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ArcelorMittal International

Structural Shapes
Sales Program and Product Information
Table of Contents
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Production Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
ASTM Standard Specications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
HISTAR / ASTM A913 in the Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Benets of HISTAR / ASTM A913 Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Applications of HISTAR / ASTM A913 Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
ASTM A913 Steel Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) . . . . . 10
Section Availability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
A913 HISTAR References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
ArcelorMittal International
North America Headquarters
1 South Dearborn Street, 13th Floor
Chicago, Ill. 60603
T 312 899 3500
F 312 899 3765
Chicago
Vincent Mondelli
Director
T 312 899 3961
vincent.mondelli@arcelormittal.com
Anthony Bryant
Sales Manager
T 312 899 3695
anthony.bryant@arcelormittal.com
Robert Caroti
Technical Sales Engineer
T 312 899 3960
robert.caroti@arcelormittal.com
Shelley Finnigan, S.E.
Technical Sales Engineer
T 312 899 3936
shelley.nnigan@arcelormittal.com
West Coast United States / Canada
Emiliano Mora
Sales Manager
T 778 355 8871
M 604 838 0450
F 778 355 8872
emiliano.mora@arcelormittal.com
Canada / Burlington
Angelo Curcuru
Sales Manager
T 905 631 9500
M 905 320 6649
F 905 631 9505
angelo.curcuru@arcelormittal.com
Mexico / Queretaro
Priv. de los Industriales No.110-A, Desp.802
Col. Ind. Benito Juarez, 76100 Queretaro,
Qro.
Jose Bustos
Sales Manager
T +52 442 218 2887
M +52 442 322 6207
F +52 442 218 1400
jose.bustos@arcelormittal.com
1 | Structural Shapes
ArcelorMittal is
the worlds leading
steel and mining
company and the
largest importer of
wide-ange beams
in the United
States a market
which it has served
for more than 80
years. Our total
steel production
of 97.2-million tons in 2012, represents
six percent of world steel output and ranks
us rst in the world for steel production.
ArcelorMittal employs 245,000 individuals
across 60 countries, including more than
36,000 in North America.
As the leading global provider of
structural steel shapes, ArcelorMittal
produces steel that is used in buildings
around the world, from tall towers to petrol
reneries, from airports to railway stations
and from shopping malls to residential
houses. Our annual sales of structural shapes
exceed ve and a half million tons and make
us the European leader in the production
of structural and piling sections. Our mill
in Differdange, Luxembourg rolled the rst
parallel wide ange shape in the world in
1902 and the rst 40-inch deep beam in
1911. In 1979, we introduced Tailor-Made
beams (WTM), which were praised by both
structural engineers and fabricators as a cost
effective alternative to built-up sections
and concrete. Today, ArcelorMittal offers
the largest range of shapes in the world
including W14 x 16 columns weighing up to
873 lbs/ft and several W44 x 16 sections.
In 1990, ArcelorMittal introduced high-
strength, low-alloy HISTAR steel to the world
market. Initially available in only Grades 50
and 65, the range of HISTAR was expanded
in 2011 to include Grade 70. Conforming
to ASTM A913 in the United States, HISTAR
steel Grades 50 and 65 are approved by all
major United States structural design and
fabrication codes: AISC (ASD, LRFD and
Seismic); IBC; AWS; and FEMA/SAC. The
sections produced by ArcelorMittal using
A913 steel have superior characteristics,
including high yield strengths, excellent
toughness and outstanding weldability. In
addition, they are available without paying a
price premium over our A992 or A572/50
steels.
A913 steel is perfect for gravity
columns, long span trusses, strong column
/ weak beam seismic designs and short
or medium spans where deection is not a
concern. Later in this program, you will nd
an extensive list of prominent projects on
which A913 steel has been specied.
