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17

Circuit
Columns Intel Exclusives

The Magazine for Security Professionals

Minding the Media

Dangerous, demanding and no backup. Sound like fun?

s n io s s e r p m I First g in n r a e L e c Distan n io t c e t o r P Close le d in K & d a iP r o f d a lo n w Do

Explosive

The Circuit has evolved into an information grenade. Check out the re-design

EditOriAl
Hello All Welcome to issue 17 of the Circuit. It has been another incredibly busy period for all within the security industry, especially those of us who are UK based. The 30th Olympic Games were certainly a tremendous spectacle and an unquantifiable success but they also represented the largest security operation undertaken within the United Kingdom since the Second World War. On a personal note I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to be a part of what many consider to be the greatest games to date, it was a fantastic experience and it was good to bump into so many other operators working hard with their principals over the summer. There was a lot of bad press and concern surrounding security in the run up to the games with the well documented, last-minute manning crisis but I can honestly say that I saw nothing but professionalism from all that I worked with and those which I observed working at the games. It was pleasing to see the events pass without any real problems and incredibly warming to feel the sense of national pride running so strong throughout the country as a whole. I must also mention the incredible dedication shown by our Armed Forces who, despite being stretched to breaking, once again stepped up to the plate to provide top class cover. You made us all proud and your efforts were most appreciated. Now, Id like to mention some exciting news surrounding the continued growth and popularity of the Circuit Magazine. Firstly, I am delighted to announce that we will

Editorial

soon be available for all to download and read not only through Apples iTunes store but also on the Kindle and via the Samsung App World. Secondly, we will soon be launching a new revamped website for the magazine and as anyone who visited our old site will know, whilst being functional it wasnt too easy on the eye! Weve really tried to address that with the new site as we try to create an interactive experience between the magazine and our online presence. As always, wed love to get your feedback: www. circuit-magazine.com Finally, an introduction and farewell. Were delighted to welcome Pete Falkous on to the team as our Lead Magazine Designer. Hes going to help us push the magazine forward and were sure youre going to love his work. Sadly, this also means its time to say goodbye to Kal Wilkins. Kal has been a stalwart member of the team, here since its inception and has now moved on to pastures new and we wish him all the very best and thank him for his efforts and contribution in getting the magazine to where it is today. Enjoy the new look magazine and have a great year end. Next time youre reading this column the US Presidential Elections on November 6th will have been and gone and the world could be looking a little different, whatever happens Im sure there will be lots to talk about and much to concern us within the world of security. Until then, stay safe. Shaun West Editor

Gun! Gun! Knife! Gun! While I dont recommend you shouting that mantra while boarding a plane, I do sometimes feel the need to start off a discussion that way in order to get some members of our communitys attention. You know who Im talking about; the ones what feel if its not involving firearms or Krav Maga skills, then it somehow cant relate to Close Protection work. Heres a news flash, we are all on the same page that the Hard Skills, (Cover and Evacuation, CQC, weapon system familiarization, etc.) are vital to Protection work, but the soft skills can be equally as important, and depending on what environment you are operating in, sometimes even more so. So it is for that reason, that with every edition of The Circuit, we try and make sure we touch on as many faucets of the industry as the page count will allow. Additionally, we also look for engaging stories, tips and best practices from those on the outside looking in. Be it a travel agent whos intimately familiar with booking clients with Close Protection teams (and the unique challenges they present), or the civilian member of an Advance Team thats involved with US politics and elections. Guns & Ammo play a part,

but so do financial planning, medical skills, and resume writing. As Protectors, we should strive to have as many tools in the toolbox as possible, and I strongly believe that this Magazine tries to assist with that process. The best practices, news and analysis, and book & product reviews could all be the contents of individual magazines, but the editorial staff at The Circuit work in-between our day jobs, to piece the relevant and the newsworthy together in a patchwork that would do Dr. Frankenstein proud. Just from my informal polls, I know that everyone has their favorite sections, and if you are like me when reading a magazine, I often skip right to my primary interest. However, after you digest all of your favs, take a few minutes and read through several of the articles that might not crack your top 10 list. Who knows, you might be pleasantly surprised that there could be some useful information that doesnt require shooting or punching. Elijah Shaw International Editor (US Edition)

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COntents IssUe17
18Political Advances 22Close Protection In Russia

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03Editorial 06Course Review 10The Academic Edge 12Trauma Training
Quite a lot can happen in two weeks. But when I signed up at European Security Academy I was surely not prepared to witness how much those two weeks of initial CP training will indeed teach me.

Security professionals who are aware of the importance of having a wide knowledge of their field can gain a significant insight into the relatively unknown training doctrines of a modern close protection industry serving a country as vast as Russia.

25Working Girl 26World Wide Web & Surveillance 30Keeping Your Edge 34Catfish Network 38Women in Maritime

14Minding The Media

Behind many of the news teams you see reporting from high risk environments can be found a Safety Advisor, anonymous, unseen and unacknowledged, just as they prefer it.

42Intel 57The IFAK Review 48Managing an Airway 58Events 59Comms to HQ 60Classifieds

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Course Review

Close Protection Operative

Close Protection Operative: the European Security Academy course.


By Jerome Saiz
As an information security professional I had no previous CP experience when I first encountered ESA during Qatars Milipol exhibition. Nevertheless, a few month and some Internet digging later (mainly to check the companys reputation) I was headed toward Poznan, Poland. I had signed up for a two day small arms crash course followed by one week of basic CP and another week long Team Leader (advanced) course. If first impressions are a good guide then ESA got it right. I was picked up at the airport by two uniformed instructors in a black Hummer and taken via a 45 minutes drive to the Academy campus. The place is postcard-worthy : a large, very green cottage housing several quite comfortable wooden bungalows and support buildings, all located in a quiet rural area of Poland. There is an obvious advantage to the location beyond the looks : the entire course takes place behind the massive

Quite a lot can happen in two weeks but when I signed up at European Security Academy I was not prepared for how much those two weeks of initial CP training would teach me.
wooden gates of the campus. Students eat, sleep and work together 24/7. This is how the instructors start building a team out of a bunch of new trainees still wearing blue jeans and flip flops. Soon Ill discover that this is one of ESAs core values: CP IS ALL TEAM WORK. Its your team, your shared responsibility, and the job has to be done wether or not someone made a mistake or under-performed. Trainees are constantly reminded this in many subtle, and at times less than subtle ways and believe me, it works. First off, trainees are issued their uniform. Wearing the Academy uniform is mandatory and thats when the team starts looking as one. Speaking of the team, most of the trainees were either military personnel (both active and freshly out) or private security individuals working the door at clubs or doing static security at public events, along with the occasional PMC operator. All were looking to better their professional careers and they were all highly motivated.

As I was about to find out, the training itself is very practical, intensive and demanding. At times its close to 12 hours of instruction a day, and never less than ten (not counting the occasional team project to be worked on in the evenings and presented the following morning). If it feels like its non-stop then thats because it is. The instructors spare themselves no effort in sharing the full extend of their expertise and they expect no less from the trainees. It can be daunting at times, but fortunately I found the instructors to be very accessible and very involved in their trainees progression. This may be due to the fact that ESA is a family owned and operated business and the instructors are few, but I sure hope they will maintain this trait even as they grow in size, which they are sure to do. ESAs training method involves a quick classroom lecture about the subject at hand followed by hours of solid practice, then back to the classroom for some debriefing. Rinse and repeat for the next two weeks. The practical part of the training relies at first on drills to build muscle memory. Lots of drills. This is very effective, especially with small arms training. On my very first day of the small arms crash course, the solid eight hours spent on the field doing dry and live ammo drills with the Glock

proved invaluable later on. Once the drills have sunk in its time for real-life scenarios, such as attacks against a principal (using both paintball and Simunition FX for small arms, MP5 and M4). There are quite a few of these culminating with the mother of all scenarios; a 48hr real-to-life CP mission in town, complete with suits, cars, radios, mobile phones, GPS, an armed threat and a very difficult to work with VIP, played by an instructor. Were not done yet though. Starting from the ground up we learn the different configurations and foot work to conduct VIP+1 up to VIP+5 drills, and practice them in many different situations. Usually a team will practice while the rest of the trainees either watch or play obstacles, some of them are instructed to act as aggressors or to deliberately disturb the active team. Foot work, Embus / Debus, building entry and exit procedures, VIP evacuation and use of force. Those are the tools of the trade and well have honed them well by the end of the training. The campus is a real asset here: large enough and with plenty of buildings and ambush points to allow for interesting scenarios. Although the focus is clearly on practical hands-on training, theory is still very much part of the show (hence the very long hours!). The course encompasses everything from the

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CP specific shooting shooting, timed shooting with visual and sound distractions and shooting from a moving vehicle. My favorite though, was a live ammo VIP+5 evac with embus exercise. Getting six people to safely perform a flawless embus while running and shooting with live rounds truly showed how hard we had all worked and how much we had grown as a team Each course is certified thorough examination including classroom exams and practical tests with a minimum performance required on each test. Students who failed up to two tests can usually re-take them on the spot (thats what actually happened to me with the submachine gun

Close Protection Operative


evaluation), while more than two failed evaluations may earn the trainee the chance to come back to the Academy free of charge to try it all over again. Just once, though. As for me, Im pleased to say that I passed but they were two really intense, demanding and eye-opening weeks. I would definitely recommend this two week package to anybody willing to get his foot in the door of the CP industry. Since then Ive seen some of my fellow teammates enter the circuit. Im not sure I will for the moment, as my motivation was to complement my information security expertise with physical security practice but nevertheless, this is not the last that the ESA will see of me.

structure of a typical or not so typical CP operation (Advance Team, Counter Assault Team, residence and office security teams etc) to the need for countersurveillance, understanding kidnapers motivations and strategies and real-life case studies. Theory picks up during the advanced Team Leader course and here the curriculum goes into much more detail regarding advance team work, route reconnaissance, report writing, setting up a Command & Control room, working with security drivers and local drivers, firearms sourcing, traveling by plane, working in restaurants and other public venues, etc etc This last course truly ties it all together and is, in my opinion, not optional even though technically one could just book the CP Basic course alone. Then theres a day of paramedical response training. Of course its not be enough to qualify an operator as a paramedic but its still good enough to learn the basics such as: what does that stuff in the medical kit do? Familiarization of likely injuries potentially encountered - hemorrhages, choking,

bullet wounds and so on. As with the other courses, medical is also very practical with props used to simulate different conditions. While it will obviously not make us all paramedics, just learning how to quickly assess a condition, how and when to use a tourniquet and when to apply QuikClot is beneficial. For everything else, there are good specialized paramedical response courses out there ! Finally, the firearms package. The Academy is equipped with an indoor shooting range complete with strobe lights, timers, sound effects and mannequins. They also own an outdoor shooting range just outside the perimeter (it is surrounded by a fairly testing obstacle course which trainees will get to know and love during those early morning team-building runs). The armory is well stocked with various small arms as well as submachine guns and various assault rifles. All are taught over the two weeks course except the assault rifles. Beside regular target practice, more specific drills including

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The Academic Edge

The Academic Edge


The world of Protective Security never stands still; change has been the only constant over the years and like every other sector and every business, it is affected by client needs and the operational environment.

Social, technological, economic and political influences, as well as those from legal, regulatory and economic dynamics, all play a part in the ongoing development of our roles. And to match all that change to be able to operate confidently, capably and with authority, we need to ensure that we are comfortable in our knowledge of its effect, impact and how we, as specialists, fit into the wider world that we are protecting and supporting. In terms of recruitment, the equations are simple: operational capability = good operator. Operational capability + wider understanding = good operator with an edge. The companies and organisations that you want to work for are looking for more than the physical skills and role specific knowledge of drills and planning that you should have and be well-practised in. And if you want to climb the ladder and aim higher, then you need to understand management. More specifically, you should be considering the type of management that fits our business sector and its activities. We have been helping security operators to become managers for 6 years at Buckinghamshire New University, bringing out the best from our students from many companies and backgrounds and helping them on the road to career progression. Our Foundation Degree (FD) in Protective Security Management is designed to give students the knowledge to develop and deliver effective and capable management for their teams, their clients and ultimately their principals. The course, which is by distance learning, takes two years to complete and is current in terms of content and approach. Our academic team understands your worries, commitments, pressures and needs as we are all experienced in the security industry as well as academically qualified; the course leader and co-tutor are both operational in the protective security sector. As the only University that is also an SIA awarding body we also understand and are influential in the direction of Protective Security education and qualification development.

In 2012, the whole course was relaunched with a comprehensive content update and with modules designed to meet the needs of todays professionals. So, we have Maritime Security as a new element for this programme, alongside redeveloped elements covering legislation and regulation, planning and protection. Overall, the FD provides you with the opportunity to study widely, develop your knowledge, grow your management capabilities and to root all of this in the real world in which you are required to operate and earn your living. Learning with a University for the first time can be intimidating, and people often think long and hard about approaching us to join the degree programme. Thats understandable, but there is no need to worry about not being able to make the grade without talking to us first. We have had many successful students who started with few qualifications from school and have graduated without major difficulty. The main reason for this is because at Bucks we understand the pressures of your job, the problems of balancing work, home life and study, and the fact that if you are new to this type of study it can all seem to be a little strange. If you join us, you are joining a supportive environment where we do everything that we can to help you along. Our students are everywhere, at the time of writing we have students on every continent, and most are working operationally right now. Some are at sea on maritime security tasks. What they all have in common is that they are working through the course, getting the support that they need by internet, telephone, social media and SMS if necessary, and using our extensive virtual learning system to access materials and information. Students can work from desktops, laptops, iPads, smartphones and even good old-fashioned printed texts and resources all of these can be used effectively. If students dont have internet capability, there is also the capability to provide CD/DVD copies of course materials. You can study when and where you get the opportunity; on the train, at the airport and during down time so flexibility is the key to suiting your learning needs.

