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][NClLUDES TJHIE 1-1/2 x 3 LN2 TRANSFER L][NE

ANALYSIS RESULTS
D-ZEROEngineeringNote:3740.S10-EN-162
JeffWendlandt
(RevisedbyC.H.Kurita)
May31,1988

I
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 2
-
INTRODUCTION
The analysis of pipe stress due to thermal contraction and expansion
can be accomplished in numerous ways. This report examines the analysis
methods available to us and provides the reasons for the methods we chose
to use. It then describes the results of the 1-1/2 x 3 vacuum-jacketed LN2
transfer line. The LN2 line also serves as an example for an analysis using
the method chosen. A brief discussion of the 4 x 6 N2 exhaust line follows
these items.
METHOD COMPARISON AND SELECTION
The methods compared include the Grinnell and Tube Turns Chart
methods, Grinnell Moment method, commercial software for PC's, and
ANSYS.
The chart methods have been used for many years with success but
are very tedious and time consuming. This type of analysis has limitations.
For instance, the particular geometry being analyzed might not fit into the
charts available in the handbook. To analyze a given geometry,
assumptions are made which lead to uncertainties in the results. From the
past experience with chart methods, it was decided that a better approach
was needed.
Information on pipe stress software advertised in magazines was
acquired originally by Brian Fitzpatrick. The information received included
written material and demonstration disks. Several demonstration disks
were working programs. One working program, AUTOPIPE, was available
for us to compare our results with the other analysis methods. AUTOPIPE
proved to be easy to use and provided a detailed analysis. The geometry is
quickly entered and conforms to various codes including B31.1 and B31.3.
Letter sized sheets can be printed out which reveal the results in an
organized manner. The software packages have these stated advantages
but are expensive. The initial purchase prices range from $1500.00 to
$6000.00 with the average at $4500.00 (not including user fees).
At the same time, an analysis was performed on ANSYS. ANSYS offers
much more power and is less expensive than the software programs
because the pipe module is already available as a part of the existing
,.-)
ANSYS package in use at the laboratory. The PC software, however, is
much easier to use than ANSYS even though ANSYS provides a pipe module
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 3
_\ for easy geometry input. The LN2 transfer line was analyzed first by the
Grinnell chart method and later done on ANSYS. The ANSYS solution
provided much lower bending stress results. The values were lower by a
factor of two in some instances. We questioned whether or not the stress
intensification factor( SIF ) of the short radius elbows was included in the
ANSYS calculations because the SIF value of 2.6 is close to the factor the
ANSYS values differed from the chart values. After later investigation, the
SIF used in ANSYS was found to be 2.3 because the default radius for a
short radius (sr) elbow is incorrectly 1 x 0.0. The actual radius of sr
elbows is 1 x NOM DIA. This radius is a term in the SIF calculations and
leads to the discrepancy. CODE B31.3 equations for the SIF calculations are
shown in TABLE 1. This flaw in ANSYS is easily corrected by inserting the
numerical elbow radius instead of "sr" ,
In order to compare the results of each analysis method, a simple 6' x
6' "L" shaped pipe run was examined. The 1-1/2 sch-l0s 304 SS pipe with
a short radius elbow was analyzed under the condition that it is rigidly
fixed at both ends and cooled down from 300K to 77K. The results are as
follows:
MEIHOD MAX BENDING STRESS
Grinnell Moment 13,664 psi ( A. Parker)
Grinnell Chart 20,075 psi
Tube Turns Chart 14,769 psi ( A. Parker)
ANSYS 12,737 psi
AUTOPIPE 9,638 psi
From this comparison, several conclusions were drawn: The Grinnell
Chart method is too conservative and both chart methods are inefficient
and limited. AUTOPIPE and other PC programs are efficient but too
expensive. Therefore, ANSYS is our best alternative because it already
exists here and is inexpensive to operate.
11/Z" X 3" LNZ TRANSFER LINE ANALYSIS RESULTS
The analysis included in this report contains the maximum bending
stresses (which are located at the elbows), the forces at the anchor points,
and the displacements at the nodes. The initial analysis began with a
dimensioned piping layout sketch. An acceptable solution was determined
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 4
""':1 by locating vacuum break placements. The vacuum breaks act as rigid
anchors and restrain displacements which then redistribute stresses.
Originally. the solution was checked with the use of the Grinnell Piping
Handbook. The 1-1/2" x 3" pipe is 304 SS sch-IOs pipe with short radius
elbows and a single welding tee. The thermal contraction upon cooling
from 300K to 77K results in the majority of the stresses produced;
additionally. gravity was added to this analysis although it did not produce
any sizable changes in the results. The thermal contraction shown in code
B31.1 is 3.85"/100ft or 1.4387 X 10-5in/in-K [3.85in/I00ft)/12in/ft)1
(300K-77K)]. The dimensions and locations of ,the anchor points are shown
in FIGURE I. The bending stresses and anchor forces are shown in FIGURE
2. The allowable code stress(Sa) is 25.500 psi and should never be
exceeded by the computed stress (Se). Computed stress consists of the
bending stress(Sb) and the torsional stress(St): Se= (Sb
2
+ 4St
2
)1/2. The
torsional stresses are insignificant contributors to the computed stress. At
the element with the maximum bending stress of 17,840 psi. the maximum
torsional stress is 49 psi.