#1 Producer of Structural Shapes
AOB in Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
Popular sizes available
in HISTAR A913
W14 x 90 132
W14 x 145 873
W36 x 150 387
W36 x 231 925
W40 x 167 392
W40 x 199 655
W44 x 230 335
2 | Structural Shapes
Production Process of Shapes
ISO 9001 Certified Quality
As the worlds leading manufacturer of
steel beams, ArcelorMittal offers engineers
and fabricators innovative, competitive
and sustainable solutions that are fully
compatible with the use of other materials.
Our electrical steelworks comply with
the strictest environmental criteria, and
our products meet all of the construction
sectors technological requirements.
ArcelorMittal structural shapes
are produced in modern minimills using
100 percent scrap as raw material. The
below schematic diagram shows the
production process, which consists of
three main operations: melting, casting
and rolling. To begin production, the
scrap material is melted in highly efcient
and environmentally friendly electric arc
furnaces. The steel is then rened in a ladle
furnace, and its temperature and chemistry
is regulated before the casting process. In a
continuous castor, the steel is solidied to a
semi-nished product called a beam blank.
After casting, the beam blanks are directly
reheated to rolling temperature or stocked
for later rolling. The rolling mills typically have
one break-down stand and two or three
universal rolling stands to shape the product
to its nal dimensions. Finally, the proles are
cooled, cut to length, inspected, marked and
bundled before shipment to our customers.
3 | Structural Shapes
ASTM Standard Specifications
A913/A913M - 11
1.1. This specication covers high-strength low-alloy structural steel shapes in Grades 50 [345], 65 [450] and 70 [485], produced by the
quenching and self-tempering process (QST). The shapes are intended for riveted, bolted or welded construction of bridges, buildings and
other structures.
HISTAR grades meet
the specifications of
ASTM A913
A6/A6M 12
S30.1 For shapes with a ange thickness equal to or greater than 1
inches that are specied in the purchase order to be tested in accordance
with this supplementary requirement, Charpy V-notch impact tests shall
be conducted in accordance with Specication A673/A673M, using
specimens taken from the alternate core location. Unless otherwise
specied in the purchase order, the minimum average absorbed energy for
each test shall be 20 ft-lbf and the test temperature shall be 70F.
Designers can also request the Charpy V-notch (CVN)
results below, often referred to as Supplement 2
6.2 Charpy V-notch tests shall be made in accordance with
Specication A673/A673M, Frequency H:
6.2.1 The test results of full-size specimens shall meet an
average value of 40 ft-lbf at 70F.
SUPPLEMENTARY REQUIREMENTS
The following special supplementary requirements should be considered for
seismic applications.
S75. Maximum Yield Point to Tensile Strength Ratio Grade
50 [345]:
S75.1 The maximum yield point shall be 65 [450] ksi.
S75.2 The maximum yield to tensile ratio shall be 0.85.
These requirements help the designer control the formation of the plastic
hinge during an earthquake using the strong column - weak beam concept.
S77. Reduced Sulfur Grade 65 [450]:
S77.1 The Grade 65 [450] shall be furnished with a
maximum sulfur of 0.010 percent. This may be desirable
in material subjected to high through-thickness stresses.
Alternate Core Location
Standard Flange Location of
CVN Specimens: 1/6 ange
width, 1/4 ange thickness
Alternate Core Location of
CVN Specimens: 1/2 ange
width, 1/4 ange thickness
Table 1 Chemical Requirements
Element Maximum content in %
Grade 50 Grade 65 Grade 70
Carbon 0.12 0.16 0.16
Manganese 1.60 1.60 1.60
Phosphorus 0.040 0.030 0.040
Sulfur 0.030 0.030 0.030
Silicon 0.40 0.40 0.40
Copper 0.45 0.35 0.45
Nickel 0.25 0.25 0.25
Chromium 0.25 0.25 0.25
Molybdenum 0.07 0.07 0.07
Columbium 0.05 0.05 0.05
Vanadium 0.06 0.08 0.09
Table 2 Tensile Requirements
Grade Yield Point,
min.