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Trauma Training for Security Employers


symptoms than your doctor. The NHS guidelines do not recommend medication for post-traumatic symptoms, but many GPs still offer antidepressants to new trauma cases. So you should insist on a referral. There is a strong chance that with appropriate treatment you will experience a good recovery. Managers should develop a company culture that is responsible not macho. Operational machinery is maintained regularly and repaired when necessary, so it is rational to adopt the same approach with your people, at the very least. Piers Bishop advises that if you manage people who may experience trauma, to keep an eye on their behaviour. If someone is involved in an incident and seems to have changed, it may be a sign that they need help. Let them know that you are aware of what they have been through, that the company policy is to be open about stress reactions and to get help if necessary so that everyone can continue to work well together. If the employee does not seem to be returning to their normal attitudes, demeanour and behaviour after a few weeks, it is as well to open a dialogue about how they would like to be helped to recover. It is helpful to develop a relationship with an organisation like PTSD Resolution that has experience of posttraumatic reactions and can deliver brief interventions that return people to work. The cost of a typical course of treatment should be very much less than the expense of supporting an unwell employee down the line - or worse still coping with the collateral damage if someone does something unfortunate while traumatised in your employment. PTSD Resolution Network The PTSD Resolution national outreach programme has more than 200 therapists. Treatment is on an outpatient basis, to support family and work routines. It is free for UK veterans, confidential and local, conducted on a one-to-one basis, with no waiting lists - and no referral is needed. Therapy is brief and effective. Generally within three to five one-hour sessions treatment is ended by mutual agreement. It is unusual for further support to be needed. Patients are not required to talk about the events that may have caused the traumatic memory. The programme policy is that re-exposure is better done in the clients visual imagination and while in a relaxed state, protecting confidentiality and reducing distress. The PTSD Resolution network was launched in February 2010. This followed a three-year pilot programme, which included a project with the Falklands Veterans Foundation that helped ex-services personnel recover successfully after experiencing the symptoms of PTSD for 25 years in some cases. Overall the programme has had a better than 80 per cent success rate in resolving the condition for the UK veterans of the armed services treated. This is similar to the recovery rate in a recent study of 599 stress-related cases from the general population who were treated using the same therapeutic method: over 70 per cent reached a significant and sustained improvement after an average of 3.6 treatment sessions, according to the study. Treatment is complementary to the work of other armed forces charities, because it can resolve the immediate mental health issues that may be a barrier to qualifying for further help and assistance. PTSD Resolution (charity No. 1133188) is organising a one-day course for managers in Trauma Awareness Training for Employers November 29th 2012, London (199 plus VAT) visit www.ptsdresolution.org/tate

Trauma Training for Security Employers


By Patrick Rea, campaign director at PTSD Resolution (Charity No. 1133188) which organises a one-day course for managers: Trauma Awareness Training for Employers visit www.ptsdresolution.org/tate
Do any of your staff suffer from trauma? If they do, could you spot the symptoms of post-traumatic stress and would you know what to do about it? PTSD is the hidden illness in the security sector, for staff who experience trauma in their jobs, or have done so in previous employment, perhaps if they have been in the armed forces. PTSD is usually only discussed in the security sector when an accident occurs. Perhaps the reason for this is that few line mangers know how to recognise the symptoms of trauma or what to do about it. It is to meet this need that the charity PTSD Resolution has introduced Trauma Awareness Training for Employers (TATE). The implications of staff trauma - for employer and employee - can be costly in human and financial terms. The symptoms can include depression and behavioural problems at work. Left untreated, the condition may result in accidents, possibly extended sick-leave and dismissal. It can also produce a major legal liability for the employer, as the issue often lies within the organisations duty of care PTSD Resolution was founded to provide free trauma treatment to UK armed forces veterans. The charitys therapists have increasingly noted the need to help employers of veterans too and indeed of all organisations where staff may be exposed to trauma during their work. As a result, PTSD Resolution has set up a one-day seminar to help company owners, line managers and HR staff to recognise and then deal with the issue of trauma, however caused, by sign-posting an effective route to treatment.. Trauma Tips If as an employer you have staff who have been exposed to violent scenes, or maybe are going to come across them in their current employment, they need to be educated in these facts through proper training, according to Piers Bishop, the director of therapy at PTSD Resolution: It is possible that as an employee now, or in the past, you were affected adversely by the things you saw and did. This is normal, and will have faded in many cases. If it does not do so in a month or so, or if it is getting worse, it is a good idea to get some help. If you experience the effects of trauma, you are not going mad and this is not a sign of weakness. It is a normal reaction to events and can happen to anyone, even robust and apparently stable people. Everyone has a threshold beyond which they can be traumatised. Its ok to talk about it, but it wont necessarily help. Treatment is what you need. The sooner you get on with it, the sooner youll be able to get back to normal life. If you broke your leg, youd get it fixed professionally it is not so different with mental health. Your GP probably wont be a trauma specialist. In fact you may know a great deal more about post-traumatic

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Minding The Media

By Chris Cobb-Smith

These individuals are more than bodyguards: highly trained and experienced, skilled in field medicine, communications and logistics they also have a sound tactical awareness. It is always demanding, often dangerous and there is seldom any backup. I was tucking in to a mammoth breakfast when I was rudely interrupted by the noise of an incoming 107 mm rocket slamming into the hotel reception. As my fellow diners fled the room to the underground shelter I eyed my plate. Experience told me that the residential security team would very soon be ushering us to safety and away from the story possibly locking us in for hours. Hunger and danger are not great companions and the porridge won I gulped it down and ignored frantic shouts to join the fleeing morass being herded to the underground safe room. Instead I dodged and weaved my way back to our corridor and hammered on the cameramans door. We had had some very long days and hed clearly slept through the entire event and probably wasnt ready

wake. Too bad. After 10 years with the media I knew that the rocket attack was an exclusive and the priority was the footage and not our personal safety or sleep. Stewart appeared, bleary and tousled at the door, wearing his boxers and body armour and already cradling his camera. Quickly aware of the situation he followed me as we ran towards the scene, swerving past the security guards, ignoring their flailing arms and screams. When everyone else is moving out of danger the media move in. In our case, it allowed us to get that vital footage of the still smouldering remains of the reception and the arrival of the first security forces. That rocket may well have been the first in a salvo; it may have been followed up by a ground attack suffered by the same hotel just a year earlier. Instinctively Stewart and the rest of the crew knew what to do, and their priority was to capture the moment for the rest of the world to see. To many old school reporters, such a situation of imminent danger is part of the job a role carried out

Behind many of the news teams you see reporting from high risk environments can be found a Safety Advisor, anonymous, unseen and unacknowledged, just as they prefer it.

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in a pioneering spirit, a role jealously guarded within a tight knit industry. So taking on safety advisors is a contentious issue for some. But employing such experts is a policy that an increasing number of news networks are now following. With their operational experience Safety Advisors can help organise the strategy behind news gathering which ultimately helps news to be gathered and broadcasted quicker, and safer. With more news networks being established all the time, competition is fierce and they will employ anything that gives them an edge. 24-hour news and satellite channels are reaching an increasingly wider audience and potentially wield a massive influence. So journalists can find themselves manipulated, often restricted, sometimes detained, and even directly targeted. Technology has also enabled the citizen journalist to capture broadcast quality imagery and young eager freelancers occasionally steal a march on the mainstream broadcasters. The result of all this is that networks are now taking their responsibility to a duty of care very seriously and a safety advisor is now a vital addition to most crews deploying to High Risk areas. Good safety advisors are much in demand when a story breaks in a high risk environment but there are few opportunities for a full career in the industry. Most consultants are freelance and rely on their reputation for employment. It is definitely a case of both what you know and who you know in order to keep in business. There are no short cuts. Being a media safety advisor requires very specific and specialised skills and thats aside from getting to understand the quirkiness of newsgathering. Such skills come from past experience and training. Actively monitoring the local as well as the national security situation in any trouble spot is key. Being able to converse, liaise, beguile and befriend the multitude of culturally diverse peoples encountered are essential qualities that are honed through years

of experience in a wide variety of countries. Excellent navigational skills, being able to provide first response medical support, managing back up and emergency communications, organising and keeping track and account for a multitude of equipment this is just the start of the list. Vitally, a Safety Advisor will be expected to know about weapons, tactics and even strategy. They will have to have a black book of contacts bulging with names of security companies, NGOs and Foreign Office officials even the odd Defence Attach or Ambassador. Personality, too, comes into it. No good having someone on board for what could be long periods if they are difficult in any way. A Safety Advisor has to be a consummate diplomat able to work with a small team in stressful situations and to keep a cool head when everything is going wrong and others are starting to panic. And finally a little bit of old fashioned courage is required; a media safety advisors role is not for the faint hearted. Journalists regularly exposure themselves to real danger, they are shot at, shelled, arrested and taken hostage as they try to get their story, and where the media crew is then so will be their safety advisor. A journalist who has just returned from Syria commented that the ability of his safety advisor to reverse a car at high-speed around a corner while under fire was a pretty useful skill to have within the team! And when there hasnt been enough time for lunch and a new story breaks towards the end of the day, or that interview is delayed yet again or the desk decide on another live or an incident causes you to be stuck on the wrong side of a road block youll be very glad of that mammoth breakfast. With unpredictability every day its worth gulping down that last mouthful of porridge even as the ceiling plaster floats down around you.

Chris Cobb-Smith started working as a media safety advisor during the conflict in Kosovo. In 2000 he formed Chiron Resources (Operations) Ltd which over the last twelve years has provided specialist safety advisors to media crews filming in nearly every conflict zone throughout the world. Chris was employed by the BBC to implement their High Risk Team in 2002 and this has become the model for a number of the primary news networks. Chiron Resources (Operations) Ltd is an accredited supplier to all the major British, as well as a number of American, Canadian and European TV companies.

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Demobilising from the Circuit By Pamela McCurdy

POliticAl AdVAnces
What do I do personally? Advance work. I am part of the team responsible for setting up a very large event or series of events that occur in the political arena. The devil, they say, is in the details, and we are heavily involved in all the logistics from the moment a politician gets off the plane to when they go wheels up to the next event. My personal experience has run the gambit from functions involving Mayoral candidates all the way to the White House with pretty much every stop in between. While on the Political Circuit Ive been to inaugurations, funerals, world summits, bus tours, stadium events, fundraisers, The World Series, The Super Bowl, factories in the middle of nowhere, college campuses, and union halls. In fact, one of my most interesting moments occurred in a hotel in Mexico City when Fidel Castro unexpectedly cruised by me. The one constant in all of this? Security. In high-level politics, security usually involves the Secret Service. They have the very obvious job of protecting the President, Vice President and their families. When the President travels the Secret Service also sends an Advance Team to work with staff, host city, state and local law enforcement. As their non-security counterpart, we work together to plan, execute, and make an event successful. One thing you have to be mindful of in my role is Operational Security. In this new era of social media one has to be very

Being behind the scenes in high profile events always seems so glamorous. However, for those that are actually working, sometimes a better word to describe it might be surreal. Working behind the scenes in the world of politics also adds an additional element to the equation - security.
careful of what you say and where you say it. Caution should be taken to make sure you are not directly, or indirectly revealing locations, plans or details that might be sensitive information from a security standpoint. We have to also be careful of leaving a paper trail. That means making sure we are not leaving important papers behind in meeting locations such as restaurants or even the trash can of a hotel room. Political events also mean media, so get used to them. All media personnel will need to be credentialed by the event planner and depending on whos in attendance and/ or the location, there may be several layers of security each with their own credentialing process. Working with event planners and local security, you will want to establish with the security staff exactly what the process is and make sure all follow it to a T. Establishing protocols such as where the media is allowed, and what time they will need to be there for security sweeps are also important. There is not a lot of flexibility when it comes to these procedures so make sure everyone is in full agreement. Advance people joke around that we can always figure out how to make something happen because weve done it so many times. Pulling things together quickly, and preparing for the unexpected is an art form and to do the job of the Advance at times requires you to be Picasso.

Sitting in a street cafe with a contractor recently returned from Baghdad, I ask the question Ive repeated many times over the past few weeks: was there any sort of demobilisation procedure coming back to the UK from Iraq?
Every time I ask this question Ive had a similar response. A laugh, a look of confusion, a clarification of the question (are you sure you mean demobilisation?). Todays response is no different: a puzzled smile and a simple no. This straightforward answer once again illustrates that contractors can be in Baghdad or any other hostile environment on the circuit doing close protection ops one day and back in the UK doing corporate security in central London two or three days later. The lack of any demobilisation procedure has interested me for a few months now, ever since an associate of mine who works for the British Security Industry Association mentioned that it was increasingly common to find contractors fresh from the military circuit working the doors of city centre nightclubs. It interested me in part because I was so surprised that Id not heard about it sooner. In a climate where soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan are greeted with huge media fanfare, extensive charitable support and almost blanket popular celebration, it seemed strange that UK citizens working for private military companies thousands I later found out, and many of them ex-soldiers were coming home completely under the radar. No-one outside of the circuit appeared to be noticing. So I decided to find out more, which explains how Ive ended up in so many cafes around the country asking questions about the transition from the military circuit to corporate security in the UK. The eventual answer to my question was always more

Twitter: @pamelamacmac

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interesting than a simple no, however. The more you dig the more you find. Just as consistent as the initial laugh, look of confusion and clarification of the question, was the fact that in every interview further questions revealed that there is such a thing as contractor demobilisation. Its just not what most of us traditionally think of as demobilisation. This is not surprising. From the British point of view, foreign war-zones have, for the past hundred years or so, been populated almost exclusively by soldiers. As such, demobilisation has been something that only soldiers do. This is our common understanding of the term demobilisation, and it is an understanding which has no space for contractors working on the circuit. But as the nature of military operations, peacekeeping and post-war reconstruction changes, and hostile environments are ever more populated by contractors as well as soldiers, it begins to make sense to think about contractor demobilisation as well. So, what is this new form of demobilisation which takes place outside the remit of the British Armed Forces? The first thing to note is that there is no standard procedure as there is with traditional demobilisation. There is no decompression in Cyprus, no automatic trauma risk management, no advanced learning credits for retraining. Contractor demobilisation is, as you would expect in a competitive marketplace, highly variable. Indeed, it is perhaps best to regard contractor demobilisation as a spectrum, with comprehensive at one end and minimal at the other. Contractors going through comprehensive demobilisation have something like the following experience. To begin with, you choose when you want to leave the circuit and return to the UK that is, whether or not you want to renew your contract or find employment elsewhere. In looking for new opportunities, you get in touch with ex-regiment or extraining contacts, who give you a job or at least put you in touch with someone else who can. Ex-paras help out other ex-paras, ex-Ronin help out other ex-Ronin, and so on. There is a clearly defined old boys network waiting for you. If necessary, you receive guidance from an organisation such as the British Bodyguard Association when re-crafting your CV for the UK marketplace, so as to advertise your skills in the best possible manner. If youre suffering from any of the

Demobilising from the Circuit


common psychological hangovers of the military circuit post traumatic stress disorder or survivors guilt you seek treatment from your former employers welfare programme, or from one of the few charitable enterprises which welcomes contractors such as Talking 2 Minds. Your pathway back into the UK marketplace, in other words, has structure and direction, and shares certain characteristics with traditional demobilisation from the British Armed Forces. Those who go though minimal demobilisation have an entirely different experience. You do not choose when to leave the circuit. The return ticket to Baghdad youve been waiting for simply never turns up. Your contract of employment is terminated without any prior warning and youre unexpectedly thrown into the cut-throat security marketplace. You dont have any ex-regiment or ex-training contacts to draw upon, so you upload your CV onto an online employment network, keeping your fingers crossed that your CV stands out alongside the thousands of others which are regularly harvested by private military and security companies. Unfortunately, youve never written a CV before and you dont know who to ask for help in writing one, so you dont get the magic formula right. No work offers come your way and moneys running out, so you end up working the doors in your local nightclub. You may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder, but you dont know where to go to have it diagnosed, so it goes unmanaged, leaving you edgy and increasingly dependent on alcohol and drugs. In sum, your pathway from Iraq back into the UK marketplace is unstructured and hovering on a knife edge. These two scenarios are, of course, extremes. Most peoples experiences seem to fall somewhere in between. But this spectrum does serve to illustrate an important point: whichever way you look at it, there is such a thing as contractor demobilisation. It may be highly variable, but it exists. So what, you might ask? Do we really need to give a name to this patchwork of procedures? My answer is yes, it does matter. Giving these procedures a name means that we can talk about and study them more effectively. They can become a topic of discussion for security professionals and policy makers, academics and journalists. And through such dialogue, we can try to ensure that more contractors follow the comprehensive route, rather than the minimal route. This is surely better for everyone.

Dr Adam White is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the University of York (UK) and author of The Politics of Private Security. His research on contractor demobilisation is ongoing and he would very much welcome contact from anyone willing to share their experiences, in a cafe, on the telephone or via email (adam.white@york.ac.uk).

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Feature

By John Dagklis

Despite the large range of the technical elements available, included in the style were only those which had proven effective under real combat conditions. Through the passage of time, operational karate has spread beyond the Cuban borders and a number of other countries, Russia included, have shown high appreciation for the martial art. The universal character of the style means that it is widely applicable in all sorts of situations and combat scenarios. In 1976 the Soviet Committee for State Security (KGB) decided to make operational karate an essential part in the physical training of its officers. Featuring among the first group of instructors which met the operational karate qualifications were Valery Samoilov and Anatoly Prudov. It is worth mentioning that, Raul Riso was again invited to the USSR in 1989 to attend an event involving operational karate instructors, with the purpose of identifying and certifying the vest best who were then tasked to serve as bodyguards to President Mikhail Gorbachev. Today, Gennadi Dementiev retired Spetsnaz officer, Presidential close protection agent and executive manager of TIN WOODMAN School, is one of the leading operational karate instructors in Russia. A remarkable individual in many ways, his activities were marked by Federal Presidents degree, dated October 12, 2006,
NAST Test Event

awarding him the title of The Honorary Worker of Physical Culture of the Russian Federation. The National Bodyguard Association of Russia (NAST Russia) The National Bodyguard Association of Russia was established in Moscow on December 20th 1995 by retired Kremlin-9 (todays FSO - Presidential Security Service) officers. For more than 15 years NAST Russia has been the sole professional bodyguard organisation, which is working to establish and control a Personal Protection professional approach in Russia. Headed by the NAST Russia President Dmitry N. Fonareff, retired KGB 9th Directorate HQ senior officer, the Association unites 27 regional offices from Kaliningrad (Baltic Sea) to Vladivostok (Pacific ocean). All NAST regional offices operate within the private security industry. More than 25 licensed private security companies comprise the NAST security network to provide the majority of basic security and close protection services. The NAST network is allowed to provide armed and unarmed protective services and risk analysis according to current law meaning that NAST Russia can supply up to 1500 bodyguards locally and simultaneously.

