Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 91

CONSCIOUSNESS,

AS

REVBALIMO

THE

EXISTENCE
AND

OF NATURE.

GOD,

MAN,

BOSTON:
A.

WILLIAMS
100, WASHINGTON

AND

COMPANY,
STREET.

1864.

"d

by

Thil

n7,/"

eiuw.
?:

d- -t '.".'..,4/.
.

'^'

C'"^
boston:
prutted by johh wilson

f"

"

"? //,'

'J

akd

sok,

5,

Water

Street.

HAPVARD

iUNIV

.;TY|

LIBRARY

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

When the

dense

fogs

and

smoke

darken
cover*

earth, and
"

thick
sun,

clouds the
or

the all

heavens,

the

stars, and
reflect

objects that give


become
were

forth
eye
:

light, they
the

to not

the
at

as

though
because

all eye

not

virtue

of

the

is

diminished heavens

by
and

the
the

obscuration earth that

of

the

(forthe

hidden

subjective*
tends
ever

force
to

calls itself the


eye
which
the it

Ego

action, and
*

is not

impaired
-Ejgro ; and

That is

is

subject
which

calls itself

that

object
from

subject
Non-^o.

guishes contradistin-

calling itself,
1

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

by
nor

the

mere

withdrawal
the

of

light);
are

because

of objects

vision

blotted from
the

existence
the

(for the
would

sun,
tinue con-

stars,and
to

earth

be, although the veil


one

ing cover-

the earth should be


but because and

of

iron);

the mutual

tions intercommunicaand
to

reciprocal
the eye,

in respect relations,

of

created

become things,

and exist in

wholly void, abeyance only.


of sensible possibility
must

In

order

to the

perception, there media,


the
or means

be

of

between relation,

and subject. Without object is


no

light, there
without

seeing; and
is
no

sound,

there

ing. hear-

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIAeS.
.

The

organs

of
can

sense
a man

must

also

ist ex-

; for how ears,


or

hear

without

see

without
be

eyes?
some

There
to be

must

also

object
shall hear
be

for perceived'; there where


is

who

where
or see

nothing to
is

heard,
be

there

nothing to
must

seen?

And,
sentient shines

above

there all,
;

be

the

subject
and

since

light
in
ears

in

vain, and sound echoes


eyes in the

vain, in the
a

of for

body wherein
dead
not
see

life is extinct:
with

the hear

not

their eyes, and


of

with

their ears, because

the

of disjunction of
sense.

the

soul from

the

organs

There

may

be

thick

clouds

and

"d

by

TH^

THREE

PRINCIPLBS.

darkness, not
souPs
universe also
a

only
on

in the

the
face there

visible of the
is
a

heavens,but also
firmament of the
universe

for

body, and
of the
two

there

is

soul.

Man

lives

in simultaneously

distinct

worlds. When that


are man

looks

upon

the

stars

located

in actual

space, he ; for he

lives in the world

of

sense

perceivesthose
when he turns

stars

by
from

the

mentality instru:

of his natural organs


away

but

the world
not stars,

of nature, and
in the actual

beholds

the

heavens,but
heaven of the

in the

presentative re-

soul,he
ception, cona

lives in the world


and

of memory,

imagination,
soul

"

world

as

real to the

(but

often

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

to

the

soul

only)

as

is the

actual

world
K

of nature. there

be, in

star, any thingunof that star is not


man

so perceived,

much
; for

remembered
own

remembers

his

acts

only.

The

of reproduction is the representation


as

the world

in memory

of the
seen

world

the

soul

has the

not it,
as

the

of representation

world the

it exists

independentlyof

soul.

in contemplating the Nevertheless, facts of memory,


as

the
those

soul

perceives,
in the

to pertaining

facts, possible
noted thus obtains

relations which

were

not

sensible
the

and perception,

conception
the

of

realities not

directly given in perception; and

sensible original

this

conception

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

may

be verified

or

exploded by
In

ther fur-

experience.*
the observations,
sees;

spontaneous
hears

soul

and
quent conse-

but, in observations
upon

the foregoneconceptions, and looks.

soul listens

Time

and

Eternity.
in

Motion
When
a

is

translation

space.
ceives per-

star moves,

the observer it
was

that it is where

not,
the it

and

was

where
a

it is not.
star

But

knowledge that
is derived

is where

is,

from present sensible ob*

servation ; while the

knowledge that
competent, not only
also to think
and

"

That

is to say, the soul is

to

remember

and

imagine,but

judge.

"d

by

THE

THEEB

PBINCIPLE8.

star
a

was

where

it was,

is derived

from
is
a

and past sensible observation, Prom


a

fact of memory. of therefore,

junction, con-

observations

in

the the such and

worlds of
notion

sense

and

of memory,
in born; for, is

of time

is

time conjunction, times


are

noticed,
with

noted.
were

If the

Ego

the
not

same
a

the

and perceptions,

persisting
and
served ob-

something
transcends

which

differs from

them, the Ego that


some

the star
not

time

ago

would

be

the
now:
was

same

Ego
and is

that observes observation


the
was

the

star was,

for the

that

not; and

observation
not.
a

that

now same

is,is

and

But it is the

Ego, that, by
in
two

simultaneous

observation

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

distinct the star

spheres,sees
now

the

position
and
members re-

holds

in space,
space

the
once

in position

that it

held.
was,

The

first sensible observation

not therefore,

made

by
the

one

and the second soul,

sensible observation

by
two
were

another

sonl; but

made

by

maining singleEgo, re-

identical to itself thronghont the time which

elapsedbetween

the

observations.
The

facts of memory
:

are

all equally
event
as

present to the soul


occurred
ten

the is

that

years
as

ago

present
that is not
curred oca

in recollection

the event Time

yesterday. soul,but

relation of the facts of memory


is the souPs

to the

of perception and succession

the relation of order

"d

by

THE

THREE

PBINCIPLES.

which
The

those notion

facts bear to each of time derives


and

other.
its element

of succession

discontinuity
; but

from

the

order

of events

it derives

its element the takes

of duration of the
that

from which
For

identity

soul

cognizanqeof

order.

and that only,endures, which, that,

itself

remaining unchanged,
and
of the acts

passes

through alteration
Some

changes.
'are

of the soul have

alreadybeen

accomplished, some
and
some

accomplishednow,
the author itself,

will be

hereafter accomplished

; but

the soul

of those

acts,has its
where
nor

being outside
there
future.

of

time, and

is neither

past, present,

is not Eternity

time

exindefinitely

"d

by

10

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

tended ; it is not the

sum impossible

of.the
events

infinite series
; it is not

of

successive

time at all : for time

and

exclude eternity reciprocally is Eternity succession the absolute time.

each other.

negationof

and

VvrtuaUty,
When
so
or

the organs
that

of

sense

are

lyzed, para-

is seen, heard, Nothing the faculties


of the

felt; when
become

mind that

altogether dormant,so
when

bered, nothing is perceived,rememor imagined conceived, ;

all communication
and

between
cut

the

Ego
the

life

Non-ego is of the Ego

off,
"

then

is

and intermitted,

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.
.

11

the

soul

re-enters

the that

virtual
"

state, lapsing
darkness the the the which

into
is the

original
of of

abyss* abyss
of the

universe;
universe

for the

is nothingother than

sum indistinguishable

tentialitie po-

of all
The

things. existing
its substance

soul is not when

destroyedin
the abstracts
no

it re-enters

abyss;

for such from


occur

re-entrance

its virtuality, and


in the

nothing change can

of inhering simplicity

the
*

soul's essence.f
A

is said CAUSE, without its oorrelative effect, to be in the void state, in the empty, virtual,
"

or

abyssal

state.

