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Thus Spake Zarathustra

Friedrich Nietzsche
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Thus Spake Zarathustra
by Friedrich Nietzsche
Trans#ated by Tho'as "o''on
*ece'ber, !000 3Etext !0045
Project Gutenberg Etext of Thus Spake Zarathustra, by Nietzsche
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This etext $as prepared by Sue ;sscher <asschers=aia(net(au>
F-2E*-2"/ N2ETZS"/E
T/8S SP;WE Z;-;T/8ST-;
; .77W F7- ;:: ;N* N7NE
T-;NS:;TE* .Q T/79;S "7997N
"7NTENTS(
2NT-7*8"T27N .Q 9-S F7-STE-DN2ETZS"/E(
T/8S SP;WE Z;-;T/8ST-;(
F2-ST P;-T(
ZarathustraMs Pro#ogue(
ZarathustraM *iscourses(
2( The Three 9eta'orphoses(
22( The ;cade'ic "hairs of ,irtue(
222( .ack$or#ds'en(
2,( The *espisers of the .ody(
,( Toys and Passions(
,2( The Pa#e "ri'ina#(
,22( -eading and )riting(
,222( The Tree on the /i##(
2R( The Preachers of *eath(
R( )ar and )arriors(
R2( The Ne$ 2do#(
R22( The F#ies in the 9arketDp#ace(
R222( "hastity(
R2,( The Friend(
R,( The Thousand and 7ne Goa#s(
R,2( NeighbourD:o%e(
R,22( The )ay of the "reating 7ne(
R,222( 7#d and Qoung )o'en(
R2R( The .ite of the ;dder(
RR( "hi#d and 9arriage(
RR2( ,o#untary *eath(
RR22( The .esto$ing ,irtue(
SE"7N* P;-T(
RR222( The "hi#d $ith the 9irror(
RR2,( 2n the /appy 2s#es(
RR,( The Pitifu#(
RR,2( The Priests(
RR,22( The ,irtuous(
RR,222( The -abb#e(
RR2R( The Tarantu#as(
RRR( The Fa'ous )ise 7nes(
RRR2( The NightDSong(
RRR22( The *anceDSong(
RRR222( The Gra%eDSong(
RRR2,( Se#fDSurpassing(
RRR,( The Sub#i'e 7nes(
RRR,2( The :and of "u#ture(
RRR,22( 2''acu#ate Perception(
RRR,222( Scho#ars(
RRR2R( Poets(
R:( Great E%ents(
R:2( The Soothsayer(
R:22( -ede'ption(
R:222( 9an#y Prudence(
R:2,( The Sti##est /our(
T/2-* P;-T(
R:,( The )anderer(
R:,2( The ,ision and the Enig'a(
R:,22( 2n%o#untary .#iss(
R:,222( .efore Sunrise(
R:2R( The .ed$arfing ,irtue(
:( 7n the 7#i%eD9ount(
:2( 7n PassingDby(
:22( The ;postates(
:222( The -eturn /o'e(
:2,( The Three E%i# Things(
:,( The Spirit of Gra%ity(
:,2( 7#d and Ne$ Tab#es(
:,22( The "on%a#escent(
:,222( The Great :onging(
:2R( The Second *anceDSong(
:R( The Se%en Sea#s(
F78-T/ ;N* :;ST P;-T(
:R2( The /oney Sacrifice(
:R22( The "ry of *istress(
:R222( Ta#k $ith the Wings(
:R2,( The :eech(
:R,( The 9agician(
:R,2( 7ut of Ser%ice(
:R,22( The 8g#iest 9an(
:R,222( The ,o#untary .eggar(
:R2R( The Shado$(
:RR( NoonDTide(
:RR2( The Greeting(
:RR22( The Supper(
:R222( The /igher 9an(
:RR2,( The Song of 9e#ancho#y(
:RR,( Science(
:RR,2( ;'ong *aughters of the *esert(
:RR,22( The ;$akening(
:RR,222( The ;ssDFesti%a#(
:RR2R( The *runken Song(
:RRR( The Sign(
;PPEN*2R(
Notes on NThus Spake ZarathustraN by ;nthony 9( :udo%ici(
2NT-7*8"T27N .Q 9-S F7-STE-DN2ETZS"/E(
/7) Z;-;T/8ST-; ";9E 2NT7 .E2NG(
NZarathustraN is 'y brotherMs 'ost persona# $orkL it is the history of his
'ost indi%idua# experiences, of his friendships, idea#s, raptures,
bitterest disappoint'ents and sorro$s( ;bo%e it a##, ho$e%er, there soars,
transfiguring it, the i'age of his greatest hopes and re'otest ai's( 9y
brother had the figure of Zarathustra in his 'ind fro' his %ery ear#iest
youth? he once to#d 'e that e%en as a chi#d he had drea't of hi'( ;t
different periods in his #ife, he $ou#d ca## this haunter of his drea's by
different na'esL Nbut in the end,N he dec#ares in a note on the subject, N2
had to do a PE-S2;N the honour of identifying hi' $ith this creature of 'y
fancy( Persians $ere the first to take a broad and co'prehensi%e %ie$ of
history( E%ery series of e%o#utions, according to the', $as presided o%er
by a prophetL and e%ery prophet had his M/azar,MDDhis dynasty of a thousand
years(N
;## ZarathustraMs %ie$s, as a#so his persona#ity, $ere ear#y conceptions of
'y brotherMs 'ind( )hoe%er reads his posthu'ous#y pub#ished $ritings for
the years !4P0D4C $ith care, $i## constant#y 'eet $ith passages suggesti%e
of ZarathustraMs thoughts and doctrines( For instance, the idea# of the
Super'an is put forth Uuite c#ear#y in a## his $ritings during the years
!41FD1KL and in N)e Phi#o#ogistsN, the fo##o$ing re'arkab#e obser%ations
occur?DD
N/o$ can one praise and g#orify a nation as a $ho#eSDDE%en a'ong the
Greeks, it $as the 2N*2,2*8;:S that counted(N
NThe Greeks are interesting and extre'e#y i'portant because they reared
such a %ast nu'ber of great indi%idua#s( /o$ $as this possib#eS The
Uuestion is one $hich ought to be studied(
N2 a' interested on#y in the re#ations of a peop#e to the rearing of the
indi%idua# 'an, and a'ong the Greeks the conditions $ere unusua##y
fa%ourab#e for the de%e#op'ent of the indi%idua#L not by any 'eans o$ing to
the goodness of the peop#e, but because of the strugg#es of their e%i#
instincts(
N)2T/ T/E /E:P 7F F;,78-;.:E 9E;S8-ES G-E;T 2N*2,2*8;:S 92G/T .E
-E;-E* )/7
)78:* .E .7T/ *2FFE-ENT F-79 ;N* /2G/E- T/;N T/7SE )/7 /E-ET7F7-E
/;,E 7)E*
T/E2- ER2STEN"E T7 9E-E "/;N"E( /ere $e 'ay sti## be hopefu#? in the
rearing of exceptiona# 'en(N
The notion of rearing the Super'an is on#y a ne$ for' of an idea# Nietzsche
a#ready had in his youth, that NT/E 7.TE"T 7F 9;NW2N* S/78:* :2E 2N 2TS
/2G/EST 2N*2,2*8;:SN @or, as he $rites in NSchopenhauer as EducatorN?
N9ankind ought constant#y to be stri%ing to produce great 'enDDthis and
nothing e#se is its duty(NA .ut the idea#s he 'ost re%ered in those days
are no #onger he#d to be the highest types of 'en( No, around this future
idea# of a co'ing hu'anityDDthe Super'anDDthe poet spread the %ei# of
beco'ing( )ho can te## to $hat g#orious heights 'an can sti## ascendS
That is $hy, after ha%ing tested the $orth of our nob#est idea#DDthat of
the Sa%iour, in the #ight of the ne$ %a#uations, the poet cries $ith
passionate e'phasis in NZarathustraN?
NNe%er yet hath there been a Super'an( Naked ha%e 2 seen both of the', the
greatest and the s'a##est 'an?DD
;##DtooDsi'i#ar are they sti## to each other( ,eri#y e%en the greatest
found 2DDa##DtooDhu'an&NDD
The phrase Nthe rearing of the Super'an,N has %ery often been
'isunderstood( .y the $ord Nrearing,N in this case, is 'eant the act of
'odifying by 'eans of ne$ and higher %a#uesDD%a#ues $hich, as #a$s and
guides of conduct and opinion, are no$ to ru#e o%er 'ankind( 2n genera#
the doctrine of the Super'an can on#y be understood correct#y in
conjunction $ith other ideas of the authorMs, such as?DDthe 7rder of -ank,
the )i## to Po$er, and the Trans%a#uation of a## ,a#ues( /e assu'es that
"hristianity, as a product of the resent'ent of the botched and the $eak,
has put in ban a## that is beautifu#, strong, proud, and po$erfu#, in fact
a## the Uua#ities resu#ting fro' strength, and that, in conseUuence, a##
forces $hich tend to pro'ote or e#e%ate #ife ha%e been serious#y
under'ined( No$, ho$e%er, a ne$ tab#e of %a#uations 'ust be p#aced o%er
'ankindDDna'e#y, that of the strong, 'ighty, and 'agnificent 'an,
o%erf#o$ing $ith #ife and e#e%ated to his zenithDDthe Super'an, $ho is no$
put before us $ith o%erpo$ering passion as the ai' of our #ife, hope, and
$i##( ;nd just as the o#d syste' of %a#uing, $hich on#y exto##ed the
Uua#ities fa%ourab#e to the $eak, the suffering, and the oppressed, has
succeeded in producing a $eak, suffering, and N'odernN race, so this ne$
and re%ersed syste' of %a#uing ought to rear a hea#thy, strong, #i%e#y, and
courageous type, $hich $ou#d be a g#ory to #ife itse#f( Stated brief#y,
the #eading princip#e of this ne$ syste' of %a#uing $ou#d be? N;## that
proceeds fro' po$er is good, a## that springs fro' $eakness is bad(N
This type 'ust not be regarded as a fancifu# figure? it is not a nebu#ous
hope $hich is to be rea#ised at so'e indefinite#y re'ote period, thousands
of years henceL nor is it a ne$ species @in the *ar$inian senseA of $hich
$e can kno$ nothing, and $hich it $ou#d therefore be so'e$hat absurd to
stri%e after( .ut it is 'eant to be a possibi#ity $hich 'en of the present
cou#d rea#ise $ith a## their spiritua# and physica# energies, pro%ided they
adopted the ne$ %a#ues(
The author of NZarathustraN ne%er #ost sight of that egregious exa'p#e of a
trans%a#uation of a## %a#ues through "hristianity, $hereby the $ho#e of the
deified 'ode of #ife and thought of the Greeks, as $e## as strong -o'edo',
$as a#'ost annihi#ated or trans%a#ued in a co'parati%e#y short ti'e( "ou#d
not a reju%enated GraecoD-o'an syste' of %a#uing @once it had been refined
and 'ade 'ore profound by the schoo#ing $hich t$o thousand years of
"hristianity had pro%idedA effect another such re%o#ution $ithin a
ca#cu#ab#e period of ti'e, unti# that g#orious type of 'anhood sha##
fina##y appear $hich is to be our ne$ faith and hope, and in the creation
of $hich Zarathustra exhorts us to participateS
2n his pri%ate notes on the subject the author uses the expression
NSuper'anN @a#$ays in the singu#ar, byDtheDbyeA, as signifying Nthe 'ost
thorough#y $e##Dconstituted type,N as opposed to N'odern 'anNL abo%e a##,
ho$e%er, he designates Zarathustra hi'se#f as an exa'p#e of the Super'an(
2n NEcco /o'oN he is carefu# to en#ighten us concerning the precursors and
prereUuisites to the ad%ent of this highest type, in referring to a certain
passage in the NGay ScienceN?DD
N2n order to understand this type, $e 'ust first be Uuite c#ear in regard
to the #eading physio#ogica# condition on $hich it depends? this condition
is $hat 2 ca## G-E;T /E;:T/2NESS( 2 kno$ not ho$ to express 'y 'eaning
'ore p#ain#y or 'ore persona##y than 2 ha%e done a#ready in one of the #ast
chapters @;phoris' F4CA of the fifth book of the MGaya ScienzaM(N
N)e, the ne$, the na'e#ess, the hardDtoDunderstand,NDDit says there,DDN$e
first#ings of a yet untried futureDD$e reUuire for a ne$ end a#so a ne$
'eans, na'e#y, a ne$ hea#thiness, stronger, sharper, tougher, bo#der and
'errier than a## hea#thiness hitherto( /e $hose sou# #ongeth to experience
the $ho#e range of hitherto recognised %a#ues and desirabi#ities, and to
circu'na%igate a## the coasts of this idea# M9editerranean SeaM, $ho, fro'
the ad%entures of his 'ost persona# experience, $ants to kno$ ho$ it fee#s
to be a conUueror, and disco%erer of the idea#DDas #ike$ise ho$ it is $ith
the artist, the saint, the #egis#ator, the sage, the scho#ar, the de%otee,
the prophet, and the god#y nonDconfor'ist of the o#d sty#e?DDreUuires one
thing abo%e a## for that purpose, G-E;T /E;:T/2NESSDDsuch hea#thiness as
one not on#y possesses, but a#so constant#y acUuires and 'ust acUuire,
because one unceasing#y sacrifices it again, and 'ust sacrifice it&DD;nd
no$, after ha%ing been #ong on the $ay in this fashion, $e ;rgonauts of the
idea#, 'ore courageous perhaps than prudent, and often enough ship$recked
and brought to grief, ne%erthe#ess dangerous#y hea#thy, a#$ays hea#thy
again,DDit $ou#d see' as if, in reco'pense for it a##, that $e ha%e a sti##
undisco%ered country before us, the boundaries of $hich no one has yet
seen, a beyond to a## countries and corners of the idea# kno$n hitherto, a
$or#d so o%erDrich in the beautifu#, the strange, the Uuestionab#e, the
frightfu#, and the di%ine, that our curiosity as $e## as our thirst for
possession thereof, ha%e got out of handDDa#as& that nothing $i## no$ any
#onger satisfy us&DD
N/o$ cou#d $e sti## be content $ith T/E 9;N 7F T/E P-ESENT *;Q after such
out#ooks, and $ith such a cra%ing in our conscience and consciousnessS Sad
enoughL but it is una%oidab#e that $e shou#d #ook on the $orthiest ai's and
hopes of the 'an of the present day $ith i##Dconcea#ed a'use'ent, and
perhaps shou#d no #onger #ook at the'( ;nother idea# runs on before us, a
strange, te'pting idea# fu## of danger, to $hich $e shou#d not #ike to
persuade any one, because $e do not so readi#y ackno$#edge any oneMs -2G/T
T/E-ET7? the idea# of a spirit $ho p#ays nai%e#y @that is to say
in%o#untari#y and fro' o%erf#o$ing abundance and po$erA $ith e%erything
that has hitherto been ca##ed ho#y, good, intangib#e, or di%ineL to $ho'
the #oftiest conception $hich the peop#e ha%e reasonab#y 'ade their 'easure
of %a#ue, $ou#d a#ready practica##y i'p#y danger, ruin, abase'ent, or at
#east re#axation, b#indness, or te'porary se#fDforgetfu#nessL the idea# of
a hu'an#y superhu'an $e#fare and bene%o#ence, $hich $i## often enough
appear 2N/89;N, for exa'p#e, $hen put a#ongside of a## past seriousness on
earth, and a#ongside of a## past so#e'nities in bearing, $ord, tone, #ook,
'ora#ity, and pursuit, as their truest in%o#untary parodyDDand )2T/ $hich,
ne%erthe#ess, perhaps T/E G-E;T SE-278SNESS on#y co''ences, $hen the proper
interrogati%e 'ark is set up, the fate of the sou# changes, the hourDhand
'o%es, and tragedy begins(((N
;#though the figure of Zarathustra and a #arge nu'ber of the #eading
thoughts in this $ork had appeared 'uch ear#ier in the drea's and $ritings
of the author, NThus Spake ZarathustraN did not actua##y co'e into being
unti# the 'onth of ;ugust !44! in Si#s 9ariaL and it $as the idea of the
Eterna# -ecurrence of a## things $hich fina##y induced 'y brother to set
forth his ne$ %ie$s in poetic #anguage( 2n regard to his first conception
of this idea, his autobiographica# sketch, NEcce /o'oN, $ritten in the
autu'n of !444, contains the fo##o$ing passage?DD
NThe funda'enta# idea of 'y $orkDDna'e#y, the Eterna# -ecurrence of a##
thingsDDthis highest of a## possib#e for'u#ae of a QeaDsaying phi#osophy,
first occurred to 'e in ;ugust !44!( 2 'ade a note of the thought on a
sheet of paper, $ith the postscript? P,666 feet beyond 'en and ti'e& That
day 2 happened to be $andering through the $oods a#ongside of the #ake of
Si#%ap#ana, and 2 ha#ted beside a huge, pyra'ida# and to$ering rock not far
fro' Sur#ei( 2t $as then that the thought struck 'e( :ooking back no$, 2
find that exact#y t$o 'onths pre%ious to this inspiration, 2 had had an
o'en of its co'ing in the for' of a sudden and decisi%e a#teration in 'y
tastesDD'ore particu#ar#y in 'usic( 2t $ou#d e%en be possib#e to consider
a## MZarathustraM as a 'usica# co'position( ;t a## e%ents, a %ery
necessary condition in its production $as a renaissance in 'yse#f of the
art of hearing( 2n a s'a## 'ountain resort @-ecoaroA near ,icenza, $here 2
spent the spring of !44!, 2 and 'y friend and 9aestro, Peter GastDDa#so one
$ho had been born againDDdisco%ered that the phoenix 'usic that ho%ered
o%er us, $ore #ighter and brighter p#u'es than it had done theretofore(N
*uring the 'onth of ;ugust !44! 'y brother reso#%ed to re%ea# the teaching
of the Eterna# -ecurrence, in dithyra'bic and psa#'odic for', through the
'outh of Zarathustra( ;'ong the notes of this period, $e found a page on
$hich is $ritten the first definite p#an of NThus Spake ZarathustraN?DD
N92**;Q ;N* ETE-N2TQ(N
NG82*EDP7STS T7 ; NE) );Q 7F :2,2NG(N
.eneath this is $ritten?DD
NZarathustra born on #ake 8r'iL #eft his ho'e in his thirtieth year,
$ent into the pro%ince of ;ria, and, during ten years of so#itude in
the 'ountains, co'posed the ZendD;%esta(N
NThe sun of kno$#edge stands once 'ore at 'iddayL and the serpent of
eternity #ies coi#ed in its #ightDD? 2t is Q78- ti'e, ye 'idday brethren(N
2n that su''er of !44!, 'y brother, after 'any years of steadi#y dec#ining
hea#th, began at #ast to ra##y, and it is to this first gush of the
reco%ery of his once sp#endid bodi#y condition that $e o$e not on#y NThe
Gay ScienceN, $hich in its 'ood 'ay be regarded as a pre#ude to
NZarathustraN, but a#so NZarathustraN itse#f( Tust as he $as beginning to
recuperate his hea#th, ho$e%er, an unkind destiny brought hi' a nu'ber of
'ost painfu# persona# experiences( /is friends caused hi' 'any
disappoint'ents, $hich $ere the 'ore bitter to hi', inas'uch as he regarded
friendship as such a sacred institutionL and for the first ti'e in his #ife
he rea#ised the $ho#e horror of that #one#iness to $hich, perhaps, a##
greatness is conde'ned( .ut to be forsaken is so'ething %ery different
fro' de#iberate#y choosing b#essed #one#iness( /o$ he #onged, in those
days, for the idea# friend $ho $ou#d thorough#y understand hi', to $ho' he
$ou#d be ab#e to say a##, and $ho' he i'agined he had found at %arious
periods in his #ife fro' his ear#iest youth on$ards( No$, ho$e%er, that
the $ay he had chosen gre$ e%er 'ore peri#ous and steep, he found nobody
$ho cou#d fo##o$ hi'? he therefore created a perfect friend for hi'se#f in
the idea# for' of a 'ajestic phi#osopher, and 'ade this creation the
preacher of his gospe# to the $or#d(
)hether 'y brother $ou#d e%er ha%e $ritten NThus Spake ZarathustraN
according to the first p#an sketched in the su''er of !44!, if he had not
had the disappoint'ents a#ready referred to, is no$ an id#e UuestionL but
perhaps $here NZarathustraN is concerned, $e 'ay a#so say $ith 9aster
Eckhardt? NThe f#eetest beast to bear you to perfection is suffering(N
9y brother $rites as fo##o$s about the origin of the first part of
NZarathustraN?DDN2n the $inter of !44CD4F, 2 $as #i%ing on the char'ing
#itt#e Gu#f of -apa##o, not far fro' Genoa, and bet$een "hia%ari and "ape
Porto Fino( 9y hea#th $as not %ery goodL the $inter $as co#d and
exceptiona##y rainyL and the s'a## inn in $hich 2 #i%ed $as so c#ose to the
$ater that at night 'y s#eep $ou#d be disturbed if the sea $ere high(
These circu'stances $ere sure#y the %ery re%erse of fa%ourab#eL and yet in
spite of it a##, and as if in de'onstration of 'y be#ief that e%erything
decisi%e co'es to #ife in spite of e%ery obstac#e, it $as precise#y during
this $inter and in the 'idst of these unfa%ourab#e circu'stances that 'y
MZarathustraM originated( 2n the 'orning 2 used to start out in a
souther#y direction up the g#orious road to Zoag#i, $hich rises a#oft
through a forest of pines and gi%es one a %ie$ far out into the sea( 2n
the afternoon, as often as 'y hea#th per'itted, 2 $a#ked round the $ho#e
bay fro' Santa 9argherita to beyond Porto Fino( This spot $as a## the 'ore
interesting to 'e, inas'uch as it $as so dear#y #o%ed by the E'peror
Frederick 222( 2n the autu'n of !44P 2 chanced to be there again $hen he
$as re%isiting this s'a##, forgotten $or#d of happiness for the #ast ti'e(
2t $as on these t$o roads that a## MZarathustraM ca'e to 'e, abo%e a##
Zarathustra hi'se#f as a typeLDD2 ought rather to say that it $as on these
$a#ks that these ideas $ay#aid 'e(N
The first part of NZarathustraN $as $ritten in about ten daysDDthat is to
say, fro' the beginning to about the 'idd#e of February !44F( NThe #ast
#ines $ere $ritten precise#y in the ha##o$ed hour $hen -ichard )agner ga%e
up the ghost in ,enice(N
)ith the exception of the ten days occupied in co'posing the first part of
this book, 'y brother often referred to this $inter as the hardest and
sick#iest he had e%er experienced( /e did not, ho$e%er, 'ean thereby that
his for'er disorders $ere troub#ing hi', but that he $as suffering fro' a
se%ere attack of inf#uenza $hich he had caught in Santa 9argherita, and
$hich tor'ented hi' for se%era# $eeks after his arri%a# in Genoa( ;s a
'atter of fact, ho$e%er, $hat he co'p#ained of 'ost $as his spiritua#
conditionDDthat indescribab#e forsakennessDDto $hich he gi%es such
heartrending expression in NZarathustraN( E%en the reception $hich the
first part 'et $ith at the hands of friends and acUuaintances $as extre'e#y
disheartening? for a#'ost a## those to $ho' he presented copies of the
$ork 'isunderstood it( N2 found no one ripe for 'any of 'y thoughtsL the
case of MZarathustraM pro%es that one can speak $ith the ut'ost c#earness,
and yet not be heard by any one(N 9y brother $as %ery 'uch discouraged by
the feeb#eness of the response he $as gi%en, and as he $as stri%ing just
then to gi%e up the practice of taking hydrate of ch#ora#DDa drug he had
begun to take $hi#e i## $ith inf#uenza,DDthe fo##o$ing spring, spent in
-o'e, $as a so'e$hat g#oo'y one for hi'( /e $rites about it as fo##o$s?DD
N2 spent a 'e#ancho#y spring in -o'e, $here 2 on#y just 'anaged to #i%e,DD
and this $as no easy 'atter( This city, $hich is abso#ute#y unsuited to
the poetDauthor of MZarathustraM, and for the choice of $hich 2 $as not
responsib#e, 'ade 'e inordinate#y 'iserab#e( 2 tried to #ea%e it( 2
$anted to go to ;Uui#aDDthe opposite of -o'e in e%ery respect, and actua##y
founded in a spirit of en'ity to$ards that city @just as 2 a#so sha## found
a city so'e dayA, as a 'e'ento of an atheist and genuine ene'y of the
"hurchDDa person %ery c#ose#y re#ated to 'e,DDthe great /ohenstaufen, the
E'peror Frederick 22( .ut Fate #ay behind it a##? 2 had to return again
to -o'e( 2n the end 2 $as ob#iged to be satisfied $ith the Piazza
.arberini, after 2 had exerted 'yse#f in %ain to find an antiD"hristian
Uuarter( 2 fear that on one occasion, to a%oid bad s'e##s as 'uch as
possib#e, 2 actua##y inUuired at the Pa#azzo de# Vuirina#e $hether they
cou#d not pro%ide a Uuiet roo' for a phi#osopher( 2n a cha'ber high abo%e
the Piazza just 'entioned, fro' $hich one obtained a genera# %ie$ of -o'e
and cou#d hear the fountains p#ashing far be#o$, the #one#iest of a## songs
$as co'posedDDMThe NightDSongM( ;bout this ti'e 2 $as obsessed by an
unspeakab#y sad 'e#ody, the refrain of $hich 2 recognised in the $ords,
Mdead through i''orta#ity(MN
)e re'ained so'e$hat too #ong in -o'e that spring, and $hat $ith the effect
of the increasing heat and the discouraging circu'stances a#ready
described, 'y brother reso#%ed not to $rite any 'ore, or in any case, not
to proceed $ith NZarathustraN, a#though 2 offered to re#ie%e hi' of a##
troub#e in connection $ith the proofs and the pub#isher( )hen, ho$e%er, $e
returned to S$itzer#and to$ards the end of Tune, and he found hi'se#f once
'ore in the fa'i#iar and exhi#arating air of the 'ountains, a## his joyous
creati%e po$ers re%i%ed, and in a note to 'e announcing the dispatch of
so'e 'anuscript, he $rote as fo##o$s? N2 ha%e engaged a p#ace here for
three 'onths? forsooth, 2 a' the greatest foo# to a##o$ 'y courage to be
sapped fro' 'e by the c#i'ate of 2ta#y( No$ and again 2 a' troub#ed by the
thought? )/;T NERTS 9y MfutureM is the darkest thing in the $or#d to 'e,
but as there sti## re'ains a great dea# for 'e to do, 2 suppose 2 ought
rather to think of doing this than of 'y future, and #ea%e the rest to T/EE
and the gods(N
The second part of NZarathustraN $as $ritten bet$een the CPth of Tune and
the Pth Tu#y( NThis su''er, finding 'yse#f once 'ore in the sacred p#ace
$here the first thought of MZarathustraM f#ashed across 'y 'ind, 2
concei%ed the second part( Ten days sufficed( Neither for the second, the
first, nor the third part, ha%e 2 reUuired a day #onger(N
/e often used to speak of the ecstatic 'ood in $hich he $rote
NZarathustraNL ho$ in his $a#ks o%er hi## and da#e the ideas $ou#d cro$d
into his 'ind, and ho$ he $ou#d note the' do$n hasti#y in a noteDbook fro'
$hich he $ou#d transcribe the' on his return, so'eti'es $orking ti##
'idnight( /e says in a #etter to 'e? NQou can ha%e no idea of the
%ehe'ence of such co'position,N and in NEcce /o'oN @autu'n !444A he
describes as fo##o$s $ith passionate enthusias' the inco'parab#e 'ood in
$hich he created Zarathustra?DD
NDD/as any one at the end of the nineteenth century any distinct notion of
$hat poets of a stronger age understood by the $ord inspirationS 2f not, 2
$i## describe it( 2f one had the s'a##est %estige of superstition in one,
it $ou#d hard#y be possib#e to set aside co'p#ete#y the idea that one is
the 'ere incarnation, 'outhpiece or 'ediu' of an a#'ighty po$er( The idea
of re%e#ation in the sense that so'ething beco'es sudden#y %isib#e and
audib#e $ith indescribab#e certainty and accuracy, $hich profound#y
con%u#ses and upsets oneDDdescribes si'p#y the 'atter of fact( 7ne hearsDD
one does not seekL one takesDDone does not ask $ho gi%es? a thought
sudden#y f#ashes up #ike #ightning, it co'es $ith necessity,
unhesitating#yDD2 ha%e ne%er had any choice in the 'atter( There is an
ecstasy such that the i''ense strain of it is so'eti'es re#axed by a f#ood
of tears, a#ong $ith $hich oneMs steps either rush or in%o#untari#y #ag,
a#ternate#y( There is the fee#ing that one is co'p#ete#y out of hand, $ith
the %ery distinct consciousness of an end#ess nu'ber of fine thri##s and
Uui%erings to the %ery toesLDDthere is a depth of happiness in $hich the
painfu##est and g#oo'iest do not operate as antitheses, but as conditioned,
as de'anded in the sense of necessary shades of co#our in such an o%erf#o$
of #ight( There is an instinct for rhyth'ic re#ations $hich e'braces $ide
areas of for's @#ength, the need of a $ideDe'bracing rhyth', is a#'ost the
'easure of the force of an inspiration, a sort of counterpart to its
pressure and tensionA( E%erything happens Uuite in%o#untari#y, as if in a
te'pestuous outburst of freedo', of abso#uteness, of po$er and di%inity(
The in%o#untariness of the figures and si'i#es is the 'ost re'arkab#e
thingL one #oses a## perception of $hat constitutes the figure and $hat
constitutes the si'i#eL e%erything see's to present itse#f as the readiest,
the correctest and the si'p#est 'eans of expression( 2t actua##y see's, to
use one of ZarathustraMs o$n phrases, as if a## things ca'e unto one, and
$ou#d fain be si'i#es? M/ere do a## things co'e caressing#y to thy ta#k
and f#atter thee, for they $ant to ride upon thy back( 7n e%ery si'i#e
dost thou here ride to e%ery truth( /ere f#y open unto thee a## beingMs
$ords and $ordDcabinetsL here a## being $anteth to beco'e $ords, here a##
beco'ing $anteth to #earn of thee ho$ to ta#k(M This is 9Q experience of
inspiration( 2 do not doubt but that one $ou#d ha%e to go back thousands
of years in order to find so'e one $ho cou#d say to 'e? 2t is 'ine
a#so&DDN
2n the autu'n of !44F 'y brother #eft the Engadine for Ger'any and stayed
there a fe$ $eeks( 2n the fo##o$ing $inter, after $andering so'e$hat
erratica##y through Stresa, Genoa, and Spezia, he #anded in Nice, $here the
c#i'ate so happi#y pro'oted his creati%e po$ers that he $rote the third
part of NZarathustraN( N2n the $inter, beneath the ha#cyon sky of Nice,
$hich then #ooked do$n upon 'e for the first ti'e in 'y #ife, 2 found the
third MZarathustraMDDand ca'e to the end of 'y taskL the $ho#e ha%ing
occupied 'e scarce#y a year( 9any hidden corners and heights in the
#andscapes round about Nice are ha##o$ed to 'e by unforgettab#e 'o'ents(
That decisi%e chapter entit#ed M7#d and Ne$ Tab#esM $as co'posed in the
%ery difficu#t ascent fro' the station to EzaDDthat $onderfu# 9oorish
%i##age in the rocks( 9y 'ost creati%e 'o'ents $ere a#$ays acco'panied by
unusua# 'uscu#ar acti%ity( The body is inspired? #et us $ai%e the
Uuestion of the Msou#(M 2 'ight often ha%e been seen dancing in those
days( )ithout a suggestion of fatigue 2 cou#d then $a#k for se%en or eight
hours on end a'ong the hi##s( 2 s#ept $e## and #aughed $e##DD2 $as
perfect#y robust and patient(N
;s $e ha%e seen, each of the three parts of NZarathustraN $as $ritten,
after a 'ore or #ess short period of preparation, in about ten days( The
co'position of the fourth part a#one $as broken by occasiona#
interruptions( The first notes re#ating to this part $ere $ritten $hi#e he
and 2 $ere staying together in Zurich in Septe'ber !44E( 2n the fo##o$ing
No%e'ber, $hi#e staying at 9entone, he began to e#aborate these notes, and
after a #ong pause, finished the 'anuscript at Nice bet$een the end of
Tanuary and the 'idd#e of February !44K( 9y brother then ca##ed this part
the fourth and #astL but e%en before, and short#y after it had been
pri%ate#y printed, he $rote to 'e saying that he sti## intended $riting a
fifth and sixth part, and notes re#ating to these parts are no$ in 'y
possession( This fourth part @the origina# 9S( of $hich contains this
note? N7n#y for 'y friends, not for the pub#icNA is $ritten in a
particu#ar#y persona# spirit, and those fe$ to $ho' he presented a copy of
it, he p#edged to the strictest secrecy concerning its contents( /e often
thought of 'aking this fourth part pub#ic a#so, but doubted $hether he
$ou#d e%er be ab#e to do so $ithout considerab#y a#tering certain portions
of it( ;t a## e%ents he reso#%ed to distribute this 'anuscript production,
of $hich on#y forty copies $ere printed, on#y a'ong those $ho had pro%ed
the'se#%es $orthy of it, and it speaks e#oUuent#y of his utter #one#iness
and need of sy'pathy in those days, that he had occasion to present on#y
se%en copies of his book according to this reso#ution(
;#ready at the beginning of this history 2 hinted at the reasons $hich #ed
'y brother to se#ect a Persian as the incarnation of his idea# of the
'ajestic phi#osopher( /is reasons, ho$e%er, for choosing Zarathustra of
a## others to be his 'outhpiece, he gi%es us in the fo##o$ing $ords?DD
NPeop#e ha%e ne%er asked 'e, as they shou#d ha%e done, $hat the na'e
Zarathustra precise#y 'eans in 'y 'outh, in the 'outh of the first
2''ora#istL for $hat distinguishes that phi#osopher fro' a## others in the
past is the %ery fact that he $as exact#y the re%erse of an i''ora#ist(
Zarathustra $as the first to see in the strugg#e bet$een good and e%i# the
essentia# $hee# in the $orking of things( The trans#ation of 'ora#ity into
the 'etaphysica#, as force, cause, end in itse#f, $as /2S $ork( .ut the
%ery Uuestion suggests its o$n ans$er( Zarathustra "-E;TE* the 'ost
portentous error, 97-;:2TQ, conseUuent#y he shou#d a#so be the first to
PE-"E2,E that error, not on#y because he has had #onger and greater
experience of the subject than any other thinkerDDa## history is the
experi'enta# refutation of the theory of the soDca##ed 'ora# order of
things?DDthe 'ore i'portant point is that Zarathustra $as 'ore truthfu#
than any other thinker( 2n his teaching a#one do $e 'eet $ith truthfu#ness
uphe#d as the highest %irtueDDi(e(? the re%erse of the "7);-*2"E of the
Midea#istM $ho f#ees fro' rea#ity( Zarathustra had 'ore courage in his
body than any other thinker before or after hi'( To te## the truth and T7
;29 ST-;2G/T? that is the first Persian %irtue( ;' 2 understoodS(((The
o%erco'ing of 'ora#ity through itse#fDDthrough truthfu#ness, the o%erco'ing
of the 'ora#ist through his oppositeDDT/-78G/ 9EDD? that is $hat the na'e
Zarathustra 'eans in 'y 'outh(N
E:2Z;.ET/ F7-STE-DN2ETZS"/E(
Nietzsche ;rchi%es,
)ei'ar, *ece'ber !06K(
T/8S SP;WE Z;-;T/8ST-;(
F2-ST P;-T(
Z;-;T/8ST-;MS *2S"78-SES(
Z;-;T/8ST-;MS P-7:7G8E(
!(
)hen Zarathustra $as thirty years o#d, he #eft his ho'e and the #ake of
his ho'e, and $ent into the 'ountains( There he enjoyed his spirit and
so#itude, and for ten years did not $eary of it( .ut at #ast his heart
changed,DDand rising one 'orning $ith the rosy da$n, he $ent before the
sun, and spake thus unto it?