The ANSYS model is composed of elements n ~ nodes. The pipe
elements are made of two nodes and share these nodes with two adjacent
elements. Some nodes are "Ieftover" during the geometry construction and
are not associated with any elements. FIGURE 3 gives locations of the
nodes and FIGURE 4 gives the element numbers formed in the creation of
the ANSYS model. TABLE 2 shows the displacements of these nodes. The
maximum displacements and associated nodes are shown at the bottom of
this table. This concludes the summary of the results.
PIPING ANALYSIS USING ANSYS
Using the LN2 transfer line as an example. I present a procedure for
piping analysis using ANSYS. The reader is assumed to have access to the
ANSYS 4.3 version user manual and any applicable VAX user guides. The
ANSYS USER'S GUIDE written by Mark Leininger used as a reference in this
report is helpful for any ANSYS user. Any analysis begins with a
dimensioned piping layout sketch. After this. vacuum breaks.
external/internal bellows. and"flexhose can be located on the piping layout
to reach acceptable stress levels. The model is created and entered into
ANSYS. To use ANSYS. the user must be setup to do so. This can be
accomplished in the login file or by typing "@LIB:[LIB.ANSYS]SETUP.COM"
after login.
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 5
There are two modes used in ANSYS. These are the interactive and
""'"\
batch modes. The interactive mode is entered by typing ANSYS_INTER
after the $ prompt. The budget code (dch) and the user defined file name
excluding the file extension(.DAT) is then entered. The user is now in the
interactive mode. This mode allows the user to input and analyze a model
at the terminal. Frequently, plots are made on the screen to get the proper
view arrangements. The interactive mode is helpful when a specific stress
or displacement is desired instead of extra information. The batch mode is
entered by typing ANSYS_BA TCH. The budget code, previously defined file
name including the file extension, approximate CPU time, and several
questions answered "NO" follow. After this, the job is put in queue for
analysis. Upon completion, files are created including the solution file and
a file that extracts the geometry, stresses, displacements, and forces from
the solution file and lists them in a readable manner. This latter file
("name".LIS) can be printed out on a line printer and the results can then
be viewed. The listing file provides a documentation of the stresses for
later use.
The analysis of the LN2 transfer line began with the creation of a file
named N2LINE26.DAT. A file ("name"26.DAT) contains the pipe data and
geometry and is created outside of ANSYS. If the input data needs to be
changed, the outside file("name"26.DAT) is just edited. The complete
file(N2LINE.DAT) includes the analysis commands and postprocessing to
extract the results and is appended to this report. N2LINE26.DA T only
includes the pipe data and geometry, and its end is indicated on the
appended file. A step by step procedure is now presented for a batch job:
1. Create "name"26.DAT file using an editor
2. Type ANSYS_INTER
3. Enter budget code ( dch )
4. Enter file name with no extension ( "name")
5. Type liNT
-"Begin-inp" prompt is then displayed.
6. Type /INPUT,26 (ANSYS reads file 26)
7. Check the information scrolling by the screen
8. Enter FINI to leave PREP7
) 9. Enter IEOF to leave ANSYS_INTER
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 6
10. Edit "name"26.DAT, adding additional
retrieval information and correcting any errors.
11. Rename the "name"26.DAT to "name",DAT
12. Type ANSYS_BATCH after the $ prompt
13. Enter budget code
14. Enter CPU time [ 5 minutes]
15. Answer "NO" to the next 3 questions
16, After completion of the job, type the listing
file, "name".LIS, on the screen to check the
results.
17. Print the listing file on your line printer
The commands listed in the appended file are now explained and/or
given the locations of the explanations in the ANSYS manual.
/PREP7
This command places the user in the preprocessing module for model
input. A brief summary of the module is found starting on page 3.2.1.
/TIT, 1-112 X 3 LIQUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
An explanation is found on page 3.1.12 of the ANSYS User's Manual.
MPTEMP,1, 75,144,200,294
MPDAT A,EX,I,I,30.4E6,29.9E6,29.4E6,28.3E6
These two commands construct a temperature table for the Youngs
Modulus. The first field, ", ,.. , in MPTEMP and the third in MPDATA are the
beginning slot location in the temperature table. The slot locations must be
the same. The data for the temperature table was found in TABLE C-6 of
the ASME B31.1 CODE. A more detailed explanation of these commands is
found on pages 3.3.3.1 and 3.3.3.2. The valid material properties are found
on page 3.4.3.1.
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 7
-
ALPX,I,I.4387E5
DENS,I,.2899
These both are material properties that also can be placed in the
temperature table but were not for this example. They are shown on page
3.4.3.1.
TREF,300
TUNIF,77
These commands specify the reference and uniform temperatures of the
pipe. The commands are found on pages 3.3.2.1 and 3.3.15.7.
The following commands used in the geometry input are found in the
PIPE MODULE section 3.3.24.
PSPEC,I,1.5,10S
This command is found on page 3.3.24.1 .and defines the pipe material and
dimensions.
BRANCH,1
Defines the beginning point of a new stretch of pipe and is explained on
page 3.3.24.2.
RUN, , , 18
RUN, 29.5
BEND, , ,1.5
These two commands are used to define straight runs of pipe and elbows.
The straight runs of pipe are formed in incremental lengths from a
beginning point. The elbows are formed between two previously defined
straight pipes. The bend radius must be specified in order to get the
correct SIP's. The defaults and explanations of these commands are
explained on pages 3.3.24.3 and 3.3.24.4. The first RUN command forms
nodes 1 and 2, while the second forms node 3. The BEND command forms
nodes 4 -7. The next RUN command creates node 8. This pattern continues
throughout the piping layout.