When

cause

realizes and
to

ac-

tnalizes the effect it is competent


said to be
or

full; and
or

the effect

produce, it is called the plenum


cause. sense

is

pleroma
without exist
as

fulness

of the

t Essence,in the scholastic


that which
a

of the

word, is

may

particular thing, althoughit be what it is. A another, cannot

"d

by

12

THE

THBEE

PBINCIPLES.

Sometimes
his

man

will dream

that

body

is

gradually but
a

steadily
an

over sliding

bank

or

cliffinto

unknown while thus conscious

and

fathomless

gulf,and,
be

will dreaming, that


are
a

actively
of voluntary

his organs

motion When such

becoming paralyzed.
dream
is and realized, the dreamer effect,

the fatal falltakes into lapses


mere

virtuality,
;

"

that soul
ture, naa

is to say, he vindicate the


clock and
a

dies

but, if the

its

with conjunction wake with


of like

sleeperwill
a

turnspit may

be constrncted

terials; ma-

but

it is essential to

clock

that

it should

re^lar divisions of time: if a clock lose its to be, quoad of keeping time, it ceases capability cating clock,although it may stillbe utilized for communiof rotation. movement an irregular is used in the text,not in the word The essence
mark
the scholastic
sense

but of the terra,

simply as denoting
existence.

pure

from beingas distinguished

"d

by

THE

THBEE

PBINCIFLES.

13

sudden hold

start, and
the

will confirm
from

his

upon

universe

which

he had

been

consciously receding in sleepof


in trance the
a

sleep.
akin
to

It is in

nature

akin

to trance, and

of

nature

that sleep,

soul feels in from

itself its own


and

emergence its own

tiality, poten-

into retrogression
thus

the

an obtaining knowledge of that abyss experimental

void; original
darkness

of utter

which

is the root of

the visible universe.

all Minerals, vegetables, animals, the of nature, manifest objects


to
or

selves them-

the soul

by their

qualities
is
no

properties only; by
which of such

for there

process

the soul may,

pendently inde-

take manifestation,

"d

by

14

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

congnizanceof
The

material of
the

existences.
ness color,hardto

destruction

of resistance (or faculty

the
a

touch),sonnd, taste, and


mass an

odor, of

of matter, is the

destruction, as
itself.

existing mass, of
is not

that matter

Matter
but

exists

as cognizable passive, in its activities (tothe soul)

only :
is
a

the

mere

of faculty

ance resistsoul upon

of feculty

action.

The

retains a hold in recollection


bodies that pass,

by

an

occultation of

their

out qualities,

of the

sphere
thus

of

sensible observation ; and


soul is

the

enabled, by inference from its


of its the
own

knowledge
to

virtual nature,
or

affirm that of
are

substances,

roots

bodies,

of occulted potentiality, The soul imperishable.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PBINCIPLES.

15

has

conscious

knowledge of
takes
no

its own direct


of

virtual

being, but
the
: objects

cognizance of
material

latent it is

being

by inference,
direct knowledge, the
seen, un-

therefore,and
that the

not

by

soul aflSrms

untasted unheard,unfelt,

stance sub-

of material
Material

things.
their virtualiin that
same

thingshave
the world souPs

or potential ties, essence,

abyss
No any has

of

which

is the

ground

being. substance be destroyed. If can it thing appear to be destroyed, either changed its form (as
wood, which
and still exists in

of the

hidden

burned smoke

ashes),or

it has

lapsed

into the virtual state.

"d

by

16

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

Space
ultimate

is

by its nature

divisible to

indivisible, Indestructible, infinity.


atoms,
or are. nevertheless,

Indivisibles, abode, neither


but in the where
:

atoms, have their


nor

in time

in space, of the
are

abyss original
time and

verse, uniscended tran-

space

not actual, they are virtual,

and

have

their inherent

tendencies,
as

which, when
or

manifest, appear

finity afthe
ist, ex-

repulsion ; and, where


of their manifestation actualize themselves
as

conditions

they
ultimate* Visible

the

of material things. particles


matter

visible does not contain ina vase

as virtuality

holds

its

Those

of particles

matter to

are

ultimate,whieh,
and
revert

when

dividedi cease

exist,

into

"irtualit7.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

17

contents:

the and

invisible the

is virtuality
matter

the

vase,

visible

is the

content; and, when


is

the
or

ble visi-

matter

poured
vase

out

spilled,

the void.

invisible

remains, though
the

The

abyss of

universe

is,
It

one therefore, somethingand nothing,

and

real multiple,

and

not

actual.

it is the root because somethingf because and ground of all being ; noihing,

is

it is the
f

negationof

all existence

one,

because

all distinctions

vanish
many,

in the because is
a

abyss of potentiality ;
the
of virtuality the

world

sity divervirtuality involving

and

change; real,because
and
essence

the
; not

abyss

is substance
mere
2*

because acttial,

is potentiality

18

THE

THBEE

PRINCIPLES.

exclusive
or

of all manifeBtation of quality

property.
this beginning,
as

In the in its

universe
and

lay
col-

abyss

if broken

as lapsed;

it reveals itselfto the mind


of abstraction

after the process been No


to applied

has

all cognizable things.

by which the bodies of quality selves themnature now contradistinguish


from itself in the
each

other,manifested
dead

abyss. All properties,

all the activities of nature,were and and inoperative,


were own

sleeping
original
each ence exist-

in the darkness
essence.

of their that

All

by which
its
own

thing now
was

manifests then

in the

virtual state.

All

all activities, were properties,


in

then,not

act, but

only in

the

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES,

19

power

of
as

acting. Whatever
fulness
eye
as

we

now

behold

was

then

held be-

by God's
In

total

void.
was

this immense
be
seen

abyss, there
;
no

nothing to

no darkness,

no no light, fire, creature,no no

change,
unsearch-

springing source, deep


without

but

an

able

existence:
essence,

yet it
root of

is that

ground of
was

and

substance, from- which


universe
**

this visible

drawn.*

"

And

the earth

was

without

form

(Heb. tho-

and void potentiality contingent of existence), and of existence); (Heb. bo-HU, in a potentiality the face of the deep (Heb. tho-iioM, darkness was on Ihe contingent abyss),'*Bercsshith, chap. i. ver. 2. in Hebrew, is h; this The sign of beingand life,

HU,

"

sign doubled givesthe


vowel
in this root

root

rh

; the

insertion of the
to be

existing. this verb is formed the great name From Jehovah, isbecause He He that t he and life or is, Eternal, being From the same in their plenitttde. sign, by a change in the vowel, is obtained ru, virtual existence, mere latentbeing, potentiality.
roh,
"

givesthe

verb

"

"d

by

20

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

The

Birth

of the

Universe.

The
is

world of memory

and

tion imaginasoul; for

objective

to the

the

soul

guishes consciously contradistinmemo^

itselffrom the facts of


ry and and

itselfEgo, calling imagination, facts of


ry memo-

the characterizing

asfacts of memory imagination and as Non-ego. The and imagination that which is reprosoul contemplates duced

and

to itself in memory

and

nation imagi-

; and

is therefore

distinguished
tinction contradisfrom from the the

from

it in the fundamental of

the

knower the
seer

thing known, thing


The
seen.

vague

and

indistinguishable

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

21

mass

of material
is

in
to

man's

memory

(which
no

present

the

soul when

is formed, and positive conception


no

when is
the
a

distinct

image

is called

up)
of
a

of correspondency universe
; for
man

the

abyss

has, after
a

relative and
power. it every

finite manner,
Man
can

tive crea-

day)

call up

he does (for by conception,

from the materials


memory,

slumberingin

his

imaginative productswhich
and of contemplation, objects since transcripts reallyexist, may
or on
a

become which of them

be

made

in stone, on Such

canvas,

printedpage.
in any their way

products do
for the
the

not

depend,

of reality

on existence,

fact of their outward

visibility:
the
reve-

outwardly visible, they are

"d

by

22

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES,

lation of

one

soul to

another
a

sonl ; tion revelaitself

they are inwardlyrealized,


of the
creative

soul

to

only.*

Artisa

rtvekUum
wall is and

from Ufe to Ufe.


a

The

laying
of that

of
a

stone plain

work of

art

The

builder

wall is conscious

and voluntary,

the stones

materials presented oompose the wall are unconscious The builder arranges the stones,with to his hand.
in intention, accordance with their

accidents
a

and
stone

forms,to accomplish a
wall is the embodiment

purpose:
of
as a

therefore
and

purpose
a

plan which
is read in
a

may
but

be read in the wall

sentence

boolc.