Tensile
Strength, min.
Elongation, min.
(ksi) (ksi) 8-inch, % 2-inch, %
50 50 65 18 21
65 65 80 15 17
70 70 90 14 16
4 | Structural Shapes
HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 in the Codes


AISC 360-10 Specication for Structural Steel Buildings
ASTM A913 has been an approved specication with AISC since
the publication of LRFD Specication for Structural Steel Buildings
in 1999. The approval came in a letter ballot of the Specications
Committee in July 1995 and was conrmed at its meeting in
November 1995. ASTM A913 (including all grades) is still included
as an approved specication under A3.1a of the Specication for
Structural Steel Buildings dated June 22, 2010. This includes both
ASD and LRFD design methods.
AISC 341-10 Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel
Buildings
Section A3.1, the Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings
allows ASTM A913 Grades 50 and 65 for use in seismic force
resisting systems and states that the specied minimum yield stress
of structural steel shall not exceed 65 ksi (450 MPa) for columns
in systems dened in Sections E3, E4, G3, H1, H2 and H3, and for
columns in all systems in Chapter F. ASTM A913 Grade 70 can be
used at the engineers discretion.
AWS D1.1 Structural Welding Code
AWS D1.1 (2010) lists ASTM A913 Grades 50 and 65 as
prequalied steels. In accordance with Table 3.2 of the structural
welding code AWS D1.1, ASTM A913 Grades 50 and 65 are
weldable without preheating (minimum 32F) when welded with low
hydrogen electrodes (H8).
FEMA 350 and 353
FEMA-350 (July 2000) Recommended Seismic Design Criteria for
New Steel Moment-Frame Buildings approves and recommends the
use of ASTM A913 Grades (Chapter 2.6.1). FEMA-353 (July 2000)
Recommended Specications and Quality Assurance Guidelines
for Steel Moment-Frame Construction for Seismic Applications
approves and recommends the use of ASTM A913 Grades (Chapter
2.1c)
IBC 2012
By reference to AISC 360-10, the use of ASTM A913 steel is
approved by the 2012 IBC, Section 2205.1
5 | Structural Shapes
Benefits of HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 Steel


Weldability
ASTM A913 Grades 50, 65 and 70 have
a guaranteed maximum carbon equivalent
(CE%) of 0.38, 0.43 and 0.45 percents. In
most cases, these low maximum CE% values
allow A913 grades to be welded without
preheating.
In accordance with AWS D1.1, all shapes
in A913 Grades 50 and 65 are weldable
without preheating (minimum 32F) when
welded with low hydrogen electrodes (H8).
For welding large material thicknesses in
highly restrained conditions, preheating may
be necessary. For base metal temperatures
below 32F, AWS D1.1 requires preheating
to 70F. AWS D1.1 also species that if
electrodes have a higher level of hydrogen
than 8ml/100g, A913 Grades 50 and 65 are
to be welded like ASTM A572 Grades 50 and
65, with preheating.
Toughness
The guaranteed minimum toughness of all ASTM A913 steel grades
is 40 ft-lbs at 70F at the ange location. Upon agreement material
can be supplied with Charpy V-Notch tests down to -58F at
additional cost.
Typical statistical distribution
of Charpy V-Notch values
CVN test
at 32F
HISTAR A913
Grade 50
HISTAR A913
Grade 65
(ft-lbf) (ft-lbf)
Average 136 141
Standard deviation 24 28
Minimum 76 64
Maximum 190 266
No Extra Charge
ArcelorMittal provides its ASTM A913 steel without a price premium over our A992 or A572/50 steels. Therefore, users
reap all the benets of this material without an added cost. A comparison of A913, A992 and A572 steels follows:
A913 Gr. 70 A913 Gr.65 A913 Gr.50 A992 A572 Gr. 50
40 ft-lbf CVN min @ 70F Yes Yes Yes No No
Weldable without Preheating TBD*** Yes* Yes* No No
Max Sulfur % 0.03% 0.03% 0.03% 0.045% 0.050%
Max Carbon % 0.16% 0.16% 0.12% 0.23% 0.23%
Max CE % 0.45% 0.43% 0.38% 0.45% / 0.47% No Max
Max Yield No Max No Max 65 ksi** 65ksi No Max
Max Yield to Tensile Ratio No Max No Max 0.85** 0.85 No Max
* Per AWS D1.1 a minimum temperature of 32 F and the use of a low hydrogen electrode (H8) are required.