Thou great star& )hat $ou#d be thy happiness if thou hadst not those for
$ho' thou shinest&
For ten years hast thou c#i'bed hither unto 'y ca%e? thou $ou#dst ha%e
$earied of thy #ight and of the journey, had it not been for 'e, 'ine
eag#e, and 'y serpent(
.ut $e a$aited thee e%ery 'orning, took fro' thee thine o%erf#o$
and b#essed thee for it(
:o& 2 a' $eary of 'y $isdo', #ike the bee that hath gathered too 'uch
honeyL 2 need hands outstretched to take it(
2 $ou#d fain besto$ and distribute, unti# the $ise ha%e once 'ore beco'e
joyous in their fo##y, and the poor happy in their riches(
Therefore 'ust 2 descend into the deep? as thou doest in the e%ening,
$hen thou goest behind the sea, and gi%est #ight a#so to the netherD$or#d,
thou exuberant star&
:ike thee 'ust 2 G7 *7)N, as 'en say, to $ho' 2 sha## descend(
.#ess 'e, then, thou tranUui# eye, that canst beho#d e%en the greatest
happiness $ithout en%y&
.#ess the cup that is about to o%erf#o$, that the $ater 'ay f#o$ go#den out
of it, and carry e%ery$here the ref#ection of thy b#iss&
:o& This cup is again going to e'pty itse#f, and Zarathustra is again
going to be a 'an(
Thus began ZarathustraMs do$nDgoing(
C(
Zarathustra $ent do$n the 'ountain a#one, no one 'eeting hi'( )hen he
entered the forest, ho$e%er, there sudden#y stood before hi' an o#d 'an,
$ho had #eft his ho#y cot to seek roots( ;nd thus spake the o#d 'an to
Zarathustra?
NNo stranger to 'e is this $anderer? 'any years ago passed he by(
Zarathustra he $as ca##edL but he hath a#tered(
Then thou carriedst thine ashes into the 'ountains? $i#t thou no$ carry
thy fire into the %a##eysS Fearest thou not the incendiaryMs doo'S
Qea, 2 recognise Zarathustra( Pure is his eye, and no #oathing #urketh
about his 'outh( Goeth he not a#ong #ike a dancerS
;#tered is ZarathustraL a chi#d hath Zarathustra beco'eL an a$akened one is
Zarathustra? $hat $i#t thou do in the #and of the s#eepersS
;s in the sea hast thou #i%ed in so#itude, and it hath borne thee up(
;#as, $i#t thou no$ go ashoreS ;#as, $i#t thou again drag thy body
thyse#fSN
Zarathustra ans$ered? N2 #o%e 'ankind(N
N)hy,N said the saint, Ndid 2 go into the forest and the desertS )as it
not because 2 #o%ed 'en far too $e##S
No$ 2 #o%e God? 'en, 2 do not #o%e( 9an is a thing too i'perfect for 'e(
:o%e to 'an $ou#d be fata# to 'e(N
Zarathustra ans$ered? N)hat spake 2 of #o%e& 2 a' bringing gifts unto
'en(N
NGi%e the' nothing,N said the saint( NTake rather part of their #oad, and
carry it a#ong $ith the'DDthat $i## be 'ost agreeab#e unto the'? if on#y
it be agreeab#e unto thee&
2f, ho$e%er, thou $i#t gi%e unto the', gi%e the' no 'ore than an a#'s, and
#et the' a#so beg for it&N
NNo,N rep#ied Zarathustra, N2 gi%e no a#'s( 2 a' not poor enough for
that(N
The saint #aughed at Zarathustra, and spake thus? NThen see to it that
they accept thy treasures& They are distrustfu# of anchorites, and do not
be#ie%e that $e co'e $ith gifts(
The fa## of our footsteps ringeth too ho##o$ through their streets( ;nd
just as at night, $hen they are in bed and hear a 'an abroad #ong before
sunrise, so they ask the'se#%es concerning us? )here goeth the thiefS
Go not to 'en, but stay in the forest& Go rather to the ani'a#s& )hy not
be #ike 'eDDa bear a'ongst bears, a bird a'ongst birdsSN
N;nd $hat doeth the saint in the forestSN asked Zarathustra(
The saint ans$ered? N2 'ake hy'ns and sing the'L and in 'aking hy'ns
2 #augh and $eep and 'u'b#e? thus do 2 praise God(
)ith singing, $eeping, #aughing, and 'u'b#ing do 2 praise the God $ho is 'y
God( .ut $hat dost thou bring us as a giftSN
)hen Zarathustra had heard these $ords, he bo$ed to the saint and said?
N)hat shou#d 2 ha%e to gi%e thee& :et 'e rather hurry hence #est 2 take
aught a$ay fro' thee&NDD;nd thus they parted fro' one another, the o#d 'an
and Zarathustra, #aughing #ike schoo#boys(
)hen Zarathustra $as a#one, ho$e%er, he said to his heart? N"ou#d it be
possib#e& This o#d saint in the forest hath not yet heard of it, that G7*
2S *E;*&N
F(
)hen Zarathustra arri%ed at the nearest to$n $hich adjoineth the forest, he
found 'any peop#e asse'b#ed in the 'arketDp#aceL for it had been announced
that a ropeDdancer $ou#d gi%e a perfor'ance( ;nd Zarathustra spake thus
unto the peop#e?
2 TE;"/ Q78 T/E S8PE-9;N( 9an is so'ething that is to be surpassed( )hat
ha%e ye done to surpass 'anS
;## beings hitherto ha%e created so'ething beyond the'se#%es? and ye $ant
to be the ebb of that great tide, and $ou#d rather go back to the beast
than surpass 'anS
)hat is the ape to 'anS ; #aughingDstock, a thing of sha'e( ;nd just the
sa'e sha## 'an be to the Super'an? a #aughingDstock, a thing of sha'e(
Qe ha%e 'ade your $ay fro' the $or' to 'an, and 'uch $ithin you is sti##
$or'( 7nce $ere ye apes, and e%en yet 'an is 'ore of an ape than any of
the apes(
E%en the $isest a'ong you is on#y a dishar'ony and hybrid of p#ant and
phanto'( .ut do 2 bid you beco'e phanto's or p#antsS
:o, 2 teach you the Super'an&
The Super'an is the 'eaning of the earth( :et your $i## say? The Super'an
S/;:: .E the 'eaning of the earth&
2 conjure you, 'y brethren, -E9;2N T-8E T7 T/E E;-T/, and be#ie%e not those
$ho speak unto you of superearth#y hopes& Poisoners are they, $hether they
kno$ it or not(
*espisers of #ife are they, decaying ones and poisoned ones the'se#%es, of
$ho' the earth is $eary? so a$ay $ith the'&
7nce b#asphe'y against God $as the greatest b#asphe'yL but God died, and
there$ith a#so those b#asphe'ers( To b#asphe'e the earth is no$ the
dreadfu#est sin, and to rate the heart of the unkno$ab#e higher than the
'eaning of the earth&
7nce the sou# #ooked conte'ptuous#y on the body, and then that conte'pt $as
the supre'e thing?DDthe sou# $ished the body 'eagre, ghast#y, and fa'ished(
Thus it thought to escape fro' the body and the earth(
7h, that sou# $as itse#f 'eagre, ghast#y, and fa'ishedL and crue#ty $as the
de#ight of that sou#&
.ut ye, a#so, 'y brethren, te## 'e? )hat doth your body say about your
sou#S 2s your sou# not po%erty and po##ution and $retched se#fD
co'p#acencyS
,eri#y, a po##uted strea' is 'an( 7ne 'ust be a sea, to recei%e a po##uted
strea' $ithout beco'ing i'pure(
:o, 2 teach you the Super'an? he is that seaL in hi' can your great
conte'pt be sub'erged(
)hat is the greatest thing ye can experienceS 2t is the hour of great
conte'pt( The hour in $hich e%en your happiness beco'eth #oathso'e unto
you, and so a#so your reason and %irtue(
The hour $hen ye say? N)hat good is 'y happiness& 2t is po%erty and
po##ution and $retched se#fDco'p#acency( .ut 'y happiness shou#d justify
existence itse#f&N
The hour $hen ye say? N)hat good is 'y reason& *oth it #ong for kno$#edge
as the #ion for his foodS 2t is po%erty and po##ution and $retched se#fD
co'p#acency&N
The hour $hen ye say? N)hat good is 'y %irtue& ;s yet it hath not 'ade 'e
passionate( /o$ $eary 2 a' of 'y good and 'y bad& 2t is a## po%erty and
po##ution and $retched se#fDco'p#acency&N
The hour $hen ye say? N)hat good is 'y justice& 2 do not see that 2 a'
fer%our and fue#( The just, ho$e%er, are fer%our and fue#&N
The hour $hen $e say? N)hat good is 'y pity& 2s not pity the cross on
$hich he is nai#ed $ho #o%eth 'anS .ut 'y pity is not a crucifixion(N
/a%e ye e%er spoken thusS /a%e ye e%er cried thusS ;h& $ou#d that 2 had
heard you crying thus&
2t is not your sinDDit is your se#fDsatisfaction that crieth unto hea%enL
your %ery sparingness in sin crieth unto hea%en&
)here is the #ightning to #ick you $ith its tongueS )here is the frenzy
$ith $hich ye shou#d be inocu#atedS
:o, 2 teach you the Super'an? he is that #ightning, he is that frenzy&DD
)hen Zarathustra had thus spoken, one of the peop#e ca##ed out? N)e ha%e
no$ heard enough of the ropeDdancerL it is ti'e no$ for us to see hi'&N
;nd a## the peop#e #aughed at Zarathustra( .ut the ropeDdancer, $ho
thought the $ords app#ied to hi', began his perfor'ance(
E(
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, #ooked at the peop#e and $ondered( Then he spake
thus?
9an is a rope stretched bet$een the ani'a# and the Super'anDDa rope o%er an
abyss(
; dangerous crossing, a dangerous $ayfaring, a dangerous #ookingDback, a
dangerous tre'b#ing and ha#ting(
)hat is great in 'an is that he is a bridge and not a goa#? $hat is
#o%ab#e in 'an is that he is an 7,E-DG72NG and a *7)NDG72NG(
2 #o%e those that kno$ not ho$ to #i%e except as do$nDgoers, for they are
the o%erDgoers(
2 #o%e the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arro$s
of #onging for the other shore(
2 #o%e those $ho do not first seek a reason beyond the stars for going do$n
and being sacrifices, but sacrifice the'se#%es to the earth, that the earth
of the Super'an 'ay hereafter arri%e(
2 #o%e hi' $ho #i%eth in order to kno$, and seeketh to kno$ in order that
the Super'an 'ay hereafter #i%e( Thus seeketh he his o$n do$nDgoing(
2 #o%e hi' $ho #aboureth and in%enteth, that he 'ay bui#d the house for the
Super'an, and prepare for hi' earth, ani'a#, and p#ant? for thus seeketh
he his o$n do$nDgoing(
2 #o%e hi' $ho #o%eth his %irtue? for %irtue is the $i## to do$nDgoing,
and an arro$ of #onging(
2 #o%e hi' $ho reser%eth no share of spirit for hi'se#f, but $anteth to be
$ho##y the spirit of his %irtue? thus $a#keth he as spirit o%er the
bridge(
2 #o%e hi' $ho 'aketh his %irtue his inc#ination and destiny? thus, for
the sake of his %irtue, he is $i##ing to #i%e on, or #i%e no 'ore(
2 #o%e hi' $ho desireth not too 'any %irtues( 7ne %irtue is 'ore of a
%irtue than t$o, because it is 'ore of a knot for oneMs destiny to c#ing
to(
2 #o%e hi' $hose sou# is #a%ish, $ho $anteth no thanks and doth not gi%e
back? for he a#$ays besto$eth, and desireth not to keep for hi'se#f(
2 #o%e hi' $ho is asha'ed $hen the dice fa## in his fa%our, and $ho then
asketh? N;' 2 a dishonest p#ayerSNDDfor he is $i##ing to succu'b(
2 #o%e hi' $ho scattereth go#den $ords in ad%ance of his deeds, and a#$ays
doeth 'ore than he pro'iseth? for he seeketh his o$n do$nDgoing(
2 #o%e hi' $ho justifieth the future ones, and redee'eth the past ones?
for he is $i##ing to succu'b through the present ones(
2 #o%e hi' $ho chasteneth his God, because he #o%eth his God? for he 'ust
succu'b through the $rath of his God(
2 #o%e hi' $hose sou# is deep e%en in the $ounding, and 'ay succu'b through
a s'a## 'atter? thus goeth he $i##ing#y o%er the bridge(
2 #o%e hi' $hose sou# is so o%erfu## that he forgetteth hi'se#f, and a##
things are in hi'? thus a## things beco'e his do$nDgoing(
2 #o%e hi' $ho is of a free spirit and a free heart? thus is his head on#y
the bo$e#s of his heartL his heart, ho$e%er, causeth his do$nDgoing(
2 #o%e a## $ho are #ike hea%y drops fa##ing one by one out of the dark
c#oud that #o$ereth o%er 'an? they hera#d the co'ing of the #ightning, and
succu'b as hera#ds(
:o, 2 a' a hera#d of the #ightning, and a hea%y drop out of the c#oud? the
#ightning, ho$e%er, is the S8PE-9;N(DD
K(
)hen Zarathustra had spoken these $ords, he again #ooked at the peop#e, and
$as si#ent( NThere they stand,N said he to his heartL Nthere they #augh?
they understand 'e notL 2 a' not the 'outh for these ears(
9ust one first batter their ears, that they 'ay #earn to hear $ith their
eyesS 9ust one c#atter #ike kett#edru's and penitentia# preachersS 7r do
they on#y be#ie%e the sta''ererS
They ha%e so'ething $hereof they are proud( )hat do they ca## it, that
$hich 'aketh the' proudS "u#ture, they ca## itL it distinguisheth the'
fro' the goatherds(
They dis#ike, therefore, to hear of Mconte'ptM of the'se#%es( So 2 $i##
appea# to their pride(
2 $i## speak unto the' of the 'ost conte'ptib#e thing? that, ho$e%er, is
T/E :;ST 9;N&N
;nd thus spake Zarathustra unto the peop#e?
2t is ti'e for 'an to fix his goa#( 2t is ti'e for 'an to p#ant the ger'
of his highest hope(
Sti## is his soi# rich enough for it( .ut that soi# $i## one day be poor
and exhausted, and no #ofty tree $i## any #onger be ab#e to gro$ thereon(
;#as& there co'eth the ti'e $hen 'an $i## no #onger #aunch the arro$ of his
#onging beyond 'anDDand the string of his bo$ $i## ha%e un#earned to $hizz&
2 te## you? one 'ust sti## ha%e chaos in one, to gi%e birth to a dancing
star( 2 te## you? ye ha%e sti## chaos in you(
;#as& There co'eth the ti'e $hen 'an $i## no #onger gi%e birth to any
star( ;#as& There co'eth the ti'e of the 'ost despicab#e 'an, $ho can no
#onger despise hi'se#f(
:o& 2 sho$ you T/E :;ST 9;N(
N)hat is #o%eS )hat is creationS )hat is #ongingS )hat is a starSNDDso
asketh the #ast 'an and b#inketh(
The earth hath then beco'e s'a##, and on it there hoppeth the #ast 'an $ho
'aketh e%erything s'a##( /is species is ineradicab#e #ike that of the
groundDf#eaL the #ast 'an #i%eth #ongest(
N)e ha%e disco%ered happinessNDDsay the #ast 'en, and b#ink thereby(
They ha%e #eft the regions $here it is hard to #i%eL for they need $ar'th(
7ne sti## #o%eth oneMs neighbour and rubbeth against hi'L for one needeth
$ar'th(
Turning i## and being distrustfu#, they consider sinfu#? they $a#k $ari#y(
/e is a foo# $ho sti## stu'b#eth o%er stones or 'en&
; #itt#e poison no$ and then? that 'aketh p#easant drea's( ;nd 'uch
poison at #ast for a p#easant death(
7ne sti## $orketh, for $ork is a pasti'e( .ut one is carefu# #est the
pasti'e shou#d hurt one(
7ne no #onger beco'eth poor or richL both are too burdenso'e( )ho sti##
$anteth to ru#eS )ho sti## $anteth to obeyS .oth are too burdenso'e(
No shepherd, and one herd& E%ery one $anteth the sa'eL e%ery one is eUua#?
he $ho hath other senti'ents goeth %o#untari#y into the 'adhouse(
NFor'er#y a## the $or#d $as insane,NDDsay the subt#est of the', and b#ink
thereby(
They are c#e%er and kno$ a## that hath happened? so there is no end to
their rai##ery( Peop#e sti## fa## out, but are soon reconci#edDDother$ise
it spoi#eth their sto'achs(
They ha%e their #itt#e p#easures for the day, and their #itt#e p#easures
for the night, but they ha%e a regard for hea#th(
N)e ha%e disco%ered happiness,NDDsay the #ast 'en, and b#ink thereby(DD
;nd here ended the first discourse of Zarathustra, $hich is a#so ca##ed
NThe Pro#ogueN? for at this point the shouting and 'irth of the 'u#titude
interrupted hi'( NGi%e us this #ast 'an, 7 Zarathustra,NDDthey ca##ed outD
DN'ake us into these #ast 'en& Then $i## $e 'ake thee a present of the
Super'an&N ;nd a## the peop#e exu#ted and s'acked their #ips(
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, turned sad, and said to his heart?
NThey understand 'e not? 2 a' not the 'outh for these ears(
Too #ong, perhaps, ha%e 2 #i%ed in the 'ountainsL too 'uch ha%e 2 hearkened
unto the brooks and trees? no$ do 2 speak unto the' as unto the goatherds(
"a#' is 'y sou#, and c#ear, #ike the 'ountains in the 'orning( .ut they
think 'e co#d, and a 'ocker $ith terrib#e jests(
;nd no$ do they #ook at 'e and #augh? and $hi#e they #augh they hate 'e
too( There is ice in their #aughter(N
P(
Then, ho$e%er, so'ething happened $hich 'ade e%ery 'outh 'ute and e%ery eye
fixed( 2n the 'eanti'e, of course, the ropeDdancer had co''enced his
perfor'ance? he had co'e out at a #itt#e door, and $as going a#ong the
rope $hich $as stretched bet$een t$o to$ers, so that it hung abo%e the
'arketDp#ace and the peop#e( )hen he $as just 'id$ay across, the #itt#e
door opened once 'ore, and a gaudi#yDdressed fe##o$ #ike a buffoon sprang
out, and $ent rapid#y after the first one( NGo on, ha#tDfoot,N cried his
frightfu# %oice, Ngo on, #azyDbones, inter#oper, sa##o$Dface&DD#est 2
tick#e thee $ith 'y hee#& )hat dost thou here bet$een the to$ersS 2n the
to$er is the p#ace for thee, thou shou#dst be #ocked upL to one better than
thyse#f thou b#ockest the $ay&NDD;nd $ith e%ery $ord he ca'e nearer and
nearer the first one( )hen, ho$e%er, he $as but a step behind, there
happened the frightfu# thing $hich 'ade e%ery 'outh 'ute and e%ery eye
fixedDDhe uttered a ye## #ike a de%i#, and ju'ped o%er the other $ho $as in
his $ay( The #atter, ho$e%er, $hen he thus sa$ his ri%a# triu'ph, #ost at
the sa'e ti'e his head and his footing on the ropeL he thre$ his po#e a$ay,
and shot do$n$ards faster than it, #ike an eddy of ar's and #egs, into the
depth( The 'arketDp#ace and the peop#e $ere #ike the sea $hen the stor'
co'eth on? they a## f#e$ apart and in disorder, especia##y $here the body
$as about to fa##(
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, re'ained standing, and just beside hi' fe## the body,
bad#y injured and disfigured, but not yet dead( ;fter a $hi#e
consciousness returned to the shattered 'an, and he sa$ Zarathustra
knee#ing beside hi'( N)hat art thou doing thereSN said he at #ast, N2 kne$
#ong ago that the de%i# $ou#d trip 'e up( No$ he draggeth 'e to he##?
$i#t thou pre%ent hi'SN
N7n 'ine honour, 'y friend,N ans$ered Zarathustra, Nthere is nothing of a##
that $hereof thou speakest? there is no de%i# and no he##( Thy sou# $i##
be dead e%en sooner than thy body? fear, therefore, nothing any 'ore&N
The 'an #ooked up distrustfu##y( N2f thou speakest the truth,N said he, N2
#ose nothing $hen 2 #ose 'y #ife( 2 a' not 'uch 'ore than an ani'a# $hich
hath been taught to dance by b#o$s and scanty fare(N
NNot at a##,N said Zarathustra, Nthou hast 'ade danger thy ca##ingL therein
there is nothing conte'ptib#e( No$ thou perishest by thy ca##ing?
therefore $i## 2 bury thee $ith 'ine o$n hands(N
)hen Zarathustra had said this the dying one did not rep#y furtherL but he
'o%ed his hand as if he sought the hand of Zarathustra in gratitude(
1(
9ean$hi#e the e%ening ca'e on, and the 'arketDp#ace %ei#ed itse#f in g#oo'(
Then the peop#e dispersed, for e%en curiosity and terror beco'e fatigued(
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, sti## sat beside the dead 'an on the ground, absorbed
in thought? so he forgot the ti'e( .ut at #ast it beca'e night, and a
co#d $ind b#e$ upon the #one#y one( Then arose Zarathustra and said to his
heart?
,eri#y, a fine catch of fish hath Zarathustra 'ade toDday& 2t is not a 'an
he hath caught, but a corpse(
So'bre is hu'an #ife, and as yet $ithout 'eaning? a buffoon 'ay be fatefu#
to it(
2 $ant to teach 'en the sense of their existence, $hich is the Super'an,
the #ightning out of the dark c#oudDD'an(
.ut sti## a' 2 far fro' the', and 'y sense speaketh not unto their sense(
To 'en 2 a' sti## so'ething bet$een a foo# and a corpse(
G#oo'y is the night, g#oo'y are the $ays of Zarathustra( "o'e, thou co#d
and stiff co'panion& 2 carry thee to the p#ace $here 2 sha## bury thee
$ith 'ine o$n hands(
4(
)hen Zarathustra had said this to his heart, he put the corpse upon his
shou#ders and set out on his $ay( Qet had he not gone a hundred steps,
$hen there sto#e a 'an up to hi' and $hispered in his earDDand #o& he that
spake $as the buffoon fro' the to$er( N:ea%e this to$n, 7 Zarathustra,N
said he, Nthere are too 'any here $ho hate thee( The good and just hate
thee, and ca## thee their ene'y and despiserL the be#ie%ers in the orthodox
be#ief hate thee, and ca## thee a danger to the 'u#titude( 2t $as thy good
fortune to be #aughed at? and %eri#y thou spakest #ike a buffoon( 2t $as
thy good fortune to associate $ith the dead dogL by so hu'i#iating thyse#f
thou hast sa%ed thy #ife toDday( *epart, ho$e%er, fro' this to$n,DDor
to'orro$ 2 sha## ju'p o%er thee, a #i%ing 'an o%er a dead one(N ;nd $hen
he had said this, the buffoon %anishedL Zarathustra, ho$e%er, $ent on
through the dark streets(
;t the gate of the to$n the gra%eDdiggers 'et hi'? they shone their torch
on his face, and, recognising Zarathustra, they sore#y derided hi'(
NZarathustra is carrying a$ay the dead dog? a fine thing that Zarathustra
hath turned a gra%eDdigger& For our hands are too c#ean#y for that roast(
)i## Zarathustra stea# the bite fro' the de%i#S )e## then, good #uck to
the repast& 2f on#y the de%i# is not a better thief than Zarathustra&DDhe
$i## stea# the' both, he $i## eat the' both&N ;nd they #aughed a'ong
the'se#%es, and put their heads together(
Zarathustra 'ade no ans$er thereto, but $ent on his $ay( )hen he had gone
on for t$o hours, past forests and s$a'ps, he had heard too 'uch of the
hungry ho$#ing of the $o#%es, and he hi'se#f beca'e aDhungry( So he ha#ted
at a #one#y house in $hich a #ight $as burning(
N/unger attacketh 'e,N said Zarathustra, N#ike a robber( ;'ong forests and
s$a'ps 'y hunger attacketh 'e, and #ate in the night(
NStrange hu'ours hath 'y hunger( 7ften it co'eth to 'e on#y after a
repast, and a## day it hath fai#ed to co'e? $here hath it beenSN
;nd thereupon Zarathustra knocked at the door of the house( ;n o#d 'an
appeared, $ho carried a #ight, and asked? N)ho co'eth unto 'e and 'y bad
s#eepSN
N; #i%ing 'an and a dead one,N said Zarathustra( NGi%e 'e so'ething to eat
and drink, 2 forgot it during the day( /e that feedeth the hungry
refresheth his o$n sou#, saith $isdo'(N
The o#d 'an $ithdre$, but ca'e back i''ediate#y and offered Zarathustra
bread and $ine( N; bad country for the hungry,N said heL Nthat is $hy 2
#i%e here( ;ni'a# and 'an co'e unto 'e, the anchorite( .ut bid thy
co'panion eat and drink a#so, he is $earier than thou(N Zarathustra
ans$ered? N9y co'panion is deadL 2 sha## hard#y be ab#e to persuade hi' to
eat(N NThat doth not concern 'e,N said the o#d 'an su##en#yL Nhe that
knocketh at 'y door 'ust take $hat 2 offer hi'( Eat, and fare ye $e##&NDD
Thereafter Zarathustra again $ent on for t$o hours, trusting to the path
and the #ight of the stars? for he $as an experienced nightD$a#ker, and
#iked to #ook into the face of a## that s#ept( )hen the 'orning da$ned,
ho$e%er, Zarathustra found hi'se#f in a thick forest, and no path $as any
#onger %isib#e( /e then put the dead 'an in a ho##o$ tree at his headDDfor
he $anted to protect hi' fro' the $o#%esDDand #aid hi'se#f do$n on the
ground and 'oss( ;nd i''ediate#y he fe## as#eep, tired in body, but $ith a
tranUui# sou#(
0(
:ong s#ept ZarathustraL and not on#y the rosy da$n passed o%er his
head, but a#so the 'orning( ;t #ast, ho$e%er, his eyes opened, and
a'azed#y he gazed into the forest and the sti##ness, a'azed#y he gazed
into hi'se#f( Then he arose Uuick#y, #ike a seafarer $ho a## at once
seeth the #andL and he shouted for joy? for he sa$ a ne$ truth( ;nd he
spake thus to his heart?