The

builder's

thought
embodied obtained

is built into his is life that has


an

wall;
been

thought that is lived,and that has


from that of him

existence

separate

in

lived it originally enshrines itself The buUder's thought permanently wall is therefore a vehicle The the wall. by who of which
the lived
to is,

means

life is communicable tlie beholder

to

that life that is living;

of the walL

The

builder

and

beholder

of the

known wall,although un-

to each

enter other,

into communion their communion

; and

the

wall is the element effect. work The


stone

in which wall

takes

a is,therefore, essentially

of art

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

23

The takes

actual creation of

work

of art

place in

successive appears
as

stages. At
a

the work first,

mere

multuous tu-

before potentiality, striving


the soul

for

actualization, determination,
:

utterance

this is the

stage of
the

inspiration.

AfterwaFds

tiality poten-

is realized in
; the harmonies

active

tion concep-

of the parts and

of the whole fact of their

are

determined

by

the

being distinctly nized recogexists to the soul

; and the work

in

words, forms,or colors.


As

the soul

in gathers,

memory,

the the
preme Su-

materials of

thought which
so meditation,

make
the

objectof world, the


universe.

its

in gathered,

the

abyss of

the

elements When
the

of this visible

original germs

"d

by

24

THE

THBEB

PRINCIPLES.

were

they became the gathered, object of the Divine Intelligence;


thus
AND THE

Supreme
PROM

contradistinguished
THEM IN THE ACT

HIMSELF

OP

INTELLECTUAL

CONCEPTION.

Then

the

worlds in the

existed out

of the

Supreme,
non-

property

or

qualityof

divinity.*

and Virtuality

Form.

"Behold

the

distinction of the virtualities and


assnmed

two

All principles!
*

pomand com-

In the

the Almighty beginning,


host.

of his Rimy

before his
im AOR

He uttered his voice in person. of command, He gave the word


rolled from the

I and

immediately there
darkness

nite infiverse uni-

abyss
of

under

this immeasurable

like an revolving worlds, dilatingitself, avalanche of visible glory,through inexhaustible

spheres.
space

In this act, the their

relations of

time

and

received

being.

"d

by

THE

THBEE

PBIKCIPLE8.

25

tentialities of
of
power,

being,all spontaneitjr
which, when
as

all that

not

manifest,persists
in the

substance

abyss,is in
the the Father.

the First

Principle,

and

belongsto

propertyor quality
laws of

of God All

all energies, plastic and

growth

development,all
in

dualizing indivi-

forms, are
of quality

the

Second

and belongto Principle,


or

the property

God
root

the Eternal Word.

Without

of substance

in the

no abyss of non-existence,

individual
a

thing can
nature,

be ; and
no

without

form, or
ist. ex-

individual of
act

thing can
divine of

By
which

that act
is the

tion, concep-

creation, consists,
individual

and the

in which

this universe

Supreme

thought

"d

by

26

THE

THBEE

PBIKCIPLEB.

things in
came things

their
to be

natores, and
"

thus tent la-

indrvidnals,the

becaose becoming actnal, npon with

clothed

forms

or

organisms.
the

The Eternal

Divine

Intelligence (or
with the Eternal

Father),actirely conceiving Word,


tion operathe verse uni-

in accordance is the
cause

of that continnons forms and moulds and

which

in the whole

in all of its

parts.
The
First is Principle
to

outside

of

Nature, is anterior
The the

and it,

virtual.

Second
framer

is Nature itself, Principle and former

(but not

the

of originator)

all worlds.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

27

Forms,

When

twig of

peach-tree

is

the sap of graftedinto a plum-tree, flows into the ingrafted the plum-tree

twig.
and the

The

air,earth,light, water,

that feed the tree, feed the circumstances

twig also ; peach-

of the

twig become
those it.
never

in all respects similar to


that plum-twigs surround

of the

this peachNevertheless, twig will


bear

plums. The

bark, fibres, always


the the

are leaves,of the peach-twig,

the

of bark,fibres, leaves,
never

peachplum
;

tree, and
and
as

those

of

the

will peach-twig

bear

peaches,
tinued con-

it would

have

done

if it had

to live in its

parent tree.

The

"d

by

28

THE

THREE

PBINCIPLES.

twig
law

remains of
its

always
kind.

faithful to the

From

the

forth the lily-seed springs


from other
to

lily-plant ; and
When the

seed,other
kind.
in proper

plants,according
and soil,

their

is sown lily-seed

begins to

feel the influences


moisture

of the
ences

and air, light,

(influ.
that

concurringwith

the vital force

for inheringin itself,


is dead and
no

from

seed

plantwill grow), it swells


First
a

bursts.

root

is put forth ;

afterwards

the stalk ; then the leaves


;

show

themselves

and

at

last the
its

flower appears

in the

of perfection

beauty:

but

the

root, bark, leaves,


the

flower, seeds, are


of the

root, bark,

of the lily, and flower,seeds, leaves,


never rose or

violet.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

29

The

law

is not

the

and kind,

the

kind

is not the

law,and the force*


nor

is neither the kind


the

the law

for

kind

is

consequent resulting
of

from. the
force First

permanence

law;

and the all

in to virtuality pertains

its

while law, with Principle; to the consequents, pertains actual Nature. or Principle,

cond Se-

and Life, Virtuality

The in the

powder
bore of

that is rammed
a

home

cannon

contains vir-

"

The

is force of gravitation which

the virtual

inhering

tendency
each

other; and
of the and

of matter to approach compels masses the law of gravitation ployment not the deis, virtual force (forsuch deployment is
not

activity,
the

when force,

law),but the manner deployed,uniformlyacts.


3*

in which

"d

by

30

THE

THS("E

PRINCIPLES.

tualities that black

are

not

visible in the

grains ;

but

these

virtnalities
dark the

nevertheless exist
essence

of those
are

in the latently grains. When

conditions

fulfilledwhich

render tnalities virled

their actualization
are

these possible, forth


own or

not

drawn

forth :

they rush,by their


from

taneity, spon-

If the

latencyinto actuality. is broughtnear to the port-fire


present
of render the transformation
cannon

vent, the conditions become


which the
then

powder

in the

possible:
own

immediately, by
energy,

their

hering in-

the dark dark

grainswill

appear
as

no

longeras

red

an flame,

but grains, expansivegas, and Like


a

smoke. blue-gray that watches

wild beast its shaded

in patiently

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

31

covert, but springs upon


soon as

its prey

as

occasion

hidden offers,

vir-

lurks tnality but

motionless for its opportunity,


passes

suddenly from
the
sented. preare

whenever latency into actuality conditions of its actualization

The

but not life, Ego is,

is alive.

gination imaor conception, Every sensation, is an


a

act of life. Life is not

fluid in

ments, sentisensations, float like motes in cognitions,


is
a

which

the

but air,

spontaneous

or

self-

(thoughnot self-provoked) originated when in not activity.Virtualities,


exist neither relations,
to

to

themselves,
lations, Re-

each

nor other,

to the world.