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 8
BRANCH,30
RUN, , ,-43.5
TEE
This series of commands place a welding tee at node 30. The RUN's
previously executed have formed the nodes 30 and 3 ~ The RUN listed to
the right forms node 36. The TEE command forms nodes 37-39. The TEE
command is located on page 3.3.24.3.
By knowing these patterns, the nodes are located on the piping layout
before the the files are created. The organization this provides is beneficial
in locating tees and anchor points.
D,l,ALL through D,70,ALL
This command specifies zero displacements for these nodes. These nodes
are then the anchor points. On page 3.3..16.1, the D command is explained
in detail.
The D command marks the end of the N2LINE26.DAT. Use
ANSYS_INTER with the IINPUT,26 command ( see page 6 ) to input the
data. The geometry and nodes are checked to ensure that ANSYS has all of
the information necessary to execute a run. At this time, the elements and
nodes can be plotted to get the proper picture by using the /SHOW
command. With the terminal used in this example, /SHOW,9600,240 was
entered because a VT240 terminal with a 9600 baud rate was used. The
/NOSHOW command writes the plots to a file if a hardcopy is desired.
These commands are shown on page P.3.4. The NIEW command and other
plot commands located in APPENDIX P( page P.3.5 and on) can then be used
to arrange the plot. Once everything is found to be correct, ANSYS is exited
and the file is edited and must then be renamed without the two digit
integer. The commands added to the N2LINE26.DAT file are now shown.
ITER,l,l
This command indicates the number of iterations performed in the
analysis. For pipe analysis, only one iteration needs to be performed. This
command is'found on page 3.3.15.2.
ACEL", 1
The ACEL command produces the effect of gravity and is found on page
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 9
........:, 3.3.15.8. The acceleration is one "g" in the Z direction which results in a
gravity effect in the -Z direction.
KRF,l
This command calculates and prints the reaction and nodal forces in the
.LIS file. It is found on page 3.3.15.6.
AFWR, ,1
It causes the analysis file to be written and is shown on page 3.3.27.2.
/VIEW,l,-l,-l,l
/ ANGLE,1,60
EPLOT
These commands are used to get a recognizable plot. The view command
specifies a point that determines a line of viewing from that point to the
OrIgm. The angle command rotates the picture about the viewing axis and ~
is not always needed. These commands are listed on page P.3.5. The
EPLOT command produces an element plot and is discussed as well as other
/pREP7 plot commands on pages 3.3.8.1 and 3.3.8.2.
FINI
/INPUT,27
FINI
The first FINI leaves /PREP7 and the /INPUT command reads the analysis
file 27. The last FINI leaves the solution phase. If the analysis is to be
done interactively. the /EXE command shown on page 3.1.12 is placed
before the /INPUT.27. The batch execution does not need this command.
The retrieval of information or post processing follows.
/POST1
A brief summary of the POST 1 section is found on page 6.1.1.
SET,l,l
It causes the solution file to be read. and this command IS found on page
PAGE 1 0
PIPE STRESS ANALYSIS
6.1.23.
PRSTR
This command prints the stresses selected before the issue of the SET
command. The batch mode selects a list of stresses to be printed out upon
the execution of the PRSTR command. To select a stress in the interactive
mode, it must be done before the SET command with the issue of the
STRESS command. For example, the bending stress at node I(SEE FIG.
4.16.1 of the ANSYS manual) for a straight section of pipe is selected by
entering STRESS,SBI,16,14. Field 1 is for a unique label defined by the
user. Field 2 is for the stiffness type [16-straightpipe, 17 -tee, 18-elbow ].
Field 3 is the item number which defines the post data item out of the
items available for that stiffness type. The STRESS command is explained
on page 6.1.21. The post data items available for the element types are
found on 4.16.2, 4.17.2, and 4,18.2.
/VIEW,!,!,!,!
/ANGLE,!,60
PLDISP,!
These commands are the same ones that were shown earlier. The PLDISP
command is a POST 1 plot command that plots the displaced elements due
to the contraction. The,1 overlays the displaced and non-displaced
elements on the plot. This plot accompanies the appended file. The POST1
plot commands are discussed on pages 6.1.30 to 6.1.32.
FIN I
This leaves POST1 and concludes the analysis of the piping system.
To get a hardcopy of the plots created by the plot commands,
ANSYS_HARDCOPY _FILE21 is entered after the dollar sign prompt. After
which, "name"21.DAT is entered for the file name as well as a CPU time of 5
minutes. The plot is then placed in queue.
In the process of analyzing the piping system, many files are created.
These filos are given some explanation in appendix C. File 12 is the
solution file. File 16 contains the geometry information. File 18 retains the
history of the input. File 21 contains the plots, and file 26 is the file
created outside of ANSYS to be input. These files become a part of the
user's directory after a run has been completed. Once file12 is created, any
PIPESTRESSANALYSIS PAGE 11
........ \ post information available can be viewed on the screen by activating
ANSYS_INTER once again and entering /POSTt.
4 x 6 N2 EXHAUST LINE
Two different analyses were performed on the piping line, each
modeling a different solution. Both solutions lower the stresses to an
acceptable level. Vertically hanging flexhose at these nodes on the internal
pipe or horizontal external bellows on the straight pipe below these nodes
are the two solutions considered. The external bellows solution is
desirable, but due to limitations in the movement of the circled nodes, this
solution is not completely acceptable at this time. The flexhose solution
doesn't require movement in these nodes, but the flexhose are contained In
the inner pipes which is not as desirable as an external bellows solution. A
suitable solution is still being sought.