Preheat might be necessary with higher hydrogen content and with highly restrained connections.
** S75 available upon request at no additional charge
*** Not yet approved, qualication test should be done as per AWS D1.1
6 | Structural Shapes
Benefits of HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 Steel


Columns
Comparison of size, weight and cost between Grade 50 steel and
A913 Grade 65 based on same design load requirements.
Savings:
A913 Grade 65 allowed for a reduction of two footweights
17 percent weight savings
17 percent cost savings
Trusses
Comparison of size, weight, weld volume and cost between
Grade 50 steel and A913 Grade 65 based on same design load
requirements.
Savings:
A913 Grade 65 allowed for a reduction of three footweights
23 percent weight savings
23 percent cost savings
41 percent savings in weld material
7 | Structural Shapes
Applications of HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 Steel


Strong Column - Weak Beam
Concept for Seismic Resisting Moment Frame Structures
In 1989, ArcelorMittal was awarded a
patent for the Reduced Beam Section
(RBS) or dog-bone connection. This
connection is easily performed in the
fabrication shop and results in the removal
of a portion of the beams ange material
at its connection to supports. Design of
such a connection became more critical
after the 1994 Northridge earthquake,
which exposed several seismic design
deciencies. A number of steel moment-
frame buildings experienced brittle fractures
of beam-to-column connections as a result
of the earthquake. Upon study, the SAC
Joint Venture, under contract by FEMA,
developed the strong column weak beam
design concept. When used in conjunction
with ArcelorMittals RBS connection, which
was released from patent in 1995, this
design concept can facilitate a shift of the
plastic deformation from the column to
the beam during an earthquake, thereby
preventing the connection between the
column and the beam from experiencing
inelastic deformations. The method was
successfully tested by AISC and was included
in the FEMA 350 and 353 documents.
As a result of the construction industrys
shift away from ASTM A36 to Grade 50
steel, it is often necessary to use higher
strength steel in the design of columns.
Using ASTM A913 Grades 65 or 70 for
column shapes and A913 Grade 50 (with
a maximum yield point of 65 ksi) for
beams, coupled with the RBS, offers the
most economical solution to seismic design
available today. In addition, replacing A992
with higher yield A913 can lower material
weight and cost, strengthen connections,
reduce or eliminate stiffeners in the panel
zone and reduce or eliminate the need for
doubler plates.
RBS after Seismic Test
RBS
8 | Structural Shapes
Applications of HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 Steel


When it is necessary to preheat the weld area
A major advantage of ASTM A913 versus A992 or A572 is that
A913 Grades 50 and 65 generally do not need to be preheated
before welding. Since ArcelorMittal does not charge a premium
for A913 steel versus A992 or A572, you can achieve signicant
savings on welding costs. Even when a project is not suited for
A913 Grades 65 or 70 material, A913 Grade 50 still offers the no
preheat welding advantage.
AWS D1.1 (2010) Table 3.2
Minimum Preheat Temperatures
HISTAR
Thickness A913** A992 A572
1/8 - 3/4 32F* 32F 32F
3/4 - 1 1/2 32F* 50F 50F
1 1/2 - 2 1/2 32F* 150F 150F
over 2 1/2 32F* 225F 225F
* If welded with electrodes capable of depositing weld metal with a maximum
diffusible hydrogen content of 8 ml/100g (H8), otherwise to be preheated like
ASTM A572/50 and A992.