; #ight hath da$ned upon 'e? 2 need co'panionsDD#i%ing onesL not
dead co'panions and corpses, $hich 2 carry $ith 'e $here 2 $i##(
.ut 2 need #i%ing co'panions, $ho $i## fo##o$ 'e because they $ant
to fo##o$ the'se#%esDDand to the p#ace $here 2 $i##(
; #ight hath da$ned upon 'e( Not to the peop#e is Zarathustra to speak,
but to co'panions& Zarathustra sha## not be the herdMs herds'an and hound&
To a##ure 'any fro' the herdDDfor that purpose ha%e 2 co'e( The peop#e and
the herd 'ust be angry $ith 'e? a robber sha## Zarathustra be ca##ed by
the herds'en(
/erds'en, 2 say, but they ca## the'se#%es the good and just( /erds'en, 2
say, but they ca## the'se#%es the be#ie%ers in the orthodox be#ief(
.eho#d the good and just& )ho' do they hate 'ostS /i' $ho breaketh up
their tab#es of %a#ues, the breaker, the #a$breaker?DDhe, ho$e%er, is the
creator(
.eho#d the be#ie%ers of a## be#iefs& )ho' do they hate 'ostS /i' $ho
breaketh up their tab#es of %a#ues, the breaker, the #a$DbreakerDDhe,
ho$e%er, is the creator(
"o'panions, the creator seeketh, not corpsesDDand not herds or be#ie%ers
either( Fe##o$Dcreators the creator seekethDDthose $ho gra%e ne$ %a#ues on
ne$ tab#es(
"o'panions, the creator seeketh, and fe##o$Dreapers? for e%erything is
ripe for the har%est $ith hi'( .ut he #acketh the hundred sick#es? so he
p#ucketh the ears of corn and is %exed(
"o'panions, the creator seeketh, and such as kno$ ho$ to $het their
sick#es( *estroyers, $i## they be ca##ed, and despisers of good and e%i#(
.ut they are the reapers and rejoicers(
Fe##o$Dcreators, Zarathustra seekethL fe##o$Dreapers and fe##o$Drejoicers,
Zarathustra seeketh? $hat hath he to do $ith herds and herds'en and
corpses&
;nd thou, 'y first co'panion, rest in peace& )e## ha%e 2 buried thee in
thy ho##o$ treeL $e## ha%e 2 hid thee fro' the $o#%es(
.ut 2 part fro' theeL the ti'e hath arri%ed( MT$ixt rosy da$n and rosy
da$n there ca'e unto 'e a ne$ truth(
2 a' not to be a herds'an, 2 a' not to be a gra%eDdigger( Not any 'ore
$i## 2 discourse unto the peop#eL for the #ast ti'e ha%e 2 spoken unto the
dead(
)ith the creators, the reapers, and the rejoicers $i## 2 associate? the
rainbo$ $i## 2 sho$ the', and a## the stairs to the Super'an(
To the #oneDd$e##ers $i## 2 sing 'y song, and to the t$ainDd$e##ersL and
unto hi' $ho hath sti## ears for the unheard, $i## 2 'ake the heart hea%y
$ith 'y happiness(
2 'ake for 'y goa#, 2 fo##o$ 'y courseL o%er the #oitering and tardy $i## 2
#eap( Thus #et 'y onDgoing be their do$nDgoing&
!6(
This had Zarathustra said to his heart $hen the sun stood at noonDtide(
Then he #ooked inUuiring#y a#oft,DDfor he heard abo%e hi' the sharp ca## of
a bird( ;nd beho#d& ;n eag#e s$ept through the air in $ide circ#es, and
on it hung a serpent, not #ike a prey, but #ike a friend? for it kept
itse#f coi#ed round the eag#eMs neck(
NThey are 'ine ani'a#s,N said Zarathustra, and rejoiced in his heart(
NThe proudest ani'a# under the sun, and the $isest ani'a# under the sun,DD
they ha%e co'e out to reconnoitre(
They $ant to kno$ $hether Zarathustra sti## #i%eth( ,eri#y, do 2 sti##
#i%eS
9ore dangerous ha%e 2 found it a'ong 'en than a'ong ani'a#sL in dangerous
paths goeth Zarathustra( :et 'ine ani'a#s #ead 'e&
)hen Zarathustra had said this, he re'e'bered the $ords of the saint in the
forest( Then he sighed and spake thus to his heart?
N)ou#d that 2 $ere $iser& )ou#d that 2 $ere $ise fro' the %ery heart, #ike
'y serpent&
.ut 2 a' asking the i'possib#e( Therefore do 2 ask 'y pride to go a#$ays
$ith 'y $isdo'&
;nd if 'y $isdo' shou#d so'e day forsake 'e?DDa#as& it #o%eth to f#y a$ay&D
D'ay 'y pride then f#y $ith 'y fo##y&N
Thus began ZarathustraMs do$nDgoing(
Z;-;T/8ST-;M *2S"78-SES(
2( T/E T/-EE 9ET;97-P/7SES(
Three 'eta'orphoses of the spirit do 2 designate to you? ho$ the spirit
beco'eth a ca'e#, the ca'e# a #ion, and the #ion at #ast a chi#d(
9any hea%y things are there for the spirit, the strong #oadDbearing spirit
in $hich re%erence d$e##eth? for the hea%y and the hea%iest #ongeth its
strength(
)hat is hea%yS so asketh the #oadDbearing spiritL then knee#eth it do$n
#ike the ca'e#, and $anteth to be $e## #aden(
)hat is the hea%iest thing, ye heroesS asketh the #oadDbearing spirit, that
2 'ay take it upon 'e and rejoice in 'y strength(
2s it not this? To hu'i#iate onese#f in order to 'ortify oneMs prideS To
exhibit oneMs fo##y in order to 'ock at oneMs $isdo'S
7r is it this? To desert our cause $hen it ce#ebrateth its triu'phS To
ascend high 'ountains to te'pt the te'pterS
7r is it this? To feed on the acorns and grass of kno$#edge, and for the
sake of truth to suffer hunger of sou#S
7r is it this? To be sick and dis'iss co'forters, and 'ake friends of the
deaf, $ho ne%er hear thy reUuestsS
7r is it this? To go into fou# $ater $hen it is the $ater of truth, and
not disc#ai' co#d frogs and hot toadsS
7r is it this? To #o%e those $ho despise us, and gi%e oneMs hand to the
phanto' $hen it is going to frighten usS
;## these hea%iest things the #oadDbearing spirit taketh upon itse#f? and
#ike the ca'e#, $hich, $hen #aden, hasteneth into the $i#derness, so
hasteneth the spirit into its $i#derness(
.ut in the #one#iest $i#derness happeneth the second 'eta'orphosis? here
the spirit beco'eth a #ionL freedo' $i## it capture, and #ordship in its
o$n $i#derness(
2ts #ast :ord it here seeketh? hosti#e $i## it be to hi', and to its #ast
GodL for %ictory $i## it strugg#e $ith the great dragon(
)hat is the great dragon $hich the spirit is no #onger inc#ined to ca##
:ord and GodS NThouDsha#t,N is the great dragon ca##ed( .ut the spirit of
the #ion saith, N2 $i##(N
NThouDsha#t,N #ieth in its path, spark#ing $ith go#dDDa sca#eDco%ered
beastL and on e%ery sca#e g#ittereth go#den, NThou sha#t&N
The %a#ues of a thousand years g#itter on those sca#es, and thus speaketh
the 'ightiest of a## dragons? N;## the %a#ues of thingsDDg#itter on 'e(
;## %a#ues ha%e a#ready been created, and a## created %a#uesDDdo 2
represent( ,eri#y, there sha## be no M2 $i##M any 'ore( Thus speaketh the
dragon(
9y brethren, $herefore is there need of the #ion in the spiritS )hy
sufficeth not the beast of burden, $hich renounceth and is re%erentS
To create ne$ %a#uesDDthat, e%en the #ion cannot yet acco'p#ish? but to
create itse#f freedo' for ne$ creatingDDthat can the 'ight of the #ion do(
To create itse#f freedo', and gi%e a ho#y Nay e%en unto duty? for that, 'y
brethren, there is need of the #ion(
To assu'e the right to ne$ %a#uesDDthat is the 'ost for'idab#e assu'ption
for a #oadDbearing and re%erent spirit( ,eri#y, unto such a spirit it is
preying, and the $ork of a beast of prey(
;s its ho#iest, it once #o%ed NThouDsha#tN? no$ is it forced to find
i##usion and arbitrariness e%en in the ho#iest things, that it 'ay capture
freedo' fro' its #o%e? the #ion is needed for this capture(
.ut te## 'e, 'y brethren, $hat the chi#d can do, $hich e%en the #ion cou#d
not doS )hy hath the preying #ion sti## to beco'e a chi#dS
2nnocence is the chi#d, and forgetfu#ness, a ne$ beginning, a ga'e, a se#fD
ro##ing $hee#, a first 'o%e'ent, a ho#y Qea(
;ye, for the ga'e of creating, 'y brethren, there is needed a ho#y Qea unto
#ife? 2TS 7)N $i##, $i##eth no$ the spiritL /2S 7)N $or#d $inneth the
$or#dMs outcast(
Three 'eta'orphoses of the spirit ha%e 2 designated to you? ho$ the spirit
beca'e a ca'e#, the ca'e# a #ion, and the #ion at #ast a chi#d(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra( ;nd at that ti'e he abode in the to$n $hich is
ca##ed The Pied "o$(
22( T/E ;";*E92" "/;2-S 7F ,2-T8E(
Peop#e co''ended unto Zarathustra a $ise 'an, as one $ho cou#d discourse
$e## about s#eep and %irtue? great#y $as he honoured and re$arded for it,
and a## the youths sat before his chair( To hi' $ent Zarathustra, and sat
a'ong the youths before his chair( ;nd thus spake the $ise 'an?
-espect and 'odesty in presence of s#eep& That is the first thing& ;nd to
go out of the $ay of a## $ho s#eep bad#y and keep a$ake at night&
9odest is e%en the thief in presence of s#eep? he a#$ays stea#eth soft#y
through the night( 2''odest, ho$e%er, is the nightD$atch'anL i''odest#y he
carrieth his horn(
No s'a## art is it to s#eep? it is necessary for that purpose to keep
a$ake a## day(
Ten ti'es a day 'ust thou o%erco'e thyse#f? that causeth $ho#eso'e
$eariness, and is poppy to the sou#(
Ten ti'es 'ust thou reconci#e again $ith thyse#fL for o%erco'ing is
bitterness, and bad#y s#eep the unreconci#ed(
Ten truths 'ust thou find during the dayL other$ise $i#t thou seek truth
during the night, and thy sou# $i## ha%e been hungry(
Ten ti'es 'ust thou #augh during the day, and be cheerfu#L other$ise thy
sto'ach, the father of aff#iction, $i## disturb thee in the night(
Fe$ peop#e kno$ it, but one 'ust ha%e a## the %irtues in order to s#eep
$e##( Sha## 2 bear fa#se $itnessS Sha## 2 co''it adu#teryS
Sha## 2 co%et 'y neighbourMs 'aidser%antS ;## that $ou#d i## accord $ith
good s#eep(
;nd e%en if one ha%e a## the %irtues, there is sti## one thing needfu#? to
send the %irtues the'se#%es to s#eep at the right ti'e(
That they 'ay not Uuarre# $ith one another, the good fe'a#es& ;nd about
thee, thou unhappy one&
Peace $ith God and thy neighbour? so desireth good s#eep( ;nd peace a#so
$ith thy neighbourMs de%i#& 7ther$ise it $i## haunt thee in the night(
/onour to the go%ern'ent, and obedience, and a#so to the crooked
go%ern'ent& So desireth good s#eep( /o$ can 2 he#p it, if po$er #ike to
$a#k on crooked #egsS
/e $ho #eadeth his sheep to the greenest pasture, sha## a#$ays be for 'e
the best shepherd? so doth it accord $ith good s#eep(
9any honours 2 $ant not, nor great treasures? they excite the sp#een( .ut
it is bad s#eeping $ithout a good na'e and a #itt#e treasure(
; s'a## co'pany is 'ore $e#co'e to 'e than a bad one? but they 'ust co'e
and go at the right ti'e( So doth it accord $ith good s#eep(
)e##, a#so, do the poor in spirit p#ease 'e? they pro'ote s#eep( .#essed
are they, especia##y if one a#$ays gi%e in to the'(
Thus passeth the day unto the %irtuous( )hen night co'eth, then take 2
good care not to su''on s#eep( 2t dis#iketh to be su''onedDDs#eep, the
#ord of the %irtues&
.ut 2 think of $hat 2 ha%e done and thought during the day( Thus
ru'inating, patient as a co$, 2 ask 'yse#f? )hat $ere thy ten o%erco'ingsS
;nd $hat $ere the ten reconci#iations, and the ten truths, and the ten
#aughters $ith $hich 'y heart enjoyed itse#fS
Thus pondering, and crad#ed by forty thoughts, it o%ertaketh 'e a## at
onceDDs#eep, the unsu''oned, the #ord of the %irtues(
S#eep tappeth on 'ine eye, and it turneth hea%y( S#eep toucheth 'y 'outh,
and it re'aineth open(
,eri#y, on soft so#es doth it co'e to 'e, the dearest of thie%es, and
stea#eth fro' 'e 'y thoughts? stupid do 2 then stand, #ike this acade'ic
chair(
.ut not 'uch #onger do 2 then stand? 2 a#ready #ie(DD
)hen Zarathustra heard the $ise 'an thus speak, he #aughed in his heart?
for thereby had a #ight da$ned upon hi'( ;nd thus spake he to his heart?
; foo# see'eth this $ise 'an $ith his forty thoughts? but 2 be#ie%e he
kno$eth $e## ho$ to s#eep(
/appy e%en is he $ho #i%eth near this $ise 'an& Such s#eep is contagiousDD
e%en through a thick $a## it is contagious(
; 'agic resideth e%en in his acade'ic chair( ;nd not in %ain did the
youths sit before the preacher of %irtue(
/is $isdo' is to keep a$ake in order to s#eep $e##( ;nd %eri#y, if #ife
had no sense, and had 2 to choose nonsense, this $ou#d be the desirab#est
nonsense for 'e a#so(
No$ kno$ 2 $e## $hat peop#e sought for'er#y abo%e a## e#se $hen they sought
teachers of %irtue( Good s#eep they sought for the'se#%es, and poppyDhead
%irtues to pro'ote it&
To a## those be#auded sages of the acade'ic chairs, $isdo' $as s#eep
$ithout drea's? they kne$ no higher significance of #ife(
E%en at present, to be sure, there are so'e #ike this preacher of %irtue,
and not a#$ays so honourab#e? but their ti'e is past( ;nd not 'uch #onger
do they stand? there they a#ready #ie(
.#essed are those dro$sy ones? for they sha## soon nod to s#eep(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
222( .;"W)7-:*S9EN(
7nce on a ti'e, Zarathustra a#so cast his fancy beyond 'an, #ike a##
back$or#ds'en( The $ork of a suffering and tortured God, did the $or#d
then see' to 'e(
The drea'DDand dictionDDof a God, did the $or#d then see' to 'eL co#oured
%apours before the eyes of a di%ine#y dissatisfied one(
Good and e%i#, and joy and $oe, and 2 and thouDDco#oured %apours did they
see' to 'e before creati%e eyes( The creator $ished to #ook a$ay fro'
hi'se#f,DDthereupon he created the $or#d(
2ntoxicating joy is it for the sufferer to #ook a$ay fro' his suffering and
forget hi'se#f( 2ntoxicating joy and se#fDforgetting, did the $or#d once
see' to 'e(
This $or#d, the eterna##y i'perfect, an eterna# contradictionMs i'age and
i'perfect i'ageDDan intoxicating joy to its i'perfect creator?DDthus did
the $or#d once see' to 'e(
Thus, once on a ti'e, did 2 a#so cast 'y fancy beyond 'an, #ike a##
back$or#ds'en( .eyond 'an, forsoothS
;h, ye brethren, that God $ho' 2 created $as hu'an $ork and hu'an 'adness,
#ike a## the Gods&
; 'an $as he, and on#y a poor frag'ent of a 'an and ego( 7ut of 'ine o$n
ashes and g#o$ it ca'e unto 'e, that phanto'( ;nd %eri#y, it ca'e not unto
'e fro' the beyond&
)hat happened, 'y brethrenS 2 surpassed 'yse#f, the suffering oneL 2
carried 'ine o$n ashes to the 'ountainL a brighter f#a'e 2 contri%ed for
'yse#f( ;nd #o& Thereupon the phanto' )2T/*-E) fro' 'e&
To 'e the con%a#escent $ou#d it no$ be suffering and tor'ent to be#ie%e in
such phanto's? suffering $ou#d it no$ be to 'e, and hu'i#iation( Thus
speak 2 to back$or#ds'en(
Suffering $as it, and i'potenceDDthat created a## back$or#dsL and the short
'adness of happiness, $hich on#y the greatest sufferer experienceth(
)eariness, $hich seeketh to get to the u#ti'ate $ith one #eap, $ith a
deathD#eapL a poor ignorant $eariness, un$i##ing e%en to $i## any #onger?
that created a## Gods and back$or#ds(
.e#ie%e 'e, 'y brethren& 2t $as the body $hich despaired of the bodyDDit
groped $ith the fingers of the infatuated spirit at the u#ti'ate $a##s(
.e#ie%e 'e, 'y brethren& 2t $as the body $hich despaired of the earthDDit
heard the bo$e#s of existence speaking unto it(
;nd then it sought to get through the u#ti'ate $a##s $ith its headDDand not
$ith its head on#yDDinto Nthe other $or#d(N
.ut that Nother $or#dN is $e## concea#ed fro' 'an, that dehu'anised,
inhu'an $or#d, $hich is a ce#estia# naughtL and the bo$e#s of existence do
not speak unto 'an, except as 'an(
,eri#y, it is difficu#t to pro%e a## being, and hard to 'ake it speak(
Te## 'e, ye brethren, is not the strangest of a## things best pro%edS
Qea, this ego, $ith its contradiction and perp#exity, speaketh 'ost
upright#y of its beingDDthis creating, $i##ing, e%a#uing ego, $hich is the
'easure and %a#ue of things(
;nd this 'ost upright existence, the egoDDit speaketh of the body, and
sti## i'p#ieth the body, e%en $hen it 'useth and ra%eth and f#uttereth $ith
broken $ings(
;#$ays 'ore upright#y #earneth it to speak, the egoL and the 'ore it
#earneth, the 'ore doth it find tit#es and honours for the body and the
earth(
; ne$ pride taught 'e 'ine ego, and that teach 2 unto 'en? no #onger to
thrust oneMs head into the sand of ce#estia# things, but to carry it
free#y, a terrestria# head, $hich gi%eth 'eaning to the earth&
; ne$ $i## teach 2 unto 'en? to choose that path $hich 'an hath fo##o$ed
b#ind#y, and to appro%e of itDDand no #onger to s#ink aside fro' it, #ike
the sick and perishing&
The sick and perishingDDit $as they $ho despised the body and the earth,
and in%ented the hea%en#y $or#d, and the redee'ing b#oodDdropsL but e%en
those s$eet and sad poisons they borro$ed fro' the body and the earth&
Fro' their 'isery they sought escape, and the stars $ere too re'ote for
the'( Then they sighed? N7 that there $ere hea%en#y paths by $hich to
stea# into another existence and into happiness&N Then they contri%ed for
the'se#%es their byDpaths and b#oody draughts&
.eyond the sphere of their body and this earth they no$ fancied the'se#%es
transported, these ungratefu# ones( .ut to $hat did they o$e the
con%u#sion and rapture of their transportS To their body and this earth(
Gent#e is Zarathustra to the sick#y( ,eri#y, he is not indignant at their
'odes of conso#ation and ingratitude( 9ay they beco'e con%a#escents and
o%erco'ers, and create higher bodies for the'se#%es&
Neither is Zarathustra indignant at a con%a#escent $ho #ooketh tender#y on
his de#usions, and at 'idnight stea#eth round the gra%e of his GodL but
sickness and a sick fra'e re'ain e%en in his tears(
9any sick#y ones ha%e there a#$ays been a'ong those $ho 'use, and #anguish
for GodL %io#ent#y they hate the discerning ones, and the #atest of
%irtues, $hich is uprightness(
.ack$ard they a#$ays gaze to$ard dark ages? then, indeed, $ere de#usion
and faith so'ething different( -a%ing of the reason $as #ikeness to God,
and doubt $as sin(
Too $e## do 2 kno$ those god#ike ones? they insist on being be#ie%ed in,
and that doubt is sin( Too $e##, a#so, do 2 kno$ $hat they the'se#%es 'ost
be#ie%e in(
,eri#y, not in back$or#ds and redee'ing b#oodDdrops? but in the body do
they a#so be#ie%e 'ostL and their o$n body is for the' the thingDinDitse#f(
.ut it is a sick#y thing to the', and g#ad#y $ou#d they get out of their
skin( Therefore hearken they to the preachers of death, and the'se#%es
preach back$or#ds(
/earken rather, 'y brethren, to the %oice of the hea#thy bodyL it is a 'ore
upright and pure %oice(
9ore upright#y and pure#y speaketh the hea#thy body, perfect and sUuareD
bui#tL and it speaketh of the 'eaning of the earth(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
2,( T/E *ESP2SE-S 7F T/E .7*Q(
To the despisers of the body $i## 2 speak 'y $ord( 2 $ish the' neither to
#earn afresh, nor teach ane$, but on#y to bid fare$e## to their o$n
bodies,DDand thus be du'b(
N.ody a' 2, and sou#NDDso saith the chi#d( ;nd $hy shou#d one not speak
#ike chi#drenS
.ut the a$akened one, the kno$ing one, saith? N.ody a' 2 entire#y, and
nothing 'oreL and sou# is on#y the na'e of so'ething in the body(N
The body is a big sagacity, a p#ura#ity $ith one sense, a $ar and a peace,
a f#ock and a shepherd(
;n instru'ent of thy body is a#so thy #itt#e sagacity, 'y brother, $hich
thou ca##est NspiritNDDa #itt#e instru'ent and p#aything of thy big
sagacity(
NEgo,N sayest thou, and art proud of that $ord( .ut the greater thingDDin
$hich thou art un$i##ing to be#ie%eDDis thy body $ith its big sagacityL it
saith not Nego,N but doeth it(
)hat the sense fee#eth, $hat the spirit discerneth, hath ne%er its end in
itse#f( .ut sense and spirit $ou#d fain persuade thee that they are the
end of a## things? so %ain are they(
2nstru'ents and p#aythings are sense and spirit? behind the' there is
sti## the Se#f( The Se#f seeketh $ith the eyes of the senses, it
hearkeneth a#so $ith the ears of the spirit(
E%er hearkeneth the Se#f, and seekethL it co'pareth, 'astereth, conUuereth,
and destroyeth( 2t ru#eth, and is a#so the egoMs ru#er(
.ehind thy thoughts and fee#ings, 'y brother, there is a 'ighty #ord, an
unkno$n sageDDit is ca##ed Se#fL it d$e##eth in thy body, it is thy body(
There is 'ore sagacity in thy body than in thy best $isdo'( ;nd $ho then
kno$eth $hy thy body reUuireth just thy best $isdo'S
Thy Se#f #augheth at thine ego, and its proud prancings( N)hat are these
prancings and f#ights of thought unto 'eSN it saith to itse#f( N; byD$ay
to 'y purpose( 2 a' the #eadingDstring of the ego, and the pro'pter of its
notions(N
The Se#f saith unto the ego? NFee# pain&N ;nd thereupon it suffereth, and
thinketh ho$ it 'ay put an end theretoDDand for that %ery purpose it 2S
9E;NT to think(
The Se#f saith unto the ego? NFee# p#easure&N Thereupon it rejoiceth, and
thinketh ho$ it 'ay oftti'es rejoiceDDand for that %ery purpose it 2S 9E;NT
to think(
To the despisers of the body $i## 2 speak a $ord( That they despise is
caused by their estee'( )hat is it that created estee'ing and despising
and $orth and $i##S
The creating Se#f created for itse#f estee'ing and despising, it created
for itse#f joy and $oe( The creating body created for itse#f spirit, as a
hand to its $i##(
E%en in your fo##y and despising ye each ser%e your Se#f, ye despisers of
the body( 2 te## you, your %ery Se#f $anteth to die, and turneth a$ay fro'
#ife(
No #onger can your Se#f do that $hich it desireth 'ost?DDcreate beyond
itse#f( That is $hat it desireth 'ostL that is a## its fer%our(
.ut it is no$ too #ate to do so?DDso your Se#f $isheth to succu'b, ye
despisers of the body(
To succu'bDDso $isheth your Se#fL and therefore ha%e ye beco'e despisers of
the body( For ye can no #onger create beyond yourse#%es(
;nd therefore are ye no$ angry $ith #ife and $ith the earth( ;nd
unconscious en%y is in the side#ong #ook of your conte'pt(
2 go not your $ay, ye despisers of the body& Qe are no bridges for 'e to
the Super'an&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
,( T7QS ;N* P;SS27NS(
9y brother, $hen thou hast a %irtue, and it is thine o$n %irtue, thou hast
it in co''on $ith no one(
To be sure, thou $ou#dst ca## it by na'e and caress itL thou $ou#dst pu##
its ears and a'use thyse#f $ith it(
;nd #o& Then hast thou its na'e in co''on $ith the peop#e, and hast beco'e
one of the peop#e and the herd $ith thy %irtue&
.etter for thee to say? N2neffab#e is it, and na'e#ess, that $hich is pain
and s$eetness to 'y sou#, and a#so the hunger of 'y bo$e#s(N
:et thy %irtue be too high for the fa'i#iarity of na'es, and if thou 'ust
speak of it, be not asha'ed to sta''er about it(
Thus speak and sta''er? NThat is 9Q good, that do 2 #o%e, thus doth it
p#ease 'e entire#y, thus on#y do X2X desire the good(
Not as the #a$ of a God do 2 desire it, not as a hu'an #a$ or a hu'an need
do 2 desire itL it is not to be a guideDpost for 'e to superearths and
paradises(
;n earth#y %irtue is it $hich 2 #o%e? #itt#e prudence is therein, and the
#east e%eryday $isdo'(
.ut that bird bui#t its nest beside 'e? therefore, 2 #o%e and cherish itDD
no$ sitteth it beside 'e on its go#den eggs(N
Thus shou#dst thou sta''er, and praise thy %irtue(
7nce hadst thou passions and ca##edst the' e%i#( .ut no$ hast thou on#y
thy %irtues? they gre$ out of thy passions(
Thou i'p#antedst thy highest ai' into the heart of those passions? then
beca'e they thy %irtues and joys(
;nd though thou $ert of the race of the hotDte'pered, or of the %o#uptuous,
or of the fanatica#, or the %indicti%eL
;## thy passions in the end beca'e %irtues, and a## thy de%i#s ange#s(
7nce hadst thou $i#d dogs in thy ce##ar? but they changed at #ast into
birds and char'ing songstresses(
7ut of thy poisons bre$edst thou ba#sa' for thyse#fL thy co$, aff#iction,
'i#kedst thouDDno$ drinketh thou the s$eet 'i#k of her udder(
;nd nothing e%i# gro$eth in thee any #onger, un#ess it be the e%i# that
gro$eth out of the conf#ict of thy %irtues(
9y brother, if thou be fortunate, then $i#t thou ha%e one %irtue and no
'ore? thus goest thou easier o%er the bridge(
2##ustrious is it to ha%e 'any %irtues, but a hard #otL and 'any a one hath
gone into the $i#derness and ki##ed hi'se#f, because he $as $eary of being
the batt#e and batt#efie#d of %irtues(
9y brother, are $ar and batt#e e%i#S Necessary, ho$e%er, is the e%i#L
necessary are the en%y and the distrust and the backDbiting a'ong the
%irtues(
:o& ho$ each of thy %irtues is co%etous of the highest p#aceL it $anteth
thy $ho#e spirit to be 2TS hera#d, it $anteth thy $ho#e po$er, in $rath,
hatred, and #o%e(
Tea#ous is e%ery %irtue of the others, and a dreadfu# thing is jea#ousy(
E%en %irtues 'ay succu'b by jea#ousy(
/e $ho' the f#a'e of jea#ousy enco'passeth, turneth at #ast, #ike the
scorpion, the poisoned sting against hi'se#f(
;h& 'y brother, hast thou ne%er seen a %irtue backbite and stab itse#fS
9an is so'ething that hath to be surpassed? and therefore sha#t thou #o%e
thy %irtues,DDfor thou $i#t succu'b by the'(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
,2( T/E P;:E "-292N;:(
Qe do not 'ean to s#ay, ye judges and sacrificers, unti# the ani'a# hath
bo$ed its headS :o& the pa#e cri'ina# hath bo$ed his head? out of his eye
speaketh the great conte'pt(
N9ine ego is so'ething $hich is to be surpassed? 'ine ego is to 'e the
great conte'pt of 'anN? so speaketh it out of that eye(
)hen he judged hi'se#fDDthat $as his supre'e 'o'entL #et not the exa#ted
one re#apse again into his #o$ estate&
There is no sa#%ation for hi' $ho thus suffereth fro' hi'se#f, un#ess it be
speedy death(
Qour s#aying, ye judges, sha## be pity, and not re%engeL and in that ye
s#ay, see to it that ye yourse#%es justify #ife&
2t is not enough that ye shou#d reconci#e $ith hi' $ho' ye s#ay( :et your
sorro$ be #o%e to the Super'an? thus $i## ye justify your o$n sur%i%a#&
NEne'yN sha## ye say but not N%i##ain,N Nin%a#idN sha## ye say but not
N$retch,N Nfoo#N sha## ye say but not Nsinner(N
;nd thou, red judge, if thou $ou#d say audib#y a## thou hast done in
thought, then $ou#d e%ery one cry? N;$ay $ith the nastiness and the
%iru#ent repti#e&N
.ut one thing is the thought, another thing is the deed, and another thing
is the idea of the deed( The $hee# of causa#ity doth not ro## bet$een
the'(
;n idea 'ade this pa#e 'an pa#e( ;deUuate $as he for his deed $hen he did
it, but the idea of it, he cou#d not endure $hen it $as done(
E%er'ore did he no$ see hi'se#f as the doer of one deed( 9adness, 2 ca##
this? the exception re%ersed itse#f to the ru#e in hi'(
The streak of cha#k be$itcheth the henL the stroke he struck be$itched his
$eak reason( 9adness ;FTE- the deed, 2 ca## this(
/earken, ye judges& There is another 'adness besides, and it is .EF7-E the
deed( ;h& ye ha%e not gone deep enough into this sou#&
Thus speaketh the red judge? N)hy did this cri'ina# co''it 'urderS /e
'eant to rob(N 2 te## you, ho$e%er, that his sou# $anted b#ood, not booty?