PIPE STRESS ANALYSIS PAGE 1 2
REFERENCES
ANSYS USER'S MANUAL. Swanson Analysis Systems. 1987.
Chemical Plant and Petroleum Refinery Piping [ B31.3]. ASME, 1984.
Leininger, Mark. ANSYS USER'S GUIDE. Fermilab Computing
Department, July,1986.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I wish to thank Tony Parker, Bob Wands, and Kay Weber for their
help.
--.... .-_...__...._-_.. _---------------
1-1/2 X 3 LIQUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONS
CC T
76.5"
DRO
A3
"
374.75"
x-VACUUM BREAKS ( ANCHOR POINTS)
z
72"
PLATFORM
JUMPER
Y x
T
SEC
JUMPER
+
33"
.
.
an
C'?
~
L
/
~ 1 0
*
18"
~ 29.5"
Figure 1 V"
1-1/2 X 3 LIQUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
NODES 46
~
x -VACUUM BREAKS ( ANCHOR POINTS )
.- NODES
8
z
y
12 x
Figure 3
1-1/2 X 3 LIQUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
ELEMENTS
29
8
x-VACUUM BREAKS ( ANCHOR POINTS )
- NODES
z
5
y
x
7
1
3
4
Figure 4
----
ASMECODEFOR PRESSURE PIPING ANSI/ASME B31.3-1984 EDITION
CHEMICAL PLANTAND PETROLEUM REFINERY PIPING TABLE D-l
APPENDIX D
FLEXIBILITYAND STRESS INTENSIFICATION
FACTORS
Notes toTable D-l appearon p. 207.
TABLE D-l
FLEXIBIUTY FACTORkAND STRESS INTENSIFICATION FACTORi
StressIntensification
Facto"u
Flexibility Flexiblf'lty
Characteristic Factor
Description k b SketdI
T
Welding elbow
U
.l.6,9 or 1.&5 0.75 0.9
r.,
pipe bend h hZ/ ) ---r -
t 2 .
~ l
h
V
'
__ Rl - bend
radius
Closely spaced miterbend
1
.2.l cot6 fs
s < r
z
(1 + tan 6)
2 r 2
z
Sin<Jle miter bendl.2 or
1.52 0.9 0.9 1 cot 8 f
widely spaced miter bend
h'l'
h 2 /} h21l 2
s ;:: rl (1 + tan 8)
r
2
~
)
TABLE1
IIAIA - VNAUHIlIUlll:.U USE. I>IBTRIIlUIION OR DUPL1CATION IS PROHIBITED. ALL RESEHVED.
FOR SUPPORT CALL MARK LEININGER PHONE (312) 840-4' ) TWX
)'
1-112 X ::l LIQUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE 8.0959 MAY 18.1988 CP.. 5.380
)
--'"
"-'"
t
***** DISPLACEMENT 80LUTION ***** TIME - O.OOOOOE+OO LOAD 8TEP- ITERATION- CUM. ITER."
NODE UX UY UZ ROTX ROTY ROll
-0.785001-01
-0.729399E-Ol
0.106087
0.100783
0.104652
0,-106360

1 O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO


5 0.200770E-01 0.000000+00 0.530064E-01
6 0.291757E-Ol O.OOOOOOE+OO 0.581453E-Ol
:( 7 0.278996E-Ol O.ooOOOOE+OO 0.649375E-Ol ('
8 O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO
10 -0.570740E-Ol O.OooOOOE+OO 0.224778
11 -0.622445E-Ol O.OOOOOOE+OO 0.227976
.(
12 -0.663526-01 O.OOOOOOE+OO 0.225838 , ..
16 0.232365-01 0.641586 -1.19763 ::-t,"
17 0.229486-01 ---0.641136 . -1.20142
18 0.229072-01 0.638066 -1.20360
21 0.221115E-01 -0.104154E-Ol -0.130369 ( (.
22 0.216073E-01 -0.122292E-Ol -0.126316
23 0.204393E-Ol ---0.137067E-Ol -0.1
24 O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO 0.0
( 26 -0. 223638E-02 -0.327385E-Ol O.
(
27 -0.442232E-02 -0.330519E-Ol O.
28 -o.-304oo1E-01--o,-692069E-o1 O.
30 0.750909E-Ol -0.634371E-o1 -0.
( 32 0.923824E-ol -0.188193E-01 -0.
(
33 0.958342E-ol -0.223627E-Ol -0.
34 ..,,0,956997E-ol-'-- -0'-:267539E-01
35 O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO 0.0
37 0.816256E-01 -0.527509E-Ol 0.1
'c 38 O. 593960E-01 -0.510090E-Ol O. 9
_.. ---39----0,..-936252E-Qt-..--QH-6013-oI---o..-t
, 40 -0.186745 0.189717 -0. 1
(
(-- :5 8: 8:
. 44 - 0,369103--,,---0.-4'16;''74--_..'---0.
46 O.OOOOOOE+OO O.OOOOOOE+OO O.
48 -0.630592 0.230938E-01 O.