Security professionals who are aware of the importance of having a wide knowledge of their field can gain a significant insight into the relatively unknown training doctrines of a modern close protection industry serving a country as vast as Russia.
By sharing the legendary experiences of retired officers within the Russian Presidential Security Service, the notorious Kremlin 9 (US. Secret Service equivalent) I aim to offer the reader an unparalleled view of where Russia stands in the international executive and close protection industry. KGB 9th Directorate Kremlin -9 The 9th Directorate of the KGB was the organisation responsible for providing close protection services to the principal Communist Party of the Soviet Unions (CPSU) leaders, families and major government facilities. It operated the Moscow VIP subway system, and the secure governmental telephone system linking high-level government and CPSU officers. In mid 1992 the KGBs Directorate became the Main Guard Directorate and in 1996 it was reorganised to become the Federal Protective Service of Russia. The Presidential Security Service ( ) is a federal government agency concerned with the tasks related to the protection of the President of Russia. It traces its origin to the USSRs 9th Chief Directorate of the KGB and in the beginning it was led by KGB general Alexander Korzhakov. Operational Karate ( KGB 9th Directorates Martial Arts system ) Operational Karate is a rare version of martial arts which came into being as a result of the efforts of Cuban combat masters and primarily those of Raul Riso. Riso became the senior instructor of the Cuban National Karate Federation after studying classical karate in Japan in the late 60s. However, he did not confine himself to the basic knowledge obtained from his Japanese teachers but instead went on to create a multi-purpose applied combat style, thereby making it adaptable for use by a wide range of service units, military and law enforcement alike.

Raul Riso

Gennadi Dementiev

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Regular

Eugenij Grigoriev

Eugenij Grigoriev

Raul Riso

Supported by Grey Shadows International Bodyguard Club and general program coordinator Frank Whip since July 2003, NAST Russia is the official organisation trusted with providing top quality executive protection and security consultancy to VIPs visiting Moscow and St Petersburg for business or leisure. Under the guidance and inspiring leadership of its President, NAST Russia is working hard to establish values like integrity, teamwork, personal competence and the continued perfection of individual skills within Russia and the international EP industry. The training concept of NAST Russia is based on the best professional traditions of the KGB 9th Directorate and NAST instructors train their students as they have been trained. Modern Close Protection industry & training in Russia. The Russian close protection market numbers more than 10,000 close protection agents working in the private security sector with an average age of 32 years old and monthly income ranging from 1200 -1500 depending on the location (Moscow and big cities) for a total of 220 hours on the post. Carrying a firearm is also an option according to federal law. Most companies in Russia and internationally who are seeking advice, security expertise or consultancy entrust the NAST network for EP contracts and advanced security training. When a protector identifies the key skills that must be developed before working on a personal protection assignment, they start seeking a course that will help him / her acquire these skills. It is imperative to receive the best training available when deciding to work as operators for Government or State level security details. A typical method for a country or State is to recruit agents following standard entry tests and procedures, followed by relevant training that will ensure that those individuals have the qualifications to escort Heads of States and government officials. Presidential level security training - KGB Doctrine Close Protection Course NAST Russia designed a special course for civilian operators called KGB Doctrine Close Protection Course . The training program is focused on protection principles along with advanced theoretical and practical competences which are required to become a successful protector at Presidential level. Course key points are based on practical

experience of the USSR KGB 9th Directorate retired officers and are delivered to students from the perspective of those who have been involved in this industry for more than 30 years. Their vast experience showcases the foremost expertise in protection to some of the most powerful people, including numerous world leaders and high profile individuals such as; Russian Presidents Mikhail Gorbachev and Yuri Andropov and US officials, Henry Kissinger and James Baker. The main goal of the course is to deliver staff and field agents training, special drills for personal protection details in addition to site security tactics during mass events such as the Olympic Games and World Championships. Some skills and tactics being taught during the course include but are not limited to: Security budget planning Planning, preparation documents & duties Dignitary personal protection Protocol & etiquette Control room routine & operational logistics Health care & emergency response Due diligence & background checks routine Law enforcement cooperation strategy Operational karate close combat techniques Counter surveillance tactics & equipment etc Instructors on the training cadre include living legends of KGB 9th Directorate Kremlin -9 , and NAST regional managers who are still on duty. Finally, it is worth mentioning the superb training facilities that exist to accommodate domestic and international students during training in Moscow. The training centre is a multi-functional environment that helps instructors to accomplish course objectives offering, in the same building, modern classrooms, martial arts dojo, shooting range, conference rooms, restaurant /caf and much more. John Dagklis is Operations Manager at Shadow Close Protection and certified instructor by NAST Russia and the National Accreditation Centre . Shadow Close Protection is a NAST Russia strategic partner and international training provider offering a range of standard and tailor-made courses to individuals, corporations and national agencies worldwide. For further information on Russian doctrine training contact John Dagklis at info@shadowcp.gr or opsman@ windgr.blackberry.com or telephone: 0030 6948539664

So who really cares that Prince Harry was seen naked playing billiards in a Las Vegas Hotel Suite? Personally not me! The lad serves his country in the Armed Forces and is entitled to let his hair down now and again.
What does bother me though is the fact the pictures could be taken in the first place. As a CPO we have probably been in the same situation albeit not with a British Royal Prince as a principal. How many of you that deal with the entertainment industry have seen far worse? I know I have. Yes we do sometimes have to babysit our principals and point out that doing somethings is bad for their image or public relations. One newspaper showed the Princes PPO in the hot tub with him, wearing trunks and a straw hat, I bet if that picture was expanded you would see other CPOs around the tub and pool all properly dressed and armed, but that doesnt make good red top headlines now does it? So is it our job to protect the principals image when they are carrying out drunken foolish deeds? Yes of course it is, we do not just protect these people from physical harm we have to protect their public image and brand as well. A good lesson for us all to learn is next time your principal says lets have a pool party and all get pissed, think to yourself ok but Im searching the guests for cameras and camera phones and banning them or delete all footage before they leave the party. Well the Olympics are over thank god, and with it that embarrassing charade of G4S pretending they were going to protect us all. I have had countless conversations about this before they came to the table and admitted they wouldnt have been able to fulfill the contract, anyone who is in our business knew they would fail, what I find hard to understand is why they didnt know it earlier. The majority of full time year round G4s staff who work on the ground are good reliable people, its when the recruiting comes from Universities and job centers that it all falls apart. I have seen many of these recruited students on events jobs and sadly they are not used to working twelve hours a day seven days a week, so they may turn up on time the first couple of days but after that its all down hill. Still its what in the trade is known as bums on seats, in other words Company A agrees to supply six hundred guards for an event and on paper they do, whether these people are trained or fit for purpose is another matter. I have been inundated with CVs in the last couple of weeks because all those of you who did a CP course for the Olympics thinking they would make a fortune but ended up on a venue somewhere directing the traffic are now jobless and sadly because some of the courses you did were pretty ropey a lot of companies will not employ you. Before you do a course thoroughly check them out, research the instructors and see if they are also operators who will be able to help you after the course get that first foot on the ladder. Read up on the subject, Ive just finished Richard Aitchs book Close Protection, a good read and a very valuable source for newbies of what to expect on the circuit. Ive got a busy few months ahead of me running a CP and surveillance team so I look forward to seeing some of you around the world. Until then Stay Safe

WORKING GIRL

By Jacquie Davis

Jacquie Davis is Director of Protective Services at Optimal Risk. Web: www.optimalrisk.com

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Feature

The World Wide Web & Surveillance

The World Wide Web & Surveillance

The ramifications are wide spread. Businesses experience devastating losses, Government expenditure increases to support illicit benefit claims and insurance companies deal with fraudulent activity. Those involved believe they have a right to do so and justify their actions because they have more than me or others do it, so I will. In this downward economy, surveillance tends not to be viewed as pernicious, but often as an activity to confirm or in some cases deny the intelligence to hand. So what is the starting point? The phone rings, a meeting is arranged and the task is discussed and agreed. The operative needs information and fast. This is where Open Source Research (OSR) is a great asset and what happens from this point forward is down to skill. At the touch of a keypad an operative can build a portfolio of essential information courtesy of the all-inspiring Internet. Operatives can access aerial views of any street, in any town and in any part of the world. Buildings, road networks and open spaces become accessible. Fences, hedges, gates, entrance and exit points become real-time imagery. Additionally, the ability to identify potential pickup locations and various other task requirements give the surveillance operative an advantage before hitting the ground. The World Wide Web (WWW) continues to weave its magic by providing the means to establish a Pattern of Life (POL) of those suspected of reprehensible behaviour. Intelligence can be collated quickly, easily and incognito. Maintaining a grey man status, which is an essential to the process. This is where the use of social networks comes into their own. They have proved to be a common place for individuals to broadcast about past and future events often providing vital clues and intelligence for the surveyor. Coventry City Council was able to prosecute a benefit cheat living a champagne lifestyle whilst claiming housing benefit (2009). The Government was able to negate against the single parent of three claiming benefit, whilst actually cohabiting (2010). AXA Corporate Solutions used evidence

obtained from Facebook to defeat organized fraud connected to self-drive hire vehicles (2011), this proving social media is becoming a widely used and successful source of intelligence. Apart from using social media groups, operatives can access more legitimate sources of information through the electoral role and Land Registry office (although a fee may be applicable). This is often used to identify occupant details of residential properties, relationship, age and gender, thus providing additional clues. The use of OSR continues to be advantageous and reverse engineering a POL for personal use is commonplace. Used initially to build a profile on the target, the same methods can be used to create a temporary persona and a plausible cover story for the operative. Operatives can match who they should be, need to be and must be against the target profile. Owning the ground of operational activity is essential, especially if they are up against a surveillance aware target. Street savvy and expectant, they will pick up on the abnormal - the car, the van, the workman hut, anything that does not fit will rouse suspicion and any doubts need to be alleviated. Therefore, the value of a plausible cover story should never be underestimated. The ability to access local intelligence on the move has become second nature for a good surveillance operative and it is achievable at the click of a keyboard through the World Wide Web. Armed with details and ready to deploy, understanding personal limitations becomes a vital part of the process. The necessity for self-preservation is heightened and the requirement to maintain a grey man status becomes priority. This places the emphasis on the ability to slow release a new identity in real time. For an operative to be able to integrate into any corner of any community undetected requires quick thinking. Body image, personality traits and physical appearance are an important part of the process but the use of technology and the social network era has turned into the modern day Gift Horse.

Dick Whittington stole from the rich to give to the poor and during the prolonged economic battering; an increase in criminal activity has been witnessed. Whether driven through greed or family pressures to maintain a life style, the former innocent are catapulted into a life of crime.
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A V Lawson, P Allsopp. W: www.lawsonassociates.co,uk Members of the BBA are eligible for 10% discount off Surveillance Courses.

Issue 17

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Feature

EP Certification

Part I: The Present and The Future


At a multi day conference on protective Services the major topics of discussion in the corridors, at lunch and during socials were about national certification within the US and the state of training in the industry. By Tony Scotti

EP Certification in the United States

If you think about it - in reality the two subjects cannot be separated. What I took away from the conference was that segments of the job market wants, and will support, a certification that meets the standards set by respected credentialing organizations. Those who supply job opportunities welcome an EP Certification that will withstand the scrutiny of the corporate, legal and insurance community, with that being said, there are job markets where insurance risk and liability are not a concern, and neither is certification. Also I discovered that many of the practitioners that desire certification do not have a clear understanding of the concept of certification as defined by all other industries. Most of the practitioners feel that if I attend a training program, and the training provider says Im certified well Im certified. When told, no that is not certification, it evokes a myriad of verbiage, usually none pleasant. The general feeling in the industry is - I have spent all this time and money to attend training programs, of course I am certified well that is not how the concept of certification works. The Definition of Certification The American College Dictionary defines certified as guaranteed or reliably endorsed. In general, there are three levels of assurance that can be provided through certification: first, second and third party. First party certification defines most EP training - the training provider offers the student some type of assurance that their training is of value, but the question the students needs to ask, before attending the program, of value to whom? Because the training and certificate come from the same source: the training provider, this process lacks the independent verification that is required in all other industries. Second party certification requires an association to provide the assurance that the training received is of value to the student and the market it serves. It is incumbent on the associations to monitor the level of knowledge skill and experience of its members to ensure the value of their certification, and as with first party certification of value to whom? Third party certification involves the independent evaluation of the level of knowledge skill and experience by expert unbiased sources. In general, third party certification is considered the highest level of assurance that can be achieved, and it is the type of certification needed in the EP industry simply because it is universally accepted.

That third party evaluation is provided by the two organizations such as American National Institute of Standards (ANSI) and the Institute for Credentialing Excellence (ICE). Getting certification approval from these two organizations is a very expensive and arduous task. These groups are recognized by every major industry on the planet as independent providers of certifications. More importantly are recognized by the corporate - legal and insurance community. Training and Certification In other industries it is common practice to conduct training and issue a certificate. That is a reasonable and accepted practice, which is evident by the number of seminars conducted ranging from one to three day events that cover a particular industry subject. But it is not the same as certification. So this has to be said, for decades the EP training available is not certification, it is training to a certificate. There is an enormous difference, which does not mean that the certificate is not valuable, but it is not a certification as defined by the credentialing organizations that are the standards in all other industries. That is the issue, if the United States EP industry wants to be recognized by the job market as creditable, the industry has to do what other industries do be recognized by credentialing organizations such as ANSI and ICE. The Certification Process I also got from the conference and from discussions in the social media, that a major issue that seems to be problematic is experience vs. certification. I was and still am surprised at the number of messages I receive from individuals who felt that simply taking a training program and having limited or no experience, qualified them for certification. This may be hard to accept but you cannot enter a training program with little or no experience and at the end of five seven or whatever days later and be certified by those who have conducted the training in fact it is ludicrous to think you can have a certification without experience, and in fact so does the job market. The question becomes can the industry survive without a certification that is universally recognized and meets the strictest definition of certification as defined by third party certification mentioned above and in this article - the answer is yes. It has survived for decades. But in the final word what is the definition of survive? Survive, in my eyes, means the individual makes a living supplying protective services. What can be said is that there will be a major change in the definition of certification more about that in part two of this series on EP Certification in the United States.