he thirsted for the happiness of the knife&
.ut his $eak reason understood not this 'adness, and it persuaded hi'(
N)hat 'atter about b#ood&N it saidL N$ishest thou not, at #east, to 'ake
booty therebyS 7r take re%engeSN
;nd he hearkened unto his $eak reason? #ike #ead #ay its $ords upon hi'DD
thereupon he robbed $hen he 'urdered( /e did not 'ean to be asha'ed of his
'adness(
;nd no$ once 'ore #ieth the #ead of his gui#t upon hi', and once 'ore is
his $eak reason so benu'bed, so para#ysed, and so du##(
"ou#d he on#y shake his head, then $ou#d his burden ro## offL but $ho
shaketh that headS
)hat is this 'anS ; 'ass of diseases that reach out into the $or#d through
the spiritL there they $ant to get their prey(
)hat is this 'anS ; coi# of $i#d serpents that are se#do' at peace a'ong
the'se#%esDDso they go forth apart and seek prey in the $or#d(
:ook at that poor body& )hat it suffered and cra%ed, the poor sou#
interpreted to itse#fDDit interpreted it as 'urderous desire, and eagerness
for the happiness of the knife(
/i' $ho no$ turneth sick, the e%i# o%ertaketh $hich is no$ the e%i#? he
seeketh to cause pain $ith that $hich causeth hi' pain( .ut there ha%e
been other ages, and another e%i# and good(
7nce $as doubt e%i#, and the $i## to Se#f( Then the in%a#id beca'e a
heretic or sorcererL as heretic or sorcerer he suffered, and sought to
cause suffering(
.ut this $i## not enter your earsL it hurteth your good peop#e, ye te## 'e(
.ut $hat doth it 'atter to 'e about your good peop#e&
9any things in your good peop#e cause 'e disgust, and %eri#y, not their
e%i#( 2 $ou#d that they had a 'adness by $hich they succu'bed, #ike this
pa#e cri'ina#&
,eri#y, 2 $ou#d that their 'adness $ere ca##ed truth, or fide#ity, or
justice? but they ha%e their %irtue in order to #i%e #ong, and in $retched
se#fDco'p#acency(
2 a' a rai#ing a#ongside the torrentL $hoe%er is ab#e to grasp 'e 'ay grasp
'e& Qour crutch, ho$e%er, 2 a' not(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
,22( -E;*2NG ;N* )-2T2NG(
7f a## that is $ritten, 2 #o%e on#y $hat a person hath $ritten $ith his
b#ood( )rite $ith b#ood, and thou $i#t find that b#ood is spirit(
2t is no easy task to understand unfa'i#iar b#oodL 2 hate the reading
id#ers(
/e $ho kno$eth the reader, doeth nothing 'ore for the reader( ;nother
century of readersDDand spirit itse#f $i## stink(
E%ery one being a##o$ed to #earn to read, ruineth in the #ong run not on#y
$riting but a#so thinking(
7nce spirit $as God, then it beca'e 'an, and no$ it e%en beco'eth popu#ace(
/e that $riteth in b#ood and pro%erbs doth not $ant to be read, but #earnt
by heart(
2n the 'ountains the shortest $ay is fro' peak to peak, but for that route
thou 'ust ha%e #ong #egs( Pro%erbs shou#d be peaks, and those spoken to
shou#d be big and ta##(
The at'osphere rare and pure, danger near and the spirit fu## of a joyfu#
$ickedness? thus are things $e## 'atched(
2 $ant to ha%e gob#ins about 'e, for 2 a' courageous( The courage $hich
scareth a$ay ghosts, createth for itse#f gob#insDDit $anteth to #augh(
2 no #onger fee# in co''on $ith youL the %ery c#oud $hich 2 see beneath 'e,
the b#ackness and hea%iness at $hich 2 #aughDDthat is your thunderDc#oud(
Qe #ook a#oft $hen ye #ong for exa#tationL and 2 #ook do$n$ard because 2 a'
exa#ted(
)ho a'ong you can at the sa'e ti'e #augh and be exa#tedS
/e $ho c#i'beth on the highest 'ountains, #augheth at a## tragic p#ays and
tragic rea#ities(
"ourageous, unconcerned, scornfu#, coerci%eDDso $isdo' $isheth usL she is a
$o'an, and e%er #o%eth on#y a $arrior(
Qe te## 'e, N:ife is hard to bear(N .ut for $hat purpose shou#d ye ha%e
your pride in the 'orning and your resignation in the e%eningS
:ife is hard to bear? but do not affect to be so de#icate& )e are a## of
us fine su'pter asses and assesses(
)hat ha%e $e in co''on $ith the roseDbud, $hich tre'b#eth because a drop of
de$ hath for'ed upon itS
2t is true $e #o%e #ifeL not because $e are $ont to #i%e, but because $e
are $ont to #o%e(
There is a#$ays so'e 'adness in #o%e( .ut there is a#$ays, a#so, so'e
'ethod in 'adness(
;nd to 'e a#so, $ho appreciate #ife, the butterf#ies, and soapDbubb#es, and
$hate%er is #ike the' a'ongst us, see' 'ost to enjoy happiness(
To see these #ight, foo#ish, pretty, #i%e#y #itt#e sprites f#it aboutDDthat
'o%eth Zarathustra to tears and songs(
2 shou#d on#y be#ie%e in a God that $ou#d kno$ ho$ to dance(
;nd $hen 2 sa$ 'y de%i#, 2 found hi' serious, thorough, profound, so#e'n?
he $as the spirit of gra%ityDDthrough hi' a## things fa##(
Not by $rath, but by #aughter, do $e s#ay( "o'e, #et us s#ay the spirit of
gra%ity&
2 #earned to $a#kL since then ha%e 2 #et 'yse#f run( 2 #earned to f#yL
since then 2 do not need pushing in order to 'o%e fro' a spot(
No$ a' 2 #ight, no$ do 2 f#yL no$ do 2 see 'yse#f under 'yse#f( No$ there
danceth a God in 'e(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
,222( T/E T-EE 7N T/E /2::(
ZarathustraMs eye had percei%ed that a certain youth a%oided hi'( ;nd as
he $a#ked a#one one e%ening o%er the hi##s surrounding the to$n ca##ed NThe
Pied "o$,N beho#d, there found he the youth sitting #eaning against a tree,
and gazing $ith $earied #ook into the %a##ey( Zarathustra thereupon #aid
ho#d of the tree beside $hich the youth sat, and spake thus?
N2f 2 $ished to shake this tree $ith 'y hands, 2 shou#d not be ab#e to do
so(
.ut the $ind, $hich $e see not, troub#eth and bendeth it as it #isteth( )e
are sorest bent and troub#ed by in%isib#e hands(N
Thereupon the youth arose disconcerted, and said? N2 hear Zarathustra, and
just no$ $as 2 thinking of hi'&N Zarathustra ans$ered?
N)hy art thou frightened on that accountSDD.ut it is the sa'e $ith 'an as
$ith the tree(
The 'ore he seeketh to rise into the height and #ight, the 'ore %igorous#y
do his roots strugg#e earth$ard, do$n$ard, into the dark and deepDDinto the
e%i#(N
NQea, into the e%i#&N cried the youth( N/o$ is it possib#e that thou hast
disco%ered 'y sou#SN
Zarathustra s'i#ed, and said? N9any a sou# one $i## ne%er disco%er, un#ess
one first in%ent it(N
NQea, into the e%i#&N cried the youth once 'ore(
NThou saidst the truth, Zarathustra( 2 trust 'yse#f no #onger since 2
sought to rise into the height, and nobody trusteth 'e any #ongerL ho$ doth
that happenS
2 change too Uuick#y? 'y toDday refuteth 'y yesterday( 2 often o%er#eap
the steps $hen 2 c#a'berL for so doing, none of the steps pardons 'e(
)hen a#oft, 2 find 'yse#f a#$ays a#one( No one speaketh unto 'eL the frost
of so#itude 'aketh 'e tre'b#e( )hat do 2 seek on the heightS
9y conte'pt and 'y #onging increase togetherL the higher 2 c#a'ber, the
'ore do 2 despise hi' $ho c#a'bereth( )hat doth he seek on the heightS
/o$ asha'ed 2 a' of 'y c#a'bering and stu'b#ing& /o$ 2 'ock at 'y %io#ent
panting& /o$ 2 hate hi' $ho f#ieth& /o$ tired 2 a' on the height&N
/ere the youth $as si#ent( ;nd Zarathustra conte'p#ated the tree beside
$hich they stood, and spake thus?
NThis tree standeth #one#y here on the hi##sL it hath gro$n up high abo%e
'an and beast(
;nd if it $anted to speak, it $ou#d ha%e none $ho cou#d understand it? so
high hath it gro$n(
No$ it $aiteth and $aiteth,DDfor $hat doth it $aitS 2t d$e##eth too c#ose
to the seat of the c#oudsL it $aiteth perhaps for the first #ightningSN
)hen Zarathustra had said this, the youth ca##ed out $ith %io#ent gestures?
NQea, Zarathustra, thou speakest the truth( 9y destruction 2 #onged for,
$hen 2 desired to be on the height, and thou art the #ightning for $hich 2
$aited& :o& $hat ha%e 2 been since thou hast appeared a'ongst usS 2t is
'ine en%y of thee that hath destroyed 'e&NDDThus spake the youth, and $ept
bitter#y( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, put his ar' about hi', and #ed the youth
a$ay $ith hi'(
;nd $hen they had $a#ked a $hi#e together, Zarathustra began to speak thus?
2t rendeth 'y heart( .etter than thy $ords express it, thine eyes te## 'e
a## thy danger(
;s yet thou art not freeL thou sti## SEEWEST freedo'( Too uns#ept hath thy
seeking 'ade thee, and too $akefu#(
7n the open height $ou#dst thou beL for the stars thirsteth thy sou#( .ut
thy bad i'pu#ses a#so thirst for freedo'(
Thy $i#d dogs $ant #ibertyL they bark for joy in their ce##ar $hen thy
spirit endea%oureth to open a## prison doors(
Sti## art thou a prisonerDDit see'eth to 'eDD$ho de%iseth #iberty for
hi'se#f? ah& sharp beco'eth the sou# of such prisoners, but a#so deceitfu#
and $icked(
To purify hi'se#f, is sti## necessary for the freed'an of the spirit( 9uch
of the prison and the 'ou#d sti## re'aineth in hi'? pure hath his eye
sti## to beco'e(
Qea, 2 kno$ thy danger( .ut by 'y #o%e and hope 2 conjure thee? cast not
thy #o%e and hope a$ay&
Nob#e thou fee#est thyse#f sti##, and nob#e others a#so fee# thee sti##,
though they bear thee a grudge and cast e%i# #ooks( Wno$ this, that to
e%erybody a nob#e one standeth in the $ay(
;#so to the good, a nob#e one standeth in the $ay? and e%en $hen they ca##
hi' a good 'an, they $ant thereby to put hi' aside(
The ne$, $ou#d the nob#e 'an create, and a ne$ %irtue( The o#d, $anteth
the good 'an, and that the o#d shou#d be conser%ed(
.ut it is not the danger of the nob#e 'an to turn a good 'an, but #est he
shou#d beco'e a b#usterer, a scoffer, or a destroyer(
;h& 2 ha%e kno$n nob#e ones $ho #ost their highest hope( ;nd then they
disparaged a## high hopes(
Then #i%ed they sha'e#ess#y in te'porary p#easures, and beyond the day had
hard#y an ai'(
NSpirit is a#so %o#uptuousness,NDDsaid they( Then broke the $ings of their
spiritL and no$ it creepeth about, and defi#eth $here it gna$eth(
7nce they thought of beco'ing heroesL but sensua#ists are they no$( ;
troub#e and a terror is the hero to the'(
.ut by 'y #o%e and hope 2 conjure thee? cast not a$ay the hero in thy
sou#& 9aintain ho#y thy highest hope&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
2R( T/E P-E;"/E-S 7F *E;T/(
There are preachers of death? and the earth is fu## of those to $ho'
desistance fro' #ife 'ust be preached(
Fu## is the earth of the superf#uousL 'arred is #ife by the 'anyDtooD'any(
9ay they be decoyed out of this #ife by the N#ife eterna#N&
NThe ye##o$ onesN? so are ca##ed the preachers of death, or Nthe b#ack
ones(N .ut 2 $i## sho$ the' unto you in other co#ours besides(
There are the terrib#e ones $ho carry about in the'se#%es the beast of
prey, and ha%e no choice except #usts or se#fD#aceration( ;nd e%en their
#usts are se#fD#aceration(
They ha%e not yet beco'e 'en, those terrib#e ones? 'ay they preach
desistance fro' #ife, and pass a$ay the'se#%es&
There are the spiritua##y consu'pti%e ones? hard#y are they born $hen they
begin to die, and #ong for doctrines of #assitude and renunciation(
They $ou#d fain be dead, and $e shou#d appro%e of their $ish& :et us
be$are of a$akening those dead ones, and of da'aging those #i%ing coffins&
They 'eet an in%a#id, or an o#d 'an, or a corpseDDand i''ediate#y they say?
N:ife is refuted&N
.ut they on#y are refuted, and their eye, $hich seeth on#y one aspect of
existence(
Shrouded in thick 'e#ancho#y, and eager for the #itt#e casua#ties that
bring death? thus do they $ait, and c#ench their teeth(
7r e#se, they grasp at s$eet'eats, and 'ock at their chi#dishness thereby?
they c#ing to their stra$ of #ife, and 'ock at their sti## c#inging to it(
Their $isdo' speaketh thus? N; foo#, he $ho re'aineth a#i%eL but so far
are $e foo#s& ;nd that is the foo#ishest thing in #ife&N
N:ife is on#y sufferingN? so say others, and #ie not( Then see to it that
QE cease& See to it that the #ife ceaseth $hich is on#y suffering&
;nd #et this be the teaching of your %irtue? NThou sha#t s#ay thyse#f&
Thou sha#t stea# a$ay fro' thyse#f&NDD
N:ust is sin,NDDso say so'e $ho preach deathDDN#et us go apart and beget no
chi#dren&N
NGi%ing birth is troub#eso'e,NDDsay othersDDN$hy sti## gi%e birthS 7ne
beareth on#y the unfortunate&N ;nd they a#so are preachers of death(
NPity is necessary,NDDso saith a third party( NTake $hat 2 ha%e& Take
$hat 2 a'& So 'uch #ess doth #ife bind 'e&N
)ere they consistent#y pitifu#, then $ou#d they 'ake their neighbours sick
of #ife( To be $ickedDDthat $ou#d be their true goodness(
.ut they $ant to be rid of #ifeL $hat care they if they bind others sti##
faster $ith their chains and gifts&DD
;nd ye a#so, to $ho' #ife is rough #abour and disUuiet, are ye not %ery
tired of #ifeS ;re ye not %ery ripe for the ser'on of deathS
;## ye to $ho' rough #abour is dear, and the rapid, ne$, and strangeDDye
put up $ith yourse#%es bad#yL your di#igence is f#ight, and the $i## to
se#fDforgetfu#ness(
2f ye be#ie%ed 'ore in #ife, then $ou#d ye de%ote yourse#%es #ess to the
'o'entary( .ut for $aiting, ye ha%e not enough of capacity in youDDnor
e%en for id#ing&
E%ery$here resoundeth the %oices of those $ho preach deathL and the earth
is fu## of those to $ho' death hath to be preached(
7r N#ife eterna#NL it is a## the sa'e to 'eDDif on#y they pass a$ay
Uuick#y&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R( );- ;N* );--27-S(
.y our best ene'ies $e do not $ant to be spared, nor by those either $ho'
$e #o%e fro' the %ery heart( So #et 'e te## you the truth&
9y brethren in $ar& 2 #o%e you fro' the %ery heart( 2 a', and $as e%er,
your counterpart( ;nd 2 a' a#so your best ene'y( So #et 'e te## you the
truth&
2 kno$ the hatred and en%y of your hearts( Qe are not great enough not to
kno$ of hatred and en%y( Then be great enough not to be asha'ed of the'&
;nd if ye cannot be saints of kno$#edge, then, 2 pray you, be at #east its
$arriors( They are the co'panions and forerunners of such saintship(
2 see 'any so#diersL cou#d 2 but see 'any $arriors& N8nifor'N one ca##eth
$hat they $earL 'ay it not be unifor' $hat they there$ith hide&
Qe sha## be those $hose eyes e%er seek for an ene'yDDfor Q78- ene'y( ;nd
$ith so'e of you there is hatred at first sight(
Qour ene'y sha## ye seekL your $ar sha## ye $age, and for the sake of your
thoughts& ;nd if your thoughts succu'b, your uprightness sha## sti## shout
triu'ph thereby&
Qe sha## #o%e peace as a 'eans to ne$ $arsDDand the short peace 'ore than
the #ong(
Qou 2 ad%ise not to $ork, but to fight( Qou 2 ad%ise not to peace, but to
%ictory( :et your $ork be a fight, #et your peace be a %ictory&
7ne can on#y be si#ent and sit peacefu##y $hen one hath arro$ and bo$L
other$ise one prateth and Uuarre##eth( :et your peace be a %ictory&
Qe say it is the good cause $hich ha##o$eth e%en $arS 2 say unto you? it
is the good $ar $hich ha##o$eth e%ery cause(
)ar and courage ha%e done 'ore great things than charity( Not your
sy'pathy, but your bra%ery hath hitherto sa%ed the %icti's(
N)hat is goodSN ye ask( To be bra%e is good( :et the #itt#e gir#s say?
NTo be good is $hat is pretty, and at the sa'e ti'e touching(N
They ca## you heart#ess? but your heart is true, and 2 #o%e the
bashfu#ness of your good$i##( Qe are asha'ed of your f#o$, and others are
asha'ed of their ebb(
Qe are ug#yS )e## then, 'y brethren, take the sub#i'e about you, the
'ant#e of the ug#y&
;nd $hen your sou# beco'eth great, then doth it beco'e haughty, and in your
sub#i'ity there is $ickedness( 2 kno$ you(
2n $ickedness the haughty 'an and the $eak#ing 'eet( .ut they
'isunderstand one another( 2 kno$ you(
Qe sha## on#y ha%e ene'ies to be hated, but not ene'ies to be despised( Qe
'ust be proud of your ene'iesL then, the successes of your ene'ies are a#so
your successes(
-esistanceDDthat is the distinction of the s#a%e( :et your distinction be
obedience( :et your co''anding itse#f be obeying&
To the good $arrior soundeth Nthou sha#tN p#easanter than N2 $i##(N ;nd
a## that is dear unto you, ye sha## first ha%e it co''anded unto you(
:et your #o%e to #ife be #o%e to your highest hopeL and #et your highest
hope be the highest thought of #ife&
Qour highest thought, ho$e%er, ye sha## ha%e it co''anded unto you by 'eDD
and it is this? 'an is so'ething that is to be surpassed(
So #i%e your #ife of obedience and of $ar& )hat 'atter about #ong #ife&
)hat $arrior $isheth to be spared&
2 spare you not, 2 #o%e you fro' 'y %ery heart, 'y brethren in $ar&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R2( T/E NE) 2*7:(
So'e$here there are sti## peop#es and herds, but not $ith us, 'y brethren?
here there are states(
; stateS )hat is thatS )e##& open no$ your ears unto 'e, for no$ $i## 2
say unto you 'y $ord concerning the death of peop#es(
; state, is ca##ed the co#dest of a## co#d 'onsters( "o#d#y #ieth it a#soL
and this #ie creepeth fro' its 'outh? N2, the state, a' the peop#e(N
2t is a #ie& "reators $ere they $ho created peop#es, and hung a faith and
a #o%e o%er the'? thus they ser%ed #ife(
*estroyers, are they $ho #ay snares for 'any, and ca## it the state? they
hang a s$ord and a hundred cra%ings o%er the'(
)here there is sti## a peop#e, there the state is not understood, but hated
as the e%i# eye, and as sin against #a$s and custo's(
This sign 2 gi%e unto you? e%ery peop#e speaketh its #anguage of good and
e%i#? this its neighbour understandeth not( 2ts #anguage hath it de%ised
for itse#f in #a$s and custo's(
.ut the state #ieth in a## #anguages of good and e%i#L and $hate%er it
saith it #iethL and $hate%er it hath it hath sto#en(
Fa#se is e%erything in itL $ith sto#en teeth it biteth, the biting one(
Fa#se are e%en its bo$e#s(
"onfusion of #anguage of good and e%i#L this sign 2 gi%e unto you as the
sign of the state( ,eri#y, the $i## to death, indicateth this sign&
,eri#y, it beckoneth unto the preachers of death&
9any too 'any are born? for the superf#uous ones $as the state de%ised&
See just ho$ it enticeth the' to it, the 'anyDtooD'any& /o$ it s$a##o$eth
and che$eth and reche$eth the'&
N7n earth there is nothing greater than 2? it is 2 $ho a' the regu#ating
finger of GodNDDthus roareth the 'onster( ;nd not on#y the #ongDeared and
shortDsighted fa## upon their knees&
;h& e%en in your ears, ye great sou#s, it $hispereth its g#oo'y #ies& ;h&
it findeth out the rich hearts $hich $i##ing#y #a%ish the'se#%es&
Qea, it findeth you out too, ye conUuerors of the o#d God& )eary ye beca'e
of the conf#ict, and no$ your $eariness ser%eth the ne$ ido#&
/eroes and honourab#e ones, it $ou#d fain set up around it, the ne$ ido#&
G#ad#y it basketh in the sunshine of good consciences,DDthe co#d 'onster&
E%erything $i## it gi%e Q78, if QE $orship it, the ne$ ido#? thus it
purchaseth the #ustre of your %irtue, and the g#ance of your proud eyes(
2t seeketh to a##ure by 'eans of you, the 'anyDtooD'any& Qea, a he##ish
artifice hath here been de%ised, a deathDhorse jing#ing $ith the trappings
of di%ine honours&
Qea, a dying for 'any hath here been de%ised, $hich g#orifieth itse#f as
#ife? %eri#y, a hearty ser%ice unto a## preachers of death&
The state, 2 ca## it, $here a## are poisonDdrinkers, the good and the bad?
the state, $here a## #ose the'se#%es, the good and the bad? the state,
$here the s#o$ suicide of a##DDis ca##ed N#ife(N
Tust see these superf#uous ones& They stea# the $orks of the in%entors and
the treasures of the $ise( "u#ture, they ca## their theftDDand e%erything
beco'eth sickness and troub#e unto the'&
Tust see these superf#uous ones& Sick are they a#$aysL they %o'it their
bi#e and ca## it a ne$spaper( They de%our one another, and cannot e%en
digest the'se#%es(
Tust see these superf#uous ones& )ea#th they acUuire and beco'e poorer
thereby( Po$er they seek for, and abo%e a##, the #e%er of po$er, 'uch
'oneyDDthese i'potent ones&
See the' c#a'ber, these ni'b#e apes& They c#a'ber o%er one another, and
thus scuff#e into the 'ud and the abyss(
To$ards the throne they a## stri%e? it is their 'adnessDDas if happiness
sat on the throne& 7ftti'es sitteth fi#th on the throne(DDand oftti'es
a#so the throne on fi#th(
9ad'en they a## see' to 'e, and c#a'bering apes, and too eager( .ad#y
s'e##eth their ido# to 'e, the co#d 'onster? bad#y they a## s'e## to 'e,
these ido#aters(
9y brethren, $i## ye suffocate in the fu'es of their 'a$s and appetites&
.etter break the $indo$s and ju'p into the open air&
*o go out of the $ay of the bad odour& )ithdra$ fro' the ido#atry of the
superf#uous&
*o go out of the $ay of the bad odour& )ithdra$ fro' the stea' of these
hu'an sacrifices&
7pen sti## re'aineth the earth for great sou#s( E'pty are sti## 'any sites
for #one ones and t$ain ones, around $hich f#oateth the odour of tranUui#
seas(
7pen sti## re'aineth a free #ife for great sou#s( ,eri#y, he $ho
possesseth #itt#e is so 'uch the #ess possessed? b#essed be 'oderate
po%erty&
There, $here the state ceasethDDthere on#y co''enceth the 'an $ho is not
superf#uous? there co''enceth the song of the necessary ones, the sing#e
and irrep#aceab#e 'e#ody(
There, $here the state "E;SET/DDpray #ook thither, 'y brethren& *o ye not
see it, the rainbo$ and the bridges of the Super'anSDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R22( T/E F:2ES 2N T/E 9;-WETDP:;"E(
F#ee, 'y friend, into thy so#itude& 2 see thee deafened $ith the noise of
the great 'en, and stung a## o%er $ith the stings of the #itt#e ones(
;d'irab#y do forest and rock kno$ ho$ to be si#ent $ith thee( -ese'b#e
again the tree $hich thou #o%est, the broadDbranched oneDDsi#ent#y and
attenti%e#y it oMerhangeth the sea(
)here so#itude endeth, there beginneth the 'arketDp#aceL and $here the
'arketDp#ace beginneth, there beginneth a#so the noise of the great actors,
and the buzzing of the poisonDf#ies(
2n the $or#d e%en the best things are $orth#ess $ithout those $ho represent
the'? those representers, the peop#e ca## great 'en(
:itt#e do the peop#e understand $hat is greatDDthat is to say, the creating
agency( .ut they ha%e a taste for a## representers and actors of great
things(
;round the de%isers of ne$ %a#ues re%o#%eth the $or#d?DDin%isib#y it
re%o#%eth( .ut around the actors re%o#%e the peop#e and the g#ory? such
is the course of things(
Spirit, hath the actor, but #itt#e conscience of the spirit( /e be#ie%eth
a#$ays in that $here$ith he 'aketh be#ie%e 'ost strong#yDDin /29SE:F&
To'orro$ he hath a ne$ be#ief, and the day after, one sti## ne$er( Sharp
perceptions hath he, #ike the peop#e, and changeab#e hu'ours(
To upsetDDthat 'eaneth $ith hi' to pro%e( To dri%e 'adDDthat 'eaneth $ith
hi' to con%ince( ;nd b#ood is counted by hi' as the best of a## argu'ents(
; truth $hich on#y g#ideth into fine ears, he ca##eth fa#sehood and
tru'pery( ,eri#y, he be#ie%eth on#y in Gods that 'ake a great noise in the
$or#d&
Fu## of c#attering buffoons is the 'arketDp#ace,DDand the peop#e g#ory in
their great 'en& These are for the' the 'asters of the hour(
.ut the hour presseth the'L so they press thee( ;nd a#so fro' thee they
$ant Qea or Nay( ;#as& thou $ou#dst set thy chair bet$ixt For and ;gainstS
7n account of those abso#ute and i'patient ones, be not jea#ous, thou #o%er
of truth& Ne%er yet did truth c#ing to the ar' of an abso#ute one(
7n account of those abrupt ones, return into thy security? on#y in the
'arketDp#ace is one assai#ed by QeaS or NayS
S#o$ is the experience of a## deep fountains? #ong ha%e they to $ait unti#
they kno$ )/;T hath fa##en into their depths(
;$ay fro' the 'arketDp#ace and fro' fa'e taketh p#ace a## that is great?
a$ay fro' the 'arketDP#ace and fro' fa'e ha%e e%er d$e#t the de%isers of
ne$ %a#ues(
F#ee, 'y friend, into thy so#itude? 2 see thee stung a## o%er by the
poisonous f#ies( F#ee thither, $here a rough, strong breeze b#o$eth&
F#ee into thy so#itude& Thou hast #i%ed too c#ose#y to the s'a## and the
pitiab#e( F#ee fro' their in%isib#e %engeance& To$ards thee they ha%e
nothing but %engeance(
-aise no #onger an ar' against the'& 2nnu'erab#e are they, and it is not
thy #ot to be a f#yDf#ap(
2nnu'erab#e are the s'a## and pitiab#e onesL and of 'any a proud structure,
rainDdrops and $eeds ha%e been the ruin(
Thou art not stoneL but a#ready hast thou beco'e ho##o$ by the nu'erous
drops( Thou $i#t yet break and burst by the nu'erous drops(
Exhausted 2 see thee, by poisonous f#iesL b#eeding 2 see thee, and torn at
a hundred spotsL and thy pride $i## not e%en upbraid(
.#ood they $ou#d ha%e fro' thee in a## innocenceL b#ood their b#ood#ess
sou#s cra%e forDDand they sting, therefore, in a## innocence(
.ut thou, profound one, thou sufferest too profound#y e%en fro' s'a##
$oundsL and ere thou hadst reco%ered, the sa'e poisonD$or' cra$#ed o%er thy
hand(
Too proud art thou to ki## these s$eetDtooths( .ut take care #est it be
thy fate to suffer a## their poisonous injustice&
They buzz around thee a#so $ith their praise? obtrusi%eness, is their
praise( They $ant to be c#ose to thy skin and thy b#ood(
They f#atter thee, as one f#attereth a God or de%i#L they $hi'per before
thee, as before a God or de%i#( )hat doth it co'e to& F#atterers are
they, and $hi'perers, and nothing 'ore(
7ften, a#so, do they sho$ the'se#%es to thee as a'iab#e ones( .ut that
hath e%er been the prudence of the co$ard#y( Qea& the co$ard#y are $ise&
They think 'uch about thee $ith their circu'scribed sou#sDDthou art a#$ays
suspected by the'& )hate%er is 'uch thought about is at #ast thought
suspicious(
They punish thee for a## thy %irtues( They pardon thee in their in'ost
hearts on#yDDfor thine errors(
.ecause thou art gent#e and of upright character, thou sayest? N.#a'e#ess
are they for their s'a## existence(N .ut their circu'scribed sou#s think?