.-
49 -0.631708 O. 219327E-01 O. _
.. -50..--0r-625S2:i!------Or;!Wa81E-01
52 -0. 174571 O. 193874-0.129839
C. 53 -0.1989.23 O. 18.4.976-0.115296
':: f
54 -0.191491 0.177527 -0.118146

58 -0.170122 0.159984 -0. 1
(
C :8: I
- ..--63..--0...:;t3SQ06E-O.t----{h.. 0.-4 :-g2
64 -0.678540E-01 0.253599 -0.158933
( 67 0.728159E-Ol 0.150943 -0.822340E-01
(
68 0.754061-01 0.145924 -0.788463E-01
( (
(.
v
l :{
ANSYS - ENGINEERING ANALYSIS SYSTEM REVISION 4.3 20 (FERMILAB) 1.1987
..-ANSYS( --COPYRHlHHCl-1-97t.l978,1982,1983,-4985,1987.. SWANSON ANALYSIS SYSTEMS, .INC... AS ....
PROPRI Y DATA - UNAUTHORIZED USE. DISTRIBUTION OR DUPLICATION IS PROHIBITED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
FOR S T CALL MARK LEININGER PHONE (312) 840-4776 TWX
(
-- -.----.......__ i: -1-1/2 x..3-LHIUID--NI-TROGEN-TRANSFER-ldNE----- n.."_--_...-8.0960- HAY-18,1988---Cpa ',-440
l (.
***** DISPLACEMENT SOLUTION ***** TIME - O.OOOOOE+OO LOAD STEP- ITERATION'" 1 CUM. ITER.-
NODE -UX UY UZ ROTX ROTY ROTZ
t. :.. l
69 0.734721E-01 0.141071 -0.755202E-01 0.217799E-02 -0.224104E-02 -0.301198E-02
...70 ----O...oOOOOOE+OO--o'-oooOooE+OO---OrOOOooOE+OO---O.-OOOOOOE+OO-0. OOOOOOE+00---0.OOOOOOE+00 ..-----.-
72 -0.131267E-01 0.762805E-01 -0. 174912E-01 0.149378E-02 -0.182792E-02 -0.188259E-02

(. ., 73 -0.157880E-01 0.730249E-01 -o.151339E-01 0.132495E-02 -0.143373E-02 -0.158209E-02
(
74 -0.156880E-01 0.689719E-01 -0.132987E-01 0.103755E-02 -0.124774E-02 -0.126971E-02
.._-,---_."- -_._---,-_._---... -
MAXIMUMS
(
NODE 49 16 18 21 50 64
VALUE -0.631709 0.641586 -1.20360 0.701399E-02 0.819035E-02 -0.438934E-02
INTEGEk STORAGE"REOUIREMENTS FOR BACK SUBSTITUTION CP- 5.490 TIME- 9.09603
FIXED DATA. 762 TEMPORARY DATA - 902 TOTAL- 1664
C"TvC'n _ t..,..,,,,,,1\1"\ TC'....n,..CA.cv _ ,.tl,,1" - .... """It"""'''' ofI
TABLE2

l
IPREP7
ITIT, 1-1/2 X3 LIqUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
MPTEMP,1,75,144,200,294

\LPX,l,l.4387E-5
DENS,1,.2899
TREF,300
TUNIF,77
PSPEC,l,1.5,10S
BRANCH,l
RUN",-18
RUN,29.5
BEND",1.5
RUN",72
BEND, I ,1.5
RUN",374.5
RUN,,204.25
BEND" ,1.5
RUN,8,8
BEND" ,1.5
RUN, 11-22 .75
BEND, ,,1.5
RUN",-33
RUN,lO,10
BEND, ,,1.5
RUN",33
BRANCH,30
RUN",-43.5
TEE
ARUN,175
BEND, ,,1.5
RUN,140
RUN",76.5
BEND" ,1.5
BRANCH,40
RUN, ,10
TEE
RUN,-30
BEND",1.5
RUN, ,35
BEND" ,1.5
RUN,30
BEND, ,,1.5
RUNII 23
BEND",l.5
D,l,ALL
D,8,ALL
D,24,ALL
D,35,ALL
D,46,ALL
D,70,AL__ l..,.. ___ ENDOFN2LINE26.DAT
ITER,l,1
ACEL",l
KRF,l
r--AFWR, ,1
IVIEW,l,-l,-l,l
IANGLE,l,60
EPLOT
FINI
IINPUT,27
FINI
fPOSTl
SET.1,l
PRSTR
I"""(VIEW. 1. -I. -I. 1
IANGLE,I.60
PLOISP.l
FIN!
/
--
J
o
')
!
'--"
ANSYS--' 4.3
MAY 18 1988
8:05:54
PLOT NO. 2
POST1 DISPL.
STEP= 1
ITER= 1
ORIG
XV=-1
YV=-1
ZV=1
DIST=321
XF=80.9
YF=9S.2
ZF=251
ANGL=6O
DMAX= 1.36
DSCA=23.6
Z
x
1 1 - 1 /2 X QUID NITROGEN TRANSFER LINE
APPENDIXA
r 1 IntheanalysisperformedontheLN2transferline,theinnerpipeis
supportedbytheouterpipeonlyattheanchorpoints. Inthefinaldetailed
design,G-IOspiderswhichactas guidesandsupportswillbeincluded. If
thefinaldesigninanywayhindersmovementoftheinnerpipe,another
analysiswillbeperformed. Thedesignismodifieduntilanacceptable
solutionisreached. Thedetailingworkhasnotbeenperformedatthis
time.