which activities that

are

interpenetrating

reciprocally imply each

"d

by

32

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

the onlyactualities are other, created universe.


are

of the

correlatives

and object Subject the subject is not,

the therefore,
the

unmanifested

Ego,

but

Ego

in

the Ego relations,

in act,

the

Ego

that knows is the

itself to be

Ego

neither

object an
it is
a

absolutely
force recognized

hidden

for force,
in its

and characterized activities,


as

by the Ego

Non-ego. Ego
is
no

When
the

of the the inter-relation

and

Non-ego
either

ceases,

there

longer

or object; since the subject into their two enter simultaneously and no longerexist latent virtualities,

the

one

for the other.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

33

Gonsdovsness,

Consciousness

is the

recognition
"

by the Ego of itselfas subject, that


as is,

virtual relative
to

force, nizable non-cogand

the

senses,

of which gination. ima-

no

can picture

be

drawn

in the

The

existence

of the

and subject

and object, and quoad subject object,


not
as

unrelated

tutes constivirtualities,
tion fact of rela-

that fundamental which

is the essential content

of consciousness. But the relative is correlative with


; and

the Absohite exist


itdoes)

the

relative

not can-

(as the soul perceivesthat

in consciousquoad relative,

34

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

ness, without

the coexistence

in

sciousness con-

of the Absolute
It is
to impossible

also.* the ence exist-

prove

of

either
but
man

the

subject or

the
ject sub-

object ;
and

both recognizes

and objectin consciousness,

The

of hypothesis
account

the self-existence of relative


for the existence

causes causes

cannot

of those
less
can

much themselves, qttoad relative;

it

account

for the existence


such

of their relations : for the


causes a

of inter-dependmce
to

(somethingvery

eign for-

prior condition In other words, no of the existence of the relations. relation can originally depend solelyon the causes which and for the reason, that it subsists; between establish such relation if they those causes never can be not, before the establishment, already in relations*
necessary For if
causes
come

is self-existence)

into relations other


so

by

their

own

act,
currence con-

each influencing

that

they

shall thenceforth

act in concurrence,

this first act of


act

coming

into

is itself an act in relations* The existence of

of

concurrence

; that

is,an

causes

in relations
a

is

involved,
in

in necessarily,

the existence of

cause

that is not Cause.

in that of the Absolute relations;that is,

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

35

afSrms
of the

the

existence

of the is it

one

and

other.
the

Neither

possible

to prove

being

of the

Absolute.

man Nevertheless,

in the recognizes,
presence

act of

the consciousness,
as

of the

the

Absolute

disfinct from
the

Ego,
which

distinct from
the

object with

Ego
be

is in

and distinct relation,

from If
if is,
as a
man

the relation itself.

conscious (that actively


well the

he

as recognize

subject
the
real

the

objectin
the
same

his act of

thought),

and, at

time,doubt

existence of the
to aflSrm

Absolute,let him try


mere

(not in

words, but
is
no

sciously) con-

that there that

God

at all ;

is,let him

try

to

candidlyand
ence non-existfeat
can-

believe consciously

in the The

of the Absolute.

"d

by

36

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

not
to

be

performed;

and

the

attempt
shadow

the performit will dissipate


that darkened

of doubt

the mind.*

lidaiions.

All relations

stand

in the Third

Principle.Every thingthat
the universe of substance
in the

exists in

has its virtuality or root First

Principle;
the cond Se-

its form, nature, and

law, in
its

Principle ;
the

and

in actuality

Third

Principle.

This has been d

and called,

with

singalarimpr"
existence

an priety,

priori argument for'the


no

God.

It is
a

argument
for
a

at all : it is

simpleveriA
premiss k
the Sm

cation of

fact of consciousness.
conclusion not

No

greatenough
preme.
God

that contains

is

known,

proved.

"d

by

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

37

Every part of
its

the universe

is either for

or indirectly dependent directly

actuality upon
other

its relations with

every and

part and with the whole,


is

the

whole

dependent

for its

actuality upon
part. The
consists

its relations with every

universe,as
is the of

actualized,
the
a

in relations; for solely

visible universe divine process


a

product of
and

thought:
to conceive

it is

divine

work

of art;

it hath

the Supreme pleased

this

universe

as

made
are

up

of conceived determined other in tions, relamine deterstill

which relations,
act

by

the
and

conceptionof
which
the

themselves

in act other

conceptionof

relations.

Created

things

appear

therefore,

"d

by

38

THE

THREE

PRINCIPLES.

in

time; as
;
as

antecedents antecedents

and
which

quents conseare an-

themselves

consequents of other
as

and tecedentS;
are

consequents which
of other

themselves

antecedents

consequents; formingone
in which

great chain,
other

the links follow each solution of

without
Bpace,

continuity. In
as re^

created

things appear
are

lations which

themselves

in rela-

unbroken forminga re-entering^ tionS; series of terms


in mutual and
one

cal reciprothing

No inter-dependence. in the universe

exists in isolation;

for isolation is non-existence.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

The

lily-plant

is

in

state

of
one

con-

tinuons nutrition

formation: and
to

its

life is
It the

of

growth.
itself, by

assimilates

unceasingly
of

operation
such ganic inor-

regular

and

special functions,
elements
are

of the

diverse world
as

of

the
to

necessary
to

repair
own

its

own

waste

and It

insure

its

development.
determinate form the

exists
and

through
a

time,
;

under

minate deterfrom its

drawing

particles
into

surrounding

elements

"d

by

40

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

and composition,

renderingback
of particles
to

to

the elements
has

the

which

it

(in respect
its
own

their relations of

to utility

nature) exhausted
but

the

virtue.

Thus
to
nor

the for

lilylives;
nor

neither

from*

itself. natural

The
an

life of man's

body

is

in determinate activity
an

relations,

but

activityof

the
act

Supreme,
of intellectual

who, in the creative

establishes, conception, upholds,


and sustains of the

the

body
The

and

the

tions func-

body.
its
own

soul contradistinguishes that of life

life from
own

the

its body, characterizing

To

exist

from
will.

self is to be

causative; to

exist

to self is to be

conscious;

to exist

for self

is to be

endowed

with

"d

by

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

41

as

fre e, and
own

that of the

to its

of faculty

body as alien and origination,


point of view)
exists in the the preme, Su-

therefore (fromits own


as

necessary.

This

whole

universe

intellectual
and

conception of
has.

that

conceptionis the sole

it actuality

Every

individual

a word thingit contains, is, therefore,

spokenby
*

God

man.* to,

nothingmore of self-originated life and that caverns sequestered


coontries. halls and of Such

There

is

foreignto
free action
are

the than in

sentiment the
some

dark,
stone limetinuous con-

met
are

with

caverns

divided

into

an presenting galleries,

appearance

organicplan; yet, although the incrustations on and of a torch in a weird their walls reflect the light each individual hall and gallery peculiar manner, there is no creahaving its individual characteristics, that of the beholder save turely life in such caves
who
enters

them.

exists, and has its


cave, in the

such cave Nevertheles, every individual actuality, ^tioa^an creative

intellectual and
4"

conceptionof

"d

by

42

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

The

SouVs

Ignorance of
Nature,

the

Body's

The

soul

has
of the

very

inadequate
in which hazardous
or own

knowledge
aflSrm what do under in the of

body
be

it
to

lives ; and it would


the

body

can,

cannot,
nature

the laws

of its

Second

Principle.The process the and, in general, digestion,


of the animal
my econo-

motions regular

(such as
the

the

circulation of the

Supreme. Every divine art; and, since


cavern *

cavern

work is, a therefore,


a

of

art is
a

revelation and

from

life to

life, every
"

has

vague

is

wo''"i written this

by the
reason

ing* meaninorganic Almighty in stone

and

obscurity. For
a

it

is,that

men

tive sensiing enter-

to the influences of

nature, feel darkly, on


of the

cavern,

genius

the presence of the place.

peculiarinforming

"d

by

"THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

43

blood and the take

of pulsations

the

heart),
con-

placewithout
of the

the conscious
soul.

concurrence

The

body continually gives back


the

to particles

surrounding elements,
to

and

assimilates particles continually those replace


it is

from the elements


has that so lost,

its entire material


once

regularlychanged
every
seven

in

about
curs oc-

years ; and

all this

without the process

the souPa

cognizanceof

that thus repeats itself. effect in the


currence con-

All vision takes


of the

and object in subject


the

the
never

organ

of

sight; yet

soul

directly perceivesthe picture


the retina of the
see

on paintedby light

eye.