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Keeping Your Edge

Elijah Shaw

Keeping YOUr Edge


Let me first begin this issues column with a full disclosure: I run an Executive Protection Training Academy. Additionally, I am also the CEO of a Firm that provides, Close Protection services to clients with a need.
A short while ago this very topic generated some pretty extensive commentary on the Facebook Page of the North American Bodyguard Association, however thats only the most recent example. For years Ive tried to stay aware of trending topics in our industry --the ones that once they come up, generate the most commentary (and in many cases the most polarizing opinions.) The obligation of training providers to their graduates almost always makes the list. The conversation can take a few different forms. First and foremost is the individual who is seeking training and is in the research phase before plopping down his hard earned cash to a school. That person reaches out to his (social) network and says something along the lines of Im thinking about attending ABC school. Can anyone tell me if they help with job placement after graduation? Valid question, right? More insidious is the advertisement from some training sites that say, guaranteed job upon taking our course. Now while this type of marketing ploy is just that a ploy, and all things considered, is pretty few and far between in the industry, I unfortunately encounter men and women on a fairly consistent basis who tell horror stories about being roped in to this con. The course is usually held on-line in which they pay their tuition, read a manual, take a bodyguard test and receive a certificate. And thenTraditionally nothing, but unanswered phone calls. Then theres the reoccurring story about the company (which has now gone into hiding) that offers a guaranteed job. In this case, they actually have the distinction of putting the student on assignment immediately after they graduate. Thats great! Sign me up! However, savvy students discover that the Protectee does not seem to meet the characteristics of a typical client; in fact they actually seem to be role-players. The real moment of clarity comes when I explain to the person that what that school did was essentially pay the student using their own (overpriced) tuition which is why the detail traditionally never lasts for more than one day, and they never again get a phone call from that school about additional work. Seeing an unrecognizable VIP walk through the mall surrounded by a 5 personal security detail would almost be

comical, if it werent for the fact that the students recruited are the victim of the Executive Protection equivalent of a Ponzi scheme. For my part, Im never going to promise that attending a course will guarantee a person a job with my firm. Dont get me wrong, Ive had some great men and women come though my classes, but Ive also had a few that I wouldnt let guard an outhouse in Alaska. Its either deceptive marketing or a catch and I dont want any parts of either. Now with that said, the open secret is that a great number of the Operators at my agency started off as graduates of our program. Here is my thought process: Every day I receive at minimum a half dozen job resumes, many of them quite impressive. These display a laundry list of credentials, certifications, and achievements. However, at the end of the day, its still words on paper. Lets say I take the next step and bring them in for an interview. On the high end, how long is that process, an hour or two? Lets go extreme and say a series of four, 1hour interview totaling you guessed it 4 hours. Having some skill as an interviewer I might pull quite a bit of useful information out during that time, painting a solid picture of the candidate. Now lets contrast that with my training program: The one my firm is best known for is our Celebrity & VIP Protection Course. This course clocks in at 5 days and in

excess of 70 hours. During that time we introduce fatigue, stress, conflict resolution, crisis management, oh yeah and honest to goodness hands on protection work. So from an employer perspective, which would give me the better sense of a potential new hire; 3 hours and a shiny well produced C.V., or 70+ hours of operating under pressure? Once that realization hit, it was almost a no brainer for me. In fact, in August and September of 2012, I was contracted to run multiple security details for a client highly intertwined with the US Republican and Democratic National Political Conventions. Upon successful completion, I noticed that 95% of the individuals tapped for this assignment were course graduates. Was that planned? Only to the degree that I knew these individuals were aware of what I as a service provider expected, were well trained, and could be equally confident that the person to their left and right were also working off of the same sheet of music. While not every training provider offers services outside of training, the better ones will be honest and forthcoming about the realities of the industry. Ultimately however, its up to the individuals to find their own path. Just like traditional Universities are designed to give you the skills to be competitive in the marketplace, the same should be true of EP Providers.

Elijah Shaw is the CEO of Icon Services Corporation and The National Director of the North American Bodyguard Association

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First Impressions Count By Shaun West


Dont get me wrong, Im not saying that the standard of a course has no bearing or that certain experience is worthless but if this is not highlighted in the best manner on your CV/resume then it may go unnoticed. Employers and HR staff are busy people and with so many candidates to choose from why should they waste their time trying to decipher your poorly constructed CV when youre up against well wrote ones. For some inexplicable reason, in the security industry, badly constructed CVs and resumes seem to be much more commonplace than in most other industries comparable by pay scale. There are a few reasons as to why this might be; possibly its to do with a lack of education in this area or perhaps its the fact that while weve all been sat in comfortable jobs the industry has become much more competitive and its not until we re-entered the job market that we realize the dynamics have changed. Dont get caught out, avoid the obvious mistakes. Some of the most common issues I see from applicants are: Poor spelling, grammar and sentence construction. Get someone to proof read or pay for professional CV writing services. Length/Padding. Try to keep your CV to 2 pages. Additional information can accompany but should be bullet pointed within the main document. Creative and unique layouts. Follow a tried and tested template for laying out the main blocks of information. Employers will be expecting a certain layout, dont make it harder for them to find the relevant information. Offensive font size and style. Dont use oversized fonts, excessive capitals, exclamations marks or multiple font types. Insufficient personal information. Regardless of certain perceptions, being vague or aloof will not add credibility to your security experience and instead will bring it into question. Employers want to know your date of birth, previous experience and companies worked for, details of your military career (if any) and dont underestimate the importance of a photo. Reluctance to share this information will mean more time sat at home on the sofa watching TV! Irrelevant information: If Im hiring you for a CPO position on a team, I dont want to know about your favourite hillwalking routes, which TV shows you were an extra in or your separate business ventures, which would actually make me question your commitment. Stay focused and put yourself in the employers shoes and think about what theyre looking for. Conclusion So, we can see that if a resume or CV is your first impression then you simply must get it right, by not doing so, youre not giving yourself a fighting chance. You will be up against fierce competition and hopefully this article has shown that even though you may not have done the best courses or you may come with less experience than someone else, if you put in the effort with your CV in effect, marketing yourself correctly then you will give yourself a far better chance of employment than those who pay lip service to this valuable information. Good luck.

When applying for a new job in a saturated sector, as the security industry has become, then first impressions are all important. Do not make the mistake of thinking that this begins with the interview.
The biggest hurdle you will have to overcome is going from getting your CV or resume read to being called forward for an interview. In the current climate most PPO/EP positions which are openly advertised will receive upwards of 50 applications however, an employer will probably only want to interview the top 5, so as little as 10% will get beyond the first hurdle. Therefore, with those odds stacked against you, wouldnt you want to give yourself the best chance possible and remember, First Impressions Count! I have lost count of the amount of CVs i have received over the years which are littered with spelling mistakes and bad grammar. Surely this is not the first impression you wish to be giving out to potential employers as it shows no attention to detail and the majority of the time it will rule you out of an interview or being contacted further, unless you are fortunate enough to have a recommendation from someone within that organization. Of course, advertising ones self doesnt come natural to us all nor might you be the most IT literate person but to have the best chance of finding employment then you must to be realistic and honest with yourself - If you are not a great CV/ resume writer then seek the services and advice of someone who is and pay them to do it for you! This is an investment that so many people just do not make; but why? If it gets you the job which youre after then isnt it money well spent? People will spend thousands from their hard earned cash doing All Singing, All Dancing Courses but dont then invest anything towards their CV which, to me seems like money thrown away and an opportunity wasted if you dont know how to advertise that valuable experience correctly. Case Study Candidate A has just spent 4000.00 on a course which he completes successfully and then sets about writing his CV. It is littered with spelling mistakes, bad punctuation and grammar and is in no way tailored towards the job he is applying for. He goes up against Candidate B who has spent only 600.00 on their course but comes out with the same qualification. However B has spent time and effort on his CV, it is spell checked, nicely laid out with a well written cover letter and it looks professional. Furthermore they have read the job spec and have highlighted their strengths and experiences which are most relevant and likely to be noticed by the employer. Remember you can spend all of the money in the world doing what is deemed the best course, but it is the first impression that you make which is the biggest influence on whether you will go any further. Once this first impression has been made and you are called for interview then you can sell yourself in person and highlight your abilities and qualifications, however you are limiting your chances of getting there if your CV is not up to scratch!

First Impressions Count

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The Catfish Network

There is a phrase that I frequently use, Your net-worth is only as good as your Network meaning that your value or success in this industry is only as good as the people [protection specialists/bodyguards and service providers] you associate with.
This phrase holds true when it comes to your network of clients. Some clients are very fertile, meaning their reach within their own network of colleagues can further your client base. This is the real value of having a good network. There is another such phrase that I refer to very often that is associated to the very demise of this industrys professionalism, ethics and trust among peers. That is the Catfish network. These are the scavengers of the industry who survive just as that bottom feeder fish does. This is a sector of the industry frequently acts alone or in collusion with others within its unethical group. They are the prime example of the clich thick as thieves. However there is no honor amongst thieves in this case. In many cases they will use unethical tactics against their own. Whiskers on Fish? Inferior Genome Sequencing In my experience some members of the catfish network show signs that they are characteristically inferior before they come into the industry. What I mean is that this behavior was normal to them before they entered the protection industry. There is an inherent light that should go off when a person knows that a decision he/she makes could be construed as offering their services while working for another business owner in an attempt to steal a client. The choice between behaving at a higher level is overshadowed with the choice to continue feeding at even lower depths. From the business owner perspective it is critical that you only use specialists that you have vetted through trusted and reliable sources. I use the first cousin rule. I only use men/ women that have been vouched for by a trusted member of my network who knows my standards and expectations. If one of these trusted persons vouches for the person and the new person operates in a catfish manner they both are shown the door. This methodology has kept me clean after experiencing the worst time in my business life in 2005. I was staffing a long-term detail that included full-time closein coverage and 24/7 residential security on a principal. I had 2 other full-time details going in the same state which depleted my trained, qualified and licensed local network. A newer member of my network recommended 2 guys that he had worked with on another detail, that he knew were available. Too focused on getting the staffing approved, I went with his recommendations and told the client we were set to go. One of the guys was on the rotation as a shift leader and the other was the daytime driver. The client was very happy with the staff and comfortable with everyone in his/her private space. As time went on I would get reports from specialists that had tenure with me about behavior inconsistent with professional standards. Calling the principal by first name is not a deal breaker but should be a warning sign. I approached both of the new guys and told them that it had to stop. They both stated that the Principal

The Catfish Network

By Eric Konohia

insisted that they call him/her by first name, yet the other shift leaders and residential detail staff were not afforded the same privileges. I approached the Principal during our weekly meeting and explained to him/her that I was going to rotate the close-in so that there would not be any burn out. He/she insisted that the 2 new guys must stay in place. I knew at that point that I had lost my footing and that I had been infiltrated. On one night the principal went to a bar and was accompanied by the night shift. When the night detail arrived at the bar they observed the 2 new guys in the bar at a booth. The principal approached the booth, sat down and waved off the on-duty crew. He/she told them to sit in the vehicle until he/she was ready to leave. Shortly thereafter, I received a call from the company I was contracted under who stated that the client wanted to terminate services. I knew what happened and went on the offensive. Without giving up too many secrets I found out that they were working directly for the principal, which was a direct violation of the states licensing body. I had a copy of my nonsolicitation mailed to both guys and a copy to the principal, stating that I was prepared to move forward legally unless there was some resolution as well as I had already reported both of them to the state governing body. Within 30 days the principal called and begged me to return because the 2 guys that he/she had allowed to befriend and infiltrate had used his/her funds improperly to attend courses and purchase weapons. The latter is a perfect example of the genetic flaw in ethical behavior I referenced earlier in this article. Knowingly positioning yourself to steal a client and then is appropriating funds is a professional and character flaw that exudes in the catfish network. Bottom Feeders go fishing Its sad to say that some of these degenerates survive long enough as a specialist that they start their own company. They tend to use personalities that can fit in their school of thought. Just as fish swim in schools so do these catfish in the industry. Any specialist that has a sound ethical background that knowingly works within this culture is a catfish too. The fact that you are willing to jeopardize your reputation for the sole purpose of making a dollar and catapult your tenure in the industry puts you smack dab in the middle of this species. Before long you will fall into the guilt by association clich. Eventually your core standards start taking a backseat to the way the catfish survive. Once you are labeled as part of

this network you will never get out of the murky waters that youve accustomed yourself in. Any specialist that has been entrusted to be in close proximity of another companys client and willingly takes that client on, as his/her own client, regardless of the reason that the security company parted ways with that client is a bottom feeder or catfish. Your allegiance has to always be with your reputation [first] and the service provider [second] that gave you the opportunity. Conversely, as a specialist if you know that someone has stolen a client or alleged to have stolen a client and you align yourself in that space you have damaged your reputation as a professional and ethical specialist. I have to feed my family is a bad excuse for saying I am a crook. The sad part about this whole diatribe that I have written is that many of the catfish network are licensed and trained specialists. They are wolves in sheeps clothing. They are very active on social media and come across as knowledgeable and skilled. They post pictures in suits working high profile clients and some others are donning full kits in Iraq. Their outward appearance and resumes are appealing yet the inner man/woman is a volatile mixture of greed and desperation. As some of you read this article a couple of people will come to mind. There are others of you who have read this article and have personally been affected by this group. Separate yourselves from this infectious band of gypsies and save your careers. Over the years there has been an effort by protection providers to list these bandits on a website with a narrative describing what actually occurred. It would be a Wall of shame of sorts. In theory this sounds like a great idea, but in practicality it would never work. So how do we warn our trusted colleagues of impending danger? First, you must exercise some level of vetting before you align yourself or company with anyone. Ascertain names of whom they worked with or for. Find a common link between the names given and someone in your trusted network and then ask. If I am asked about a suspected member of the catfish network, my answer is usually, Be careful you need to talk to. If it is regarding someone that I have personally had a bad experience, then I will tell what happened. I will never knowingly allow a colleague to be infected by a catfish. No one is exempt from this group unless we protect ourselves from them. Youll know them because they swim low in murky unclear waters and feed off the bottom.

Eric Konohia is the President of BPI Group and a regular contributor to the NABA Social Media Networks. Find him at www.Bpisecurity.com

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Maritime

Non Lethal Force Piracy at sea has long gripped the imagination with its romanticized image of swashbuckling heroes, buried treasures and tales of high adventure. The reality in the modern age however is a rather different story with acts of piracy costing world trade an estimated 7 to 10 Billion US dollars annually.
It is almost impossible to calculate the human cost of those held for ransom against their will for extended periods of time by merciless pirates. The industry-developed document Best Management Practices (BMP) sets out a range of non-lethal ship selfprotection measures designed to help commercial ships avoid, deter or delay acts of piracy off the coast of Somalia, in the Gulf of Aden and throughout the Indian Ocean. The recommendations included in the BMP are wide ranging and include the use of non-lethal equipment to inhibit boarding by pirates, such as razor wire, electrified barriers, anti-climb paint and water sprays; and the use of binoculars and night vision optics to assist in identifying potential threats. The advice contained within the BMP is predominantly passive and/or reactive in nature. In some cases the advice suggested is beyond the capability of the vessel (high speed manoeuvring) or is only applicable once the vessel is being boarded (vessel hardening) or indeed has been boarded. Evidence that the current BMP are not providing a sufficient solution is demonstrated both by the increasing number of attempted pirate attacks taking place, successful pirate attacks and by the growing demands from the marine industry to be allowed to employ armed personnel on board vessels transiting through areas laced with pirates. Whilst the provision of international military Naval support is not to be discounted in terms of deterring acts of piracy, the geographical scale of the problem means that the use of military forces can never be a single solution to the issue. Naval support can be effective in localised areas whilst those forces are in place, but cannot realistically cover the entire region in sufficient time or numbers. To tackle the problem, shipping companies now seem to have taken matters into their own hands. It has been reported that today there are almost 3,000 armed guards onboard merchant ships transiting through the Indian Ocean. The carriage of armed guards onboard of commercial vessels can have tragic unintended consequences as was only too graphically demonstrated earlier this year when Italian Marines shot dead two Indian fishermen they mistakenly took for pirates. This drift towards the militarisation of merchant ships risks sparking a mini-arms race between pirates and shipping companies. As pirates encounter lethal resistance from merchant vessels the natural conclusion will be an escalation of lethal force being applied by both parties. In the worst case scenario it seems logical to conclude that pirate attacks may well involve pre-emptive use of lethal force as the norm rather than the exception. Perhaps more concerning is the implication that once faced with well trained, professional armed personnel, the pirates will look to armed extremist groups, such as Al Qaida and others for advice, training, equipment and support in executing their acts of piracy. Pushing these normally disparate groups together by means of necessity and mutual gain is likely to have long lasting and serious ramifications for global sea trade. Manufacturers of maritime security equipment have developed non-lethal proactive defensive devices like pressurized air-launchers and hailing devices that have the capability to fill the gap between passive self- protective measures and the application of lethal force. There are enormous merits linked with using these intermediate measures before resorting to lethal force. They are far more cost effective than hiring armed guards per crossing and are within the laws currently banning the carriage of weapons in certain ports. Until the International Community clarifies the rules of engagement, the maritime industry needs to take a serious second look at proactive non-lethal solutions to protect their ships, cargo and crews from acts of piracy. The lethal alternative risks escalating the violence of the tactics and weaponry used by pirates.