-- ... ~
r\
APPENDIXB
The allowable stress of 25,500 psi is calculated by using table A-I and
section 302.3.5 of the ANSIIASME B31.3 1984 edition. The information is
enclosed within this appendix.
ANSI/ASME 831.3-1984 EDITION ASME CODE FOR PRESSURE PIPING
.1"'" i
302.3.4, 302.3.5 CHEMICAL PLANT AND PETROLEUM REFINERY PIPING
TABLE 302.3.3C TABLE302.3.3D
INCREASED CASTING QUALITY FACTORS Ec ACCEPTANCE LEVELS FOR CASTINGS
Supplementary Examination Factor Material Acceptance Acceptable
in Accordance with Note(s) Ec Examined Applicable level Discontin-
(Thickness) Standard (orClass) uities
(1) 0.85
(2)(al or (2Hbl 0.85 Steel
(J)(a) or (3Hb) 0.95 (to 1 in.> ASTM E446
1
1 Types A. S, C
IIIand (V(al or (2)(bl 0.90 (25mm)
mand (3)(a) or (3)(b) 1.00
(2)(a) or (2)(b) and (3)(a) orO)(b) LOO
Steel
(over 1 in. to ASTM E446
1
2 Types A. S, C
NOTES:
2 in.) (2S
(1) Machineall surfaces toa finish of250 ,.,.in. arithmetic average
to Slmm)
roughness heightperANSIB46.1,thusincreasingtheeffective-
Steel
ness ofsurface examination.
(over 2 in. t" "'STM E 186
1
2 Categories A, B, C
'")\ 1,1 all surfaces of each casting (magnetic material
4112 in,)
oJ' bythemagneticparticlemethodif' withASTM
E709*orE138*.Judgeacceptabilityir. __"" dancewith MSS
(51 mm
SP-53, using reference photos in ASTM E 125*. to 114 mm)
(bJ Examineallsurfacesofeachcastingby theliquid penetrant Steel
method,in accordancewithASTM E16S*. Judgeacceptability (over 4112 in. ASTM E280
1
2 Categories A, S, C
of flaws and weld repairs in accordance with Table 1 of MSS
to 12 inJ
SP-53, using ASTM E 12S'" as a reference for surface flaws.
(114 mm to
(3) (a) Fullyexamineeachcastingultrasonicallyinaccordancewith
305 mm)
ASTM E114*,accepting a casting only ifthereis no evidence
Aluminum & ASTM ElSS
1
Shown in reference
ofdepth ofdefects in excess ofS% ofwall thickness.
Magnesium radiographs
(b) Fully radiograph each casting inaccordance with ASTM E
142'".Judgeinaccordancewiththestated acceptancelevels in
Copper, Ni-Cu ASTM E2721 2 Codes A, Ba, Bb
Table 302.3.30.
Bronze ASTM E310
1
2 Codes A and B
".....::\
'"ThesestandardshavebeenapprovedbyANSIasAmericanNational
NOT8 (0
Standards.
(ll Thesestandardshavebeenapproved by ANSI as American Na-
tional Standards.
J.
which may beused forcertaintypesofweldsifaddi-
tional examinationis performed beyond that required
by the productspecification.
S, +0.25 s.0 (1a)
302.3.5 limitsofCalculatedStressesDuetoSus- Intheaboveequation:
tained Loads and DisplacementStrains Sf: = basicallowablestressat minimum metal tem-
(a) Internal Pressure Stresses. Stressesduetointernal perature expected during the displacement
pressureshall be consideredsafewhen thewall thick- cycle underanalysis. [See Note(2) ofAppen-
nessofthepipingeomponent.andits meansofstiffen- dix A, 302.2.4, and 302.3.]
ing. meet the requirements of304. Sh = basicallowablestressatmaximummetaltem-
(b) External Pressure Stresses. Stressesduetoexter- perature expected during the displacement
nal pressure shall be considered safe when the wall cycleunderanalysis. [See Note(2) ofAppen-
thickness ofthe piping component, and its means of dix A. 302.2.4, and 302.3.]
stiffening. meet the requirementsof304. f =stress-rangereductionfactorfordisplacement
(c) Longitudinal Stresses SL' Thesumoflongitudi- cycleconditions
2
for the total numberofcy-
nalstressesduetopressure,weight,andothersustained cles over the expected life (from Table
loadings SL shall not exceed S" in 302.3.5(d). The 302.3.5). Expected life
J
means thetotal num-
thickness ofpipe used in calculating SL shall be the ber ofyears the system is expected to be in
nominalthickness Tminusmechanical,corrosion,and
erosion allowancec.
2Applies toessentially noncorroded piping. Corrosion can sharply
(d) Allowable Displacement Stress Range SA' The
decreasecycliclife;therefore,corrosionresistantmaterialsshouldbe
allowable displacement stress range (see 319.2.3) for
consideredwherealargenumberofmajorstresscyclesisanticipatedo
the computed displacement stress range Sf: (see
'Thedesigneriscautioned that the fatiguelifeofmaterialsoperated
319.4.4) shall be in the creep range may be reduced
16
ANSI/ASME B31.3-\984 EDITION ASME CODE FOR PRESSURE PIPING
TABLE AI CHEMICAL PLANT AND PETROLEUM REFINERY PIPING (
TABLE A-I(CONT'o)
ALLOWABLE STRESSES IN TENSION FOR METALS (1)
Numbers in Parentheses Refer to Stress Table Notes, Which Appear atthe Beginning ofthis Appendix; Specifications ASTM Unless
OtherwiseIndicated
Min. Min.