The

eye
can

cannot

itself. No

inference

be drawn

in conscious-

"d

by

44

THE

WILL

OF

MAN,

ness

from the existence of the

picture
direct

in the eye to the existence of the type in nature


; for the soul has
no

conscious
of the

of cognizance

the existence

picture.
known
to

It is not
means,
moves,
or

how,

or

by

what

what

extent, the soul


or

the

body;
or

whether
a

the
power

soul

has actually the

has not

to move

body ;
the

neither is itknown

in what

the ultimate

empire
consists.

of the
The
ticulations, ar-

soul

over

body

number

of

muscles,tendons,and
concerned in
a

simple
them
in

movement

of the

hand,is very great;


mention
no

and

the

soul cannot
it has

since detail,

innate knowledge

of anatomy.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

45

The

Nattvre

of the

Will,

When

the soul wills

that the word

8ovl shall be

it examines written,

the
fers pre-

circumstances

of the

case,

and

it to (or perceives

be

preferable)
be written.

that the word This is


a

sovl should

which of preferability, perception distinct intellectual act, is the of the


but does volition, after it any The

firstelement

draw not,of itself alone,

motion

of the

body.
presence

soul also

the recognizes
paper, and

of pen, It
moreover

ink,

of the hand.

of the adaptation recognizes


per, pen,

the par
end of

ink,and hand, to the


traced word

making the
and such

aovl to exist ;

recognitionof

complex

"d

by

46

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

means

and

and adaptations, presence,

of their

concurrent

is another

tinct disthe

intellectual
second As

and perception,

element
soon
as

of the

volition.

the

soul be

prefers that
and written,
of the
"

the word

soul should

perceivesthe
material presence

presence

sary neces-

implements,
to wet
over

also the the pen the paper,

of the hand

in the
"

and guide it ink, the hand

by its (not the soul),


without
any

own

motion, and
The

order
on

from the

traces the word soul soul,

the paper.

word

soul is therefore the action energy that of

not through written,

of the the

conscious

causative
a;

but by magi soul,

is, by

the action of causative


to the

known energiesun-

and soul,

whose

sudden

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

47

manifestatic"i8 furnish it with for astonishment.


of to the neglect If,

matter

the paper,

pen,
turn dons, ten-

ink, and hand,


and

the soul letters,

itsattention to the

brain, nerves,
soul wills
never

word no articulations,
The

will

be written. the final

always
the particular
and

and result,

motions

of the

tendons

articulations which

accomplish that
by
nature
no

result ; for the soul has conscious

knowledge of

the existence and lations. articu-

and action of the tendons

When mind

it enters

into the should the


hand

planof
move

the

that the hand


and right,

from

left to

twitches,

by

sudden and

abnormal

action of the

nerves

from right to left, muscles,

"d

by

48

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

the

unexpected movement
without is

is

plished accom-

and foresight

tion, inten-

Will

involuntary. impliesforesightand design.


and actions,
as are

undesigned and
such

Such

only,are

vo*

luntary
intention. The
mind

accomplished with
the view of the

nexiis

between

and

the

consequent motion
known
to

of

the The

body

is not

the

soul.

soul is conscious programme,


the and

of

certain

forming a consciously
does that programme of

that perceives
not

body acts, or
with

act,in accordance
; and

is conscious

nothing
The
luntary vo-

further

in the and

connection.

motions involuntary
alike unaccountable

of
to

the

body

are

the soul.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

49

Error

and

Delusion*

The of

quoad imaginations, imaginations^


a

delirious man,

mark, not
a

an

and weakness, but imperfection

gular sin-

and faculty

power.

The

error

of delirium consists in if for,


a

ignorance only;
could be made

delirious that his


and

man

to know

have imaginations

their

cause

occasion in the spontaneity


own

of his of

the faculties,
at
once

ment elebe

would insanity

eliminated from his mental

condition.

Conversely, if
should become that he is himself

creative of the
creator

poet
iact

unaware

the

of the

imagerypresent to
cease

his mind,he would

to be

poet ; for his inspiration

"d

by

50

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

would
and

be

transformed

into

delirium

insanity.* It is always a defect

of

knowledge,

fact of

a fact of non-perignorance, ception, of crethe faculty and never ating

images, that
source

constitutes The

the of

of delusion. is

occasion

delusion

always essentially, tive. negais therefore

Strong conviction adequateground


; and

no

of absolute

ty certaincommon

it is the lesson of
persons

that experience,

of the least absolute


can

information their

are

the most No
man

in
so

judgments.

be

drags Intoxicating
which

furnish

never

that

positive
a

element

is

hot alwayt poetic inspiration, is

negativeelement,which
which leads to delirium.

and stupefaction, partial

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

61

Bare

of the

correctness

of his

own

view of any
in

as to be justified subject to impose his opinion attempting

upon

another.

All
All

men

are

more

or

less delirious. tions for

honest

persecu*
wars

opinion's sake,all
are

of

which principle for the

not

conducted dividual securingin-

sole purpose
and

of

public liberty, that


of

is, all
thoae
of

wars

principle, except
the work

are selfrdefence,

of maniacs.

The

Nature

of Error,

man

falls into

error

when

he

is

of importantelements non-cognizant

of the

case

on

which

he

passes

ed judg-

by

52

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

ment, and
own

also

of non-cognizant

his

ignorance.
The occasion of
error

is neither

in

thl3

nor imagination

in the

of faculty

judgment,but
which

in the

makinadequat-e the
oase

of ing-upand presentation
on

judgment is passed. is /requenUy unavoidable ; Error is affected vnih /or 80 long as a man
ike

of a thing^ imaginaiion ayetemjOr and is not affeded with a cognitheory, tion that exdudea or renders doubtful
existenceof thai ihing,
or

the presence and


or

the truth of thai system

he

necessarily regards thai

theory thing as
^

or thai sysiem or presentand existing^

theoryas
The which

true.

soul

cannot

perceive that

is not at all present to it ; nei-

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

63

ther

can

it

not arbitrarily

perceive its

that

which

is the

real

objectof

perception.
The determinations of the
and will,

the consequent motions


are

of the

body,
of

dependent on
of the

the

judgments
the

the

understanding ;

and

ements judgoften

are understanding

Man^s actual conduct, grounded in error. often necessarily runs therefore,


counter to the nature

of

things.

and Imagination

Conadouaness.

From

the

and images, traces,

sentations reprewe

present in
construct
we

memory,

of portraits imaginary know


and
6*

sons per-

of ourselves ; for

"d

by

54

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

we

remember

the likeness of ourselves


and the mirrors^
on our own we

that is reflected from


we impressions

produce

minds

by

oar

conduct,and those
we on produce,

or produce,

think

the

minds

of others.
thus

Although

the

tures picand

formed

of ourselves
or

others

are

more unavoidably

l^^s

it is nevertheless distorted, and


to

to

them,

their
names

supposed types, that


are

proper
to

given.