N.#a'ab#e is a## great existence(N
E%en $hen thou art gent#e to$ards the', they sti## fee# the'se#%es despised
by theeL and they repay thy beneficence $ith secret 'a#eficence(
Thy si#ent pride is a#$ays counter to their tasteL they rejoice if once
thou be hu'b#e enough to be fri%o#ous(
)hat $e recognise in a 'an, $e a#so irritate in hi'( Therefore be on your
guard against the s'a## ones&
2n thy presence they fee# the'se#%es s'a##, and their baseness g#ea'eth and
g#o$eth against thee in in%isib#e %engeance(
Sa$est thou not ho$ often they beca'e du'b $hen thou approachedst the', and
ho$ their energy #eft the' #ike the s'oke of an extinguishing fireS
Qea, 'y friend, the bad conscience art thou of thy neighboursL for they are
un$orthy of thee( Therefore they hate thee, and $ou#d fain suck thy b#ood(
Thy neighbours $i## a#$ays be poisonous f#iesL $hat is great in theeDDthat
itse#f 'ust 'ake the' 'ore poisonous, and a#$ays 'ore f#yD#ike(
F#ee, 'y friend, into thy so#itudeDDand thither, $here a rough strong
breeze b#o$eth( 2t is not thy #ot to be a f#yDf#ap(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R222( "/;ST2TQ(
2 #o%e the forest( 2t is bad to #i%e in cities? there, there are too 'any
of the #ustfu#(
2s it not better to fa## into the hands of a 'urderer, than into the drea's
of a #ustfu# $o'anS
;nd just #ook at these 'en? their eye saith itDDthey kno$ nothing better
on earth than to #ie $ith a $o'an(
Fi#th is at the botto' of their sou#sL and a#as& if their fi#th hath sti##
spirit in it&
)ou#d that ye $ere perfectDDat #east as ani'a#s& .ut to ani'a#s be#ongeth
innocence(
*o 2 counse# you to s#ay your instinctsS 2 counse# you to innocence in
your instincts(
*o 2 counse# you to chastityS "hastity is a %irtue $ith so'e, but $ith
'any a#'ost a %ice(
These are continent, to be sure? but doggish #ust #ooketh en%ious#y out of
a## that they do(
E%en into the heights of their %irtue and into their co#d spirit doth this
creature fo##o$ the', $ith its discord(
;nd ho$ nice#y can doggish #ust beg for a piece of spirit, $hen a piece of
f#esh is denied it&
Qe #o%e tragedies and a## that breaketh the heartS .ut 2 a' distrustfu# of
your doggish #ust(
Qe ha%e too crue# eyes, and ye #ook $anton#y to$ards the sufferers( /ath
not your #ust just disguised itse#f and taken the na'e of fe##o$DsufferingS
;nd a#so this parab#e gi%e 2 unto you? Not a fe$ $ho 'eant to cast out
their de%i#, $ent thereby into the s$ine the'se#%es(
To $ho' chastity is difficu#t, it is to be dissuaded? #est it beco'e the
road to he##DDto fi#th and #ust of sou#(
*o 2 speak of fi#thy thingsS That is not the $orst thing for 'e to do(
Not $hen the truth is fi#thy, but $hen it is sha##o$, doth the discerning
one go un$i##ing#y into its $aters(
,eri#y, there are chaste ones fro' their %ery natureL they are gent#er of
heart, and #augh better and oftener than you(
They #augh a#so at chastity, and ask? N)hat is chastityS
2s chastity not fo##yS .ut the fo##y ca'e unto us, and not $e unto it(
)e offered that guest harbour and heart? no$ it d$e##eth $ith usDD#et it
stay as #ong as it $i##&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R2,( T/E F-2EN*(
N7ne, is a#$ays too 'any about 'eNDDthinketh the anchorite( N;#$ays once
oneDDthat 'aketh t$o in the #ong run&N
2 and 'e are a#$ays too earnest#y in con%ersation? ho$ cou#d it be
endured, if there $ere not a friendS
The friend of the anchorite is a#$ays the third one? the third one is the
cork $hich pre%enteth the con%ersation of the t$o sinking into the depth(
;h& there are too 'any depths for a## anchorites( Therefore, do they #ong
so 'uch for a friend, and for his e#e%ation(
7ur faith in others betrayeth $herein $e $ou#d fain ha%e faith in
ourse#%es( 7ur #onging for a friend is our betrayer(
;nd often $ith our #o%e $e $ant 'ere#y to o%er#eap en%y( ;nd often $e
attack and 'ake ourse#%es ene'ies, to concea# that $e are %u#nerab#e(
N.e at #east 'ine ene'y&NDDthus speaketh the true re%erence, $hich doth not
%enture to so#icit friendship(
2f one $ou#d ha%e a friend, then 'ust one a#so be $i##ing to $age $ar for
hi'? and in order to $age $ar, one 'ust be ";P;.:E of being an ene'y(
7ne ought sti## to honour the ene'y in oneMs friend( "anst thou go nigh
unto thy friend, and not go o%er to hi'S
2n oneMs friend one sha## ha%e oneMs best ene'y( Thou sha#t be c#osest
unto hi' $ith thy heart $hen thou $ithstandest hi'(
Thou $ou#dst $ear no rai'ent before thy friendS 2t is in honour of thy
friend that thou sho$est thyse#f to hi' as thou artS .ut he $isheth thee
to the de%i# on that account&
/e $ho 'aketh no secret of hi'se#f shocketh? so 'uch reason ha%e ye to
fear nakedness& ;ye, if ye $ere Gods, ye cou#d then be asha'ed of
c#othing&
Thou canst not adorn thyse#f fine enough for thy friendL for thou sha#t be
unto hi' an arro$ and a #onging for the Super'an(
Sa$est thou e%er thy friend as#eepDDto kno$ ho$ he #ookethS )hat is
usua##y the countenance of thy friendS 2t is thine o$n countenance, in a
coarse and i'perfect 'irror(
Sa$est thou e%er thy friend as#eepS )ert thou not dis'ayed at thy friend
#ooking soS 7 'y friend, 'an is so'ething that hath to be surpassed(
2n di%ining and keeping si#ence sha## the friend be a 'aster? not
e%erything 'ust thou $ish to see( Thy drea' sha## disc#ose unto thee $hat
thy friend doeth $hen a$ake(
:et thy pity be a di%ining? to kno$ first if thy friend $anteth pity(
Perhaps he #o%eth in thee the un'o%ed eye, and the #ook of eternity(
:et thy pity for thy friend be hid under a hard she##L thou sha#t bite out
a tooth upon it( Thus $i## it ha%e de#icacy and s$eetness(
;rt thou pure air and so#itude and bread and 'edicine to thy friendS 9any
a one cannot #oosen his o$n fetters, but is ne%erthe#ess his friendMs
e'ancipator(
;rt thou a s#a%eS Then thou canst not be a friend( ;rt thou a tyrantS
Then thou canst not ha%e friends(
Far too #ong hath there been a s#a%e and a tyrant concea#ed in $o'an( 7n
that account $o'an is not yet capab#e of friendship? she kno$eth on#y
#o%e(
2n $o'anMs #o%e there is injustice and b#indness to a## she doth not #o%e(
;nd e%en in $o'anMs conscious #o%e, there is sti## a#$ays surprise and
#ightning and night, a#ong $ith the #ight(
;s yet $o'an is not capab#e of friendship? $o'en are sti## cats, and
birds( 7r at the best, co$s(
;s yet $o'an is not capab#e of friendship( .ut te## 'e, ye 'en, $ho of you
are capab#e of friendshipS
7h& your po%erty, ye 'en, and your sordidness of sou#& ;s 'uch as ye gi%e
to your friend, $i## 2 gi%e e%en to 'y foe, and $i## not ha%e beco'e poorer
thereby(
There is co'radeship? 'ay there be friendship&
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R,( T/E T/78S;N* ;N* 7NE G7;:S(
9any #ands sa$ Zarathustra, and 'any peop#es? thus he disco%ered the good
and bad of 'any peop#es( No greater po$er did Zarathustra find on earth
than good and bad(
No peop#e cou#d #i%e $ithout first %a#uingL if a peop#e $i## 'aintain
itse#f, ho$e%er, it 'ust not %a#ue as its neighbour %a#ueth(
9uch that passed for good $ith one peop#e $as regarded $ith scorn and
conte'pt by another? thus 2 found it( 9uch found 2 here ca##ed bad, $hich
$as there decked $ith purp#e honours(
Ne%er did the one neighbour understand the other? e%er did his sou# 'ar%e#
at his neighbourMs de#usion and $ickedness(
; tab#e of exce##encies hangeth o%er e%ery peop#e( :o& it is the tab#e of
their triu'phsL #o& it is the %oice of their )i## to Po$er(
2t is #audab#e, $hat they think hardL $hat is indispensab#e and hard they
ca## goodL and $hat re#ie%eth in the direst distress, the uniUue and
hardest of a##,DDthey exto# as ho#y(
)hate%er 'aketh the' ru#e and conUuer and shine, to the dis'ay and en%y of
their neighbours, they regard as the high and fore'ost thing, the test and
the 'eaning of a## e#se(
,eri#y, 'y brother, if thou kne$est but a peop#eMs need, its #and, its sky,
and its neighbour, then $ou#dst thou di%ine the #a$ of its sur'ountings,
and $hy it c#i'beth up that #adder to its hope(
N;#$ays sha#t thou be the fore'ost and pro'inent abo%e others? no one
sha## thy jea#ous sou# #o%e, except a friendNDDthat 'ade the sou# of a
Greek thri##? thereby $ent he his $ay to greatness(
NTo speak truth, and be ski#fu# $ith bo$ and arro$NDDso see'ed it a#ike
p#easing and hard to the peop#e fro' $ho' co'eth 'y na'eDDthe na'e $hich is
a#ike p#easing and hard to 'e(
NTo honour father and 'other, and fro' the root of the sou# to do their
$i##NDDthis tab#e of sur'ounting hung another peop#e o%er the', and beca'e
po$erfu# and per'anent thereby(
NTo ha%e fide#ity, and for the sake of fide#ity to risk honour and b#ood,
e%en in e%i# and dangerous coursesNDDteaching itse#f so, another peop#e
'astered itse#f, and thus 'astering itse#f, beca'e pregnant and hea%y $ith
great hopes(
,eri#y, 'en ha%e gi%en unto the'se#%es a## their good and bad( ,eri#y,
they took it not, they found it not, it ca'e not unto the' as a %oice fro'
hea%en(
,a#ues did 'an on#y assign to things in order to 'aintain hi'se#fDDhe
created on#y the significance of things, a hu'an significance& Therefore,
ca##eth he hi'se#f N'an,N that is, the %a#uator(
,a#uing is creating? hear it, ye creating ones& ,a#uation itse#f is the
treasure and je$e# of the %a#ued things(
Through %a#uation on#y is there %a#ueL and $ithout %a#uation the nut of
existence $ou#d be ho##o$( /ear it, ye creating ones&
"hange of %a#uesDDthat is, change of the creating ones( ;#$ays doth he
destroy $ho hath to be a creator(
"reating ones $ere first of a## peop#es, and on#y in #ate ti'es
indi%idua#sL %eri#y, the indi%idua# hi'se#f is sti## the #atest creation(
Peop#es once hung o%er the' tab#es of the good( :o%e $hich $ou#d ru#e and
#o%e $hich $ou#d obey, created for the'se#%es such tab#es(
7#der is the p#easure in the herd than the p#easure in the ego? and as
#ong as the good conscience is for the herd, the bad conscience on#y saith?
ego(
,eri#y, the crafty ego, the #o%e#ess one, that seeketh its ad%antage in the
ad%antage of 'anyDDit is not the origin of the herd, but its ruin(
:o%ing ones, $as it a#$ays, and creating ones, that created good and bad(
Fire of #o%e g#o$eth in the na'es of a## the %irtues, and fire of $rath(
9any #ands sa$ Zarathustra, and 'any peop#es? no greater po$er did
Zarathustra find on earth than the creations of the #o%ing onesDDNgoodN and
NbadN are they ca##ed(
,eri#y, a prodigy is this po$er of praising and b#a'ing( Te## 'e, ye
brethren, $ho $i## 'aster it for 'eS )ho $i## put a fetter upon the
thousand necks of this ani'a#S
; thousand goa#s ha%e there been hitherto, for a thousand peop#es ha%e
there been( 7n#y the fetter for the thousand necks is sti## #ackingL there
is #acking the one goa#( ;s yet hu'anity hath not a goa#(
.ut pray te## 'e, 'y brethren, if the goa# of hu'anity be sti## #acking, is
there not a#so sti## #ackingDDhu'anity itse#fSDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R,2( NE2G/.78-D:7,E(
Qe cro$d around your neighbour, and ha%e fine $ords for it( .ut 2 say unto
you? your neighbourD#o%e is your bad #o%e of yourse#%es(
Qe f#ee unto your neighbour fro' yourse#%es, and $ou#d fain 'ake a %irtue
thereof? but 2 fatho' your Nunse#fishness(N
The T/78 is o#der than the X2XL the T/78 hath been consecrated, but not yet
the X2X? so 'an presseth nigh unto his neighbour(
*o 2 ad%ise you to neighbourD#o%eS -ather do 2 ad%ise you to neighbourD
f#ight and to furthest #o%e&
/igher than #o%e to your neighbour is #o%e to the furthest and future onesL
higher sti## than #o%e to 'en, is #o%e to things and phanto's(
The phanto' that runneth on before thee, 'y brother, is fairer than thouL
$hy dost thou not gi%e unto it thy f#esh and thy bonesS .ut thou fearest,
and runnest unto thy neighbour(
Qe cannot endure it $ith yourse#%es, and do not #o%e yourse#%es
sufficient#y? so ye seek to 'is#ead your neighbour into #o%e, and $ou#d
fain gi#d yourse#%es $ith his error(
)ou#d that ye cou#d not endure it $ith any kind of near ones, or their
neighboursL then $ou#d ye ha%e to create your friend and his o%erf#o$ing
heart out of yourse#%es(
Qe ca## in a $itness $hen ye $ant to speak $e## of yourse#%esL and $hen ye
ha%e 'is#ed hi' to think $e## of you, ye a#so think $e## of yourse#%es(
Not on#y doth he #ie, $ho speaketh contrary to his kno$#edge, but 'ore so,
he $ho speaketh contrary to his ignorance( ;nd thus speak ye of yourse#%es
in your intercourse, and be#ie your neighbour $ith yourse#%es(
Thus saith the foo#? N;ssociation $ith 'en spoi#eth the character,
especia##y $hen one hath none(N
The one goeth to his neighbour because he seeketh hi'se#f, and the other
because he $ou#d fain #ose hi'se#f( Qour bad #o%e to yourse#%es 'aketh
so#itude a prison to you(
The furthest ones are they $ho pay for your #o%e to the near onesL and $hen
there are but fi%e of you together, a sixth 'ust a#$ays die(
2 #o%e not your festi%a#s either? too 'any actors found 2 there, and e%en
the spectators often beha%ed #ike actors(
Not the neighbour do 2 teach you, but the friend( :et the friend be the
festi%a# of the earth to you, and a foretaste of the Super'an(
2 teach you the friend and his o%erf#o$ing heart( .ut one 'ust kno$ ho$ to
be a sponge, if one $ou#d be #o%ed by o%erf#o$ing hearts(
2 teach you the friend in $ho' the $or#d standeth co'p#ete, a capsu#e of
the good,DDthe creating friend, $ho hath a#$ays a co'p#ete $or#d to besto$(
;nd as the $or#d unro##ed itse#f for hi', so ro##eth it together again for
hi' in rings, as the gro$th of good through e%i#, as the gro$th of purpose
out of chance(
:et the future and the furthest be the 'oti%e of thy toDdayL in thy friend
sha#t thou #o%e the Super'an as thy 'oti%e(
9y brethren, 2 ad%ise you not to neighbourD#o%eDD2 ad%ise you to furthest
#o%e&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R,22( T/E );Q 7F T/E "-E;T2NG 7NE(
)ou#dst thou go into iso#ation, 'y brotherS )ou#dst thou seek the $ay unto
thyse#fS Tarry yet a #itt#e and hearken unto 'e(
N/e $ho seeketh 'ay easi#y get #ost hi'se#f( ;## iso#ation is $rongN? so
say the herd( ;nd #ong didst thou be#ong to the herd(
The %oice of the herd $i## sti## echo in thee( ;nd $hen thou sayest, N2
ha%e no #onger a conscience in co''on $ith you,N then $i## it be a p#aint
and a pain(
:o, that pain itse#f did the sa'e conscience produceL and the #ast g#ea' of
that conscience sti## g#o$eth on thine aff#iction(
.ut thou $ou#dst go the $ay of thine aff#iction, $hich is the $ay unto
thyse#fS Then sho$ 'e thine authority and thy strength to do so&
;rt thou a ne$ strength and a ne$ authorityS ; first 'otionS ; se#fD
ro##ing $hee#S "anst thou a#so co'pe# stars to re%o#%e around theeS
;#as& there is so 'uch #usting for #oftiness& There are so 'any
con%u#sions of the a'bitions& Sho$ 'e that thou art not a #usting and
a'bitious one&
;#as& there are so 'any great thoughts that do nothing 'ore than the
be##o$s? they inf#ate, and 'ake e'ptier than e%er(
Free, dost thou ca## thyse#fS Thy ru#ing thought $ou#d 2 hear of, and not
that thou hast escaped fro' a yoke(
;rt thou one ENT2T:E* to escape fro' a yokeS 9any a one hath cast a$ay his
fina# $orth $hen he hath cast a$ay his ser%itude(
Free fro' $hatS )hat doth that 'atter to Zarathustra& "#ear#y, ho$e%er,
sha## thine eye sho$ unto 'e? free F7- )/;TS
"anst thou gi%e unto thyse#f thy bad and thy good, and set up thy $i## as a
#a$ o%er theeS "anst thou be judge for thyse#f, and a%enger of thy #a$S
Terrib#e is a#oneness $ith the judge and a%enger of oneMs o$n #a$( Thus is
a star projected into desert space, and into the icy breath of a#oneness(
ToDday sufferest thou sti## fro' the 'u#titude, thou indi%idua#L toDday
hast thou sti## thy courage unabated, and thy hopes(
.ut one day $i## the so#itude $eary theeL one day $i## thy pride yie#d, and
thy courage Uuai#( Thou $i#t one day cry? N2 a' a#one&N
7ne day $i#t thou see no #onger thy #oftiness, and see too c#ose#y thy
#o$#inessL thy sub#i'ity itse#f $i## frighten thee as a phanto'( Thou $i#t
one day cry? N;## is fa#se&N
There are fee#ings $hich seek to s#ay the #oneso'e oneL if they do not
succeed, then 'ust they the'se#%es die& .ut art thou capab#e of itDDto be
a 'urdererS
/ast thou e%er kno$n, 'y brother, the $ord NdisdainNS ;nd the anguish of
thy justice in being just to those that disdain theeS
Thou forcest 'any to think different#y about theeL that, charge they
hea%i#y to thine account( Thou ca'est nigh unto the', and yet $entest
past? for that they ne%er forgi%e thee(
Thou goest beyond the'? but the higher thou risest, the s'a##er doth the
eye of en%y see thee( 9ost of a##, ho$e%er, is the f#ying one hated(
N/o$ cou#d ye be just unto 'e&NDD'ust thou sayDDN2 choose your injustice as
'y a##otted portion(N
2njustice and fi#th cast they at the #oneso'e one? but, 'y brother, if
thou $ou#dst be a star, thou 'ust shine for the' none the #ess on that
account&
;nd be on thy guard against the good and just& They $ou#d fain crucify
those $ho de%ise their o$n %irtueDDthey hate the #oneso'e ones(
.e on thy guard, a#so, against ho#y si'p#icity& ;## is unho#y to it that
is not si'p#eL fain, #ike$ise, $ou#d it p#ay $ith the fireDDof the fagot
and stake(
;nd be on thy guard, a#so, against the assau#ts of thy #o%e& Too readi#y
doth the rec#use reach his hand to any one $ho 'eeteth hi'(
To 'any a one 'ayest thou not gi%e thy hand, but on#y thy pa$L and 2 $ish
thy pa$ a#so to ha%e c#a$s(
.ut the $orst ene'y thou canst 'eet, $i#t thou thyse#f a#$ays beL thou
$ay#ayest thyse#f in ca%erns and forests(
Thou #oneso'e one, thou goest the $ay to thyse#f& ;nd past thyse#f and thy
se%en de%i#s #eadeth thy $ay&
; heretic $i#t thou be to thyse#f, and a $izard and a soothDsayer, and a
foo#, and a doubter, and a reprobate, and a %i##ain(
-eady 'ust thou be to burn thyse#f in thine o$n f#a'eL ho$ cou#dst thou
beco'e ne$ if thou ha%e not first beco'e ashes&
Thou #oneso'e one, thou goest the $ay of the creating one? a God $i#t thou
create for thyse#f out of thy se%en de%i#s&
Thou #oneso'e one, thou goest the $ay of the #o%ing one? thou #o%est
thyse#f, and on that account despisest thou thyse#f, as on#y the #o%ing
ones despise(
To create, desireth the #o%ing one, because he despiseth& )hat kno$eth he
of #o%e $ho hath not been ob#iged to despise just $hat he #o%ed&
)ith thy #o%e, go into thine iso#ation, 'y brother, and $ith thy creatingL
and #ate on#y $i## justice #i'p after thee(
)ith 'y tears, go into thine iso#ation, 'y brother( 2 #o%e hi' $ho seeketh
to create beyond hi'se#f, and thus succu'beth(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R,222( 7:* ;N* Q78NG )79EN(
N)hy stea#est thou a#ong so furti%e#y in the t$i#ight, ZarathustraS ;nd
$hat hidest thou so carefu##y under thy 'ant#eS
2s it a treasure that hath been gi%en theeS 7r a chi#d that hath been born
theeS 7r goest thou thyse#f on a thiefMs errand, thou friend of the
e%i#SNDD
,eri#y, 'y brother, said Zarathustra, it is a treasure that hath been gi%en
'e? it is a #itt#e truth $hich 2 carry(
.ut it is naughty, #ike a young chi#dL and if 2 ho#d not its 'outh, it
screa'eth too #oud#y(
;s 2 $ent on 'y $ay a#one toDday, at the hour $hen the sun dec#ineth, there
'et 'e an o#d $o'an, and she spake thus unto 'y sou#?
N9uch hath Zarathustra spoken a#so to us $o'en, but ne%er spake he unto us
concerning $o'an(N
;nd 2 ans$ered her? N"oncerning $o'an, one shou#d on#y ta#k unto 'en(N
NTa#k a#so unto 'e of $o'an,N said sheL N2 a' o#d enough to forget it
present#y(N
;nd 2 ob#iged the o#d $o'an and spake thus unto her?
E%erything in $o'an is a ridd#e, and e%erything in $o'an hath one so#ution
DDit is ca##ed pregnancy(
9an is for $o'an a 'eans? the purpose is a#$ays the chi#d( .ut $hat is
$o'an for 'anS
T$o different things $anteth the true 'an? danger and di%ersion(
Therefore $anteth he $o'an, as the 'ost dangerous p#aything(
9an sha## be trained for $ar, and $o'an for the recreation of the $arrior?
a## e#se is fo##y(
Too s$eet fruitsDDthese the $arrior #iketh not( Therefore #iketh he
$o'anLDDbitter is e%en the s$eetest $o'an(
.etter than 'an doth $o'an understand chi#dren, but 'an is 'ore chi#dish
than $o'an(
2n the true 'an there is a chi#d hidden? it $anteth to p#ay( 8p then, ye
$o'en, and disco%er the chi#d in 'an&
; p#aything #et $o'an be, pure and fine #ike the precious stone, i##u'ined
$ith the %irtues of a $or#d not yet co'e(
:et the bea' of a star shine in your #o%e& :et your hope say? N9ay 2 bear
the Super'an&N
2n your #o%e #et there be %a#our& )ith your #o%e sha## ye assai# hi' $ho
inspireth you $ith fear&
2n your #o%e be your honour& :itt#e doth $o'an understand other$ise about
honour( .ut #et this be your honour? a#$ays to #o%e 'ore than ye are
#o%ed, and ne%er be the second(
:et 'an fear $o'an $hen she #o%eth? then 'aketh she e%ery sacrifice, and
e%erything e#se she regardeth as $orth#ess(
:et 'an fear $o'an $hen she hateth? for 'an in his inner'ost sou# is
'ere#y e%i#L $o'an, ho$e%er, is 'ean(
)ho' hateth $o'an 'ostSDDThus spake the iron to the #oadstone? N2 hate
thee 'ost, because thou attractest, but art too $eak to dra$ unto thee(N
The happiness of 'an is, N2 $i##(N The happiness of $o'an is, N/e $i##(N
N:o& no$ hath the $or#d beco'e perfect&NDDthus thinketh e%ery $o'an $hen
she obeyeth $ith a## her #o%e(
7bey, 'ust the $o'an, and find a depth for her surface( Surface, is
$o'anMs sou#, a 'obi#e, stor'y fi#' on sha##o$ $ater(
9anMs sou#, ho$e%er, is deep, its current gusheth in subterranean ca%erns?
$o'an sur'iseth its force, but co'prehendeth it not(DD
Then ans$ered 'e the o#d $o'an? N9any fine things hath Zarathustra said,
especia##y for those $ho are young enough for the'(
Strange& Zarathustra kno$eth #itt#e about $o'an, and yet he is right about
the'& *oth this happen, because $ith $o'en nothing is i'possib#eS
;nd no$ accept a #itt#e truth by $ay of thanks& 2 a' o#d enough for it&
S$add#e it up and ho#d its 'outh? other$ise it $i## screa' too #oud#y, the
#itt#e truth(N
NGi%e 'e, $o'an, thy #itt#e truth&N said 2( ;nd thus spake the o#d $o'an?
NThou goest to $o'enS *o not forget thy $hip&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R2R( T/E .2TE 7F T/E ;**E-(
7ne day had Zarathustra fa##en as#eep under a figDtree, o$ing to the heat,
$ith his ar's o%er his face( ;nd there ca'e an adder and bit hi' in the
neck, so that Zarathustra screa'ed $ith pain( )hen he had taken his ar'
fro' his face he #ooked at the serpentL and then did it recognise the eyes
of Zarathustra, $rigg#ed a$k$ard#y, and tried to get a$ay( NNot at a##,N
said Zarathustra, Nas yet hast thou not recei%ed 'y thanks& Thou hast
a$akened 'e in ti'eL 'y journey is yet #ong(N NThy journey is short,N said
the adder sad#yL N'y poison is fata#(N Zarathustra s'i#ed( N)hen did e%er
a dragon die of a serpentMs poisonSNDDsaid he( N.ut take thy poison back&
Thou art not rich enough to present it to 'e(N Then fe## the adder again
on his neck, and #icked his $ound(
)hen Zarathustra once to#d this to his discip#es they asked hi'? N;nd
$hat, 7 Zarathustra, is the 'ora# of thy storySN ;nd Zarathustra ans$ered
the' thus?