P. Tensile Yield Min. Min.
No. Factor Strength,Strength, Temp. Temp.
Material Spec. No. (5) Grade Class E ksi ksi (6) to 100 200 300 400 500 600
StainlessSteel (4) (Cont'd)
Electric Fusion Welded Pipe and (2) (CDni'd)
2SCr-20Ni A312 8 TP3l0 0.80 75 30 (28) (35) (39)
-325116.0
Z5Cr-ZONi Pipe A 312 8 TP310 0.80 75 30 (28) (29) (35) (39) -325 16.0
16Cr-12Ni-ZMo Pipe A 312 8 TP316 0.80 75 30 (27) (28) -325 16.0
16Cr-12Ni-2Mo Pipe A 312 8 TP316H 0.80 75 30 (27) -325 16.0
",-,,"'0 Pipe A312 8 TP316L 0.80 70 25 -325 13.3
18Cr-13Ni-3Mo Pipe A 312 8 TP317 0.80 75 30 (27) (28) -325 16.0
18Cr-10Ni-Ti Pipe A 312 8 TP321 0.80 75 30 (28) -325 10.0
18Cr-l0Ni-Ti Pipe A312 8 TP321H 0.80 75 30 -325 16.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP347 0.80 75 30 (28) -425 16.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP347H 0.80 75 30 -325 16.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP348 0.80 75 30 (28) -325 16.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb Pipe A312 8 TP348H 0.80 75 30 -325 16.0
_18Cr-aNiPipe A 312 8 TP304 0.85 75 30 (27) (28) -425 17.0
18Cr-aNi Pipe A 312 8 TP304H 0.85 75 30 (27) -325 17.0
18Cr-aNi Pipe A312 8 TP304L 0.85 70 25 -425 14.2
23Cr-12Ni Pipe A 312 8 TP309 0.85 75 30 (28) (35) (39) -3251 17.0
25Cr-ZONi Pipe A 312 8 TP310 0.85 75 30 (28) (35) (39) -3251 17.0
25Cr-ZONi Pipe A31Z 8 TP310 0.85 75 30 (28) (29) (35) (39) -3251 17.0
16Cr-12Ni-ZMo Pipe A312 8 TP316 0.85 75 30 (27) (28) -325 17.0
16Cr-12Ni-2Mo Pipe A 312 8 TP316H 0.85 75 30 (27) -325 17.0
16Cr-12Ni-2Mo Pipe A 312 8 TP316L 0.85 70 25 -325 14.2
18Cr-13Ni-3Mo Pipe A 312 8 TP317 0.85 75 30 (27) (28) -325 17.0
18Cr-10Ni-Ti Pipe A 312 8 TP321 0.85 75 30 (28) -325 17.0
18Cr-l0Ni-Ti Pipe A 312 8 TP321H 0.85 75 30 -325 17.0
18Cr-l0Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP347 0.85 75 30 (28) -425 17.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP347H 0.85 75 30 -325 17.0
18Cr-l0Ni-Cb Pipe A 312 8 TP348 0.85 75 30 (28) -325 17.0
18Cr-l0Ni-CbPipe A312 8 TP348H 0.85 75 30 -325 17.0
Type 304 A 240 A 358 8 304 2 0.85 75 30 (21) (28) (31) (36) -4251 17.0
Type 304L A240 A 358 8 304L 2 0.85 70 25 (36l -425 14.2
Type 316A240 A358 8 316 2 0.85 75 30 (27) (28) (311 (36) -3251 17.0
Type 310L A 240 A 358 8 316L 2 0.85 70 25 (36) -325 14.2
Type 347 A 240 A358 8 347 2 0.85 75 30 (28) (30) (36) -42 17.0
Type 321 A 240 A358 8 321 2 0.85 75 30 (28) (30) (36) -32 17.0
Type 309SA 240 A358 8 309S 2 0.85 75 30 (28) (311 (35) (36) -32 17.0
Type 310SA 240 A 358 8 3l0S 2 0.85 75 30 (l8) (311 (35) (36) -32 17.0
Type 310SA 240 A 358 8 310S 2 0.85 75 30 (28) (29) (311 (35) (36) -32 17.0
Type 348A 240 A 358 8 348 2 0.85 75 30 (28) (30) (36) -32 17.0
Type 304 A 240 A 358 8 304 5 0.90 75 30 (271 (28) (31) (36) 18.0
Type 304L A 240 A 358 8 304l 5 0.90 70 25 (36) -425 15.0
Type 310 A 240 A 358 8 )16 5 0.90 75 30 (27) (28) (31) (36) -3251 18.0
Type 316L A 240 A 35a 8 310l 5 0.90 70 25 U6J -325 15.0
Type 347 A 240 A 358 8 347 5 0.90 75 30 (28) DO) (Jo)

Type 321 A 240 A 358 8 321 5 0'<10 75 30 (28) (JO) Do) -.325 18.0
144
J
1- rtf
ANSI/ASME B313-1984 EDITION ASME CODE FOR PRESSURE I'IPING
TABLE A-I CHEMICAL PLANT AND PETROLEUM REFINERY PIPING
TABLE A-I (CONT'D>
ALLOWABLE STRESSES IN TENSION FOR METALS (l)
Numbers in Parentheses Refer to Stress Table Notes, Which Appear at the Beginning of this Appendix; Specifications ASTM Unless
Otherwise Indicated
Min. Min.
