

G maj

# & # # # # b b b # b

65

&

b b n b

b n b n b b b b b b b b b b b b b
B7

Fm7

& b

b b
Em7

B 7

b # # # J
E 7

# # b & b # # & b # b
B 7 E 7alt

A7

D maj

# b w

&

b b
E 7alt

Gm7

E 7

D maj

#w

Coda

& # &w

D maj

n
E 7

w b J
E 7

bw

Gm7

E 7

D maj

D maj

n
D maj

w
dim. poco a poco

E 7alt

b.

& n

Gm7

E 7

66
In B b

Etude #10
12
Impr. I
C6

&4 4 &
F7

# . #.
G7

. # .
C6

# n # #
C6

. # . . # . r . # .

& . . . # . n. n #. . . . . . #
Impr. II
C6

Dm7

. . # b . # . . # . . b . b & . # #. . n # . .
C6 3 . . b . . . . # . . # & n . . n #. . # . n # F7 Dm7

&

. . # . #
Impr. III
C6

G7

C6 . . #. . # . b . # . . # . . # . . n

3 3 3 # # n # & #. . n # . . n # . . # . n # 3 3

F7 C6 n . b . . . . #. . # . b . #. . n # . . # n &

. # . . #. . . . . # . . . & . #. . #. .
Dm7 G7 C6 2

Impr. IV
C6

&

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67

. . . . . . . # . . n # . . & # . . . . . . # & . .
Impr. V
C6 3
3

. b . # . # . # .
3

r . . . . . . .

2 3 # 3 & # n # 3 3 3 3 3 3
3

& &

C6

# #
3 3

F7

4 3 3 3 # b # # 3 3 2
3 3 3

# #
3 3 3 3 3 3

Dm7


3 3 3 3

# # & # # 3 3 3 3
G7
3 3 3 3

C6 3

Impr. VI

. . . . . . . . . . . . & . . . . . . . . . . . .
C6 F7
3 3 3 3

C6
3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 & #

Dm7
3 & # 3

. . . . & & . # .

2 C6 3 . . . . # . . . #. . . . # # . . # . G7

Theme

F7


G7

. # .
C6

C6

Dm7

# #

cresc.

68
In B b

Etude #11

8

&4 4

C - moll

..
Fm7

Cm7

# n
Cm7

b & & & b

b
3 3


Cm9

A m7

Impr. jI
Cm7

b b b

# n b


Fm7

& # b n # #
Cm7 0

& # A bm7 b b b Cm7 b b b b b b b & &


Impr. II

Cm7

b
Fm7

& &

Cm7

2 b b b & b b b A m7 2

69
3

b b b

Cm7

&

Impr. III
Cm7

Fm7 & b Cm7

b
A m7

& b
3 b b b b & 3

b b

b
3

Impr. IV
Cm7

&
Fm7

Cm7

& &

A m7

b b

3 b b

b b

b Cm7 b b b n 3 .. 3
Cm7

b & b b
A m7
3 3

b b b

# n b # n b

Cm7

n n
Cm7

A m7

&

b b b
3 3 3

Cm7

A m7

& b b

b
3

# n b

70
In B b

Etude #12
B b - dur

&4 4

b #. #. n .
Theme
B 6 E 7

E 7

& b . . b G7 & b . .
A 7 Cm7

B 7

#. . b n . . #. # . n
F7

b b. .

b # . #. n .
B 6 B 6

B b6 G7 r . # . . n . . # B 6

b . b . .

#. # . . # #
Cm7

A7

F7

b E b7 & # #. n . b . b . .
Impr. I
B 6 E 7

b B b7 ^ . r . . # n b . . #. . #

b B b6 A7 A b7 G7 1 . . & . . . . b . . b. . # . . # . . # 3 2 Cm7 F7 B b6 G7 Cm7 F7 # n . . . # # n # . . b . # # . & # #. n 3 b E b7 B b6 B b7 b . b. . . . # . . #. . b . n . & # R b


Impr. II
B 6 B b6 A7 b . . . 3 # n . . b . . & b b . . . E 7
3

&

A 7

b E b7 3 # # 3 b 3 & #. #. . #. b # n # 3 3 3 3
Impr. III
B 6 3 Cm7 F7

b .

b n

G7

Cm7

B b6 G7 . . # n r . # . b . . . . . . . . F7

71

b B b7 3 3 3 3 # & # # # 3 3
B 6

E 7

b 3 b b 3 b b 3 b 3

&

b A7 A b7 G7 3 3 3 3 # # b b b b b # b n b n b
3

B 6

&

Cm7

. . . #
F7
3 3

F7

B 6

r .

b E b7 3 3 3 3 3 b # & n
Impr. IV
Cm7
3 3 3 3 3

# . # # #
3 3 3 3

b 3 &
B 6
3

3 b # 3 3 3

B 7

E 7

b b
3 3 3 3

b A7 A b7 G7 3 3 b n 3 # b & # # # # 0 1 3 3 3 3
3

B 7

Cm7

&
Theme
B 6

F7

# . b # . R . #.
B 6 G7
3 3

Cm7

. F7

b & #. # . n & #. . b n & #. # . n


Cm7 E7

E 7

b . .

B 6

b # . #. n
B 6

B 7

b. .

b . b
F7

b A7 A b7 G7 # . # . . # # . # b. . n . . w w

B b6 r . # . # . n #.