** currently only includes A913 Grades 50 and 65
Safeco Field, Seattle, WA
2800 MT A913 Grade 65
When deection is not a concern
If the design of an element is governed by a yield problem, increasing the yield of this element normally enables the designer to choose a
smaller size, thereby reducing the weight. However, if the design is governed by deection or a vibration problem the design depends only on
the stiffness or the inertia and not on the yield.
The weight savings for column applications have historically been between 15 and 25 percent. For long-span trusses the savings are
often as high as 30 percent. In addition to steel weight savings, the fabrication, transportation, handling, erection and foundation costs of the
structure are also reduced. Particularly for heavy shapes the welding time and costs are reduced as thinner members reduce the weld volume
and ASTM A913 grades generally do not need to be preheated before welding allowing considerable savings of time and energy.
9 | Structural Shapes
Applications of HISTAR

/ ASTM A913 Steel


Gravity Columns for High-Rise Buildings
When design is not governed by drift or vibration problems, the use
of ASTM A913 Grades 65 and 70 in gravity columns with normal
buckling lengths (typically less than 15 ft) enables the engineer
to reduce the weight and the cost of their structures. The steel
weight of the columns can typically be reduced by 10 to 25 percent.
Recent projects where A913 Grade 65 was used for gravity columns
include One World Trade Center in New York and the Shanghai World
Financial Center in China.
Long-Span Trusses
The best use of A913 Grades 65 or 70 is in tension members, such
as the typical bottom chord of a truss, or in compression members
with short buckling lengths. The use of A913 Grades 65 or 70 in
trusses can generally result in a 25 percent reduction in weight
compared to Grade 50 steel. This reduction in weight is a function
of the total span-length and the importance of dead loads on the
design. High-yield A913 grades have resulted in savings on several
high-prole stadium projects with retractable roofs, high-rise
buildings featuring long-span transfer trusses and hangar facilities
with roofs supported by trusses, such as the Boeing Assembly Hall,
which features a 354-foot-long spanning roof and saw a weight
reduction of 28 percent when A913 Grade 65 was used in lieu of
Grade 50 steel.
Seismic Design / Moment Frames / Strong Column -
Weak Beam
The use of ASTM A913 steel allows the engineer to design a
moment-frame structure with the economical strong column
weak beam concept commonly used on the West Coast. A913
Grade 65 is the only steel grade with a yield point above 50 ksi that
is included in the AISC Seismic Provisions for use in the columns of
moment-frame structures in seismic zones.
Bridge Girders
When the design of a bridge is not governed by a deection problem,
usually the case for light loads and/or for short spans, the use of
A913 Grades 65 or 70 enables engineers to reduce the weight and
the cost of the structure. In addition, the use of A913 Grades 50
and 65 make it possible for the fabricator to weld the steel without
preheating (minimum 32F with low-hydrogen electrodes).
3000 MT A913 Grade 65
10 | Structural Shapes
What is the availability of A913?
ASTM A913 is available in grades 50, 65 and
70 with delivery approximately 6 to 8 weeks
after rolling (add 2 weeks for West Coast
ports).
Are all shapes available in A913?
The individual sizes available in A913 are also
listed on page 13.
W14 x 90 132*
W14 x 145 873*
W24 x 84 370
W27 x 102 129
W30 x 108 148
W33 x 130 169
W36 x 150 387*
W36 x 231 925*
W40 x 167 392
W40 x 199 655
W44 x 230 335
HP 10 x 57
HP 12 x 74 89
HP 14 x 89 117
Upon agreement:
W10 x 49 112
W12 x 65 230
* most popular shapes
Is there a premium for A913?
There is no premium. Our A913 Grades 50,
65 and 70 cost the same as our A992 and
A572 Grade 50.
What lengths are available?
Lengths of 30 to 60 feet are standard.
Other lengths may be available subject to
agreement.
