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virtual address (also known as logical address)

In a virtual memory
(1)
system, the addresses that application programs deal with
are known as virtual addresses.
The virtual addresses used by the application program are translated by the virtual
memory system (often using TLs and page!tables) to physical addresses. It is the
physical address that is used to retrieve the contents from the memory
(")
.
Opposites: physical address.
virtual address space
The virtual address space is the space of virtual addresses.
#n virtual memory
(1)
systems, user processes see the virtual address space, and
commonly have a separate virtual address space each, so that they map the same
addresses to different data. These systems often have shared memory as well.
Opposites: physical address space.
virtual memory
(1)
(also known as $%(1))
In a virtual memory (VM) system, the program code deals with virtual addresses.
&pon use, the virtual address is translated by the %%& to obtain a physical
address that is used to access physical memory
(1)
.
'ome operating systems can simulate having more memory
(()
than is available as
main memory, by storing part of the data in backing store, typically on disk. If the
page referenced by the virtual address is not currently in main memory, a page
fault occurs, triggering an operating system handler that swaps in the page. 'ome
other page might be swapped out to make room.
)ach process typically has its own separate virtual address space with its own
mappings and protections.
Example of the relationship between the virtual address spaces of two processes,
physical memory, and backing store
$irtual memory technology can be used in many useful memory management
techni*ues, such as barriers
(1)
, copy!on!write, and memory mapping.
+$irtual+ means never knowing where your ne,t byte is coming from.
Opposites: real memory
(1)
.
See also: paging- paged in- paged out- swapping- swap space- mapped- reserved-
unmapped- shared memory.
VM
(1)
(for full details, see virtual memory
(1)
)
In a virtual memory (VM) system, the program code deals with virtual addresses.
&pon use, the virtual address is translated by the %%& to obtain a physical
address that is used to access physical memory
(1)
.
VM
(2)

In the .ost'cript/ language, VM is the storage where the values of the composite
ob0ects reside.
$% is short for +virtual memory+, but this has nothing to do with the usual sense
of the phrase (see virtual memory
(1)
).