It is not

each

distinct virtual

Ego

that

name specially* distinguishing

is applied
or are

; for there is

no

sound,name,

in quality,

the

abyss. Names
persons
as

givento
to

natural and

existing
self is it

sensation

imagination. The
one's

of portrait imaginative

objective:

and

for that

reason

"d

by

THj;

WILL

OF

MAN.

55

is that the

of majority

men

think of
and them-

themselves

in the third person,

that children selv^

naturally speak of

in the third person ; for,"3vhen first learn to


denotes
say

children
pronoun

"J," the

in their

mouths, not
the

the transcendent before steoiding each


of his child,
manner,
a

Ego, but
the
own

picture

imaginationof
natural person.

In Kke
to be

when

the child grows


use

man,

and

learns to

the

word

consciousness,
he

he says he is is

when se^-conscums

contemplate
also,

of ing the portrait


in his

himself that exists


says,

imagination. He
he

when

the imaginary contemplates


are

that representations him

present

to

of other persons, that these other exist


to

persons

his

conadov^ness.

"d

by

56

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

And
-source

this in

languagehas ignorance ; for the true


error

of

its
act

of consciousness
The

is not known

to him.

of contemplation

the

imaginative
a

of portraits

ourselves and others is world of memory

(in the perception


and

of imagination)
as

ourselves

and

others

objects,and

therefore not

consciousness: is the
not
as
a

for consciousness
of

recognition by the Ego


but object,
as

itself,
that

subject;
of which

as is,

virtual relative

force, non-cognizable
no

to the senses, and


can picture

be drawn

in the

imagine^

tion.*
is pleasure of the imaginaLove,as an affection, tion, or j oy, accompanied by an image representing of that joy. the supposed cause Hatred is a pain of the imagination, or grief,accompanied,
*

"c.
Tlie

self subjective

is

non-existent transcendent,

"d

by

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

57

If consciousness of the

were

the

mere

cognition re-

pictureof objective
us

ourselves that exists to and


not
a

in

tion, imagina-

subjective graspingof Ego


in its

itself by the ilie first young her


to

subjectivity,
home from

ladytaken

would be found boarding-school mand possess, by nature, greater com-

of the art of observation


than either
was ever

in

sciousness con-

obtained,

or naturally through laborious

by application,
in philosopher
t0 the

the most the

painstaking

world.
the senses, and

to non-cognizable imagination,

incapable of being objectively represented. It is, gination therefore (since it cannot be represented in the imaof either joy or sorrow), an neyer as a cause of affection. There is no such thingas either object
love
or

hatred

of the

SsLF-LOYE of the natural

self. subjective is love, not of the subjective but self, which is objectively person, or self, the

in represented

imngination.

"d

by

58

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

Of

Man^B

into the 'First imagining Principle,

The

gates of all the Three


man

ples Princi-

stand open, and

may any,

imagine
of tiiem. he introduces his

into

each, either
one

or

Into whichever
his will

of them the

by

of kindling
one

into imagination, So

that

he goes.

longas

man

has not yet attained

to true

he feels darkly consciousness,

which stitutes convirtuality subjective his substance as a perceiving tinctly Ego, but without being able to disthe

grasp it in in that its subjectivity. Therefore,


or it, recognize

to

of himself objectiverepresentation which is naturally present to him


a

in

he beholds imagination,

trace,g:leam^

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

59

or

reflection of

mysterious halfthere appears


as
a source

revealed energy,
as

which
and

in inhering

self,

of

untold

and ability, capacity, If he kindle

ture fu-

of force.
in this into he

his will

and mystery of self,

imagine
w^hich

the knows

half-hidden
not

energy

in

its

subjectivity
tion attrac-

(althoughhe
of
then will he

feels

darklythe

its transcendent

essence),
himself
he
sees

raise continually what

up, and in his

aspiretowards

a as royal seat of imagination dominion and of farself-centring

reaching power.
the conceit
and

Captivatedin
away

his

he is carried ittiiBiginations, of his


own

by
to

great beauty

glory,and proclaimshimself
as a

himself

potent prince in the

"d

by

60

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

First

Principle.But

his

climbing-up
the
more

is he
be

his necessarily

fall; and

climbs,the greater his fall must


:

for his

self-affirmation unqualified
out

throws which
and

him his

of the

relations in

existence power

inheres; really
he has

what (since

is not
as
lated re-

in himself

but only,

in himself is not

with that which

himself)
own

the stronger he becomes the will,


act ; and

in his

weaker
the
more

he is in his realized

settled he becomes the


more

in his

own

way,

emptiness,
Thus

and humiliation distress, disappointment,

he
he finds

brings upon
himself his road
he

himself.

thwarted

in all his

plans,and
him

barred

against

wherever
man

turns.
sees

The

who

himself

as

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

61

might, and is at the same subsisting of his own time non-cognizant vity, relatibecomes stately and proud,
and
own

infolds deliriously
and self-idolatry,

himself in his blinds himself


own

with

the incense he offers at his

shrine.
He

also becomes

wrongful and
men,

in-

towards other jurious them


as

and underestimates
as

much
he

he

estimates over-

himself; for
in others
no

recognizes they do
not

merit which

and very vehemently show, explicitly while he insanely regardshimself as or as actually capable of achieving,

possessing, every imaginationcan


he

excellence

that his

over, represent. Morethe wrongs he

considers

inflicts on

others

as
6

and light,

easy to

"d

by

62

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

be

borne, while he regards as


all wrongs that
are

lerable into-

inflicted

by others
at
once

on

him.

He
and

is,therefore,

sensitive
no

exacting;
com-

and he allows of

or equality

rannity of
and other

nature
men.

between

himself

He,
whatever

moreover,

seizes arbitrarily conduce


to

may

maintain

of the regardless prideand state, morality of the seizure;for force, his


and surprise are fraud,
not

narrowly Principle,

scanned

by

the soul in this which

but flow like water

dries away

and leaves
Man

no

trace.

becomes

dead

to

truth,right,

and

and justice,

and truth, right,


to

become justice

dead

him, when, self-interest,

throughthe

delusion

of

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

63

he

comes

to aflSrm that
or

might

is the of
thority au-

sole

rule, measure,
; and that

sanction

truth ; that truth is derived

from

is power authority

which

not

and onlyproclaims its

silences

to opposition

but also affirmations,


to

commands the
law

and

compels obedience
Man
sees Principle,

it

promulgates.

rally, natu-

in the First
in

self him-

as an authority ; imagination he will and, if he imagine into self, the to extreme exercise authority

limit

of it

his power,

and he

will will

cise exer-

but arbitrarily:

gain

nothing by

all his eagerness

; for his

accessions of rank,wealth, fame,skill,


or

if any learning,

he

make,
serve

are

soned poitheir

that acquisitions,
to

merely

feed

his

insanity,since

"d

by

64

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

images
the self. And may

go

at

once

into the outward

and imagination, supremacy

there
of the

strengthen objective
much

because, however seize,snatch, or


remains for
; and

man

retain,more
man

always
sire
upon
covets
men

to

seize,
de-

and retain snatch,

because

itself by enlarges
; and because

what

it feeds
a

that which from him


and

man

is withheld who
are

by

other

ready

vindicate
he

their

to willing fore possessions, there"

that

imaginesinto
back and

the

First

is thrown Principle upon

disappointed (since
upon)
ed mill-

his kindled
where

aginations kindlingim-

his desires
to feed

they have nothingelse


eat

and

tear

each

other, as

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

65

stones

which

have

no

corn

between

them

grind each

ingother in their turn-

Thus, however
into the First

great may
he

be man's

he finds, if possessions,

imagine
he is in-

that Principle, in
a a

snared and fast bound close he

strong and

where, prison,

like

scorpion,
into of emulation,
im-

and himself, stings

introduces

his life the

ragingvenom
In that

envy,* covetousness, and


potent wrath.
his dark
life burns.

hellish torment

When

there is whose

present to the mind


is
our

the

image of
of the

person

success

the loss,

form

will that is determined is enyy.

by
is

the

accompanying
success

hatred
to

While

the loss and

appear

be

still undecided appears in in

appears

only. Jealousy its activityas emulation, and envy its activity as malignity.
6*

j envy

jealousy

"d

by

66

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

Of

MarCs

into the imagining Principle.