Are heavy plates available in A913?
No. However, heavy plates in Grades 50,
65 and higher are available in other material
specications.
What are the design rules for
columns, beams and connections
in A913
A913 is a referenced standard in AISC
360-10 Specication for Structural Steel
Buildings, AISC 341-10 Seismic Provisions
for Structural Steel Buildings, IBC and FEMA.
Why is toughness of A913 superior
to hot-rolled steel?
The in-line thermal process QST results
in a very ne-grain material, showing a
superior toughness when compared with
conventional hot-rolled steel.
Which Charpy V-Notch toughness
requirements can A913 meet?
Based on impact tests per ASTM A673, a
minimum average CVN value of 40 ft-lbf
at 70F is a general requirement of A913.
Upon request a minimum average CVN value
of 20 ft-lbf at 70F in the alternate core
location (S30 per ASTM A6) is also available.
In addition, A913 can be supplied with CVN
values down to -58F for low temperature
applications. Other test temperatures and
impact values are available upon agreement.
What is the ductility of A913 Grade
65 and 70?
A913 Grades 65 and 70 are very ductile
steels, despite their distinctively higher
yield strengths compared to typical 50 ksi
steel. Based on tension tests per ASTM
370, the minimum elongation percentage
for A913 Grade 65 is 15 percent for an
8-inch specimen and 17 percent for a
2-inch specimen. The minimum elongation
percentage for A913 Grade 70 is 14 percent
for an 8-inch specimen and 16 percent
for a 2-inch specimen. These elongation
values are considered largely sufcient to
ensure the formation of a plastic hinge, if
appropriately designed and detailed.
For A913 Grade 50, what is the
maximum YS and YS/TS ratio?
For seismic applications, A913 Grade 50 is
available with maximum yield strength (YS)
of 65 ksi and maximum yield strength to
tensile strength ratio (YS/TS) of 0.85. These
additional requirements are available upon
request at no additional cost (S75 per ASTM
A913).
What is the seismic resistance of
A913?
Full-scale tests of A913 shapes exhibited
better seismic resistance than required by
the codes. A913 Grades 50 and 65 are
referenced standards in the AISC Seismic
Provisions and are recommended in the
FEMA 350 and 353 Seismic Specications. It
is ideally suited for seismic applications.
What is the fatigue behavior of
A913?
Full-scale tests of A913 shapes showed a
fatigue behavior exceeding the requirements
of the codes for conventional steels. Hence,
A913 is also particularly suited for bridge
applications.
ASTM A913 Steel Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
11 | Structural Shapes
What is the re resistance of A913?
Tests have demonstrated that the re
resistance of A913 is the same as that of
conventional hot-rolled structural grades.
What about residual stresses in
A913?
A913 has lower residual stresses relative to
its yield strength than A36.
What is the corrosion resistance of
A913?
The corrosion resistance of A913 shapes is
the same as that of conventional hot-rolled
structural grades.
Which specication should be used
when welding A913?
A913 offers good weldability for manual
and automatic processes provided the
general rules for welding are followed.
Table 3.2 of AWS D1.1 indicates that A913
grades 50 and 65 are weldable without
preheating when the product temperature
is above 32F and when using a low-
hydrogen electrode (H8). This advantage
is due to its low Carbon Equivalent (CE%)
values compared to conventional hot-
rolled structural steel. As with other steel
grades, highly restrained conditions and
large material thickness may require some
preheating. In most cases highly restrained
conditions can be avoided by choosing
adequate weld sequencing. Selection of
strength level of consumables is shown
in AWS D1.1 Table 2.3. Prequalied
combinations of base metal and ller metal
for matching strength are listed in AWS D1.1
Table 3.1.
Can A913 be used in combination
with other grades?
Yes. When welding A913 to A992 or
A36, preheating is typically needed for
the A992 or A36 material but not for the
A913 material. Preheating the A913 has no
detrimental effect.