The destroyer of 'ora#ity, the good and just ca## 'e? 'y story is i''ora#(
)hen, ho$e%er, ye ha%e an ene'y, then return hi' not good for e%i#? for
that $ou#d abash hi'( .ut pro%e that he hath done so'ething good to you(
;nd rather be angry than abash any one& ;nd $hen ye are cursed, it
p#easeth 'e not that ye shou#d then desire to b#ess( -ather curse a #itt#e
a#so&
;nd shou#d a great injustice befa## you, then do Uuick#y fi%e s'a## ones
besides( /ideous to beho#d is he on $ho' injustice presseth a#one(
*id ye e%er kno$ thisS Shared injustice is ha#f justice( ;nd he $ho can
bear it, sha## take the injustice upon hi'se#f&
; s'a## re%enge is hu'aner than no re%enge at a##( ;nd if the punish'ent
be not a#so a right and an honour to the transgressor, 2 do not #ike your
punishing(
Nob#er is it to o$n onese#f in the $rong than to estab#ish oneMs right,
especia##y if one be in the right( 7n#y, one 'ust be rich enough to do so(
2 do not #ike your co#d justiceL out of the eye of your judges there a#$ays
g#anceth the executioner and his co#d stee#(
Te## 'e? $here find $e justice, $hich is #o%e $ith seeing eyesS
*e%ise 'e, then, the #o%e $hich not on#y beareth a## punish'ent, but a#so
a## gui#t&
*e%ise 'e, then, the justice $hich acUuitteth e%ery one except the judge&
;nd $ou#d ye hear this #ike$iseS To hi' $ho seeketh to be just fro' the
heart, e%en the #ie beco'eth phi#anthropy(
.ut ho$ cou#d 2 be just fro' the heart& /o$ can 2 gi%e e%ery one his o$n&
:et this be enough for 'e? 2 gi%e unto e%ery one 'ine o$n(
Fina##y, 'y brethren, guard against doing $rong to any anchorite( /o$
cou#d an anchorite forget& /o$ cou#d he reUuite&
:ike a deep $e## is an anchorite( Easy is it to thro$ in a stone? if it
shou#d sink to the botto', ho$e%er, te## 'e, $ho $i## bring it out againS
Guard against injuring the anchorite& 2f ye ha%e done so, ho$e%er, $e##
then, ki## hi' a#so&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR( "/2:* ;N* 9;--2;GE(
2 ha%e a Uuestion for thee a#one, 'y brother? #ike a soundingD#ead, cast 2
this Uuestion into thy sou#, that 2 'ay kno$ its depth(
Thou art young, and desirest chi#d and 'arriage( .ut 2 ask thee? ;rt thou
a 'an ENT2T:E* to desire a chi#dS
;rt thou the %ictorious one, the se#fDconUueror, the ru#er of thy passions,
the 'aster of thy %irtuesS Thus do 2 ask thee(
7r doth the ani'a# speak in thy $ish, and necessityS 7r iso#ationS 7r
discord in theeS
2 $ou#d ha%e thy %ictory and freedo' #ong for a chi#d( :i%ing 'onu'ents
sha#t thou bui#d to thy %ictory and e'ancipation(
.eyond thyse#f sha#t thou bui#d( .ut first of a## 'ust thou be bui#t
thyse#f, rectangu#ar in body and sou#(
Not on#y on$ard sha#t thou propagate thyse#f, but up$ard& For that purpose
'ay the garden of 'arriage he#p thee&
; higher body sha#t thou create, a first 'o%e'ent, a spontaneous#y ro##ing
$hee#DDa creating one sha#t thou create(
9arriage? so ca## 2 the $i## of the t$ain to create the one that is 'ore
than those $ho created it( The re%erence for one another, as those
exercising such a $i##, ca## 2 'arriage(
:et this be the significance and the truth of thy 'arriage( .ut that $hich
the 'anyDtooD'any ca## 'arriage, those superf#uous onesDDah, $hat sha## 2
ca## itS
;h, the po%erty of sou# in the t$ain& ;h, the fi#th of sou# in the t$ain&
;h, the pitiab#e se#fDco'p#acency in the t$ain&
9arriage they ca## it a##L and they say their 'arriages are 'ade in hea%en(
)e##, 2 do not #ike it, that hea%en of the superf#uous& No, 2 do not #ike
the', those ani'a#s tang#ed in the hea%en#y toi#s&
Far fro' 'e a#so be the God $ho #i'peth thither to b#ess $hat he hath not
'atched&
:augh not at such 'arriages& )hat chi#d hath not had reason to $eep o%er
its parentsS
)orthy did this 'an see', and ripe for the 'eaning of the earth? but $hen
2 sa$ his $ife, the earth see'ed to 'e a ho'e for 'adcaps(
Qea, 2 $ou#d that the earth shook $ith con%u#sions $hen a saint and a goose
'ate $ith one another(
This one $ent forth in Uuest of truth as a hero, and at #ast got for
hi'se#f a s'a## deckedDup #ie? his 'arriage he ca##eth it(
That one $as reser%ed in intercourse and chose choice#y( .ut one ti'e he
spoi#t his co'pany for a## ti'e? his 'arriage he ca##eth it(
;nother sought a hand'aid $ith the %irtues of an ange#( .ut a## at once he
beca'e the hand'aid of a $o'an, and no$ $ou#d he need a#so to beco'e an
ange#(
"arefu#, ha%e 2 found a## buyers, and a## of the' ha%e astute eyes( .ut
e%en the astutest of the' buyeth his $ife in a sack(
9any short fo##iesDDthat is ca##ed #o%e by you( ;nd your 'arriage putteth
an end to 'any short fo##ies, $ith one #ong stupidity(
Qour #o%e to $o'an, and $o'anMs #o%e to 'anDDah, $ou#d that it $ere
sy'pathy for suffering and %ei#ed deities& .ut genera##y t$o ani'a#s
a#ight on one another(
.ut e%en your best #o%e is on#y an enraptured si'i#e and a painfu# ardour(
2t is a torch to #ight you to #oftier paths(
.eyond yourse#%es sha## ye #o%e so'e day& Then :E;-N first of a## to #o%e(
;nd on that account ye had to drink the bitter cup of your #o%e(
.itterness is in the cup e%en of the best #o%e? thus doth it cause #onging
for the Super'anL thus doth it cause thirst in thee, the creating one&
Thirst in the creating one, arro$ and #onging for the Super'an? te## 'e,
'y brother, is this thy $i## to 'arriageS
/o#y ca## 2 such a $i##, and such a 'arriage(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR2( ,7:8NT;-Q *E;T/(
9any die too #ate, and so'e die too ear#y( Qet strange soundeth the
precept? N*ie at the right ti'e&
*ie at the right ti'e? so teacheth Zarathustra(
To be sure, he $ho ne%er #i%eth at the right ti'e, ho$ cou#d he e%er die at
the right ti'eS )ou#d that he 'ight ne%er be born&DDThus do 2 ad%ise the
superf#uous ones(
.ut e%en the superf#uous ones 'ake 'uch ado about their death, and e%en the
ho##o$est nut $anteth to be cracked(
E%ery one regardeth dying as a great 'atter? but as yet death is not a
festi%a#( Not yet ha%e peop#e #earned to inaugurate the finest festi%a#s(
The consu''ating death 2 sho$ unto you, $hich beco'eth a sti'u#us and
pro'ise to the #i%ing(
/is death, dieth the consu''ating one triu'phant#y, surrounded by hoping
and pro'ising ones(
Thus shou#d one #earn to dieL and there shou#d be no festi%a# at $hich such
a dying one doth not consecrate the oaths of the #i%ing&
Thus to die is bestL the next best, ho$e%er, is to die in batt#e, and
sacrifice a great sou#(
.ut to the fighter eUua##y hatefu# as to the %ictor, is your grinning death
$hich stea#eth nigh #ike a thief,DDand yet co'eth as 'aster(
9y death, praise 2 unto you, the %o#untary death, $hich co'eth unto 'e
because X2X $ant it(
;nd $hen sha## 2 $ant itSDD/e that hath a goa# and an heir, $anteth death
at the right ti'e for the goa# and the heir(
;nd out of re%erence for the goa# and the heir, he $i## hang up no 'ore
$ithered $reaths in the sanctuary of #ife(
,eri#y, not the ropeD'akers $i## 2 rese'b#e? they #engthen out their cord,
and thereby go e%er back$ard(
9any a one, a#so, $axeth too o#d for his truths and triu'phsL a tooth#ess
'outh hath no #onger the right to e%ery truth(
;nd $hoe%er $anteth to ha%e fa'e, 'ust take #ea%e of honour beti'es, and
practise the difficu#t art ofDDgoing at the right ti'e(
7ne 'ust discontinue being feasted upon $hen one tasteth best? that is
kno$n by those $ho $ant to be #ong #o%ed(
Sour app#es are there, no doubt, $hose #ot is to $ait unti# the #ast day of
autu'n? and at the sa'e ti'e they beco'e ripe, ye##o$, and shri%e##ed(
2n so'e ageth the heart first, and in others the spirit( ;nd so'e are
hoary in youth, but the #ate young keep #ong young(
To 'any 'en #ife is a fai#ureL a poisonD$or' gna$eth at their heart( Then
#et the' see to it that their dying is a## the 'ore a success(
9any ne%er beco'e s$eetL they rot e%en in the su''er( 2t is co$ardice that
ho#deth the' fast to their branches(
Far too 'any #i%e, and far too #ong hang they on their branches( )ou#d
that a stor' ca'e and shook a## this rottenness and $or'Deatenness fro' the
tree&
)ou#d that there ca'e preachers of SPEE*Q death& Those $ou#d be the
appropriate stor's and agitators of the trees of #ife& .ut 2 hear on#y
s#o$ death preached, and patience $ith a## that is Nearth#y(N
;h& ye preach patience $ith $hat is earth#yS This earth#y is it that hath
too 'uch patience $ith you, ye b#asphe'ers&
,eri#y, too ear#y died that /ebre$ $ho' the preachers of s#o$ death honour?
and to 'any hath it pro%ed a ca#a'ity that he died too ear#y(
;s yet had he kno$n on#y tears, and the 'e#ancho#y of the /ebre$s, together
$ith the hatred of the good and justDDthe /ebre$ Tesus? then $as he seized
$ith the #onging for death(
/ad he but re'ained in the $i#derness, and far fro' the good and just&
Then, perhaps, $ou#d he ha%e #earned to #i%e, and #o%e the earthDDand
#aughter a#so&
.e#ie%e it, 'y brethren& /e died too ear#yL he hi'se#f $ou#d ha%e
disa%o$ed his doctrine had he attained to 'y age& Nob#e enough $as he to
disa%o$&
.ut he $as sti## i''ature( 2''ature#y #o%eth the youth, and i''ature#y
a#so hateth he 'an and earth( "onfined and a$k$ard are sti## his sou# and
the $ings of his spirit(
.ut in 'an there is 'ore of the chi#d than in the youth, and #ess of
'e#ancho#y? better understandeth he about #ife and death(
Free for death, and free in deathL a ho#y Naysayer, $hen there is no #onger
ti'e for Qea? thus understandeth he about death and #ife(
That your dying 'ay not be a reproach to 'an and the earth, 'y friends?
that do 2 so#icit fro' the honey of your sou#(
2n your dying sha## your spirit and your %irtue sti## shine #ike an e%ening
afterDg#o$ around the earth? other$ise your dying hath been
unsatisfactory(
Thus $i## 2 die 'yse#f, that ye friends 'ay #o%e the earth 'ore for 'y
sakeL and earth $i## 2 again beco'e, to ha%e rest in her that bore 'e(
,eri#y, a goa# had ZarathustraL he thre$ his ba##( No$ be ye friends the
heirs of 'y goa#L to you thro$ 2 the go#den ba##(
.est of a##, do 2 see you, 'y friends, thro$ the go#den ba##& ;nd so tarry
2 sti## a #itt#e $hi#e on the earthDDpardon 'e for it&
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR22( T/E .EST7)2NG ,2-T8E(
!(
)hen Zarathustra had taken #ea%e of the to$n to $hich his heart $as
attached, the na'e of $hich is NThe Pied "o$,N there fo##o$ed hi' 'any
peop#e $ho ca##ed the'se#%es his discip#es, and kept hi' co'pany( Thus
ca'e they to a crossroad( Then Zarathustra to#d the' that he no$ $anted to
go a#oneL for he $as fond of going a#one( /is discip#es, ho$e%er,
presented hi' at his departure $ith a staff, on the go#den hand#e of $hich
a serpent t$ined round the sun( Zarathustra rejoiced on account of the
staff, and supported hi'se#f thereonL then spake he thus to his discip#es?
Te## 'e, pray? ho$ ca'e go#d to the highest %a#ueS .ecause it is
unco''on, and unprofiting, and bea'ing, and soft in #ustreL it a#$ays
besto$eth itse#f(
7n#y as i'age of the highest %irtue ca'e go#d to the highest %a#ue(
Go#d#ike, bea'eth the g#ance of the besto$er( Go#dD#ustre 'aketh peace
bet$een 'oon and sun(
8nco''on is the highest %irtue, and unprofiting, bea'ing is it, and soft of
#ustre? a besto$ing %irtue is the highest %irtue(
,eri#y, 2 di%ine you $e##, 'y discip#es? ye stri%e #ike 'e for the
besto$ing %irtue( )hat shou#d ye ha%e in co''on $ith cats and $o#%esS
2t is your thirst to beco'e sacrifices and gifts yourse#%es? and therefore
ha%e ye the thirst to accu'u#ate a## riches in your sou#(
2nsatiab#y stri%eth your sou# for treasures and je$e#s, because your %irtue
is insatiab#e in desiring to besto$(
Qe constrain a## things to f#o$ to$ards you and into you, so that they
sha## f#o$ back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your #o%e(
,eri#y, an appropriator of a## %a#ues 'ust such besto$ing #o%e beco'eL but
hea#thy and ho#y, ca## 2 this se#fishness(DD
;nother se#fishness is there, an a##DtooDpoor and hungry kind, $hich $ou#d
a#$ays stea#DDthe se#fishness of the sick, the sick#y se#fishness(
)ith the eye of the thief it #ooketh upon a## that is #ustrousL $ith the
cra%ing of hunger it 'easureth hi' $ho hath abundanceL and e%er doth it
pro$# round the tab#es of besto$ers(
Sickness speaketh in such cra%ing, and in%isib#e degenerationL of a sick#y
body, speaketh the #arcenous cra%ing of this se#fishness(
Te## 'e, 'y brother, $hat do $e think bad, and $orst of a##S 2s it not
*EGENE-;T27NSDD;nd $e a#$ays suspect degeneration $hen the besto$ing sou#
is #acking(
8p$ard goeth our course fro' genera on to superDgenera( .ut a horror to us
is the degenerating sense, $hich saith? N;## for 'yse#f(N
8p$ard soareth our sense? thus is it a si'i#e of our body, a si'i#e of an
e#e%ation( Such si'i#es of e#e%ations are the na'es of the %irtues(
Thus goeth the body through history, a beco'er and fighter( ;nd the
spiritDD$hat is it to the bodyS 2ts fightsM and %ictoriesM hera#d, its
co'panion and echo(
Si'i#es, are a## na'es of good and e%i#L they do not speak out, they on#y
hint( ; foo# $ho seeketh kno$#edge fro' the'&
Gi%e heed, 'y brethren, to e%ery hour $hen your spirit $ou#d speak in
si'i#es? there is the origin of your %irtue(
E#e%ated is then your body, and raised upL $ith its de#ight, enraptureth it
the spiritL so that it beco'eth creator, and %a#uer, and #o%er, and
e%erythingMs benefactor(
)hen your heart o%erf#o$eth broad and fu## #ike the ri%er, a b#essing and a
danger to the #o$#anders? there is the origin of your %irtue(
)hen ye are exa#ted abo%e praise and b#a'e, and your $i## $ou#d co''and a##
things, as a #o%ing oneMs $i##? there is the origin of your %irtue(
)hen ye despise p#easant things, and the effe'inate couch, and cannot couch
far enough fro' the effe'inate? there is the origin of your %irtue(
)hen ye are $i##ers of one $i##, and $hen that change of e%ery need is
needfu# to you? there is the origin of your %irtue(
,eri#y, a ne$ good and e%i# is it& ,eri#y, a ne$ deep 'ur'uring, and the
%oice of a ne$ fountain&
Po$er is it, this ne$ %irtueL a ru#ing thought is it, and around it a
subt#e sou#? a go#den sun, $ith the serpent of kno$#edge around it(
C(
/ere paused Zarathustra a$hi#e, and #ooked #o%ing#y on his discip#es( Then
he continued to speak thusDDand his %oice had changed?
-e'ain true to the earth, 'y brethren, $ith the po$er of your %irtue& :et
your besto$ing #o%e and your kno$#edge be de%oted to be the 'eaning of the
earth& Thus do 2 pray and conjure you(
:et it not f#y a$ay fro' the earth#y and beat against eterna# $a##s $ith
its $ings& ;h, there hath a#$ays been so 'uch f#o$nDa$ay %irtue&
:ead, #ike 'e, the f#o$nDa$ay %irtue back to the earthDDyea, back to body
and #ife? that it 'ay gi%e to the earth its 'eaning, a hu'an 'eaning&
; hundred ti'es hitherto hath spirit as $e## as %irtue f#o$n a$ay and
b#undered( ;#as& in our body d$e##eth sti## a## this de#usion and
b#undering? body and $i## hath it there beco'e(
; hundred ti'es hitherto hath spirit as $e## as %irtue atte'pted and erred(
Qea, an atte'pt hath 'an been( ;#as, 'uch ignorance and error hath beco'e
e'bodied in us&
Not on#y the rationa#ity of 'i##enniu'sDDa#so their 'adness, breaketh out
in us( *angerous is it to be an heir(
Sti## fight $e step by step $ith the giant "hance, and o%er a## 'ankind
hath hitherto ru#ed nonsense, the #ackDofDsense(
:et your spirit and your %irtue be de%oted to the sense of the earth, 'y
brethren? #et the %a#ue of e%erything be deter'ined ane$ by you&
Therefore sha## ye be fighters& Therefore sha## ye be creators&
2nte##igent#y doth the body purify itse#fL atte'pting $ith inte##igence it
exa#teth itse#fL to the discerners a## i'pu#ses sanctify the'se#%esL to the
exa#ted the sou# beco'eth joyfu#(
Physician, hea# thyse#f? then $i#t thou a#so hea# thy patient( :et it be
his best cure to see $ith his eyes hi' $ho 'aketh hi'se#f $ho#e(
; thousand paths are there $hich ha%e ne%er yet been troddenL a thousand
sa#ubrities and hidden is#ands of #ife( 8nexhausted and undisco%ered is
sti## 'an and 'anMs $or#d(
;$ake and hearken, ye #oneso'e ones& Fro' the future co'e $inds $ith
stea#thy pinions, and to fine ears good tidings are proc#ai'ed(
Qe #oneso'e ones of toDday, ye seceding ones, ye sha## one day be a peop#e?
out of you $ho ha%e chosen yourse#%es, sha## a chosen peop#e arise?DDand
out of it the Super'an(
,eri#y, a p#ace of hea#ing sha## the earth beco'e& ;nd a#ready is a ne$
odour diffused around it, a sa#%ationDbringing odourDDand a ne$ hope&
F(
)hen Zarathustra had spoken these $ords, he paused, #ike one $ho had not
said his #ast $ordL and #ong did he ba#ance the staff doubtfu##y in his
hand( ;t #ast he spake thusDDand his %oice had changed?
2 no$ go a#one, 'y discip#es& Qe a#so no$ go a$ay, and a#one& So $i## 2
ha%e it(
,eri#y, 2 ad%ise you? depart fro' 'e, and guard yourse#%es against
Zarathustra& ;nd better sti##? be asha'ed of hi'& Perhaps he hath
decei%ed you(
The 'an of kno$#edge 'ust be ab#e not on#y to #o%e his ene'ies, but a#so to
hate his friends(
7ne reUuiteth a teacher bad#y if one re'ain 'ere#y a scho#ar( ;nd $hy $i##
ye not p#uck at 'y $reathS
Qe %enerate 'eL but $hat if your %eneration shou#d so'e day co##apseS Take
heed #est a statue crush you&
Qe say, ye be#ie%e in ZarathustraS .ut of $hat account is Zarathustra& Qe
are 'y be#ie%ers? but of $hat account are a## be#ie%ers&
Qe had not yet sought yourse#%es? then did ye find 'e( So do a##
be#ie%ersL therefore a## be#ief is of so #itt#e account(
No$ do 2 bid you #ose 'e and find yourse#%esL and on#y $hen ye ha%e a##
denied 'e, $i## 2 return unto you(
,eri#y, $ith other eyes, 'y brethren, sha## 2 then seek 'y #ost onesL $ith
another #o%e sha## 2 then #o%e you(
;nd once again sha## ye ha%e beco'e friends unto 'e, and chi#dren of one
hope? then $i## 2 be $ith you for the third ti'e, to ce#ebrate the great
noontide $ith you(
;nd it is the great noontide, $hen 'an is in the 'idd#e of his course
bet$een ani'a# and Super'an, and ce#ebrateth his ad%ance to the e%ening as
his highest hope? for it is the ad%ance to a ne$ 'orning(
;t such ti'e $i## the do$nDgoer b#ess hi'se#f, that he shou#d be an o%erD
goerL and the sun of his kno$#edge $i## be at noontide(
N*E;* ;-E ;:: T/E G7*S? N7) *7 )E *ES2-E T/E S8PE-9;N T7 :2,E(NDD:et this
be our fina# $i## at the great noontide&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
T/8S SP;WE Z;-;T/8ST-;(
SE"7N* P;-T(
NDand on#y $hen ye ha%e a## denied 'e, $i## 2 return unto you(
,eri#y, $ith other eyes, 'y brethren, sha## 2 then seek 'y #ost onesL $ith
another #o%e sha## 2 then #o%e you(NDDZ;-;T/8ST-;, 2(, NThe .esto$ing
,irtue(N
RR222( T/E "/2:* )2T/ T/E 92--7-(
;fter this Zarathustra returned again into the 'ountains to the so#itude of
his ca%e, and $ithdre$ hi'se#f fro' 'en, $aiting #ike a so$er $ho hath
scattered his seed( /is sou#, ho$e%er, beca'e i'patient and fu## of
#onging for those $ho' he #o%ed? because he had sti## 'uch to gi%e the'(
For this is hardest of a##? to c#ose the open hand out of #o%e, and keep
'odest as a gi%er(
Thus passed $ith the #oneso'e one 'onths and yearsL his $isdo' 'ean$hi#e
increased, and caused hi' pain by its abundance(
7ne 'orning, ho$e%er, he a$oke ere the rosy da$n, and ha%ing 'editated #ong
on his couch, at #ast spake thus to his heart?
)hy did 2 start#e in 'y drea', so that 2 a$okeS *id not a chi#d co'e to
'e, carrying a 'irrorS
N7 ZarathustraNDDsaid the chi#d unto 'eDDN#ook at thyse#f in the 'irror&N
.ut $hen 2 #ooked into the 'irror, 2 shrieked, and 'y heart throbbed? for
not 'yse#f did 2 see therein, but a de%i#Ms gri'ace and derision(
,eri#y, a## too $e## do 2 understand the drea'Ms portent and 'onition? 'y
*7"T-2NE is in dangerL tares $ant to be ca##ed $heat&
9ine ene'ies ha%e gro$n po$erfu# and ha%e disfigured the #ikeness of 'y
doctrine, so that 'y dearest ones ha%e to b#ush for the gifts that 2 ga%e
the'(
:ost are 'y friendsL the hour hath co'e for 'e to seek 'y #ost ones&DD
)ith these $ords Zarathustra started up, not ho$e%er #ike a person in
anguish seeking re#ief, but rather #ike a seer and a singer $ho' the spirit
inspireth( )ith a'aze'ent did his eag#e and serpent gaze upon hi'? for a
co'ing b#iss o%erspread his countenance #ike the rosy da$n(
)hat hath happened unto 'e, 'ine ani'a#sSDDsaid Zarathustra( ;' 2 not
transfor'edS /ath not b#iss co'e unto 'e #ike a $hir#$indS
Foo#ish is 'y happiness, and foo#ish things $i## it speak? it is sti## too
youngDDso ha%e patience $ith it&
)ounded a' 2 by 'y happiness? a## sufferers sha## be physicians unto 'e&
To 'y friends can 2 again go do$n, and a#so to 'ine ene'ies& Zarathustra
can again speak and besto$, and sho$ his best #o%e to his #o%ed ones&
9y i'patient #o%e o%erf#o$eth in strea's,DDdo$n to$ards sunrise and sunset(
7ut of si#ent 'ountains and stor's of aff#iction, rusheth 'y sou# into the
%a##eys(
Too #ong ha%e 2 #onged and #ooked into the distance( Too #ong hath
so#itude possessed 'e? thus ha%e 2 un#earned to keep si#ence(
8tterance ha%e 2 beco'e a#together, and the bra$#ing of a brook fro' high
rocks? do$n$ard into the %a##eys $i## 2 hur# 'y speech(
;nd #et the strea' of 'y #o%e s$eep into unfreUuented channe#s& /o$ shou#d
a strea' not fina##y find its $ay to the sea&
Forsooth, there is a #ake in 'e, seUuestered and se#fDsufficingL but the
strea' of 'y #o%e beareth this a#ong $ith it, do$nDDto the sea&
Ne$ paths do 2 tread, a ne$ speech co'eth unto 'eL tired ha%e 2 beco'eDD
#ike a## creatorsDDof the o#d tongues( No #onger $i## 'y spirit $a#k on
$ornDout so#es(
Too s#o$#y runneth a## speaking for 'e?DDinto thy chariot, 7 stor', do 2
#eap& ;nd e%en thee $i## 2 $hip $ith 'y spite&
:ike a cry and an huzza $i## 2 tra%erse $ide seas, ti## 2 find the /appy
2s#es $here 'y friends sojournLD
;nd 'ine ene'ies a'ongst the'& /o$ 2 no$ #o%e e%ery one unto $ho' 2 'ay
but speak& E%en 'ine ene'ies pertain to 'y b#iss(
;nd $hen 2 $ant to 'ount 'y $i#dest horse, then doth 'y spear a#$ays he#p
'e up best? it is 'y footMs e%er ready ser%ant?DD
The spear $hich 2 hur# at 'ine ene'ies& /o$ gratefu# a' 2 to 'ine ene'ies
that 2 'ay at #ast hur# it&
Too great hath been the tension of 'y c#oud? Mt$ixt #aughters of
#ightnings $i## 2 cast hai#Dsho$ers into the depths(
,io#ent#y $i## 'y breast then hea%eL %io#ent#y $i## it b#o$ its stor' o%er
the 'ountains? thus co'eth its assuage'ent(
,eri#y, #ike a stor' co'eth 'y happiness, and 'y freedo'& .ut 'ine ene'ies
sha## think that T/E E,2: 7NE roareth o%er their heads(
Qea, ye a#so, 'y friends, $i## be a#ar'ed by 'y $i#d $isdo'L and perhaps ye
$i## f#ee therefro', a#ong $ith 'ine ene'ies(
;h, that 2 kne$ ho$ to #ure you back $ith shepherdsM f#utes& ;h, that 'y
#ioness $isdo' $ou#d #earn to roar soft#y& ;nd 'uch ha%e $e a#ready
#earned $ith one another&
9y $i#d $isdo' beca'e pregnant on the #oneso'e 'ountainsL on the rough
stones did she bear the youngest of her young(
No$ runneth she foo#ish#y in the arid $i#derness, and seeketh and seeketh
the soft s$ardDD'ine o#d, $i#d $isdo'&
7n the soft s$ard of your hearts, 'y friends&DDon your #o%e, $ou#d she fain
couch her dearest one&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR2,( 2N T/E /;PPQ 2S:ES(
The figs fa## fro' the trees, they are good and s$eetL and in fa##ing the
red skins of the' break( ; north $ind a' 2 to ripe figs(
Thus, #ike figs, do these doctrines fa## for you, 'y friends? i'bibe no$
their juice and their s$eet substance& 2t is autu'n a## around, and c#ear
sky, and afternoon(
:o, $hat fu##ness is around us& ;nd out of the 'idst of superabundance, it
is de#ightfu# to #ook out upon distant seas(
7nce did peop#e say God, $hen they #ooked out upon distant seasL no$,
ho$e%er, ha%e 2 taught you to say, Super'an(
God is a conjecture? but 2 do not $ish your conjecturing to reach beyond
your creating $i##(
"ou#d ye "-E;TE a GodSDDThen, 2 pray you, be si#ent about a## Gods& .ut ye
cou#d $e## create the Super'an(
Not perhaps ye yourse#%es, 'y brethren& .ut into fathers and forefathers
of the Super'an cou#d ye transfor' yourse#%es? and #et that be your best
creating&DD
God is a conjecture? but 2 shou#d #ike your conjecturing restricted to the
concei%ab#e(
"ou#d ye "7N"E2,E a GodSDD.ut #et this 'ean )i## to Truth unto you, that
e%erything be transfor'ed into the hu'an#y concei%ab#e, the hu'an#y
%isib#e, the hu'an#y sensib#e& Qour o$n discern'ent sha## ye fo##o$ out to
the end&
;nd $hat ye ha%e ca##ed the $or#d sha## but be created by you? your
reason, your #ikeness, your $i##, your #o%e, sha## it itse#f beco'e& ;nd
%eri#y, for your b#iss, ye discerning ones&
;nd ho$ $ou#d ye endure #ife $ithout that hope, ye discerning onesS
Neither in the inconcei%ab#e cou#d ye ha%e been born, nor in the
irrationa#(
.ut that 2 'ay re%ea# 'y heart entire#y unto you, 'y friends? 2F there
$ere gods, ho$ cou#d 2 endure it to be no God& T/E-EF7-E there are no
Gods(
Qea, 2 ha%e dra$n the conc#usionL no$, ho$e%er, doth it dra$ 'e(DD
God is a conjecture? but $ho cou#d drink a## the bitterness of this
conjecture $ithout dyingS Sha## his faith be taken fro' the creating one,
and fro' the eag#e his f#ights into eag#eDheightsS
God is a thoughtDDit 'aketh a## the straight crooked, and a## that standeth
ree#( )hatS Ti'e $ou#d be gone, and a## the perishab#e $ou#d be but a
#ieS
To think this is giddiness and %ertigo to hu'an #i'bs, and e%en %o'iting to
the sto'ach? %eri#y, the ree#ing sickness do 2 ca## it, to conjecture such
a thing(
E%i# do 2 ca## it and 'isanthropic? a## that teaching about the one, and
the p#enu', and the un'o%ed, and the sufficient, and the i'perishab#e&
;## the i'perishab#eDDthatMs but a si'i#e, and the poets #ie too 'uch(DD
.ut of ti'e and of beco'ing sha## the best si'i#es speak? a praise sha##
they be, and a justification of a## perishab#eness&
"reatingDDthat is the great sa#%ation fro' suffering, and #ifeMs
a##e%iation( .ut for the creator to appear, suffering itse#f is needed,
and 'uch transfor'ation(
Qea, 'uch bitter dying 'ust there be in your #ife, ye creators& Thus are
ye ad%ocates and justifiers of a## perishab#eness(
For the creator hi'se#f to be the ne$Dborn chi#d, he 'ust a#so be $i##ing
to be the chi#dDbearer, and endure the pangs of the chi#dDbearer(
,eri#y, through a hundred sou#s $ent 2 'y $ay, and through a hundred
crad#es and birthDthroes( 9any a fare$e## ha%e 2 takenL 2 kno$ the heartD
breaking #ast hours(
.ut so $i##eth it 'y creating )i##, 'y fate( 7r, to te## you it 'ore
candid#y? just such a fateDD$i##eth 'y )i##(
;## FEE:2NG suffereth in 'e, and is in prison? but 'y )2::2NG e%er co'eth
to 'e as 'ine e'ancipator and co'forter(
)i##ing e'ancipateth? that is the true doctrine of $i## and e'ancipationDD
so teacheth you Zarathustra(
No #onger $i##ing, and no #onger %a#uing, and no #onger creating& ;h, that
that great debi#ity 'ay e%er be far fro' 'e&
;nd a#so in discerning do 2 fee# on#y 'y $i##Ms procreating and e%o#%ing
de#ightL and if there be innocence in 'y kno$#edge, it is because there is
$i## to procreation in it(
;$ay fro' God and Gods did this $i## a##ure 'eL $hat $ou#d there be to
create if there $ereDDGods&
.ut to 'an doth it e%er i'pe# 'e ane$, 'y fer%ent creati%e $i##L thus
i'pe##eth it the ha''er to the stone(
;h, ye 'en, $ithin the stone s#u'bereth an i'age for 'e, the i'age of 'y
%isions& ;h, that it shou#d s#u'ber in the hardest, ug#iest stone&
No$ rageth 'y ha''er ruth#ess#y against its prison( Fro' the stone f#y the
frag'ents? $hatMs that to 'eS
2 $i## co'p#ete it? for a shado$ ca'e unto 'eDDthe sti##est and #ightest
of a## things once ca'e unto 'e&
The beauty of the Super'an ca'e unto 'e as a shado$( ;h, 'y brethren& 7f
$hat account no$ areDDthe Gods to 'e&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR,( T/E P2T2F8:(
9y friends, there hath arisen a satire on your friend? N.eho#d
Zarathustra& )a#keth he not a'ongst us as if a'ongst ani'a#sSN
.ut it is better said in this $ise? NThe discerning one $a#keth a'ongst
'en ;S a'ongst ani'a#s(N
9an hi'se#f is to the discerning one? the ani'a# $ith red cheeks(
/o$ hath that happened unto hi'S 2s it not because he hath had to be
asha'ed too oftS
7 'y friends& Thus speaketh the discerning one? sha'e, sha'e, sha'eDDthat
is the history of 'an&
;nd on that account doth the nob#e one enjoin upon hi'se#f not to abash?