Use of Armed Guards may backfire


By Jonathan Delf

By Jonathan Delf. From 1996 to 1998 he served with the Royal Navy as a Warfare Officer on board HMS Coventry, HMS Hurworth and HMS London. He subsequently transferred to the British Army where he served as a Commissioned Officer with an Infantry Regiment (Royal Anglian Regiment) in operational theatres including Northern Ireland, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan until 2008. As project manager for BCB Internationals Buccaneer non-lethal air pressurised launcher system he advises the project board with respect to the tactical deployment of non-lethal devices. He advises BCB International Ltds Research and Development Department with respect to capability, development and specification of the Buccaneer in order to meet end user requirements

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Ruth tucking into some home made Estonian Pancakes

Maritime

By Scott D

Ruth Tiik Interview

Women in Maritime Security


A females perspective of being a Maritime Security Operative in the HRA.
I first met Ruth several months ago on a floating platform in the Red Sea where we and many others were stuck for several days waiting for our next task, I was then fortunate enough to then sail with Ruth back to port where we got chatting, I was interested in how she got involved in the maritime, as she was the first girl Id met on the maritime circuit in 2 and half years. Once I got chatting and only after a short time I found her to be an interesting character with a good sense of humour and a bit of a hidden past.
She was wanted for murder. Only joking.

If there are any other ladies out there who I havent met yet doing the maritime circuit in the HRA, I give my sincere apologies now. No one else I have spoken to over the last few years has met any. I have all come across females before on the circuit in UK and I have several friends that had previously worked in Afghan and Iraq, but I have never met any that worked in this sector, other than CP client based ones who occasionally get on their clients super yachts. So I was quite interested in speaking to her and getting her viewpoint on how it is being the only girl in the High Risk Area on commercial vessels. Once I got to know Ruth and did some digging I found that she has been a bit of a celebrity back in her home country. Having initially been refused the right to go to the frontline in an Infantry role, she was so frustrated that she battled with the Ministry of Defence on her equal rights and finally won her case, and as a result 38 Circuit Magazine

ended up getting her wish to go front line. Yeah, she is slightly mad. publicity that accompanied her on her return, a magazines feature and an interview on a national TV station. She was a fairly quiet girl on the vessel when I met her, (at first) probably as she had so many blokes looking at her. The Internet room on ship had never been so busy when she went to use her laptop! But once you get to know her she is a good laugh. Her favourite English phrase is WTF which she uses a lot and makes for a very amusing conversation. Why did you want to join maritime security? Basically, I love adventure I wanted to see more of the world I had served in Afghanistan and Iraq and didnt want to miss out on seeing Africa as well. Did you have military experience prior to joining Maritime sec? Yes, I joined the army when I was 19 and ended up serving in Iraq, and then went straight to Afghanistan afterwards, I must have upset someone in the

government! I had various jobs, my main job being a rifleman and a driver in an Infantry unit. I also worked along side the Swedes as part of their Nordic Battle group training for artic warfare in Sweden. Some of us were approached by a company from the United states and asked us if we wanted to do security work at sea, so I said Yes. What was you role in the military, and did you serve in any exciting places? After graduating from school all Estonian men have to serve in the military, it used to be around 8 months but now its 11 months. Women dont have to do this, but I wanted to, so I applied and I joined the army, I didnt want to do the normal jobs that females had carried out before and I applied to join the infantry. Girls normally did medical roles and office jobs, non-combat. It is a long story, but as I wasnt classed as a conscript which is only for men and I was going into the professional army I was entitled to have the same rights as the men, so that way I could join Infantry, so basically I was their

first female, after a lot of arguing I got to serve in Iraq, after that 2 more girls joined. We were the last Estonian troops to serve in Iraq. It wasnt easy proving myself to my male colleagues, but I had to prove it to myself just as much that I could do it. My Mom always said I was a bit of a tomboy. But more and more girls are now joining so that is good. If you dont mind me asking, what age are you? I am 27 and joined the army when I was 19. How long have you been on the maritime circuit? I left the army in 2011 and I have been doing maritime security now for almost a year. How do you find being at sea? There are some good things and some bad things, fresh air at sea is good, so is not having any landmines and IEDs, also less uniform and kit to keep prepared. But I have too much time on my hands at sea, and I like to keep active which I cant always do. If I have Issue 17 39

Maritime
too long to ponder about things I want to do. I get frustrated. What does your family think about your choice of work? My Mom and 2 sisters are happy I am at sea as its safer than being in the army, they are used to me being away but we all miss each other. I was always the Tomboy in the family so I dont think it surprised them too much when I wanted to go to the army. They are happy for me, and very happy I am away from Afghanistan, they understand and we keep in touch with Skype as much as possible though si I am not too far away! What has been you best transit? That is a hard question as every transit has good and sometimes bad points. But my most interesting transit was where we had contact with pirates. Best country you have visited? It has to be Sri Lanka and Mozambique; I like them both very much. How much rivalry is there between you and your male Its difficult as we change teams all the time and dont always get to know each other very well. The rivalry comes when we come to shoot. I am quite a good shot so am often as good as, or better than some of the guys so that helps. I think because I have served on the front line as well I get on okay with them because of that. There isnt too much rivalry we work well as a team. What do you do to keep yourself from getting bored on ship? Mainly just watch movies, I am an active person and like to do sport, I used to run a lot when I was in the army but not as much, and cant run on ship but do as much fitness as possible. What do your family think about you doing this type of work? My mom and 2 sisters are my family and have been all my life like a boy, since I was a little girl they all are used to it and they are happy that I am happy, they are also happy that nothing bad has happened. There are still very few woman serving as crew on ships and you are the only female I have met in this area doing maritime security, have you met any hostility because you are a woman? No, vice versa actually, everyone is always very friendly to me and I think they are shocked, as they havent seen a female doing security before. There are things we all miss from home when we are at sea, what is yours? Friends, food and roller-skating. What is the one item you cant leave home without when you go away? This may sound a bit manly, but my Leatherman, even when I went to Hawaii for vacation I took it with me, it goes everywhere! Suppose thats the Tomboy bit of me! Have you met any other females on the maritime security circuit? No, I hear about other girls doing CP stuff, but only on land, I have never bumped into any others doing the maritime down here. As this article went to print there were 357 registered companies signed up to the International Code of Conduct and many, including you as the reader will have views on contracting females in hostile environments. Ruths path has not always been easy but she has some funny stories from along the way especially the one about a fat Egyptian guy. Has Ruth paved the way for other females to join the industry, is it generally accepted for females? Where are the main hazards from? Pirates? Is it fair to say that female operators with the correct experience and training maybe suited to work in certain areas of the maritime security industry? They are certainly working elsewhere within the industry, so why not here and in some cases its less demanding physically than land based, so what holds them back? The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has an active campaign to encourage females to enter the Shipping Industry, but we would be nave 40 Circuit Magazine

Ruth Tiik Interview


to think it is not without its issues. You will all clearly have opinions, and you just need to look at some of the security industry websites to read them, but does that mean women cant do the job? I know blokes that I dont think are up to it, so maybe its not just gender based maybe its as much about ability, regardless of sex. But there are clearly other considerations that need to be taken into account which are far more applicable. All we can ask is Has Ruth paved the way for other females to join the maritime sector? Is it a suitable environment for female operatives? Ruths experiences sound very positive and it certainly hasnt had an adverse affect on her, so will she lead the way? Only time will tell. I would like to thank Ruth for her time in speaking to me and continuing to keep in touch.

Intel: World Report

Intel: World Report


MALI Islamists kill man by firing squad: Militant Islamists in northern Mali have publicly killed a man accused of murder. A crowd of at least 100 people in Timbuktu watched a firing squad shoot the man, according to eyewitnesses. Northern Mali has been overrun by Islamist and Tuareg rebels following a coup in Bamako in March. This public killing is being seen as the latest demonstration by Islamists of their intention to impose their strict interpretation of Sharia law. One local witness told journalists the man was a member of the ethnic Tuareg rebel group, the MNLA. The MNLA is a former ally of the Islamist groups (including al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb) that have seized control of the north, but Islamists have now turned against the secular group. They have since imposed Shari a law in many of the areas under their control, despite strong opposition from the local Muslim population NIGERIA Four dead as minister escapes injury: Fisheries minister Amason Kingi escaped with his life after a campaign tour turned violent in Mtwapa, Coast province. Four people, including his bodyguard, were killed in the fracas as Mr Kingi and Kilifi Senate aspirant Stewart Madzayo were addressing boda boda riders. A group of people confronted the crowd and slashed the ministers bodyguard with machetes. Members of the public turned on the rowdy youth and killed three of them. Mr Kingis bodyguard was rushed to Jocham hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. Mr Madzayo suffered a cut to his head and was rushed to hospital. SOUTH AFRICA Amplats fires 12,000 platinum miners: The worlds biggest platinum producer, Anglo American Platinum, has fired 12,000 striking South African miners after a protracted strike over wages. Amplats said three weeks of illegal strikes by 28,000 workers in Rustenburg had cost it 39,000 ounces in output - or 700m rand ($82.3m; 51m) in revenue. South African mining has been hit by a wave of wildcat strikes, in which miners and officials have been killed. Some 34 South African platinum miners were shot dead by police in August. ASIA & THE PACIFIC CHINA Boats sail to disputed island: Chinese ships have sailed near islands disputed with Japan for a second day in a row, amid unconfirmed reports that Chinese banks have pulled out of meetings in Tokyo. Three ships were seen in the East China Sea area, Japans coast guard says. Meanwhile, a media report said that Chinese officials from major banks would not attend annual meetings with the World Bank and IMF next week. A Japanese finance official said it was disappointing if this were the case. Both China and Japan claim the islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. Taiwan also claims the islands. MALDIVES Lawmaker stabbed to death: A member of the Maldives parliament has been stabbed to death near his home. Dr Afrasheem Ali, whose party was a member of the governing coalition in the Indian Ocean archipelago nation. His murder comes at a time of political turmoil. The trial of the former president had to be postponed after he defied a court order and left the capital by boat. Police say they are yet to establish a motive for the killing. AFGHANISTAN Suicide bomber kills NATO troops: A suicide bombing in the eastern Afghan city of Khost has killed at least 14 people, three of them NATO soldiers, officials say. NATO did not confirm the nationalities of the soldiers, but the US military operates in the area. Taliban insurgents said they carried out the attack, which also killed four Afghan police. Witnesses said the attacker waited for troops to leave their vehicles before detonating the bomb. At least six civilians were also killed and 60 people were wounded in the attack. The bomber targeted a coalition convoy passing through a crowded part of Khost. Separately, a shooting at a checkpoint in eastern Afghanistan took the US militarys death toll in the war past 2,000. Three US soldiers and contractor were killed in the attack in Wardak province, along with three Afghan soldiers.

EUROPE & THE FSU ITALY Tax office hit by fire bomb attack: A fire bomb exploded outside the offices of Italian tax collection agency Equitalia in the northern city of Verona, police said. Another device planted in the entrance failed to explode, and was made safe by firemen after the first blast smashed glass doors at the tax office in the early hours of the morning, a police spokesman said. Nobody was hurt. Equitalia offices have been the target of a series of threats and attacks this year. UNITED KINGDOM Abu Hamza to be extradited to US: Five suspected terrorists including Abu Hamza al-Masri can be extradited to the US, ending a long legal battle, UK High Court judges have ruled. The radical cleric, Babar Ahmad, Syed Talha Ahsan, Adel Abdul Bary and Khaled al-Fawwaz failed to show new and compelling reasons not to send them. Their appeal came after the European Court of Human Rights backed successive UK courts in ruling for extradition. Judges said their extradition may proceed immediately. MIDDLE EAST & N. AFRICA IRAN Riots over collapse of currency: Riot police have broken up several protests in the capital Tehran over sharp falls in the currency, the rial. Traders protested outside the central bank, calling for the resignation of the government and the banks governor. A heavy police presence remains on the streets of Tehran, following this first sign of public unrest. The rial has plummeted to record lows against the US dollar in recent weeks, harming the wider Iranian economy. Up to 100 traders and official money lenders gathered in front of Irans central bank, where they were attacked by riot police and dispersed. LEBANON Blasts hit Hezbollah stronghold: A series of explosions have hit an area of eastern Lebanon dominated by the Shia Islamist group Hezbollah, security officials say. The blasts may have hit a stockpile of arms, officials and residents were quoted as saying. The cause was not immediately clear. A security official said that several people were killed and injured. One report located the blasts near the city of Baalbek in the Bekaa Valley.

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SYRIA Deadly blasts rip through Aleppo square: At least 33 people have been killed and dozens wounded by five bomb explosions in the center of Syrias second city, Aleppo, officials have said. Four of the blasts happened in the citys Saadallah al-Jabari Square, near a military officers club and a hotel. Pro-government al-Ikhbariya TV broadcast pictures of bodies being pulled out of buildings damaged by the blasts and a large crater in a road. Hezbollah military commander killed: A senior military figure in the Lebanese Shia Islamist group Hezbollah is reported to have died in Syria. Hezbollah said Ali Hussein Nassif was buried in the Bekaa valley on Monday and had been killed performing his jihadist duty, but did not say where. Rebels said Nassif and several of his men had been killed in an ambush by the Free Syrian Army. Other reports said they had died in clashes on the border. There has been

no confirmation that he was Hezbollahs commander in Syria. The US has accused Hezbollah of providing training, advice, and extensive logistical support to the Syrian government, an allegation the group has denied. Homs sees worst shelling in months: The city of Homs has been subjected to its most severe bombardment in five months, activists say. Aircraft and artillery targeted the neighborhood of Khaldiya, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Activists also reported fierce clashes in the second city Aleppo, and government shelling in the capital Damascus, Hama and Idlib. Cross border incidents: Inside Syria, the Local Coordination Committees activist network reported fierce clashes in Aleppo, and government shelling in cities including Damascus, Hama, Homs and Idlib. Activists from the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said air attacks on Homs were the worst the city had seen for five months.

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Intel: Middle East


At least seven soldiers were killed in the city of Tunceli when their transport was struck by an IED. PKK militants are suspected of carrying out the attack. Oppositon leaders in Damascus called for President alAssads departure as government jets attack targets in Aleppo.

Turkey

Syria

PM Ehud Barak published a statement suggesting a unilateral pull out of the West Bank, saying Israel must take practical steps to break through the deadlock in peace talks.

Israel & the OPT

An undisclosed number of militants were killed when they attacked an Israeli border station in the Sinai, with rifles and wearing explosive belts.

Egypt

The defense minister announced a plan to acquire US$1.6 billion worth of helicopters to secure the safety of the people of Lebanon. The Constitutional Court rejected an attempt by the government to alter the countrys five parliamentary constituencies, leaving the existing area intact.

Lebanon

A suicide bomber killed four schoolchildren and injured six more, in Hitt, a town west of Baghdad, in what officials are calling a sectarian attack.

Iraq

Officials cut off access to Google and its affiliates (YouTube and Gmail), inpreparation for insti tuting a government controlled incountry Internet.

Iran

Kuwait

UCP 9MM WEAPONS COURSE


Iran fired four antiship missiles at a large target in the Persian Gulf, conducting its own military exercise, sinking the target in under one minute.

A man who traveled to the country is in critical condition in a UK hospital with a respiratory virus resembling SARS. According to Britains Health Protection Agency, it is a new virus.

Saudi Arabia

Iran and the Gulf

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The US Fifth Fleet concludes a major 30 nation minesweeping exercise, designed to keep the Straits of Hormuz and Gulf of Aden open to all shipping.

Bahrain

The Human Rights Minister said that the former President Saleh has not stopped political activity and is disrupting the transition process.