Second

If

man

kindle

his

imaginations
thus live

in the Second
to

and Principle,
be

it,he will
amiable.

affable, courteous,
is Principle neither
not

and

Life to the Second

life to any hidden


it lifeto relations

essence,

is

in it, the (for,

im-

fastens itself neither on agination on nor essences relations) ; but it is a lifeto the natures,
as

such, of

isting ex-

things.
The
man

that lives to the Second

is practically Principle stronger than the


man

who

lives to the

First, and,in
him ; time
course

the

over prevails long-run, sure


: ally

is his

for the whole

"d

by

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

67

of nature
life of throw
centre

tends

to

thwart

the

fiery
to

the

First

and Principle,
own

it back
; while

into its

abnormal ciple Prin-

lifein the Second

is,on
with visible

the the

ance contrary, in accordconstitution of the


flows

universe,and therefore

and peaceably. quietly, easily,

Life in the First either heroic


and the
one

Principle may
and

be

or
or

mean

criminal,
mere

the

other,as
Life
in

accident

determines.
is Principle

the roic, hein

Second
but

sometimes
ever,
: poetic a

seldom,if

ordinary cases,
correct

it is either
an

life of

or mediocrity,

aimless and

life of utter diffusion in self indulgent


a

of confoundingmultiplicity and

unmas-

tered

thoughts. ill-digested

"d

by

68

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

Life in the with

First
to

is Principle

life
man

reference

self.

The

who
every his

lives it is naturally of regardless

thingthat
interests
even

is
:

no

way

related to

own

he

cannot,in many
truth that is until after he

cases,

apprehend a
to

^ted clearly
is convinced and

him,
the

that

consideration
of

acknowledgment
to his

such

truth

will conduce
The
man

welfare. personal the Second

who

lives to
"

therefore, because he Principle has,


is actuated

by
and

blind is

cravingfor
in its

formation, in-

impelled, by

the

mere

afforded pleasure
to seek for

tion, acquisi-

knowledgewhich has no bearing on his own affairs, a him that lives great advantageover
"

to the First.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

69

Moreover, the action of the


the Second
or

man

in

is often Principle

ish, unself-

disinterested;
the of

for every

proposition present to includingthe


ness or

mind, and

notion

preferablerelating
"

the

whether contrary,

or

not

tends to self, relating


known

within of
tion; mo-

the

limit of man's
"

power animal

execution and

to

produce
mind

the

tains, enternaturally

in the

Second
have

Principle, propositions
no

which self

relation to

Of

Man*s

into the imagining Principle,

Third

If

man

kindle his

in imagination thus

the Third

and Principle,
to

live to
nor

he lives neither it,

substances

"d

by

70

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

to forms

and

to the laws, but solely

or continually shifting

tions flowingrela-

of He is

things. Principle
and incapable
:

that lives to the Third

superficial, empty, naturally


of his fixing attention reckless and
more

he

is,
in
cordance ac-

moreover,

improvident;
acts thinks,
not in

he talks

than

he

accordance

with his with his

and talk,

thinking ; and
and
so

tinually con-

compromises
himself

entsmgles
that his

by

his conduct": action

of liberty

becomes ultimately lost. In

and dissipated altogether this

Principle, lunacy rages.


is
and

Pride, which
inward
source

by its

nature

an

spring,becomes
and Principle,

outward takes
the

in the form

Third of

vanity.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

71

Ambition

has,in

the and

Third

Princi-'
a

pie, no

deep root,

becomes

desire to repress
appearance

the level of the outward of others below outward


the

level of
For such

our

own

appearance. is
an

ends,falsehood
eflScacious

ment instrutruth.

more

than

The
and

energy the
are

of the

First

Principle,
the

of deep speculation therefore


a

cond, Sethe
and

replaced in

Third

by

rage

for detraction

calumny.
The
counts

of reality
as

merit
in

and

demerit Third
victions con-

nothing
in

the

: Principle

it, intellectual
an

are

replacedby
the

ledgment acknowity moral-

of is

and existing facts,

replaced by

recognition
the

of

public opinion as

ultimate

"d

by

72

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

from authority

which

there

is

no

peal. ap-

The

Woman's

Nature.

The

of organization
man :

woman

is finer of

than that of
character is

her observation

more

prompt

than

his,
are

and
more

her

instinctive Woman

conclusions is also

definite.

more

imaginative than
and sentiments
in

man.

Sensations
awaken

that perceptions
man

special
inverse

awaken
; and

sentiments in that occasion

woman

sentiments
man

in special thoughts

occasion inverse
If
woman

thoughtsin
created
as

woman.
a

had

been

mere

intellectual and
man,
men

moral

of repetition

would

live with their wivea

"d

by

THE

WILL

OF

MAN.

73

as

birds live with


an

their mates

so*

cietywould be
"

and agglomeration,
will make

"And

EUMm

We said, (He-the-gods)

Adam

in the shadow cast by Us (the (man-uaiyersal) action of Us. abyss),conformablyto the assimilating
.

did create Adam (He-the-gods) collective unity, man-universal) similitude, (original


. .

And

Ehhim

in he

his

of Ekhim created shadow, in the shadow created he him; male and female (androgynous)
"

them."

This

ch. i. ver. 26, 27. BercBshithy virtual production; was, however, a mere
was

although Adam for,


of

thus created

in the shadow

Elohim, he
sixth

nevertheless
of the

(as is

shown

by

the fifth
not

and

verses

chapter) did following


framed Adam

actually exist.
"

And the

Jehovah Elohim

ing by sublimat-

of the homogeneal ground, and principle of him the inspirainto the inspiring faculty tion inspired became of lives; and Adam a soul of life." Ber,^
"

ch. ii.ver.
"

7.

And

Jehovah Elahim

commanded
the

Adam, saying,

From

the whole

growth of

organicenclosure thou

eat : but,from the growingmight of the mayest freely knowledge of good and evil,thou shalt not eat; for, in the day of thy feeding dying thou upon any of it, to another state). shalt die (thou shalt transmute And Jehovah Ehhim said.It is not good that Adam

should subsist in his limelinees: I will make

to him

"d

by

74

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

not

an

whole organic would


be
a

; and every

ration gene-

mere

reproduction
emanated

im

auxiliary might (a propping mate)


in his
'^

fhnn

and himself, oh. ii.ver.


a
on

own

luminous

reflection.*' ^-Baf*., caused


ix" Ml

18.

And

Jehovah

Eloktm

trance (an mysterious

alienation from

his true

self)

(colleotiTe man), who slumbered; and (Jehovah "3ohim) broke tiie unity of his {Adavfe) of them, and and took one reflections, objective
clothed its weakness
with (itsinferiority)

Adam

fonn

tad

structed reconbeauty; and he {Jikovah JSlohim) corporeal the objective reflection that was broken off from AdoMj and shaped liha (inteUectual woman, and broughther to Admn man's facultyof volition), said. This is acttiaHy (man universal). And Adam

of my substance,and fbrm cf my form of voStton), 1 ftud he called ber Ma (principle


substance out of M

man) her self-hood had (intellectual taken."" 5er.,ch. ii. ver. 22, 28. '* ardor, cupidity) appetency,Now, Ndhath (internal
was
a

in principle prevailing

the whole

lUb of d"tare
it said

which hoih

Jehovah

JSbhim Ma

had

made.