bashfu#ness doth he enjoin on hi'se#f in presence of a## sufferers(
,eri#y, 2 #ike the' not, the 'ercifu# ones, $hose b#iss is in their pity?
too destitute are they of bashfu#ness(
2f 2 'ust be pitifu#, 2 dis#ike to be ca##ed soL and if 2 be so, it is
preferab#y at a distance(
Preferab#y a#so do 2 shroud 'y head, and f#ee, before being recognised?
and thus do 2 bid you do, 'y friends&
9ay 'y destiny e%er #ead unaff#icted ones #ike you across 'y path, and
those $ith $ho' 2 9;Q ha%e hope and repast and honey in co''on&
,eri#y, 2 ha%e done this and that for the aff#icted? but so'ething better
did 2 a#$ays see' to do $hen 2 had #earned to enjoy 'yse#f better(
Since hu'anity ca'e into being, 'an hath enjoyed hi'se#f too #itt#e? that
a#one, 'y brethren, is our origina# sin&
;nd $hen $e #earn better to enjoy ourse#%es, then do $e un#earn best to
gi%e pain unto others, and to contri%e pain(
Therefore do 2 $ash the hand that hath he#ped the suffererL therefore do 2
$ipe a#so 'y sou#(
For in seeing the sufferer sufferingDDthereof $as 2 asha'ed on account of
his sha'eL and in he#ping hi', sore#y did 2 $ound his pride(
Great ob#igations do not 'ake gratefu#, but re%engefu#L and $hen a s'a##
kindness is not forgotten, it beco'eth a gna$ing $or'(
N.e shy in accepting& *istinguish by accepting&NDDthus do 2 ad%ise those
$ho ha%e naught to besto$(
2, ho$e%er, a' a besto$er? $i##ing#y do 2 besto$ as friend to friends(
Strangers, ho$e%er, and the poor, 'ay p#uck for the'se#%es the fruit fro'
'y tree? thus doth it cause #ess sha'e(
.eggars, ho$e%er, one shou#d entire#y do a$ay $ith& ,eri#y, it annoyeth
one to gi%e unto the', and it annoyeth one not to gi%e unto the'(
;nd #ike$ise sinners and bad consciences& .e#ie%e 'e, 'y friends? the
sting of conscience teacheth one to sting(
The $orst things, ho$e%er, are the petty thoughts( ,eri#y, better to ha%e
done e%i##y than to ha%e thought petti#y&
To be sure, ye say? NThe de#ight in petty e%i#s spareth one 'any a great
e%i# deed(N .ut here one shou#d not $ish to be sparing(
:ike a boi# is the e%i# deed? it itcheth and irritateth and breaketh
forthDDit speaketh honourab#y(
N.eho#d, 2 a' disease,N saith the e%i# deed? that is its honourab#eness(
.ut #ike infection is the petty thought? it creepeth and hideth, and
$anteth to be no$hereDDunti# the $ho#e body is decayed and $ithered by the
petty infection(
To hi' ho$e%er, $ho is possessed of a de%i#, 2 $ou#d $hisper this $ord in
the ear? N.etter for thee to rear up thy de%i#& E%en for thee there is
sti## a path to greatness&NDD
;h, 'y brethren& 7ne kno$eth a #itt#e too 'uch about e%ery one& ;nd 'any
a one beco'eth transparent to us, but sti## $e can by no 'eans penetrate
hi'(
2t is difficu#t to #i%e a'ong 'en because si#ence is so difficu#t(
;nd not to hi' $ho is offensi%e to us are $e 'ost unfair, but to hi' $ho
doth not concern us at a##(
2f, ho$e%er, thou hast a suffering friend, then be a restingDp#ace for his
sufferingL #ike a hard bed, ho$e%er, a ca'pDbed? thus $i#t thou ser%e hi'
best(
;nd if a friend doeth thee $rong, then say? N2 forgi%e thee $hat thou hast
done unto 'eL that thou hast done it unto T/QSE:F, ho$e%erDDho$ cou#d 2
forgi%e that&N
Thus speaketh a## great #o%e? it surpasseth e%en forgi%eness and pity(
7ne shou#d ho#d fast oneMs heartL for $hen one #etteth it go, ho$ Uuick#y
doth oneMs head run a$ay&
;h, $here in the $or#d ha%e there been greater fo##ies than $ith the
pitifu#S ;nd $hat in the $or#d hath caused 'ore suffering than the fo##ies
of the pitifu#S
)oe unto a## #o%ing ones $ho ha%e not an e#e%ation $hich is abo%e their
pity&
Thus spake the de%i# unto 'e, once on a ti'e? NE%en God hath his he##? it
is his #o%e for 'an(N
;nd #ate#y, did 2 hear hi' say these $ords? NGod is dead? of his pity for
'an hath God died(NDD
So be ye $arned against pity? F-79 T/EN"E there yet co'eth unto 'en a
hea%y c#oud& ,eri#y, 2 understand $eatherDsigns&
.ut attend a#so to this $ord? ;## great #o%e is abo%e a## its pity? for
it seekethDDto create $hat is #o%ed&
N9yse#f do 2 offer unto 'y #o%e, ;N* 9Q NE2G/.78- ;S 9QSE:FNDDsuch is the
#anguage of a## creators(
;## creators, ho$e%er, are hard(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR,2( T/E P-2ESTS(
;nd one day Zarathustra 'ade a sign to his discip#es, and spake these $ords
unto the'?
N/ere are priests? but a#though they are 'ine ene'ies, pass the' Uuiet#y
and $ith s#eeping s$ords&
E%en a'ong the' there are heroesL 'any of the' ha%e suffered too 'uchDD?
so they $ant to 'ake others suffer(
.ad ene'ies are they? nothing is 'ore re%engefu# than their 'eekness( ;nd
readi#y doth he soi# hi'se#f $ho toucheth the'(
.ut 'y b#ood is re#ated to theirsL and 2 $ant $itha# to see 'y b#ood
honoured in theirs(NDD
;nd $hen they had passed, a pain attacked ZarathustraL but not #ong had he
strugg#ed $ith the pain, $hen he began to speak thus?
2t 'o%eth 'y heart for those priests( They a#so go against 'y tasteL but
that is the s'a##est 'atter unto 'e, since 2 a' a'ong 'en(
.ut 2 suffer and ha%e suffered $ith the'? prisoners are they unto 'e, and
stig'atised ones( /e $ho' they ca## Sa%iour put the' in fetters?DD
2n fetters of fa#se %a#ues and fatuous $ords& 7h, that so'e one $ou#d sa%e
the' fro' their Sa%iour&
7n an is#e they once thought they had #anded, $hen the sea tossed the'
aboutL but beho#d, it $as a s#u'bering 'onster&
Fa#se %a#ues and fatuous $ords? these are the $orst 'onsters for 'orta#sDD
#ong s#u'bereth and $aiteth the fate that is in the'(
.ut at #ast it co'eth and a$aketh and de%oureth and engu#feth $hate%er hath
bui#t tabernac#es upon it(
7h, just #ook at those tabernac#es $hich those priests ha%e bui#t
the'se#%es& "hurches, they ca## their s$eetDs'e##ing ca%es&
7h, that fa#sified #ight, that 'ustified air& )here the sou#DD'ay not f#y
a#oft to its height&
.ut so enjoineth their be#ief? N7n your knees, up the stair, ye sinners&N
,eri#y, rather $ou#d 2 see a sha'e#ess one than the distorted eyes of their
sha'e and de%otion&
)ho created for the'se#%es such ca%es and penitenceDstairsS )as it not
those $ho sought to concea# the'se#%es, and $ere asha'ed under the c#ear
skyS
;nd on#y $hen the c#ear sky #ooketh again through ruined roofs, and do$n
upon grass and red poppies on ruined $a##sDD$i## 2 again turn 'y heart to
the seats of this God(
They ca##ed God that $hich opposed and aff#icted the'? and %eri#y, there
$as 'uch heroDspirit in their $orship&
;nd they kne$ not ho$ to #o%e their God other$ise than by nai#ing 'en to
the cross&
;s corpses they thought to #i%eL in b#ack draped they their corpsesL e%en
in their ta#k do 2 sti## fee# the e%i# f#a%our of charne#Dhouses(
;nd he $ho #i%eth nigh unto the' #i%eth nigh unto b#ack poo#s, $herein the
toad singeth his song $ith s$eet gra%ity(
.etter songs $ou#d they ha%e to sing, for 'e to be#ie%e in their Sa%iour?
'ore #ike sa%ed ones $ou#d his discip#es ha%e to appear unto 'e&
Naked, $ou#d 2 #ike to see the'? for beauty a#one shou#d preach penitence(
.ut $ho' $ou#d that disguised aff#iction con%ince&
,eri#y, their Sa%iours the'se#%es ca'e not fro' freedo' and freedo'Ms
se%enth hea%en& ,eri#y, they the'se#%es ne%er trod the carpets of
kno$#edge&
7f defects did the spirit of those Sa%iours consistL but into e%ery defect
had they put their i##usion, their stopDgap, $hich they ca##ed God(
2n their pity $as their spirit dro$nedL and $hen they s$e##ed and
oMers$e##ed $ith pity, there a#$ays f#oated to the surface a great fo##y(
Eager#y and $ith shouts dro%e they their f#ock o%er their footDbridgeL as
if there $ere but one footDbridge to the future& ,eri#y, those shepherds
a#so $ere sti## of the f#ock&
S'a## spirits and spacious sou#s had those shepherds? but, 'y brethren,
$hat s'a## do'ains ha%e e%en the 'ost spacious sou#s hitherto been&
"haracters of b#ood did they $rite on the $ay they $ent, and their fo##y
taught that truth is pro%ed by b#ood(
.ut b#ood is the %ery $orst $itness to truthL b#ood tainteth the purest
teaching, and turneth it into de#usion and hatred of heart(
;nd $hen a person goeth through fire for his teachingDD$hat doth that
pro%e& 2t is 'ore, %eri#y, $hen out of oneMs o$n burning co'eth oneMs o$n
teaching&
Su#try heart and co#d headL $here these 'eet, there ariseth the b#usterer,
the NSa%iour(N
Greater ones, %eri#y, ha%e there been, and higherDborn ones, than those
$ho' the peop#e ca## Sa%iours, those rapturous b#usterers&
;nd by sti## greater ones than any of the Sa%iours 'ust ye be sa%ed, 'y
brethren, if ye $ou#d find the $ay to freedo'&
Ne%er yet hath there been a Super'an( Naked ha%e 2 seen both of the', the
greatest 'an and the s'a##est 'an?DD
;##DtooDsi'i#ar are they sti## to each other( ,eri#y, e%en the greatest
found 2DDa##DtooDhu'an&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR,22( T/E ,2-T878S(
)ith thunder and hea%en#y fire$orks 'ust one speak to indo#ent and
so'no#ent senses(
.ut beautyMs %oice speaketh gent#y? it appea#eth on#y to the 'ost a$akened
sou#s(
Gent#y %ibrated and #aughed unto 'e toDday 'y buck#erL it $as beautyMs ho#y
#aughing and thri##ing(
;t you, ye %irtuous ones, #aughed 'y beauty toDday( ;nd thus ca'e its
%oice unto 'e? NThey $antDDto be paid besides&N
Qe $ant to be paid besides, ye %irtuous ones& Qe $ant re$ard for %irtue,
and hea%en for earth, and eternity for your toDdayS
;nd no$ ye upbraid 'e for teaching that there is no re$ardDgi%er, nor
pay'asterS ;nd %eri#y, 2 do not e%en teach that %irtue is its o$n re$ard(
;h& this is 'y sorro$? into the basis of things ha%e re$ard and punish'ent
been insinuatedDDand no$ e%en into the basis of your sou#s, ye %irtuous
ones&
.ut #ike the snout of the boar sha## 'y $ord grub up the basis of your
sou#sL a p#oughshare $i## 2 be ca##ed by you(
;## the secrets of your heart sha## be brought to #ightL and $hen ye #ie in
the sun, grubbed up and broken, then $i## a#so your fa#sehood be separated
fro' your truth(
For this is your truth? ye are T77 P8-E for the fi#th of the $ords?
%engeance, punish'ent, reco'pense, retribution(
Qe #o%e your %irtue as a 'other #o%eth her chi#dL but $hen did one hear of
a 'other $anting to be paid for her #o%eS
2t is your dearest Se#f, your %irtue( The ringMs thirst is in you? to
reach itse#f again strugg#eth e%ery ring, and turneth itse#f(
;nd #ike the star that goeth out, so is e%ery $ork of your %irtue? e%er is
its #ight on its $ay and tra%e##ingDDand $hen $i## it cease to be on its
$ayS
Thus is the #ight of your %irtue sti## on its $ay, e%en $hen its $ork is
done( .e it forgotten and dead, sti## its ray of #ight #i%eth and
tra%e##eth(
That your %irtue is your Se#f, and not an out$ard thing, a skin, or a
c#oak? that is the truth fro' the basis of your sou#s, ye %irtuous ones&DD
.ut sure enough there are those to $ho' %irtue 'eaneth $rithing under the
#ash? and ye ha%e hearkened too 'uch unto their crying&
;nd others are there $ho ca## %irtue the s#othfu#ness of their %icesL and
$hen once their hatred and jea#ousy re#ax the #i'bs, their NjusticeN
beco'eth #i%e#y and rubbeth its s#eepy eyes(
;nd others are there $ho are dra$n do$n$ards? their de%i#s dra$ the'( .ut
the 'ore they sink, the 'ore ardent#y g#o$eth their eye, and the #onging
for their God(
;h& their crying a#so hath reached your ears, ye %irtuous ones? N)hat 2 a'
N7T, that, that is God to 'e, and %irtue&N
;nd others are there $ho go a#ong hea%i#y and creaking#y, #ike carts taking
stones do$nhi##? they ta#k 'uch of dignity and %irtueDDtheir drag they
ca## %irtue&
;nd others are there $ho are #ike eightDday c#ocks $hen $ound upL they
tick, and $ant peop#e to ca## tickingDD%irtue(
,eri#y, in those ha%e 2 'ine a'use'ent? $here%er 2 find such c#ocks 2
sha## $ind the' up $ith 'y 'ockery, and they sha## e%en $hirr thereby&
;nd others are proud of their 'odicu' of righteousness, and for the sake of
it do %io#ence to a## things? so that the $or#d is dro$ned in their
unrighteousness(
;h& ho$ inept#y co'eth the $ord N%irtueN out of their 'outh& ;nd $hen they
say? N2 a' just,N it a#$ays soundeth #ike? N2 a' justDDre%enged&N
)ith their %irtues they $ant to scratch out the eyes of their ene'iesL and
they e#e%ate the'se#%es on#y that they 'ay #o$er others(
;nd again there are those $ho sit in their s$a'p, and speak thus fro' a'ong
the bu#rushes? N,irtueDDthat is to sit Uuiet#y in the s$a'p(
)e bite no one, and go out of the $ay of hi' $ho $ou#d biteL and in a##
'atters $e ha%e the opinion that is gi%en us(N
;nd again there are those $ho #o%e attitudes, and think that %irtue is a
sort of attitude(
Their knees continua##y adore, and their hands are eu#ogies of %irtue, but
their heart kno$eth naught thereof(
;nd again there are those $ho regard it as %irtue to say? N,irtue is
necessaryNL but after a## they be#ie%e on#y that po#ice'en are necessary(
;nd 'any a one $ho cannot see 'enMs #oftiness, ca##eth it %irtue to see
their baseness far too $e##? thus ca##eth he his e%i# eye %irtue(DD
;nd so'e $ant to be edified and raised up, and ca## it %irtue? and others
$ant to be cast do$n,DDand #ike$ise ca## it %irtue(
;nd thus do a#'ost a## think that they participate in %irtueL and at #east
e%ery one c#ai'eth to be an authority on NgoodN and Ne%i#(N
.ut Zarathustra ca'e not to say unto a## those #iars and foo#s? N)hat do
QE kno$ of %irtue& )hat "78:* ye kno$ of %irtue&NDD
.ut that ye, 'y friends, 'ight beco'e $eary of the o#d $ords $hich ye ha%e
#earned fro' the foo#s and #iars?
That ye 'ight beco'e $eary of the $ords Nre$ard,N Nretribution,N
Npunish'ent,N Nrighteous %engeance(NDD
That ye 'ight beco'e $eary of saying? NThat an action is good is because
it is unse#fish(N
;h& 'y friends& That Q78- %ery Se#f be in your action, as the 'other is in
the chi#d? #et that be Q78- for'u#a of %irtue&
,eri#y, 2 ha%e taken fro' you a hundred for'u#ae and your %irtueMs
fa%ourite p#aythingsL and no$ ye upbraid 'e, as chi#dren upbraid(
They p#ayed by the seaDDthen ca'e there a $a%e and s$ept their p#aythings
into the deep? and no$ do they cry(
.ut the sa'e $a%e sha## bring the' ne$ p#aythings, and spread before the'
ne$ speck#ed she##s&
Thus $i## they be co'fortedL and #ike the' sha## ye a#so, 'y friends, ha%e
your co'fortingDDand ne$ speck#ed she##s&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR,222( T/E -;..:E(
:ife is a $e## of de#ightL but $here the rabb#e a#so drink, there a##
fountains are poisoned(
To e%erything c#ean#y a' 2 $e## disposedL but 2 hate to see the grinning
'ouths and the thirst of the unc#ean(
They cast their eye do$n into the fountain? and no$ g#anceth up to 'e
their odious s'i#e out of the fountain(
The ho#y $ater ha%e they poisoned $ith their #ustfu#nessL and $hen they
ca##ed their fi#thy drea's de#ight, then poisoned they a#so the $ords(
2ndignant beco'eth the f#a'e $hen they put their da'p hearts to the fireL
the spirit itse#f bubb#eth and s'oketh $hen the rabb#e approach the fire(
9a$kish and o%erD'e##o$ beco'eth the fruit in their hands? unsteady, and
$ithered at the top, doth their #ook 'ake the fruitDtree(
;nd 'any a one $ho hath turned a$ay fro' #ife, hath on#y turned a$ay fro'
the rabb#e? he hated to share $ith the' fountain, f#a'e, and fruit(
;nd 'any a one $ho hath gone into the $i#derness and suffered thirst $ith
beasts of prey, dis#iked on#y to sit at the cistern $ith fi#thy ca'e#D
dri%ers(
;nd 'any a one $ho hath co'e a#ong as a destroyer, and as a hai#stor' to
a## cornfie#ds, $anted 'ere#y to put his foot into the ja$s of the rabb#e,
and thus stop their throat(
;nd it is not the 'outhfu# $hich hath 'ost choked 'e, to kno$ that #ife
itse#f reUuireth en'ity and death and tortureDcrosses?DD
.ut 2 asked once, and suffocated a#'ost $ith 'y Uuestion? )hatS is the
rabb#e a#so NE"ESS;-Q for #ifeS
;re poisoned fountains necessary, and stinking fires, and fi#thy drea's,
and 'aggots in the bread of #ifeS
Not 'y hatred, but 'y #oathing, gna$ed hungri#y at 'y #ife& ;h, oftti'es
beca'e 2 $eary of spirit, $hen 2 found e%en the rabb#e spiritua#&
;nd on the ru#ers turned 2 'y back, $hen 2 sa$ $hat they no$ ca## ru#ing?
to traffic and bargain for po$erDD$ith the rabb#e&
;'ongst peop#es of a strange #anguage did 2 d$e##, $ith stopped ears? so
that the #anguage of their trafficking 'ight re'ain strange unto 'e, and
their bargaining for po$er(
;nd ho#ding 'y nose, 2 $ent 'orose#y through a## yesterdays and toDdays?
%eri#y, bad#y s'e## a## yesterdays and toDdays of the scribb#ing rabb#e&
:ike a cripp#e beco'e deaf, and b#ind, and du'bDDthus ha%e 2 #i%ed #ongL
that 2 'ight not #i%e $ith the po$erDrabb#e, the scribeDrabb#e, and the
p#easureDrabb#e(
Toi#so'e#y did 'y spirit 'ount stairs, and cautious#yL a#'s of de#ight $ere
its refresh'entL on the staff did #ife creep a#ong $ith the b#ind one(
)hat hath happened unto 'eS /o$ ha%e 2 freed 'yse#f fro' #oathingS )ho
hath reju%enated 'ine eyeS /o$ ha%e 2 f#o$n to the height $here no rabb#e
any #onger sit at the $e##sS
*id 'y #oathing itse#f create for 'e $ings and fountainDdi%ining po$ersS
,eri#y, to the #oftiest height had 2 to f#y, to find again the $e## of
de#ight&
7h, 2 ha%e found it, 'y brethren& /ere on the #oftiest height bubb#eth up
for 'e the $e## of de#ight& ;nd there is a #ife at $hose $aters none of
the rabb#e drink $ith 'e&
;#'ost too %io#ent#y dost thou f#o$ for 'e, thou fountain of de#ight& ;nd
often e'ptiest thou the gob#et again, in $anting to fi## it&
;nd yet 'ust 2 #earn to approach thee 'ore 'odest#y? far too %io#ent#y
doth 'y heart sti## f#o$ to$ards thee?DD
9y heart on $hich 'y su''er burneth, 'y short, hot, 'e#ancho#y, o%erDhappy
su''er? ho$ 'y su''er heart #ongeth for thy coo#ness&
Past, the #ingering distress of 'y spring& Past, the $ickedness of 'y
sno$f#akes in Tune& Su''er ha%e 2 beco'e entire#y, and su''erDnoontide&
; su''er on the #oftiest height, $ith co#d fountains and b#issfu#
sti##ness? oh, co'e, 'y friends, that the sti##ness 'ay beco'e 'ore
b#issfu#&
For this is 78- height and our ho'e? too high and steep do $e here d$e##
for a## unc#ean#y ones and their thirst(
"ast but your pure eyes into the $e## of 'y de#ight, 'y friends& /o$ cou#d
it beco'e turbid thereby& 2t sha## #augh back to you $ith 2TS purity(
7n the tree of the future bui#d $e our nestL eag#es sha## bring us #one
ones food in their beaks&
,eri#y, no food of $hich the i'pure cou#d be fe##o$Dpartakers& Fire, $ou#d
they think they de%oured, and burn their 'ouths&
,eri#y, no abodes do $e here keep ready for the i'pure& ;n iceDca%e to
their bodies $ou#d our happiness be, and to their spirits&
;nd as strong $inds $i## $e #i%e abo%e the', neighbours to the eag#es,
neighbours to the sno$, neighbours to the sun? thus #i%e the strong $inds(
;nd #ike a $ind $i## 2 one day b#o$ a'ongst the', and $ith 'y spirit, take
the breath fro' their spirit? thus $i##eth 'y future(
,eri#y, a strong $ind is Zarathustra to a## #o$ p#acesL and this counse#
counse##eth he to his ene'ies, and to $hate%er spitteth and spe$eth? NTake
care not to spit ;G;2NST the $ind&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RR2R( T/E T;-;NT8:;S(
:o, this is the tarantu#aMs den& )ou#dMst thou see the tarantu#a itse#fS
/ere hangeth its $eb? touch this, so that it 'ay tre'b#e(
There co'eth the tarantu#a $i##ing#y? )e#co'e, tarantu#a& .#ack on thy
back is thy triang#e and sy'bo#L and 2 kno$ a#so $hat is in thy sou#(
-e%enge is in thy sou#? $here%er thou bitest, there ariseth b#ack scabL
$ith re%enge, thy poison 'aketh the sou# giddy&
Thus do 2 speak unto you in parab#e, ye $ho 'ake the sou# giddy, ye
preachers of EV8;:2TQ& Tarantu#as are ye unto 'e, and secret#y re%engefu#
ones&
.ut 2 $i## soon bring your hidingDp#aces to the #ight? therefore do 2
#augh in your face 'y #aughter of the height(
Therefore do 2 tear at your $eb, that your rage 'ay #ure you out of your
den of #ies, and that your re%enge 'ay #eap forth fro' behind your $ord
Njustice(N
.ecause, F7- 9;N T7 .E -E*EE9E* F-79 -E,ENGEDDthat is for 'e the bridge to
the highest hope, and a rainbo$ after #ong stor's(
7ther$ise, ho$e%er, $ou#d the tarantu#as ha%e it( N:et it be %ery justice
for the $or#d to beco'e fu## of the stor's of our %engeanceNDDthus do they
ta#k to one another(
N,engeance $i## $e use, and insu#t, against a## $ho are not #ike usNDDthus
do the tarantu#aDhearts p#edge the'se#%es(
N;nd M)i## to EUua#ityMDDthat itse#f sha## henceforth be the na'e of
%irtueL and against a## that hath po$er $i## $e raise an outcry&N
Qe preachers of eUua#ity, the tyrantDfrenzy of i'potence crieth thus in you
for NeUua#ityN? your 'ost secret tyrantD#ongings disguise the'se#%es thus
in %irtueD$ords&
Fretted conceit and suppressed en%yDDperhaps your fathersM conceit and
en%y? in you break they forth as f#a'e and frenzy of %engeance(
)hat the father hath hid co'eth out in the sonL and oft ha%e 2 found in the
son the fatherMs re%ea#ed secret(
2nspired ones they rese'b#e? but it is not the heart that inspireth the'DD
but %engeance( ;nd $hen they beco'e subt#e and co#d, it is not spirit, but
en%y, that 'aketh the' so(
Their jea#ousy #eadeth the' a#so into thinkersM pathsL and this is the sign
of their jea#ousyDDthey a#$ays go too far? so that their fatigue hath at
#ast to go to s#eep on the sno$(
2n a## their #a'entations soundeth %engeance, in a## their eu#ogies is
'a#eficenceL and being judge see'eth to the' b#iss(
.ut thus do 2 counse# you, 'y friends? distrust a## in $ho' the i'pu#se to
punish is po$erfu#&
They are peop#e of bad race and #ineageL out of their countenances peer the
hang'an and the s#euthDhound(
*istrust a## those $ho ta#k 'uch of their justice& ,eri#y, in their sou#s
not on#y honey is #acking(
;nd $hen they ca## the'se#%es Nthe good and just,N forget not, that for
the' to be Pharisees, nothing is #acking butDDpo$er&
9y friends, 2 $i## not be 'ixed up and confounded $ith others(
There are those $ho preach 'y doctrine of #ife, and are at the sa'e ti'e
preachers of eUua#ity, and tarantu#as(
That they speak in fa%our of #ife, though they sit in their den, these
poisonDspiders, and $ithdra$n fro' #ifeDDis because they $ou#d thereby do
injury(
To those $ou#d they thereby do injury $ho ha%e po$er at present? for $ith
those the preaching of death is sti## 'ost at ho'e(
)ere it other$ise, then $ou#d the tarantu#as teach other$ise? and they
the'se#%es $ere for'er#y the best $or#dD'a#igners and hereticDburners(
)ith these preachers of eUua#ity $i## 2 not be 'ixed up and confounded(
For thus speaketh justice 8NT7 9E? N9en are not eUua#(N
;nd neither sha## they beco'e so& )hat $ou#d be 'y #o%e to the Super'an,
if 2 spake other$iseS
7n a thousand bridges and piers sha## they throng to the future, and a#$ays
sha## there be 'ore $ar and ineUua#ity a'ong the'? thus doth 'y great #o%e
'ake 'e speak&
2n%entors of figures and phanto's sha## they be in their hosti#itiesL and
$ith those figures and phanto's sha## they yet fight $ith each other the
supre'e fight&
Good and e%i#, and rich and poor, and high and #o$, and a## na'es of
%a#ues? $eapons sha## they be, and sounding signs, that #ife 'ust again
and again surpass itse#f&
;#oft $i## it bui#d itse#f $ith co#u'ns and stairsDD#ife itse#f? into
re'ote distances $ou#d it gaze, and out to$ards b#issfu# beautiesDD
T/E-EF7-E doth it reUuire e#e%ation&
;nd because it reUuireth e#e%ation, therefore doth it reUuire steps, and
%ariance of steps and c#i'bers& To rise stri%eth #ife, and in rising to
surpass itse#f(
;nd just beho#d, 'y friends& /ere $here the tarantu#aMs den is, riseth
a#oft an ancient te'p#eMs ruinsDDjust beho#d it $ith en#ightened eyes&
,eri#y, he $ho here to$ered a#oft his thoughts in stone, kne$ as $e## as
the $isest ones about the secret of #ife&
That there is strugg#e and ineUua#ity e%en in beauty, and $ar for po$er and
supre'acy? that doth he here teach us in the p#ainest parab#e(
/o$ di%ine#y do %au#t and arch here contrast in the strugg#e? ho$ $ith
#ight and shade they stri%e against each other, the di%ine#y stri%ing
ones(DD
Thus, steadfast and beautifu#, #et us a#so be ene'ies, 'y friends&
*i%ine#y $i## $e stri%e ;G;2NST one another&DD
;#as& There hath the tarantu#a bit 'e 'yse#f, 'ine o#d ene'y& *i%ine#y
steadfast and beautifu#, it hath bit 'e on the finger&
NPunish'ent 'ust there be, and justiceNDDso thinketh it? Nnot gratuitous#y
sha## he here sing songs in honour of en'ity&N
Qea, it hath re%enged itse#f& ;nd a#as& no$ $i## it 'ake 'y sou# a#so
dizzy $ith re%enge&
That 2 'ay N7T turn dizzy, ho$e%er, bind 'e fast, 'y friends, to this
pi##ar& -ather $i## 2 be a pi##arDsaint than a $hir# of %engeance&
,eri#y, no cyc#one or $hir#$ind is Zarathustra? and if he be a dancer, he
is not at a## a tarantu#aDdancer&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR( T/E F;978S )2SE 7NES(
The peop#e ha%e ye ser%ed and the peop#eMs superstitionDDN7T the truth&DD
a## ye fa'ous $ise ones& ;nd just on that account did they pay you
re%erence(
;nd on that account a#so did they to#erate your unbe#ief, because it $as a
p#easantry and a byDpath for the peop#e( Thus doth the 'aster gi%e free
scope to his s#a%es, and e%en enjoyeth their presu'ptuousness(
.ut he $ho is hated by the peop#e, as the $o#f by the dogsDDis the free
spirit, the ene'y of fetters, the nonDadorer, the d$e##er in the $oods(
To hunt hi' out of his #airDDthat $as a#$ays ca##ed Nsense of rightN by the
peop#e? on hi' do they sti## hound their sharpestDtoothed dogs(
NFor there the truth is, $here the peop#e are& )oe, $oe to the seeking
ones&NDDthus hath it echoed through a## ti'e(
Qour peop#e $ou#d ye justify in their re%erence? that ca##ed ye N)i## to
Truth,N ye fa'ous $ise ones&
;nd your heart hath a#$ays said to itse#f? NFro' the peop#e ha%e 2 co'e?