Yemen

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Circuit Magazine

Focus On: The Middle East


Major regional flash points
UN SecretaryGeneral Ban Kimoons entreaties to the Iranian president on the negative implications of overheated rhetoric, seem to have done little to curb the latters penchant for such speeches. Nevertheless, Iran faced a barrage of condemnation from Western countries on the UN Security Council over allegations that Iran is supplying the government of Syrias Bashar alAssad with weapons, in contravention of UN sanctions against Iran from selling weapons of any kind to anyone. The SecretaryGeneral said that there are grave regional implications related to the worsening situation in Syria. In his meeting with Ahmadinejad, he underlined the devastating humanitarian impact. Iran has been accused of using civilian aircraft to fly military personnel and large quantities of weapons across Iraqi airspace to Syria, to aid the Assad government in its attempt to crush the 18month uprising against him. US envoy to the UN, Susan Rice, said that Irans arms exports to the murderous Assad regime are of particular concern. Western intelligence reports indicated that Syria was now the central party in illicit arms transfers from Iran. The UK envoy to the UN said as well, This is unacceptable and it must stop. It is in stark contrast to the will of the Syrian people and a reminder of Irans hypocrisy of claiming to support freedom in the Arab world. As part of the US effort to isolate both Syria and Iran, the US Congress and the Treasury Department issued a report identifying Irans national oil company as an agent of the Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is responsible for Irans nuclear program as well. The SecretaryGeneral also chided Ahmadinejad for his and Iranian military officials statements threatening to attack US and other countries bases and infrastructure if Iran is to be attacked by Israel, and for threatening to close the Straits of Hormuz, an international waterway. Among the US facilities which Iran has threatened, directly or indirectly, to attack, include facilities in Iranian trading partners the UAE and Bahrain, among others, all of which are in immediate proximity to Iran and the Straits as well, putting Iran in the position of threatening a number of its own allies. Designating Iranian oil directly to the Revolutionary Guard Corps is likely intended to put pressure on Dubai to stop making such capabilities available to Iran. In an unexpected move, Defense Minister Ehud Barak, the former Prime Minister, called for a unilateral withdrawal from much of the West Bank region. Barak said that Israel must take such bold practical steps in order to restart the stalled peace process with the Palestinians. Prime Minister Netanyahus office declined to comment on the remarks. While suggesting a significant pullout of settlers close to the Israeli border, Barak nevertheless indicated that Israel would need to maintain a military presence, particularly along the Jordanian border. Baraks comments were not short on details, saying that what settlers remain in West Bank area under Palestinian control should do so for a five year trial period. He said that such a move would improve Israels relations with the Palestinian authorities, but also put Israel in a positive light with respect to administrations in Europe, the Americans, and other countries in the region. Such a move, plus Israels new willingness to allow natural gas exploitation

Iran

off its coast near Gaza, could enhance its posture in the eyes of Western governments and possibly with the Palestinians. Such a proposal is not completely unthinkable to all Israelis, due to demographics. Jews and Palestinians each constitute roughly 50% of the population of Israel. Soon Israeli Jews could find themselves a minority within Israel proper. Barak said that his proposal was meant as a starting point, but Sabri Sedam, an aide to Palestinian President Abbas, said that it is not sufficient as it does not address East Jerusalem. Said Barak: The time has come to make decisions based not only upon ideology but from a cold reading of current reality. Unilateral actions have been controversial in Israel since the 2005 withdrawal from Gaza.

During the attack, three armed men engaged Israeli soldiers whilst they administered aide to African refugees at a border crossing. The assailants were armed with assault weapons and an explosive belt, which detonated during the firefight. All three of the attackers were killed while one Israeli soldier was killed and another wounded. It was also reported that the attackers had placed a weapons cache in a nearby ditch, to include small arms and explosives. In recent months, Israeli and Egyptian forces have come under attack from militants, spurring coordinated security efforts in the Sinai by both countries. Despite these joint security efforts, Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman stated Israel will not change the 1979 Camp David peace treaty, which limits the number of Egyptian troops allowed in the Sinai Peninsula. This statement comes as members within Egypt have called for amendments to allow increased Egyptian troop levels to combat lawlessness in the region. It remains to be seen whether President Morsis campaign to eliminate militants and criminals from the area will have a lasting effect, as the constraints of the Camp David treaty, the difficulty of joint operations with Israel and the sheer size of the Sinai prove to be potent roadblocks to pacification of the area. According to activists, Syrian jets and artillery bombarded oppositionheld areas in the disputed city of Aleppo. Three children were reportedly among eight people killed by air strikes in the central district of Maadi. Following these attacks, troops exchanged fire with rebels in districts throughout the city. This violence came as the UN envoy to Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, prepared to brief the UN Security Council on his talks with President Bashar alAssad. The death toll from these incidents, according to the Local Co ordination Commitiees, was at least 24 dead, 15 of which were in Aleppo. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights stated that 29,000 people have died in Syria since the uprising against the Assadled government started earlier this year. It was reported that explosions damaged or destroyed a school in the southern area of Damascus. Rebel groups claim the building housed progovernment militia and security forces and was completely destroyed in the attack. Syrian state sponsored media rebuked these claims, stating that the building was a school and that damage had been minimal. Violence continued in Damascus when four military guards were killed after suicide attackers drove their vehicle, laden with bombs into the military headquarters in the heart of Damascus, Syrian officials stated. Rebels exchanged fire with soldiers at the compound and in the surrounding area for hours after the explosions. The FSA claimed they had carried out the attack, stating dozens had been killed. These events indicate that government violence against civilian populations in Syria will likely continue, as proAssad forces remain incapable of reclaiming areas of key cities. Syrian forces seem intent on waging a war of attrition, despite their waning morale and manpower. It would seem as though the rebels have gained a significant boon in their fight with government forces, as the leadership of the FSA reportedly moved into the country. If the FSA was indeed behind

the planning and execution of the attacks on government facilities in Damascus, it would likely indicate a significant and immediate improvement in the rebels capabilities to plan and carry out attacks on presumably safe government forces. This development could severely undermine Syrian morale, increase defections and sap Syrias ability to wage war on the rebels. In coming weeks, look for an increasing number of attacks on high value military targets as the FSA leadership relocates to within Syria.

Outlook
As Iran continues to pursue its military and regional aspirations, its role as a key supporter of the Assad regime and overt military posture in the region may be coming to a head. Irans supplying of the Assad regime with weapons has not only violated UN sanctions, but has likely caused the intensification of the conflict in Syria. Despite reprimands from the international community for these arms deals, as well as their continued pursuit of a nuclear capability, the Iranian military continues to assert that they are a major player in the region. Recently, Iranian forces unveiled their own indigenous drone, with a range of 2000 km as well as threatened once again to mine the Straits of Hormuz in the midst of an international naval exercise in the region. As the likelihood of the downfall of the Assad regime increases, the Iranians are likely to lose their biggest ally in the region, as well as influence via proxies in and around Syria. If this is to be the case, look for increased demonstrations of force from Iran in the region.

Iran

ShortMedium Term

An Egyptian court sentenced 14 members of an extremist group to death by hanging for attacks against police in the Sinai Peninsula, ruling that they were members of an organization that considers even other Islamists to be infidels. Another six were sentenced to life in prison, while four were acquitted. It remains unclear at this time if members of this organization, known as Takfir wilHijra or Takfiris, were involved in the attack on an Israeli border station in Sinai last week. The group is known to have been operative within Egypt since the late 1970s, with a former leader executed in 1978 under thenpresident Anwar Sadat.

Egypt

Syria

The news of the movement of the leadership of the FSA into the country for the first time since 2011 could indicate a turning point in the conflict. This decision on the part of the FSA leadership likely shows that the momentum on the ground is beginning to shift in favor of the opposition movement. Examples abound to reinforce this point. Recently, Syrian rebel groups have taken control of three key border crossings with Turkey, facilitating the movement of manpower and materiel o ver the border into opposition held territories in Syria. The FSA has claimed to have carried out successful attacks on locations once presumed secure by the Assad regime within Damascus. Opposition forces declared that they have launched a major assault on proAssad forces, aimed at retaking the contested city of Aleppo. As the opposition to Bashir alAssad continues to fight for control of Aleppo, and the country at large, the role of the FSA in the opposition movement will become increasingly important. Colonel Riad alAsaad, as well as the rest of the leadership of the FSA, will likely attempt to exert control and spread influence over the various factions fighting against the Syrian government. The FSA, it would seem, is very interested in shaping current events within Syria. As the conflict continues, opposition groups will likely continue to maneuver themselves to have a stake in the future of Syria.

Syria

MediumLong Term

Israel

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All Photographs Prometheus Medical Ltd 2012

Managing an Airway

Managing an Airway Effectively in a Medical Emergency


By Dean Bateman Following his previous article on catastrophic haemorrhage, Prometheus Medicals Chief Instructor, Dean Bateman continues the series on <C>ABCD, with Airway Management.
Loss of the airway results in failure of ventilation and reduced oxygenation and is a terminal pathway for every patient unless timely and effective management is commenced. Brain tissue begins to suffer irreversible damage after as little as 5-7 minutes. This can vary between individuals and is reduced if the patient has had severe blood loss or a traumatic brain injury. Oxygen levels in the brain will reduce far more quickly in severely ill, injured, obese and elderly patients, which will have a negative impact on survival. Airway management should start immediately after the scene has been made safe and catastrophic haemorrhage has been controlled. Safety <C> Catastrophic Haemorrhage A AIRWAY B Breathing C Circulation D Disability Different skill levels will dictate the level of care the patient receives - from a jaw thrust manoeuvre and airway adjuncts, to endotracheal intubation or performing a surgical airway. If the basics are not performed correctly, the advanced procedures will have a poor outcome. As always, doing the basics well is far better than providing advanced care poorly. AIRWAY ASSSESSMENT: LOOK, LISTEN, FEEL LOOK for Visible obstruction - food, broken teeth etc. Blood and or vomit Respiratory distress - pulling in of neck/chest muscles. Facial burns - singed nasal hair, carbonaceous sputum (black sooty saliva). Severe facial trauma LISTEN for Snoring - tongue fallen back partially occluding the airway. Gurgling -blood, vomit sitting in the hypopharynx (back of throat). Stridor - high pitched noise on inspiration, suggestive of a narrowing of the upper airways, may be caused by burns, allergic reactions etc. Silence - not breathing at all. FEEL for Movement of air passing through the mouth. The aim of airway management is to open, clear and maintain the airway. On initial assessment, if the patient is talking, shouting or crying, it may be safe to assume he/she has a patent airway. Remember though that in burns cases, an airway that sounds alright initially can rapidly deteriorate. In all cases, regular repeated re-assessment is vital.

If the patient is unconscious, the airway will have to be supported by some means either manually and/or by the use of airway devices. This is usually best achieved with the patient in the supine position (i.e. lying on his/her back). OPEN the airway Head-tilt, chin-lift This manoeuvre is easy to perform and effectively opens the airway but should not be done if there are concerns about a possible spinal injury, due to the neck extension involved.

Jaw thrust The jaw thrust takes a little more skill to carry out, but is the correct way to open an airway when there is concern about cervical spine injury. The head and neck are kept in a neutral position while the jaw is lift upwards (if the patient is lying on their back). This lifts the tongue and soft tissues forward to prevent them blocking the airway.

CLEAR the airway Remove visible foreign bodies, DO NOT PERFORM BLIND FINGER SWEEPS. Leave well-fitting dentures in place. Suction out any vomit or fluid to avoid any risk of aspiration. If the patient is vomiting or bleeding faster than you can provide suction, place the patient into the recovery position until fluid has drained. Once this has happened, roll the patient onto their back again in order to re-assess and control their airway.

MAINTAIN the airway Once the airway has been opened and cleared of any obstruction it is essential to maintain the airway in the open position to maximize brain oxygenation. Airway devices (often called adjuncts) are designed to keep the airway open. On occasion, it may be necessary to keep the airway open with manual manoeuvres whilst airway adjuncts are in place. Do not assume that airway adjuncts are enough to open the airway alone: always re-assess. Airway devices must not be used without proper training.

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OROPHARYNGEAL (OP) airway This simple device can be very effective in maintaining the airway but, if used incorrectly, can cause damage of the tissues locally and can make the patient gag and potentially vomit. Patients need to be deeply unconscious, therefore, in order to tolerate the OP airway. DO NOT try to force an OP airway into a patient with tightly clenched teeth (trismus). The OP airway should be measured for the correct size in order to work effectively. Measure between the middle of the incisors (front teeth) to the angle of the jaw (just below the ear lobe). The OP airway must be inserted gently. It is usually inserted upside down and then rotate 180o once past the roof of the mouth. If the patient gags or cough, it is usually a sign that they are guarding their own airway (i.e. do not need an adjunct) and the OP airway should be swiftly removed. Once in place, the patients airway must be re-assessed to see if they still require a manual manoeuvre too.

Managing an Airway

NASOPHARYNGEAL (NP) airway Like the OP airway, this device must not be used unless the first-aider or medic has been properly trained. The NP airway is often tolerated even with higher levels of consciousness and may be a good alternative if the patient will not accept an OP airway. It is also a good choice of airway adjunct for patients with trismus. There is a small risk of causing local trauma to the nasal cavity - use lubrication if available (consider using the patients saliva if necessary, running the NP airway along the inside of the patients lips). The NP airway comes in different sizes (diameter in mm). The two most common sizes carried are: 6mm Adult female 7mm Adult male

vertically (i.e. straight back towards the back of their head, not up their nose). They should be inserted gently using fingertip pressure. The patient should be re-assessed after insertion.

NP airways are not used in children due to the high risk of bleeding on insertion due to delicate soft tissue structures which can be damaged by the tube. With the patient lying on their back, the NP airway is inserted

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CERVICAL SPINE CONTROL The cervical spine is the terms used for the vertebral bones in the neck. Cervical spine injury should always be considered on your initial approach to the casualty. Consider the mechanism of injury. The following are situations that should make the first-aider particularly suspicious of cervical spine injury. Fall from height of more than two metres Fall onto head Ejection from vehicle Vehicle roll-over High deceleration vehicle collision Significant blunt trauma above the collar bones (clavicles) If suspected and enough resources are available, a person should hold the head in the neutral alignment until the patient is adequately immobilized. However, if the airway cannot be managed with cervical spine precautions, then priority should be given to the airway. The measures taken to control the cervical spine will depend on the operational environment and other hazards (e.g. hostile action) must be taken into account. SUMMARY Failing to recognize a blocked airway will result in death of brain tissue and death to the patient unless the appropriate action is taken quickly and effectively. The airway should always take priority over a possible cervical spine injury. Think cervical spine, Do airway. The next article will focus on the correct assessment of Breathing in the <C>ABCD algorithm, describing some life-threatening chest injuries and their management.

Review

COVert RUrAl SUrVeillAnce


Author: Ben Wall ISBN No: 978-09535378-4-6 9

Covert Rural Surveillance is a manual dedicated to covering covert tactics for rural surveillance operations.

COVERT RURAL
The definitive tradecraft manual for rural surveillance operators

Upon getting my hands on this book I was immediately impressed. It has a pretty substantial feel to it and is laid out fantastically with plenty of imagery, graphics and diagrams to illustrate all teaching points and in this subject area a picture can paint a thousand words! Whilst I have carried out a commercial surveillance course and carried out numerous surveillance taskings all of them have been in an urban environment so I got this book out of pure interest and to further my knowledge in this area. I also purchased it as it gives a good insight of the tactics used by those carrying our rural surveillance operations and whilst working as a CPO any of the techniques described in this book could be used against your principal so it is good to be aware of the latest techniques and capabilities that can be used against you. If you are interested in or are in fact working within a surveillance environment and wish to expand your knowledge in this area then this book is an absolute must as it is a treasure trove of information on rural surveillance operations. I would also highly recommend it to current members of the forces whom may be operating in this type of role or environment.

SURVEILLANCE

An essential guide for...


Specialist Military Units Police CROPS Teams Government Agencies Private Surveillance Teams
Dean Bateman is Prometheus Chief Instructor and has 20 years of experience of responding to medical emergencies in ambulances, fast response paramedic cars, physician supported units and helicopters. In addition to his work in the UK, Dean also has experience of teaching in immediate medical care and providing medical cover in hostile environments across Africa.