And

{Nk-

said) unto

(man's
say, Te

of tolitioti), fisMSulty shall not


eat

Wherefore
whole

did fhhim the

of the

growth of

endoeure? orga^c

It is in aot

dying that

to die; for surelycause yourselves jg"fttm knoweth, that,intheday ye eat of it (of that growth),your eyes shall be opened, and ye diall

ye will

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

75

of

the

that preceded it. generation

It is the mutual

of misunderstanding
and that evil." the

become

as

Etohkn^knowiog good
**

"

Ch.

iii. Ter.

4, 6.
was

And

Itha observed

natural

growth
tense

good,both according to
to the

the desire of the

and

eyes, and

rate for

the generalizing of and fed it,

pleasingin the highest intelligence ; and she took


; and

off
gave

some

thereon

also of it to her

intellectual

designedly (to her principle


**And

she

Ith\ and
the

he did feed thereon.*'"

Gh. iii. ver. 6.

both were opened,and they knew eyes of them that naked (bare, unveiled in their dark origin) they were; and

they assumed
made
to

to themselves

dense

cover-

ings, and
ver.

themselves

masks."

i"Ch.

iii.

7.

^And
covetous thou

Jehovah

EhUm

said thou

to

Nahath hast done


animal

(to that
be this,

Because passion).
the throughout

kind,and throughout the whole life of nature ! According to shalt thou proceed crawlingly(sidethine obliquity ling,
accursed and covertly,grovellingly),

whole

earth-exhalations feed

(the results
upon
all the will I

of low-lived

baseness) shalt thou


And and
a

days of thy life.


thee her

natural
and

thy antipabetween

put between

Ma,

tby productsand
duets

products; and her products and thy proshall repress thy venomous priBciple,
shall restrain in her
unto

the

tendencies

to

evil.

And

Itha (man*s

I be said, facultyof vylition)

"d

by

76

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

the

man

and

the

woman,

their natural

and misconstruicmisapprehension
and also multiplythy woful natural hinderances, thine mtellectnal so that with panging conceptions, labor shalt thou bring forth products; and toward thine Jsh (thine intellectual principle) thy desire shall will and incline,

he

shall rule

over

thee."

"

Ch. iii.ver.

14,15, 16.
for name to his (ironically) designated Eee (eleintellectual mate (his faculty of yolitlon), mentary of the mother she was because existence),
"

And

Adam

all existence." in [If,

"

Ch. iii.ver.
verb
a

20.

the absolute vowel into

HOH,

to he

we existing,

change
initial H

the

consonant, and harden


of keth for

the

by

the substitution

^e,we

obtain

riVH (Eve),which
The

existenceJ] elementary signifies

hieroglyphic style, not a double,but a multiple, and contains, meaning: it is possible that the absolute key to its inner sense lost. The is definitively rendering of the passages Fabre d*01ivett here quoted is mainly derived from Jacob Behmen, and John Pordage; and its accuracy is,without doubt, open to serious question. These
extracts
are

Bensshith is written in the

illustration

of not so^much by way given, therefore, of the text, as in the hope that some be induced
to furnish
a

competent scholar ntay


commentary,

correct ligible intel-

translation of the Hebrew


which

cosmogony,
is much

with

an

needed.

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

77

tioQ of ea^b other's aims and

motives; ahd the essential divergency of their


which characters, of

(aided by
abstraction

the

culty fa-

reproductivememory,
and

and
flection) re-

by

the

of faculty

constitute the

ground

of the

and revolutionary, tossing,

ive progress-

motion

of human

society.

Of Liberty,
Mechanical influence is
a

sion transmisacts upon

of material
the

and motion,
upon the

body, not
a

soul.

Its
terial ma-

effect is

of simpledisplacement

particles.Motive
the

influencing
ceived perso

will is outward

influence

by
transformed

the

living soul,and
the
T

by

soul living

that it

78

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

becomes

no

longer a

mere

outward of
ma tive mo-

a mere influence,

transmission
an

terial

motion, but
for action.

inward

Motive, therefore
the
wardly innot

from {quoad motive, as distinguished Uie action of outward material


nature
on

body), is livinglyand
created

by
the

the

soul,and

and,in arbitrarily,
on

itstotality, imposed actual universe.

the soul

by
act

Motive

the influencing
an

will is itself

always

of

and therefore life, well


as

as always of subjective,

of

objective, origin.
Animals
and (which feel,
to the Third
men

feel that

live they feel)

Principle. (who feel,


think
to all the

The and

of great majority

think

that

and they feel,

live darklythat they think)

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

79

Three

The Principles.
his

man

who

once

thinks distinctly finds himself in his also the To the

own

thought
finds

and thought,

Supreme.
man own

who

has

self thought him-

in his

neither

there is subjectivity, insanitynor unconquerable


is neither is neither
man nor man wonor

habit ; there
; there

barbarism

civilization.
The in its

graspingof
and

the

Ego by
the
once

itself
"

occurs subjectivity

rarely,
same
or

in

ordinarycases,
not
more

to

vidual, inditwice

than and

in

lifetime,
"

marks

epochs in
and the
phets pro-

personal history.
are

Saints

exceptions to
is

rule.

When

the soul grasps itself in its viras

it tuality,

of though the light

"d

by

80

THE

WILL

OP

MAX.

fire should
and flame,

extinguishitself
the flame should

in the

extinguish
the
sence, es-

itself in

the

glowing coal,and
in feel, its

glowing
act of

coal should

its own

burning quality. The


He
that

consciousness subjective

is instantaneo

experiencesit
and

is

fundamentally changed;

the
be

experience can,
either

never therefore,

misapprehendedor forgotten.
and

Piety

pity

are

subjectively
for its itself on is
a

but piety has God identical;

while pity expends object, God's


creatures.

Pity, which
one

transcendent
unknown
man,

sentiment,and
to

terly ut-

the

mere

natural

marks

and

seals, by its birth and


the is

the awakening of action,

ive subjectoriginal,

consciousness.

Pity

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

81

spontaneous, self-determined
and mercy
:

ness tenderone

it holds truth in
the

in and justice hsaid,

and is, other,

by

its essential

of nature, incapable of either

beingexerted
truth for
or

at the expense

Pity is not charity justice. ; is is alms-giving : neither charity


a

it love ; for love is


or

blind

instinctive,

else

passionate, impulse: neither


all these

is it

and commiseration, compassion,

fellow-feeling ; for
the

belongto tive producpatible, com-

are self, objective

alike

of evil and of
not

good,and

are

but onlywith fanaticism,

also with those

relentless
are

crueltytowards pale of
who stinctive inare

who

outside the
Men

sympathy.

seek honor one conscious, objectively who are subjectively of anpther: men

"d

by

82

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

seek primarily that honor conscious, which


comes

from God
appearances

only. Regard
finds its law
of man, and
so*

for outward in the

nature objective

its sanction in

the

approval of
abdication
of
a

ciety: regard for reputableappearances


is therefore
an

of

the soul in the presence power


that

tuted consti-

is alien to its own

worldliness urges Religious liberty. the semblance of pietyas an excuse and of pity, for the absence thropic philanworldliness urges
an excuse

the

blance sem-

of
absence

pity as

for the

of real

piety. Pietyand pity


the absence of the absence of the in its
is

and implyeach other, the


one

involves

other.

is alone Pity (or piety)

that by nothing kind, is explicable

"d

by

THE

WILL

OP

MAN.

83

I other
own

than

and itself, such


as

is inconceivable,

[ except to
essence

have

grasped

their

in its
come

and subjectivity, both themselves

have

thus

to know

and

the

Almighty.

THE

END.

"d

by

Centres d'intérêt liés