Can A913 be galvanized?
Yes. A913 is typically delivered with a
Silicon content ranging between 0.15 and
0.25 percent, and as such is suitable to be
galvanized.
What about ame cutting shapes in
A913?
A913 can be cut with a torch using the same
procedures applied to any structural steel.
Due to the low carbon equivalent of A913,
preheating in order to prevent cracking
is generally not necessary for product
temperatures above 32F.
What about ame straightening
shapes in A913?
As with any structural steel it is possible to
eliminate deformations or to give a member
a special shape by ame straightening.
For local reheating of the entire material
thickness the maximum ame straightening
temperature is 1200F. For local supercial
reheating of the surface only, the maximum
ame straightening temperature is 1650F.
What about machining shapes in
A913?
A913 can be machined under the same
conditions as grades with the same level of
yield strength. Drilling and cutting tests on
A913 showed no difference in tool wear
than for other structural grades of the same
strength level. In fact using higher strength
steel allows the designer to reduce the
size (thickness) of the material and thus to
reduce the machining time.
What about stress relieving of
shapes in A913?
Stress relieving post weld heat treatment
(PWHT) may be necessary when the layout
of the structure and/or the expected stress
condition after welding requires a reduction
of the residual stresses. If stress relieving is
required, it should be performed in the same
manner as for any structural steel grade. The
temperature should range between 980F
and 1080F. The holding time should be
two minutes per mm (1/25") of material
thickness, but not less than 30 minutes and
not more than 90 minutes.
Which sections can be
delivered according to A6 S30
(Supplement 2)?
The following proles are available with
Charpy values per 20 ft-lbf at 70F in the
alternate core location (S30 per ASTM A6):
W14 x 211 873
W24 x 229 370
W36 x 282 925
W40 x 235 392
W40 x 277 655
W44 x 290 335
Upon agreement:
W12 x 170 230
ASTM A913 Steel Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
12 | Structural Shapes Subject to change without notice.
C8 11.5 13.75
C10 15.3 20
C12 20.7 25
W4 x 4 13
W5 x 5 16 19
W6 x 4 9 12 16
W6 x 6 15 20 25
W8 x 4 10 13 15
W8 x 5 1/4 14 18 21
W8 x 6 1/2 24 28
W8 x 8 31 35 40 48 58 67
W10 x 4 12 15 17 19
W10 x 5 3/4 22 26 30
W10 x 8 33 39 45
W10 x 10 49 54 60 68 77 88 100 112
W12 x 4 14 16 19 22
W12 x 6 1/2 26 30 35
W12 x 8 40 45 50
W12 x 10 53 58
W12 x 12 65 72 79 87 96 106 120 136 152 170 190 210 230
W14 x 5 22 26
W14 x 6 3/4 30 34 38
W14 x 8 43 48 53
W14 x 10 61 68 74 82
W14 x 14 1/2 90 99 109 120 132
W14 x 16 145 159 176 193 211 233 257 283 311 342 370 398
W14 x 16 426 455 500 550 605 665 730 808 873
W16 x 5 1/2 26 31
W16 x 7 36 40 45 50 57
W16 x 10 1/4 67 77 89 100
W18 x 6 35 40 46
W18 x 7 1/2 50 55 60 65 71
W18 x 11 76 86 97 106 119 130 143 158 175
W21 x 6 1/2 44 50 57
W21 x 8 1/4 48 55 62 68 73 83 93
W24 x 7 55 62
W24 x 9 68 76 84 94 103
W24 x 12 3/4 104 117 131 146 162 176 192 207 229 250 279 306 335 370
W27 x 10 84 94 102 114 129
W30 x 10 1/2 90 99 108 116 124 132 148
W33 x 11 1/2 118 130 141 152 169
W36 x 12 135 150 160 170 182 194 210 232 256 286 318 350 387
W36 x 16 1/2 231 247 262 282 302 330 361 395 441 487 529 652 723 802 853 925
W40 x 12 149 167 183 211 235 264 278 294 331 392
W40 x 16 199 215 249 277 297 324 362 372 397 431 503 593 655
W44 x 16 230 262 290 335
W Shapes
Rolling Program
Section Footweights
Inquire for stock availability.