BEN WALL
Former British Army Reconnaissance

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Distance learning

Distance Learning Training and education is an important part of ongoing professional development. However, in the hustle and bustle of working life it can be difficult to find time to learn, particularly in professions with irregular work schedules and a lot of travel like close protection
Thankfully, the days where the only way to get a qualification is to attend a college once or twice a week are gone. There are now lots of more flexible learning options available, and distance learning in particular is gaining popularity. But, what is distance learning and how do you know if it is for you? What is distance learning? Distance learning is a formal teaching method specifically designed to deliver learning remotely. Distance learning can be as effective as traditional face-to-face teaching when delivered correctly; this includes good quality learning materials, a high standard of support from tutors, and appropriate and timely feedback on assignments. Distance learning is used for a wide range of training from short courses taking a few hours to complete to postgraduate qualifications lasting a few years. Distance learning via e-learning, in particular, is increasingly in demand as all the relevant course materials and contact with tutors can be accessed using the internet. Benefits of distance learning The central benefit of distance learning is flexibility. Distance learning allows people to study wherever they choose, at their own pace, and without the need to attend a college or university. As such it allows learners to join courses delivered in different cities, regions, or even countries facilitating access to the top quality courses in their chosen field. Traditionally, distance learning has been delivered via CD-ROMs, however, the move to internet-based learning is ongoing offering even more flexibility to learners. Quick and easy access to learning materials and flexible means of submitting coursework (e.g. via online learning environments or email) are just a few features that add to the flexibility of distance learning. Furthermore, the nature of distance learning courses means learners can continue to work alongside studying which is a big advantage for those who need to continue earning. Whilst it is true that there are some challenges in distance learning (e.g. no face-to-face contact with tutors, a less social learning environment), many learners find that distance learning suits their needs as it allows them to build education into their existing routine. The key to distance learning is to choose the right course for you (it must be in line with your long-term professional development aims), and to set time aside to study. Top tips for distance learning If you do decide to embark on distance learning, here are a few tips to help you get the most out of your course. Choose the right course as discussed in an earlier edition of The Circuit magazine (No14 published January 2012), choosing the right course is instrumental to success. The course needs to be directly linked to your aims and objectives and concentrate on developing real skills. Set time aside to study setting aside dedicated time to study is essential. It is important to understand the level of commitment needed at the outset and plan your time

By Amy Burrell
accordingly. This might be challenging if you have an irregular work schedule, however, most courses can be fitted in around your availability (i.e. lots of work for a few weeks then none for a few weeks). Choose the right training provider it is important to choose a training provider that understands the challenges you face in terms of the time you have available to study. Remember there are lots of different options for training providers from Universities and Higher Education Colleges to commercial training companies. Research carefully when choosing your course to understand how flexible the training provider is. Dont be afraid to ask for help we all need support sometimes. Dont be afraid to ask for help, as the old adage says there are no stupid questions. When you are researching the training provider ask them what support systems are in place for students (e.g. tutors) and make sure you know how to access this support when you start the course. Ensure you have the right equipment e.g. fast enough internet connection, especially if you plan to study abroad and/or in a hostile environment. This will ensure you always have access to your learning materials. Know what your assignment deadlines are - if the training provider sets assignment deadlines, ask for these at the start of the course so you can plan your study around them. If there are no set deadlines, make sure you set some yourself. This will keep you motivated and keep you on track to complete your course. Submit on time if possible submitting assignments on time means youll get your feedback in time to act on it before next assignment is due. Most training providers will recognise that this is not always possible and will work with you to set alternative deadlines. It is important to keep lines of communication open with the training provider so they know when to expect your work and make plans to get this marked for you as quickly as possible. Utilise your feedback this will help you to enhance your knowledge and skills as you progress through the course, and ultimately boost grades. Summary Distance learning is not new. However, it is becoming more and more accessible as online learning environments become more user-friendly, and more courses gain formal academic certification and recognition. The development of tailormade courses for specific industries are playing a key role in providing professionals with the opportunity to expand their knowledge and gain formal recognition of their skills and abilities. About Perpetuity Training Perpetuity Training offer a range of short courses, including Level 4 professional awards in Managing Security Surveys, and Security Management. All of our short courses can be adapted to meet the needs of individual businesses and delivered as an in-house training course. We also offer bespoke training services. Perpetuity Training is proud to be associated with the Security Institute (SyI) and to be the provider of the Institutes two membership qualifications the Certificate in Security Management (Level 3 Advanced Certificate) and the Diploma in Security Management (Level 5 Professional Diploma).For more information log onto www.perpetuitytraining.com. Contact us on 0116 222 5550 or email training@perpetuitygroup.com

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Review

The IFAK

ClOse PrOtectiOn
Author: Richard Aitch ISBN No: 978-0-9572075-0-9

An absolute pleasure it is to review this book. Why it is a pleasure you may ask? Because from the moment you clasp your eyes on it you can see from the shear size, volume and number of pages the amount of time, effort, and research that has gone into writing it.
Dont get me wrong it is not a book to sit by the pool that you can slip into and get absorbed in because it is not designed to be that type of book. It is a manual that is designed to try and raise standards within the protection industry. You have to take your hat off to the amount of effort that has been put in here, whether you agree with everything or not Rich says, he has put himself out there and his passion for the craft is plain to see throughout the book. Reading about the SIA is not the most riveting subject for people within the UK Security Industry but I particularly enjoyed Richs chapter on the SIA as it highlights the lengths he has gone to try and get answers as to why certain criteria was not laid down at the outset by the SIA. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone currently serving in or looking to enter the close protection industry! One thing I would recommend is that with the book being so large that it is released for mobile devices such as the Kindle and iPad, that way you can always have the manual as a reference if needed no matter where you are without carrying the physical book which weighs in at a whopping 1.652kg.

By Benjamin Alozie

When lives are on the line, protecting or saving lives always depends on at least two critical factors, which are having the proper training and the right tools.
The Close Protection profession exposes true professionals to domestic and global travels, and the reality is one may be called upon to protect lives in countries where there are either substandard emergency response services, or in some cases none at all. As a Red Cross Certified Emergency First Responder, that travels globally; packing light and efficiently are two very important considerations which I factor always into my bag packing travel plan. This is where IFAK comes into the picture. I recently had the opportunity to field test a customized IFAK pack for Operational use and wanted to share my thoughts on the outcome. First, IFAK stands for Individual/Improved First Aid Kit, its a SMART solution aimed at putting the right and most important first aid tools within reach when a life is on the line from the two leading causes of death in hostile environment encounters are namely; serve hemorrhage and inadequate airway. Barely larger than a deck of playing cards, IFAKs are designed to improve lifesaving capabilities, improve Self-Aid/Buddy-Aid. This capability that IFAK makes handy certainly increases survivability chances because under stress it reduces the time it takes to locate and deploy the right tool as opposed to large first aid bags with lots of tools. The Close Protection agent can make sure of this as a space saving item for the Go Bag or even in the breast pocket of a suit without any noticeable bulges. The IFAK under review is a customized Trauma pack that contained the following kits listed below: Tourniquet: The TK-4L: One-Handed Tourniquet for Legs and Lower Extremities this tool gives the user the ability to apply the maximum capable force on lower extremities. Dimensions: 2.5 x 2.5 x .6 and Weight: 4 oz. Thin H Compression Bandage: The Thin H provides a fast, effective tool for many kinds of traumas and injuries (particularly those involving arterial bleeding in extremities). This bandage is packed in a sterile, vacuumsealed 4 mil barrier bag, in a flat fold to create a small tight package. Dimensions: 6 x 4 x .25, Weight: 2 oz and Shelf Life is 3 years Boling Chest Seal: The tool is a sterile occlusive chest wound dressing for treating open pneumothorax and preventing tension pneumothorax that result from gunshots, stab wounds, or other penetrating chest trauma. Dimensions: 7.5 x 7.5 x .25 and Weight: 3 oz. Pros: Easy to deploy and use Three Years Shelf Life Sterile Vacuum Sealed & Compact Customizable to Needs Very Portable Fits Standard Sized Pockets Airport Security friendly. Cons: I wanted to place the IFAK on review under some harsh conditions and noticed it lost its airtight & Vacuum sealed packing after some rough airport baggage handling. The pack remained compact but the kits inside moved around a bit. Conclusion: This Customized IFAK Trauma pack does what it is designed for and more. It is one of those tools that give its user value for money. I will certainly incorporate it into my kit because of the real world medical emergency problem it could greatly assist in solving. Additionally, as this was a field test, I have given my thoughts/suggestions to the designers and could very well find my only con addressed by product launch. You will be able to find the IFAK after release at www.BodyguardGear.com

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Events

Comms to HQ
We like to hear all of your comments and suggestions, and welcome the opportunity to answer your questions or offer advice so please send them in to: info@circuit-magazine.com

EVents pAge
SIA Network Meeting: Door Supervision Network meeting to be held 24 Oct 2012. The next door supervision network meeting will be held in Central London on Wednesday 24 October. If you would like to attend the meeting, please register your interest by Friday 12 October 2012. Details of how to register are available at: www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk/ds-network Emergency Services Show: Registration is now open for the UKs leading emergency services event which takes place at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire

Helping you with your networking needs, here we will feature some of the next quarters upcoming events, if you would like to list your event, please contact info@circuit-magazine.com
from Wednesday 21 November - Thursday 22 November. PTSD Resolution (charity No. 1133188) is organising a one-day course for managers in Trauma Awareness Training for Employers November 29th 2012, London (199 plus VAT) visit www.ptsdresolution.org/tate Service Leavers Networking Event: Every month on the third Thursday until November 21, Venue:The Musket Club Address: Fallowfield road, Colchester, Essex, CO2 9LL, United Kingdom. Phone: +44 7974 245161 email: lleacolchester@gmail.com
Type International security Maritime Security Conferences / seminars Regional security International security International security International security Company sponsored International security Service Leavers Employment Fair Company sponsored Company Sponsored Company sponsored International security International security Company sponsored Company sponsored

COmms tO HQ
I have recently completed my CP training and am now attempting to put together my CV and cover letter to send out. I would really appreciate any tips or advice you have to offer. Steven K Hi Steven congratulations on completing your CP course and we wish you well in securing employment. If you are IT literate then you can give it a crack yourself but I would recommend paying and having it professionally done. Work is few and far between at the moment and the competition is fierce so you need to showcase yourself the best that you can. Should there be a minimum time for holding a lower license such as the DS badge before being allowed to hold a CP license? Mitch This subject is open to debate but personally I dont think this should be the case. People come from a variety of different backgrounds and it would be hard to ask somebody whom already has experience of protecting people through the military for instance to hold a DS license for a set period before being allowed to progress. If common sense was applied and Accredited Prior Learning and experience taken into account then it could work but I for one cannot see this ever happening. I am based in the UK and would like to enter the Close Protection Industry however the whole thing seems like a minefield for a new entrant trying to plan. What is happening with the SIA and is it worth holding on until the new governing body comes in before doing my course?? K. Stephens The SIA is currently being phased out and there has not been a great deal of information forthcoming about whom is replacing them or how the transition is going to take place and when but I wouldnt let this stop you from attending a course if thats what you want to do. Any transition to a new regulatory regime will be phased and I can confirm after speaking to the SIA at a recent roadshow that all current licenses will be valid until theyre renewed and that the whole process should be painless to those involved. Does the age of a CPO affect their employability? Phillipa S There is currently no age criteria laid out by the SIA but yes the age of a qualified CPO will most definitely affect the amount of opportunities that become available to you. A billionaire would not employ an 18 year old accountant or lawyer to look after their books or business dealings after just becoming qualified, the same goes for security, you have to start at the bottom and gain experience before getting the bigger more desirable roles. However of course there will always be exceptions to this rule. I am a new reader of The Circuit magazine, but I would like to see more involvement from women in Security giving advice and features. Do you have plans for this? Jim W We have been soliciting more input from our growing number of female readers working in the industry and in addition to Jacquie Davis regular column this issue also features great advice on surveillance from Angela Lawson and an intriguing interview with Ruth Tiik. Any females out there, working the circuit who wish to be heard then please get in touch. Fantastic magazine, I loved the new look of the last edition keep up the good work guys! John D, Derby Thanks John, if you liked the last issue then Im sure youre going to love the current edition with its revamped fresh modern look. Thanks for the positive feedback!

Date
Oct 17 - 20, 2012 Oct 17 20, 2012 Oct 22 - 25, 2012 Oct 23 - 26, 2012 Oct 24 - 25, 2012 Oct 24 - 26, 2012 Oct 24 - 25, 2012 Oct 25, 2012 Nov 6 - 7, 2012 Nov 6 2012 Nov 13, 2012 Nov 13-14, 2012 Nov 14, 2012 Nov 14 - 15, 2012 Nov 14 - 15, 2012 Nov 21 - 22, 2012 Dec 4, 2012

Event
CIPS 2012 Combining Piracy Week Security China 2012 BEZPEKA Expo 2012 CANASA Expo - Toronto, ON Invest Hotel 2012 Security Canada Central 2012 ADI Expo - Atlanta, GA Alarm Kielce 2012 SOUTH EAST Employment Fair for Service Leavers ADI Expo - Dallas, TX Fleet & Asset Management 2012 Samsung Smarter Security Day - Woburn Abbey 2012 Sectech 2012 - Denmark Transport Security Expo Siqura Technical Training November 2012 ADI Customer Appreciation Event - Montreal, QC

Location
Baku, Azerbaijan London Beijing, China Kiev, Ukraine Toronto, Canada Poznan, Poland Toronto, Canada Atlanta, United States of America (USA) Kielce, Poland Kempton Park Middlesex, TW16 5AQv Dallas, United States of America (USA) Atlanta Woburn Abbey, United Kingdom (UK) Copenhagen, Denmark London, United Kingdom (UK) Amsterdam Zuid-Oost, Netherlands Montreal, Canada

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Classifieds

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ClAssifiedS
United Kingdom 3D Security Ltd Taunton, Somerset, TA1 1TG Based in Taunton 3D Security provides security services for a wide range of clients. Whether you need a security guard in Somerset, event security in Leeds or Close Protection in London we will provide a solution for your needs. T: +44 (0)1823 253 001 W - www.3dsecurity.org E - enquiries@3dsecurity.org.uk A.B.I. Solutions A.B.I Solutions is a dynamic, forward thinking company, specialising in surveillance, security and investigations with local, national and internationalexperience. A.B.I provides a wide range of services to the corporate sector and individuals alike. W - www.abisolutions.co.uk Amanda Campbell A highly motivated and experienced female operative both CP and Surveillence training T 07596542249 W - www.amandacampbell.org.uk E - ac@amandacampbell.org.uk Ambassador Security Management ASM MK Lions Arena, Grafton Court, Snowden Drive, Winterhill, Milton Keynes, MK6 1AJ, GBR. After successfully gaining ACS (Door Supervision and Manned Guarding) along with ISO 9000, we here at ASM have a dedicated management team with hundreds of years combined experience in the security industry. W: www.asmsecurity.co.uk E: scott@asmsecurity.com T: 08458335750 Ark Personal and Asset Protection Ark, 2b Crow Lane, Rochester, Kent, ME11RF, GBR A small, efficient, highly descrete company employing ex special forces and detectives for all civil and corporate covert needs. E: Office@arkprotect.com T: +0044 01634 845526 Argus Europe County Durham Argus Europe has been providing specialist training for high-net worth clients and their families for close to 20 years, worldwide. Argus Europe now offer accredited training for CPOs, Surveillance Operators and Private detectives. Argus Europe is an operational company working globally with an extensive variety of contracts. W: www.arguseurope.co.uk T: +44 (0) 8456 123 843 Atlantian Business Solutions Group Rutland, LE15 6SD, GBR Atlantian Business Solutions has been designed to help both individuals and New Companies build for the future as well as support others with training needs. T: 07725970954 W: www.atlantianbsgroup.com E: info@atlantianbsgroup.com Briareus Security Our aim is to give a complete, discreet and professional service to all of our clients, be they large corporations, small businesses, local authorities or private individuals, all tailored to meet their individual needs. W: www.briareussecurity.com E: info@briareussecurity.com Alastair Christie Advice on site security, perimeter fencing, lighting, CCTV and manning requirements. Monitor and advise on guard force setting up site procedures and guard SOPs. T : +44 (0)7736 328112 E : ally.c9496@yahoo.co.uk Control Risk Management Solutions - CRMS Ireland Executive Close Protection Operations & Training (B Tec Level 3 Diploma Edexcel) Threat & Risk Assessments, Consultancy Services. W: www.crmsinternational.com E: martin@crmsinternational.com Crest Security & Surveillance Ltd 51 The Crest, West Heath, Birmingham, West Mids, B31 3QA, GBR Highly experienced Security Consultant with a proven record of accomplishment in the field of protective security. Skilled in all phases of risk assessment, operational planning, logistical organisation, implementation of security measures, security team leadership, project coordination, and delivery of security advice to a high profile clientele. E: info@stephencahill.co.uk T: 447977071427 CSI Protection Ltd International, GBR A well established security consultant and personal protection operative providing high or low Key protection to high risk and prestigious clientele. Specialising in the maritime industry as a consultant for private vessel protection on super yachts world wide. W: www.csi-protection.co.uk E: gary@csi-protection.co.uk Custodia Custodia is an independent client focused Specialist Security & Risk Management Company, specialising in Risk consultancy and Security project management. Providing a comprehensive portfolio of Risk mitigation solutions to assist Businesses and individuals to plan for, manage and mitigate risk. T: 01432 277693 W: www.custodia.co.uk DF Risk Management Solutions DF Risk Management Solutions N.I. is a modern, professional risk management company, with a diverse range of global strategic experiences and a team of executives who possess dynamic but complementary backgrounds. T: +44 (0)7837642686 +44 (0)7758743918 W: www.dfriskmanagementsolutionsni.com Executive Protection Officer Worldwide CP services W: www.executiveprotectionofficer.com