P- Tensile Yield Min. Min.
No. Factor Stmgth.,Strngth., Temp. Temp.
Material Spec. No. (5) Grade ksi ksi Notes (6) to 100 200 300 400 500 600
Stainless Steel (4) (Conl'd)
Welded Fittings
laCr-aNi
18Cr-8Ni
18Cr-8Ni
A 403
A 403
A 403
8
8
a
WP304
WP304H
WP304l
l.00
1.00
1.00
75
75
70
30.,
30
25
(l2) (lb) (27) (28) (31) (32)
Ub) (27) (31) (32)
(lb) (32)

-325.
-425
20.0
20.0
Ib.7
nCr-l2Ni A 403 a WP309 1.00 75 30 Ob) (28) (2) (35) ,"r
-- '- , 20.0

8 WP310 1.00 75 30 ObI (28) (2) (35) -325 20.0
25Cr-20Ni ,",403 8 WP310 1.00 75 30 (lb) (28) (29) (2) (35) -325 20.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb-Ta A 403 8 WP347 1.00 75 30
(lb) (28) (30) (2) -425 20.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb-Ta A 403 8 WP347H 1.00 75 30 (lb) (28) (30) (32) -325 20.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP31b 1.00 75 30 UbI (27) (28) (1)(32) -325 20.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP316H 1.00 75 30 (lb) (27) (3}) (32) -325 20.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP31bL 1.00 70 25 nb) (32) -325 Ib.7
laCr-13Ni-3Mo A 403 8 WP317 1.00 75 30 Cl6) (271 (28) (3l! (32) -325 20.0
18Cr-10Ni-Ti A 403 8 WP321 1.00 75 30 (lb) (28) (30) (32) -325 20.0
18Cr-10Ni-Ti A 403 8 WP321H 1.00 75 30 Ub) (3D) (32) -325 20.0
A 403 8 WP34a 1.00 75 30 (l6) (28) (30) (2) -325 20.0
A 403 a WP304 0.85 75 30 (l6) (271 (28) (31) (32) -425 17.0
18Cr-8Ni A 403 8 WP304H 0.85 75 30 (16) (27) CH) (32) -325 17.0
18Cr-8Ni A 403 8 WP304L 0.85 70 25 (6) (32) -425 14.1
23Cr-12Ni A 403 8 WP309 0.85 75 )0 <1b) (28) (32) 05) -325 17.0
25Cr-20Ni A 403 8 WP310 0.85 75 30 (6) (28) (32) (35) -325 17.0
25Cr-20Ni A 403 8 WP310 0.85 75 )0 (l6) (28) (29) (2) (35) -325 17.0
18Cr-8Ni-Cb A 403 8 WP347 0.85 75 30
(lb) (28) ()O) (2) -425 17.0
18Cr-eNi-Cb
IbCr-12 Ni-2 Mo
A 403
A 403
8
8
WP347H
WP316
0.85
0.85
75
75
)0
30
(l6) (28) (30) (32)
(lb) (271 (28) en) (32)
-325
-325
17.0
17.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 401 8 WP316H 0.85 75 30 (6) (27) (31) (32) -325 17.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP316L 0.85 70 25 <1b) (32) -325 14.1
18Cr-13Ni--3Mo A 403 8 WP317 0.85 75 30 (lo) (27) (28) (J II(32) -325 17.0
18Cr-10Ni--Ti A 403 8 WP321 0.85 75 30 (lb) (28) (30) (32) -325 17.0
18Cr-10Ni-Ti A 403 8 WP321H 0.85 75 30 Ub) (0) q2) -325 17.0
18Cr-10Ni-Cb A 403 8 WP348 0.85 75 30 Ub) (28) (30) (2) -325 17.0
18Cr-8Ni A 403 8 WP304 0.80 75 30 Ubi (27) (28) (311 em -425 16.0
leCr-8Ni A 403 8 WP304H 0.80 75 30 Ub) (27) (311 (2) -325 1b,0
18Cr-aNi A 403 8 WP304L 0.80 70 25 (lb) (2) -425 13.3
23Cr-12Ni A 403 8 WP309 0.80 75 30 (lb) (28) (32) OS) -325 10.0
25Cr-20Ni A 403 8 WP310 0.80 75 30
<lb) (28) (32) (35) -325 Ib,O
25Cr-20Ni A 403 8 WP310 0.80 75 30 Ub) (28) (29) (2) (5) -325 Ib.O
18Cr-8Ni-Cb A 403 8 WP347 0.80 75 30 UbI (28) (0) (32) -425 Ib.O
18Cr-8Ni-Cb A 403 8 WP347H 0.80 75 30
(1b) (30) (32) -325 1&.0
1&Cr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP31b 0.80 75 30 Ob) (27) (28) (31) (2) -325 16.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 403 8 WP31bH 0.80 75 30
(lb) (27) (1) (2) -325 1&.0
IbCr-12Ni-2Mo A 40) 8 WPHbL 0,80 70 25 (l&l D21 - 3Z5 13,)
18Cr-1 IN.-3Mo A 403 8 WP31] 0.80 75 )0 (Ibl 127) (28) D 11 021 )25 1&.0
J
152
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The information provided by Dave Howe of Rosemount, Roger Koopman
of Process Sales, and Lew Novekoff of Lesman Instrument Company is
greatly appreciated.