Sections in bold are available in HISTAR ASTM A913, Grades 50, 65 and 70.
S3 5.7 7.5
S4 7.7 9.5
S5 10
S6 12.5 17.25
S7 15.3 20
S8 18.4 23
S10 25.4 35
S12 31.8 35
S12 40.8 50
S15 42.9 50
S18 54.7 70
S20 66 75
S20 86 96
S24 80 90 100
S24 106 121
S Shapes
Section Footweights
MC6 15.1 15.3
MC7 19.1 22.7
MC8 18.7 20
MC8 21.4 22.8
MC9 23.9 25.4
MC10 22 25 28.5 33.6 41.1
MC12 31 35 40 45 50
MC18 42.7 45.8 51.9 58
MC Shapes
Section Footweights
L8 x 8 1/2 9/16 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8
L10 x 10 3/4 7/8 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8
L12 x 12 1 1 1/8 1 1/4 1 3/8
L Shapes
Section Thickness
C Shapes
Section Footweights
13 | Structural Shapes
High-rise (United States)
One World Trade Center, New York
Three World Trade Center, New York
Four World Trade Center, New York
Hearst Tower, New York
4 Times Square, New York
Broadway 655, San Diego
Advanced Equities Plaza, San Diego
111 South Wacker, Chicago
155 North Wacker, Chicago
111 Huntington, Boston
High-rise (Canada)
The Bow, Calgary, Alberta
Eighth Avenue Place, Calgary, Alberta
One London Place, London, Ontario
Bay Adelaide Centre, Toronto
High-rise (International)
Emirates Tower, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Trump Tower, Mumbai, India
Shanghai World Financial Center, Shanghai
New Poly Plaza, Shanghai
Torre de Cristal, Madrid
Torre Caja Madrid, Madrid
Puerta de Europa, Madrid
NFL Stadiums
Cowboys Stadium, Arlington, Texas
Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis
University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Ariz.
Reliant Stadium, Houston
Edward Jones Dome, St. Louis
MLB Stadiums
Marlins Park, Miami
Chase Field, Phoenix
Miller Park, Milwaukee
SAFECO Field, Seattle
Arenas (North America)
Rogers Arena, Vancouver, British Columbia
Scotiabank Place, Ottawa, Ontario
Air Canada Centre, Toronto
Rose Garden Arena, Portland, Ore.
Time Warner Cable Arena, Charlotte, N.C.
Industrial
Nucor Steel Decatur, Decatur, Ala.
Glider Offshore, Gulf of Mexico
URSA Offshore, Gulf of Mexico
Lanxi Power Plant, Zhejiang, China
Diandong Power Plant, Yunnan, China
Hospitals
Prentice Womens Hospital, Chicago
Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, Calif.
Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital of Chicago, Chicago
Cymbaluk Medical Tower at Providence Regional, Everett, Wash.
Casinos
The Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas
MGM Grand, Las Vegas
The Palazzo, Las Vegas
Convention Centers
Vancouver Convention Centre, West Building, Vancouver,
British Columbia
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington
McCormick Place Expansion, Chicago
A913 HISTAR

References
ArcelorMittal International
North America Headquarters
1 South Dearborn Street, 13th Floor
Chicago, Ill. 60603
T 312 899 3500
F 312 899 3765
West Coast United States / Canada
T 778 355 8871
Canada / Burlington
T 905 631 9500
Mexico / Queretaro
Priv. de los Industriales No.110-A, Desp.802
Col. Ind. Benito Juarez, 76100 Queretaro,
Qro.
T +52 442 218 2887
F +52 442 218 1400
www.arcelormittal.com 2013/03