is widespread and we offer nationally recognised qualifications. BBA Member. T: + 44 (0) 1423 712265 W: www.intelsecurity.co.uk Jason Morris Security Hertfordshire, UK Providing a wide range of Door supervision/ security for V.I.P and prestige venues, Concerts, Functions, Corporate and Personal Security, Weddings, Private Parties, Gala Dinners, Business Awards & School Proms, Close Protection and Body Guarding Static Guarding and Stewards. T: 01462 478900 W: www.jasonmorrissecurity.co.uk E: agosselin@jasonmorrissecurity.co.uk John Featherstone Security professional with operational experience gained in a variety of theatres. Main specialities close protection and surveillance. T: 24hrs : +44 (0)7702 740722 E: john@johnfeatherstone.co.uk W: www.johnfeatherstone.co.uk K9 Support Services Ltd K9 Support Services UK Ltd is a supplier of specialist drugs and explosives dog/ handler detection service (which includes arms & ammunition) to individuals, businesses, and the public sector. T: 0845 643 6393 E: info@k9support.org.uk Logas International Tyne & Wear, SR1, GBR Front line SIA, International CPO. Private Investigation and Surveillance operator. E: wscarr@logasinternational.com MLK Security and Protection Services Swindon, UK Close Protection Officer and Door Supervisor E: mattleekane@hotmail.com T: 07917654978 LJE Security Services North Yorkshire, HG1, GBR Close Protection, Residential Security, Asset Protection, VIP red carpet Security and Private Investigation. E: leanneedmondson@yahoo.co.uk One Events Grantham One Events offers you a stress free solution in the organisation, putting together and running of an event. Thisis accomplished by having a group of specialised companies from different industries working together for a more complete service for you. TEL: 0870 974 6779 W: www.oneevents.info Plymouth Close Protection Highly versatile, physically fit and accomplished security professional with cumulative experience in the areas of security management, close protection, crisis management, risk assessment, emergency management, asset protection and security training. E : chris@plymouthcp.co.uk W : www.plymouthcp.co.uk T : +44 (0)1752 500807 PPSS Group Body armour and stab vests provide a functional solution to individuals who require extra protection in their chosen vocation. All PPSS (formerly ASEO) body armour and stab vests are certified by the UKs Home Office (HOSDB) and offer unrivalled protection from blunt trauma caused by a punch, blow or kick. Based on our professional frontline experience and extensive research we can confirm that an impact based assault is a more likely event than an attack

involving an edged weapon or firearm. T: +44 (0) 845 5193 953 F: +44 (0) 1765 603 512 E: info@ppss-group.com W: www.ppss-group.com Presence Security Presence Security ( PS ) is a bespoke security company providing protection for private individuals and VIPs, as well as security services for businesses and organizations. T: 0800 002 9734 E: info@presencesecurity.co.uk Prestige Risks LTD 27 Old Gloucester Street, London, WC1N, 3AX, GBR. Close Protection Secure Chauffeurs Surveillance Residential Security Executive Protection Security Guards Asset Protection T : +44 (0)207 5588182 E : info@prestigerisks.com W : www.prestigerisks.com Prometheus Medical Ltd Prometheus deliver unrivalled bespoke emergency medical support in the form of specialist equipment, training, strategic advice and deployed clinical care. T: (+44) 1568 613942 W: www.prometheusmedical.co.uk Prosec Consultancy Ltd 10 Oakfield business park Westbury, BA13 4WF. Prosec Consultancy Limited are dedicated in providing a professional service, which covers a whole range of security services throughout the security industry. T: 01373 228055 W: www.prosec-ltd.co E: info@prosec-ltd.com ProTouch Security ProTouch Security is one of the UKs key providers of event safety, event security, crowd management, door supervisors, stewards, event management and health and safety. T: 01724 279 522 W: www.protouchsecurity.co.uk Python Security and Protection Ltd Providing Close Protection Officers and Door Supervisors for Events and Venue Security. E : mattleekane@hotmail.com RSM Security UK Ltd London, UK RSM Security UK Ltd offers the experience and expertise necessary to provide security personnel of the highest calibre when you need them. T: 07850091979 or 07792948523 W: www.rsmsecurity.co.uk E: info@rsmsecurity.co.uk RWSSI Rob W is a professional security consultant with world wide experience and capabilities in Security, Surveillance and Investigation; I can support you to overcome any problems and enable you to achieve your goals E: rob@rwssi.co.uk T: +44 (0)7818 220985 SDS Solutions SDS solutions provide our clients with protective solutions that are second to none, our consultants will discuss every aspect of the problems that you are facing that dictate the need for a protective solution, we promise our clients a tailor made service to meet individual requirements. Whether based in the UK or abroad our protective service T: 01453 887815 E: info@sds-solutions.org Shadow Close Protection A leading company specializing in Executive

Protection as a professional sector, with participation in high and low risk missions, providing global security solutions and consultancy to individuals, corporations and national agencies worldwide. W: www.shadowcp.gr E: info@shadowcp.gr T: + 30 6948539664 Shaun West United Kingdom SIA licensed, Highly Experienced Frontline CPO. Ronin SA trained. Providing security for both corporate and hostile environments. E: sw@shaunwest.co.uk T: +44 (0)7830 109 601 W: www.shaunwest.co.uk Spotllght Protection Services Essex based business which provides a broad and growing range of security services to businesses and organisations large and small. T: 07870560208 E: info@spotlightprotectionservices.co.uk W: www.spotlightprotectionservices.co.uk VIPA Tactical Training A specialist training academy dealing with four specific areas of combat: VIPA Civilian Self Protection Program, VIPA Close Protection Combat System, VIPA Police Defence Tactics and VIPA Military Close Quarter Combat. BBA Member. W: www.VIPAtacticaltraining.com Europe & Africa International Security Academy P.O.Box 5833, Herzeliya, 46000, ISRAEL. Our graduates are more recognized, respected and sought after by Distinguish Protection service consumers and by most of the Providers of Protection services worldwide. Organisers of the 2008 International Summit of Protection Officers. BBA Member. T: + 972 9 950 0969 W: www.SecurityAcademy.org.il Javier Galan Spain Security specialist available for operations around the world. E: oejju@hotmail.com T: 34.637080771 Military Grade Encryption Phones PO Box 52310, Limassol, CYPRUS Built-in encryption software which converts your voice to encrypted data using a constantly changing mathematical formula. It uses a dual layered RSA/ AES combination and a changing session key which modifies the encryption algorithm every second. 1,398.00 + VAT. All prices include new Nokia N73 phone. BBA Member. T: + 357 7777 7276 W: www.protechcy.com/new Security Concierge Group SCG Special Projects Ltd, Avenida, Bartolome Vicente Ramon No 10, B16, Ibiza, 07800, ESP Security Concierge Group is a privately owned and fully independent provider of exceptional security services to an interesting and varied range of clients. T: 00 34 600 665 275 W: www.securityconciergegroup.com E: joe.buckle@securityconciergegroup.com Americas Bodyguard Careers Bodyguard Careers is an informational site with the purpose of providing bodyguards with all the information and tools necessary to succeed in the Close Protection Industry Info@BodyguardCareers.com www.BodyguardCareers.com

First Class Executive Security Nottingham, UK, Nottingham based, full-service company specializing in Bodyguards and Security Consulting services. Extensive experience in VIP security, also caters for public and private sectors. W: www.firstclasssecurity.co.uk T: 0115 9266466 G6 Global G6 are specialists in all types of radio, telephony and satellite communications for both voice and data with particular emphasis on covert communications installations in both vehicles and fixed locations. In addition, our range of personal covert radios and bespoke accessories is extensive. W: info@g6-global.com T: +44 (0)1454 610050 Gordon Russell Highly trained frontline Close Protection Operatives available for UK and International contracts. Our experienced CPOs can offer bespoke packages to meet all clients needs, including a variety of language skills. All SIA licenced, BBA member E: Bodyguard-cpo@Email.cz T: +44 (0)7917 281 004 James Izett All close protection task undertaken, including training tasks. Medic (Registered with the HPCSA, Registered FAAW instructor and Assessor E : J.Izett@gmail.com T : +971 (0)505 574 350 Janice Gurney Proficient and diligent Security Professional gaining extensive knowledge and experience within the security sector. Proactive individual who has a logical, flexible and conscientious approach to all challenges undertaken, ability to work as a member of a team or as an individual willing to work anywhere. T : +44 (0)7885 793061 E : janice382006@gmail.com International Centre of Special Training International Centre of Special Training is an international training and security company based in the United Kingdom. Its priority objective is to provide services to the highest level. W: www.icost-team.com T: +44 796 736 55 65 IPSS Security Northfield, Aberdeen, AB16 7EX Security and protection services - UK and overseas. BBA Member. T: + 44 (0) 1224 69455 W: www.ippssecurity.co.uk ISS Training Ltd Riverside Cottages, Nidd Walk, Pateley Bridge, Harrogate, HG3 5NA ISS Training Limited are providers of specialist covert surveillance training courses and publications to the security and investigative industries, enforcement agencies and specialist military units. Formed in 1990, we are the longest established surveillance training company in the United Kingdom. Our credibility and reputation

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Classifieds

To place a classified lineage or box advertisement telephone our sales team on: +44 (0) 191 6450 865

Canadian Use of Force Systems 7975 Yonge St. # 7124, Innisfil, ON, L9S 1L0, CANADA A professional Use of Force and Defensive. Tactics organization teaching a full range of controlled response options for Self-Protection and Use of Force considerations in public and professional environments. BBA Associate Member. T: + 1 705 456 4333 W: www.canadianuseofforce.com Contact Front Photography Contact Front Photography is the worlds 1st photography studio dedicated to the Close Protection Professional. Stop putting generic or pirated photos on your website; instead commission custom shots to best represent you or your agency. T: +1 (612) 369-6134 E: Info@ContractFrontPhotography.com W: www.ContactFrontPhotography.com Decisiones Estratgicas Buenos Aires Argentina Executive protection specialists we have experienced in all Latin America, for multinationals companies, also providing support in project throughout Latin America to consulting first the US. and UK. We have a team of specialists and psychologists in assistance and crisis negotiation. T: +54(911) 6415 1941 E: jbenitez@destrategicas.com W: www.destrategicas.com Detective Lacerda P.O.BOX 25996, So Paulo, 05513-970, BRAZIL Providing the full range of security and investigation services throughout Latin America. BBA Member. T: + 55 (11) 3452 4388 W: www.detectivelacerda.cjb.net Global Bear Protection PO Box 11488, Jackson, Wyoming, 83002, USA Provision of British and US Ex Special forces security/medical specialists. T: 307 413 3619 W: www.globalbearprotection.com E: bear@globalbearprotection.com Icon Services Corporation 1043 Grand Ave. #312, St. Paul, MN 55105, USA A full service security and investigative agency specializing in providing high-level security and bodyguards to international celebrities, public figures and corporations. Licensed, bonded and insured, our diverse roster of clients reads as a virtual whos who in the corporate, motion picture, fashion and recording industry. Entering into our 10th year, Icon has been the hand picked choice to provide Executive Protection to everyone from Superintendents to Supermodels. BBA Member. T: + 1 651 695 8778 W: www.Industry-Icon.com Imperial Protective Service, LLC 15849 N. 71st Street, Suite 100, Scottsdale , Arizona, 85254, USA Imperial Protective Service (IPS) is a security consulting and services firm founded in 1978. IPS provides both national and international corporate, executive and celebrity protective services. BBA Member. T: + 1 480 281 1588 W: www.executiveprotect.com Panther Protection Services 3695F Cascade Road, Suite 2207, Atlanta, GA 30331 Panther Protection Services is a full service

protection agency offering such services as threat assessment, executive protection, self-defense training, firearms instruction, and high risk tactical protection. Our executive protection specialists have over 75 years of experience. Panther can handle your protection needs whether around the corner or around the world. Member: BBA and NABA T: (404) 349-9117 W: www.pantherprotectionservices.com SILVER STAR PROTECTION Executive protection, site and event security with global experience. Serving southern Minnesota with integrity and professionalism. Former USSS, ICON Alumni. available for domestic and international travel. Robert E. Jones Manager/CEO W: www.silver-star-protection.com E: rejones@silver-star-protection.com TSICS (T6) Miami, Florida, USA TSICS (T6) provides the following services in Central America: Executive Protection, Individual Bodyguard, Close Protection Training, Corporate Invest. W: www.security-professionals.org/members/ saldrix E: tsics.t6@gmail.com T: +502 6645 6822 Tony Scottis Vehicle Dynamics Institute 1162 St. Georges Ave, Suite 277 , Avenel, NJ 07001, USA The first name in advanced driver training, offering our highly acclaimed Protective/Evasive Driving Programs. Designed specifically for todays executive chauffeurs, executive protection professionals and others who are responsible for providing safe and secure transportation services. BBA Member. T: + 1 732 738 5221 W: www.vehicledynamics.net Vindex Personal Protection & Investigation Inc. 497 Hooksett Rd #365 Manchester NH 03104 603.289.3161 / Full service Private Investigations & Executive Protection. 10 years combined Law Enforcement, Private security, close protection work, & security contracting. NY Mayors, U.S. Presidents, NFL owners, and VIPs are some of the protection work Ive gained experience with. ICON alumni, NABA member. T: + 1 732 738 5221 E: vindexinc@aol.com W: www.vindexinc.com Asia Pacific Asia Protective Group Ltd Asia Protective Group (APG) is a Hong Kong based risk management company, specializing in executive protection, overseas travel security and security consultancy services. APG has an extensive network of security specialists operating throughout the Asia Pacific region. W: www.asia-pg.com E: jim@asia-pg.com E: yvonne@asia-pg.com

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The Team: Editor Managing Editor International Editor Art Direction Marketing Executive Shaun West Jon Moss Elijah Shaw Peter Falkous Christina Docherty

Contributors: Pamela McCurdy Eric Konohia Adam White Amy Burrell Tony Scotti Jerome Saiz Benjamin Alozie Jacquie Davis Jonathan Delf Chris Cobb-Smith Dean Bateman Patrick Rea John Dagklis Scott D A V Lawson P Allsopp Elijah Shaw ShaunWest Jon Moss

Our Sincere Thanks to all those that continue to contribute their wisdom and experience for the enjoyment of others The Circuit is compiled, edited and published in the UK and US quarterly. W: www.circuit-magazine.com E: info@circuit-magazine.com T: +44 845 519 2538

DISCLAIMER While every care has been taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is both accurate and up-to-date, The Circuit accepts no liability in any part for loss or damage incurred by reliance on information contained in this magazine through omissions, errors, howsoever caused. COPYRIGHT Copyright remains with the authors and contributors at all times. No part of this publication can be copied or reproduced in any way whatsoever without permission from the publisher AND the author / contributor.

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