fro' thence ca'e to 'e a#so the %oice of God(N
StiffDnecked and artfu#, #ike the ass, ha%e ye a#$ays been, as the
ad%ocates of the peop#e(
;nd 'any a po$erfu# one $ho $anted to run $e## $ith the peop#e, hath
harnessed in front of his horsesDDa donkey, a fa'ous $ise 'an(
;nd no$, ye fa'ous $ise ones, 2 $ou#d ha%e you fina##y thro$ off entire#y
the skin of the #ion&
The skin of the beast of prey, the speck#ed skin, and the dishe%e##ed #ocks
of the in%estigator, the searcher, and the conUueror&
;h& for 'e to #earn to be#ie%e in your Nconscientiousness,N ye $ou#d first
ha%e to break your %enerating $i##(
"onscientiousDDso ca## 2 hi' $ho goeth into GodDforsaken $i#dernesses, and
hath broken his %enerating heart(
2n the ye##o$ sands and burnt by the sun, he doubt#ess peereth thirsti#y at
the is#es rich in fountains, $here #ife reposeth under shady trees(
.ut his thirst doth not persuade hi' to beco'e #ike those co'fortab#e ones?
for $here there are oases, there are a#so ido#s(
/ungry, fierce, #oneso'e, GodDforsaken? so doth the #ionD$i## $ish itse#f(
Free fro' the happiness of s#a%es, redee'ed fro' *eities and adorations,
fear#ess and fearDinspiring, grand and #oneso'e? so is the $i## of the
conscientious(
2n the $i#derness ha%e e%er d$e#t the conscientious, the free spirits, as
#ords of the $i#dernessL but in the cities d$e## the $e##Dfoddered, fa'ous
$ise onesDDthe draughtDbeasts(
For, a#$ays, do they dra$, as assesDDthe PE7P:EMS carts&
Not that 2 on that account upbraid the'? but ser%ing ones do they re'ain,
and harnessed ones, e%en though they g#itter in go#den harness(
;nd often ha%e they been good ser%ants and $orthy of their hire( For thus
saith %irtue? N2f thou 'ust be a ser%ant, seek hi' unto $ho' thy ser%ice
is 'ost usefu#&
The spirit and %irtue of thy 'aster sha## ad%ance by thou being his
ser%ant? thus $i#t thou thyse#f ad%ance $ith his spirit and %irtue&N
;nd %eri#y, ye fa'ous $ise ones, ye ser%ants of the peop#e& Qe yourse#%es
ha%e ad%anced $ith the peop#eMs spirit and %irtueDDand the peop#e by you&
To your honour do 2 say it&
.ut the peop#e ye re'ain for 'e, e%en $ith your %irtues, the peop#e $ith
purb#ind eyesDDthe peop#e $ho kno$ not $hat SP2-2T is&
Spirit is #ife $hich itse#f cutteth into #ife? by its o$n torture doth it
increase its o$n kno$#edge,DDdid ye kno$ that beforeS
;nd the spiritMs happiness is this? to be anointed and consecrated $ith
tears as a sacrificia# %icti',DDdid ye kno$ that beforeS
;nd the b#indness of the b#ind one, and his seeking and groping, sha## yet
testify to the po$er of the sun into $hich he hath gazed,DDdid ye kno$ that
beforeS
;nd $ith 'ountains sha## the discerning one #earn to .82:*& 2t is a s'a##
thing for the spirit to re'o%e 'ountains,DDdid ye kno$ that beforeS
Qe kno$ on#y the sparks of the spirit? but ye do not see the an%i# $hich
it is, and the crue#ty of its ha''er&
,eri#y, ye kno$ not the spiritMs pride& .ut sti## #ess cou#d ye endure the
spiritMs hu'i#ity, shou#d it e%er $ant to speak&
;nd ne%er yet cou#d ye cast your spirit into a pit of sno$? ye are not hot
enough for that& Thus are ye una$are, a#so, of the de#ight of its
co#dness(
2n a## respects, ho$e%er, ye 'ake too fa'i#iar $ith the spiritL and out of
$isdo' ha%e ye often 'ade an a#'shouse and a hospita# for bad poets(
Qe are not eag#es? thus ha%e ye ne%er experienced the happiness of the
a#ar' of the spirit( ;nd he $ho is not a bird shou#d not ca'p abo%e
abysses(
Qe see' to 'e #uke$ar' ones? but co#d#y f#o$eth a## deep kno$#edge( 2ceD
co#d are the inner'ost $e##s of the spirit? a refresh'ent to hot hands and
hand#ers(
-espectab#e do ye there stand, and stiff, and $ith straight backs, ye
fa'ous $ise ones&DDno strong $ind or $i## i'pe##eth you(
/a%e ye neMer seen a sai# crossing the sea, rounded and inf#ated, and
tre'b#ing $ith the %io#ence of the $indS
:ike the sai# tre'b#ing $ith the %io#ence of the spirit, doth 'y $isdo'
cross the seaDD'y $i#d $isdo'&
.ut ye ser%ants of the peop#e, ye fa'ous $ise onesDDho$ "78:* ye go $ith
'e&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR2( T/E N2G/TDS7NG(
MTis night? no$ do a## gushing fountains speak #ouder( ;nd 'y sou# a#so
is a gushing fountain(
MTis night? no$ on#y do a## songs of the #o%ing ones a$ake( ;nd 'y sou#
a#so is the song of a #o%ing one(
So'ething unappeased, unappeasab#e, is $ithin 'eL it #ongeth to find
expression( ; cra%ing for #o%e is $ithin 'e, $hich speaketh itse#f the
#anguage of #o%e(
:ight a' 2? ah, that 2 $ere night& .ut it is 'y #oneso'eness to be begirt
$ith #ight&
;h, that 2 $ere dark and night#y& /o$ $ou#d 2 suck at the breasts of
#ight&
;nd you yourse#%es $ou#d 2 b#ess, ye t$ink#ing star#ets and g#o$D$or's
a#oft&DDand $ou#d rejoice in the gifts of your #ight(
.ut 2 #i%e in 'ine o$n #ight, 2 drink again into 'yse#f the f#a'es that
break forth fro' 'e(
2 kno$ not the happiness of the recei%erL and oft ha%e 2 drea't that
stea#ing 'ust be 'ore b#essed than recei%ing(
2t is 'y po%erty that 'y hand ne%er ceaseth besto$ingL it is 'ine en%y that
2 see $aiting eyes and the brightened nights of #onging(
7h, the 'isery of a## besto$ers& 7h, the darkening of 'y sun& 7h, the
cra%ing to cra%e& 7h, the %io#ent hunger in satiety&
They take fro' 'e? but do 2 yet touch their sou#S There is a gap Mt$ixt
gi%ing and recei%ingL and the s'a##est gap hath fina##y to be bridged o%er(
; hunger ariseth out of 'y beauty? 2 shou#d #ike to injure those 2
i##u'ineL 2 shou#d #ike to rob those 2 ha%e gifted?DDthus do 2 hunger for
$ickedness(
)ithdra$ing 'y hand $hen another hand a#ready stretcheth out to itL
hesitating #ike the cascade, $hich hesitateth e%en in its #eap?DDthus do 2
hunger for $ickedness&
Such re%enge doth 'ine abundance think of? such 'ischief $e##eth out of 'y
#oneso'eness(
9y happiness in besto$ing died in besto$ingL 'y %irtue beca'e $eary of
itse#f by its abundance&
/e $ho e%er besto$eth is in danger of #osing his sha'eL to hi' $ho e%er
dispenseth, the hand and heart beco'e ca##ous by %ery dispensing(
9ine eye no #onger o%erf#o$eth for the sha'e of supp#iantsL 'y hand hath
beco'e too hard for the tre'b#ing of fi##ed hands(
)hence ha%e gone the tears of 'ine eye, and the do$n of 'y heartS 7h, the
#oneso'eness of a## besto$ers& 7h, the si#ence of a## shining ones&
9any suns circ#e in desert space? to a## that is dark do they speak $ith
their #ightDDbut to 'e they are si#ent(
7h, this is the hosti#ity of #ight to the shining one? unpitying#y doth it
pursue its course(
8nfair to the shining one in its inner'ost heart, co#d to the suns?DDthus
tra%e##eth e%ery sun(
:ike a stor' do the suns pursue their courses? that is their tra%e##ing(
Their inexorab#e $i## do they fo##o$? that is their co#dness(
7h, ye on#y is it, ye dark, night#y ones, that extract $ar'th fro' the
shining ones& 7h, ye on#y drink 'i#k and refresh'ent fro' the #ightMs
udders&
;h, there is ice around 'eL 'y hand burneth $ith the iciness& ;h, there is
thirst in 'eL it panteth after your thirst&
MTis night? a#as, that 2 ha%e to be #ight& ;nd thirst for the night#y&
;nd #oneso'eness&
MTis night? no$ doth 'y #onging break forth in 'e as a fountain,DDfor
speech do 2 #ong(
MTis night? no$ do a## gushing fountains speak #ouder( ;nd 'y sou# a#so
is a gushing fountain(
MTis night? no$ do a## songs of #o%ing ones a$ake( ;nd 'y sou# a#so is
the song of a #o%ing one(DD
Thus sang Zarathustra(
RRR22( T/E *;N"EDS7NG(
7ne e%ening $ent Zarathustra and his discip#es through the forestL and $hen
he sought for a $e##, #o, he #ighted upon a green 'eado$ peacefu##y
surrounded $ith trees and bushes, $here 'aidens $ere dancing together( ;s
soon as the 'aidens recognised Zarathustra, they ceased dancingL
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, approached the' $ith friend#y 'ein and spake these
$ords?
"ease not your dancing, ye #o%e#y 'aidens& No ga'eDspoi#er hath co'e to
you $ith e%i# eye, no ene'y of 'aidens(
GodMs ad%ocate a' 2 $ith the de%i#? he, ho$e%er, is the spirit of gra%ity(
/o$ cou#d 2, ye #ightDfooted ones, be hosti#e to di%ine dancesS 7r to
'aidensM feet $ith fine ank#esS
To be sure, 2 a' a forest, and a night of dark trees? but he $ho is not
afraid of 'y darkness, $i## find banks fu## of roses under 'y cypresses(
;nd e%en the #itt#e God 'ay he find, $ho is dearest to 'aidens? beside the
$e## #ieth he Uuiet#y, $ith c#osed eyes(
,eri#y, in broad day#ight did he fa## as#eep, the s#uggard& /ad he perhaps
chased butterf#ies too 'uchS
8pbraid 'e not, ye beautifu# dancers, $hen 2 chasten the #itt#e God
so'e$hat& /e $i## cry, certain#y, and $eepDDbut he is #aughab#e e%en $hen
$eeping&
;nd $ith tears in his eyes sha## he ask you for a danceL and 2 'yse#f $i##
sing a song to his dance?
; danceDsong and satire on the spirit of gra%ity 'y supre'est, po$erfu#est
de%i#, $ho is said to be N#ord of the $or#d(NDD
;nd this is the song that Zarathustra sang $hen "upid and the 'aidens
danced together?
7f #ate did 2 gaze into thine eye, 7 :ife& ;nd into the unfatho'ab#e did 2
there see' to sink(
.ut thou pu##edst 'e out $ith a go#den ang#eL derisi%e#y didst thou #augh
$hen 2 ca##ed thee unfatho'ab#e(
NSuch is the #anguage of a## fish,N saidst thouL N$hat T/EQ do not fatho'
is unfatho'ab#e(
.ut changeab#e a' 2 on#y, and $i#d, and a#together a $o'an, and no %irtuous
one?
Though 2 be ca##ed by you 'en the Mprofound one,M or the Mfaithfu# one,M
Mthe eterna# one,M Mthe 'ysterious one(M
.ut ye 'en endo$ us a#$ays $ith your o$n %irtuesDDa#as, ye %irtuous ones&N
Thus did she #augh, the unbe#ie%ab#e oneL but ne%er do 2 be#ie%e her and
her #aughter, $hen she speaketh e%i# of herse#f(
;nd $hen 2 ta#ked face to face $ith 'y $i#d )isdo', she said to 'e angri#y?
NThou $i##est, thou cra%est, thou #o%estL on that account a#one dost thou
P-;2SE :ife&N
Then had 2 a#'ost ans$ered indignant#y and to#d the truth to the angry oneL
and one cannot ans$er 'ore indignant#y than $hen one Nte##eth the truthN to
oneMs )isdo'(
For thus do things stand $ith us three( 2n 'y heart do 2 #o%e on#y :ifeDD
and %eri#y, 'ost $hen 2 hate her&
.ut that 2 a' fond of )isdo', and often too fond, is because she re'indeth
'e %ery strong#y of :ife&
She hath her eye, her #augh, and e%en her go#den ang#eDrod? a' 2
responsib#e for it that both are so a#ikeS
;nd $hen once :ife asked 'e? N)ho is she then, this )isdo'SNDDthen said 2
eager#y? N;h, yes& )isdo'&
7ne thirsteth for her and is not satisfied, one #ooketh through %ei#s, one
graspeth through nets(
2s she beautifu#S )hat do 2 kno$& .ut the o#dest carps are sti## #ured by
her(
"hangeab#e is she, and $ay$ardL often ha%e 2 seen her bite her #ip, and
pass the co'b against the grain of her hair(
Perhaps she is $icked and fa#se, and a#together a $o'anL but $hen she
speaketh i## of herse#f, just then doth she seduce 'ost(N
)hen 2 had said this unto :ife, then #aughed she 'a#icious#y, and shut her
eyes( N7f $ho' dost thou speakSN said she( NPerhaps of 'eS
;nd if thou $ert rightDDis it proper to say T/;T in such $ise to 'y face&
.ut no$, pray, speak a#so of thy )isdo'&N
;h, and no$ hast thou again opened thine eyes, 7 be#o%ed :ife& ;nd into
the unfatho'ab#e ha%e 2 again see'ed to sink(DD
Thus sang Zarathustra( .ut $hen the dance $as o%er and the 'aidens had
departed, he beca'e sad(
NThe sun hath been #ong set,N said he at #ast, Nthe 'eado$ is da'p, and
fro' the forest co'eth coo#ness(
;n unkno$n presence is about 'e, and gazeth thoughtfu##y( )hat& Thou
#i%est sti##, ZarathustraS
)hyS )hereforeS )herebyS )hitherS )hereS /o$S 2s it not fo##y sti##
to #i%eSDD
;h, 'y friendsL the e%ening is it $hich thus interrogateth in 'e( Forgi%e
'e 'y sadness&
E%ening hath co'e on? forgi%e 'e that e%ening hath co'e on&N
Thus sang Zarathustra(
RRR222( T/E G-;,EDS7NG(
NQonder is the gra%eDis#and, the si#ent is#eL yonder a#so are the gra%es of
'y youth( Thither $i## 2 carry an e%ergreen $reath of #ife(N
-eso#%ing thus in 'y heart, did 2 sai# oMer the sea(DD
7h, ye sights and scenes of 'y youth& 7h, a## ye g#ea's of #o%e, ye di%ine
f#eeting g#ea's& /o$ cou#d ye perish so soon for 'e& 2 think of you toD
day as 'y dead ones(
Fro' you, 'y dearest dead ones, co'eth unto 'e a s$eet sa%our, heartD
opening and 'e#ting( ,eri#y, it con%u#seth and openeth the heart of the
#one seafarer(
Sti## a' 2 the richest and 'ost to be en%iedDD2, the #oneso'est one& For 2
/;,E P7SSESSE* you, and ye possess 'e sti##( Te## 'e? to $ho' hath there
e%er fa##en such rosy app#es fro' the tree as ha%e fa##en unto 'eS
Sti## a' 2 your #o%eMs heir and heritage, b#oo'ing to your 'e'ory $ith
'anyDhued, $i#dDgro$ing %irtues, 7 ye dearest ones&
;h, $e $ere 'ade to re'ain nigh unto each other, ye kind#y strange 'ar%e#sL
and not #ike ti'id birds did ye co'e to 'e and 'y #ongingDDnay, but as
trusting ones to a trusting one&
Qea, 'ade for faithfu#ness, #ike 'e, and for fond eternities, 'ust 2 no$
na'e you by your faith#essness, ye di%ine g#ances and f#eeting g#ea's? no
other na'e ha%e 2 yet #earnt(
,eri#y, too ear#y did ye die for 'e, ye fugiti%es( Qet did ye not f#ee
fro' 'e, nor did 2 f#ee fro' you? innocent are $e to each other in our
faith#essness(
To ki## 9E, did they strang#e you, ye singing birds of 'y hopes& Qea, at
you, ye dearest ones, did 'a#ice e%er shoot its arro$sDDto hit 'y heart&
;nd they hit it& .ecause ye $ere a#$ays 'y dearest, 'y possession and 'y
possessedness? 7N T/;T ;""78NT had ye to die young, and far too ear#y&
;t 'y 'ost %u#nerab#e point did they shoot the arro$DDna'e#y, at you, $hose
skin is #ike do$nDDor 'ore #ike the s'i#e that dieth at a g#ance&
.ut this $ord $i## 2 say unto 'ine ene'ies? )hat is a## 'ans#aughter in
co'parison $ith $hat ye ha%e done unto 'e&
)orse e%i# did ye do unto 'e than a## 'ans#aughterL the irretrie%ab#e did
ye take fro' 'e?DDthus do 2 speak unto you, 'ine ene'ies&
S#e$ ye not 'y youthMs %isions and dearest 'ar%e#s& 9y p#ay'ates took ye
fro' 'e, the b#essed spirits& To their 'e'ory do 2 deposit this $reath and
this curse(
This curse upon you, 'ine ene'ies& /a%e ye not 'ade 'ine eterna# short, as
a tone dieth a$ay in a co#d night& Scarce#y, as the t$ink#e of di%ine
eyes, did it co'e to 'eDDas a f#eeting g#ea'&
Thus spake once in a happy hour 'y purity? N*i%ine sha## e%erything be
unto 'e(N
Then did ye haunt 'e $ith fou# phanto'sL ah, $hither hath that happy hour
no$ f#ed&
N;## days sha## be ho#y unto 'eNDDso spake once the $isdo' of 'y youth?
%eri#y, the #anguage of a joyous $isdo'&
.ut then did ye ene'ies stea# 'y nights, and so#d the' to s#eep#ess
torture? ah, $hither hath that joyous $isdo' no$ f#edS
7nce did 2 #ong for happy auspices? then did ye #ead an o$#D'onster across
'y path, an ad%erse sign( ;h, $hither did 'y tender #onging then f#eeS
;## #oathing did 2 once %o$ to renounce? then did ye change 'y nigh ones
and nearest ones into u#cerations( ;h, $hither did 'y nob#est %o$ then
f#eeS
;s a b#ind one did 2 once $a#k in b#essed $ays? then did ye cast fi#th on
the b#ind oneMs course? and no$ is he disgusted $ith the o#d footpath(
;nd $hen 2 perfor'ed 'y hardest task, and ce#ebrated the triu'ph of 'y
%ictories, then did ye 'ake those $ho #o%ed 'e ca## out that 2 then grie%ed
the' 'ost(
,eri#y, it $as a#$ays your doing? ye e'bittered to 'e 'y best honey, and
the di#igence of 'y best bees(
To 'y charity ha%e ye e%er sent the 'ost i'pudent beggarsL around 'y
sy'pathy ha%e ye e%er cro$ded the incurab#y sha'e#ess( Thus ha%e ye
$ounded the faith of 'y %irtue(
;nd $hen 2 offered 'y ho#iest as a sacrifice, i''ediate#y did your NpietyN
put its fatter gifts beside it? so that 'y ho#iest suffocated in the fu'es
of your fat(
;nd once did 2 $ant to dance as 2 had ne%er yet danced? beyond a## hea%ens
did 2 $ant to dance( Then did ye seduce 'y fa%ourite 'instre#(
;nd no$ hath he struck up an a$fu#, 'e#ancho#y airL a#as, he tooted as a
'ournfu# horn to 'ine ear&
9urderous 'instre#, instru'ent of e%i#, 'ost innocent instru'ent& ;#ready
did 2 stand prepared for the best dance? then didst thou s#ay 'y rapture
$ith thy tones&
7n#y in the dance do 2 kno$ ho$ to speak the parab#e of the highest
things?DDand no$ hath 'y grandest parab#e re'ained unspoken in 'y #i'bs&
8nspoken and unrea#ised hath 'y highest hope re'ained& ;nd there ha%e
perished for 'e a## the %isions and conso#ations of 'y youth&
/o$ did 2 e%er bear itS /o$ did 2 sur%i%e and sur'ount such $oundsS /o$
did 'y sou# rise again out of those sepu#chresS
Qea, so'ething in%u#nerab#e, unburiab#e is $ith 'e, so'ething that $ou#d
rend rocks asunder? it is ca##ed 9Q )2::( Si#ent#y doth it proceed, and
unchanged throughout the years(
2ts course $i## it go upon 'y feet, 'ine o#d )i##L hard of heart is its
nature and in%u#nerab#e(
2n%u#nerab#e a' 2 on#y in 'y hee#( E%er #i%est thou there, and art #ike
thyse#f, thou 'ost patient one& E%er hast thou burst a## shack#es of the
to'b&
2n thee sti## #i%eth a#so the unrea#isedness of 'y youthL and as #ife and
youth sittest thou here hopefu# on the ye##o$ ruins of gra%es(
Qea, thou art sti## for 'e the de'o#isher of a## gra%es? /ai# to thee, 'y
)i##& ;nd on#y $here there are gra%es are there resurrections(DD
Thus sang Zarathustra(
RRR2,( SE:FDS8-P;SS2NG(
N)i## to TruthN do ye ca## it, ye $isest ones, that $hich i'pe##eth you and
'aketh you ardentS
)i## for the thinkab#eness of a## being? thus do X2X ca## your $i##&
;## being $ou#d ye 9;WE thinkab#e? for ye doubt $ith good reason $hether
it be a#ready thinkab#e(
.ut it sha## acco''odate and bend itse#f to you& So $i##eth your $i##(
S'ooth sha## it beco'e and subject to the spirit, as its 'irror and
ref#ection(
That is your entire $i##, ye $isest ones, as a )i## to Po$erL and e%en $hen
ye speak of good and e%i#, and of esti'ates of %a#ue(
Qe $ou#d sti## create a $or#d before $hich ye can bo$ the knee? such is
your u#ti'ate hope and ecstasy(
The ignorant, to be sure, the peop#eDDthey are #ike a ri%er on $hich a boat
f#oateth a#ong? and in the boat sit the esti'ates of %a#ue, so#e'n and
disguised(
Qour $i## and your %a#uations ha%e ye put on the ri%er of beco'ingL it
betrayeth unto 'e an o#d )i## to Po$er, $hat is be#ie%ed by the peop#e as
good and e%i#(
2t $as ye, ye $isest ones, $ho put such guests in this boat, and ga%e the'
po'p and proud na'esDDye and your ru#ing )i##&
7n$ard the ri%er no$ carrieth your boat? it 98ST carry it( ; s'a## 'atter
if the rough $a%e foa'eth and angri#y resisteth its kee#&
2t is not the ri%er that is your danger and the end of your good and e%i#,
ye $isest ones? but that )i## itse#f, the )i## to Po$erDDthe unexhausted,
procreating #ifeD$i##(
.ut that ye 'ay understand 'y gospe# of good and e%i#, for that purpose
$i## 2 te## you 'y gospe# of #ife, and of the nature of a## #i%ing things(
The #i%ing thing did 2 fo##o$L 2 $a#ked in the broadest and narro$est paths
to #earn its nature(
)ith a hundredDfaced 'irror did 2 catch its g#ance $hen its 'outh $as shut,
so that its eye 'ight speak unto 'e( ;nd its eye spake unto 'e(
.ut $here%er 2 found #i%ing things, there heard 2 a#so the #anguage of
obedience( ;## #i%ing things are obeying things(
;nd this heard 2 second#y? )hate%er cannot obey itse#f, is co''anded(
Such is the nature of #i%ing things(
This, ho$e%er, is the third thing $hich 2 heardDDna'e#y, that co''anding is
'ore difficu#t than obeying( ;nd not on#y because the co''ander beareth
the burden of a## obeyers, and because this burden readi#y crusheth hi'?DD
;n atte'pt and a risk see'ed a## co''anding unto 'eL and $hene%er it
co''andeth, the #i%ing thing risketh itse#f thereby(
Qea, e%en $hen it co''andeth itse#f, then a#so 'ust it atone for its
co''anding( 7f its o$n #a$ 'ust it beco'e the judge and a%enger and
%icti'(
/o$ doth this happen& so did 2 ask 'yse#f( )hat persuadeth the #i%ing
thing to obey, and co''and, and e%en be obedient in co''andingS
/earken no$ unto 'y $ord, ye $isest ones& Test it serious#y, $hether 2
ha%e crept into the heart of #ife itse#f, and into the roots of its heart&
)here%er 2 found a #i%ing thing, there found 2 )i## to Po$erL and e%en in
the $i## of the ser%ant found 2 the $i## to be 'aster(
That to the stronger the $eaker sha## ser%eDDthereto persuadeth he his $i##
$ho $ou#d be 'aster o%er a sti## $eaker one( That de#ight a#one he is
un$i##ing to forego(
;nd as the #esser surrendereth hi'se#f to the greater that he 'ay ha%e
de#ight and po$er o%er the #east of a##, so doth e%en the greatest
surrender hi'se#f, and stakethDD#ife, for the sake of po$er(
2t is the surrender of the greatest to run risk and danger, and p#ay dice
for death(
;nd $here there is sacrifice and ser%ice and #o%eDg#ances, there a#so is
the $i## to be 'aster( .y byD$ays doth the $eaker then s#ink into the
fortress, and into the heart of the 'ightier oneDDand there stea#eth po$er(
;nd this secret spake :ife herse#f unto 'e( N.eho#d,N said she, N2 a' that
)/2"/ 98ST E,E- S8-P;SS 2TSE:F(
To be sure, ye ca## it $i## to procreation, or i'pu#se to$ards a goa#,
to$ards the higher, re'oter, 'ore 'anifo#d? but a## that is one and the
sa'e secret(
-ather $ou#d 2 succu'b than diso$n this one thingL and %eri#y, $here there
is succu'bing and #eafDfa##ing, #o, there doth :ife sacrifice itse#fDDfor
po$er&
That 2 ha%e to be strugg#e, and beco'ing, and purpose, and crossDpurposeDD
ah, he $ho di%ineth 'y $i##, di%ineth $e## a#so on $hat "-77WE* paths it
hath to tread&
)hate%er 2 create, and ho$e%er 'uch 2 #o%e it,DDsoon 'ust 2 be ad%erse to
it, and to 'y #o%e? so $i##eth 'y $i##(
;nd e%en thou, discerning one, art on#y a path and footstep of 'y $i##?
%eri#y, 'y )i## to Po$er $a#keth e%en on the feet of thy )i## to Truth&
/e certain#y did not hit the truth $ho shot at it the for'u#a? M)i## to
existenceM? that $i##DDdoth not exist&
For $hat is not, cannot $i##L that, ho$e%er, $hich is in existenceDDho$
cou#d it sti## stri%e for existence&
7n#y $here there is #ife, is there a#so $i##? not, ho$e%er, )i## to :ife,
butDDso teach 2 theeDD)i## to Po$er&
9uch is reckoned higher than #ife itse#f by the #i%ing oneL but out of the
%ery reckoning speakethDDthe )i## to Po$er&NDD
Thus did :ife once teach 'e? and thereby, ye $isest ones, do 2 so#%e you
the ridd#e of your hearts(
,eri#y, 2 say unto you? good and e%i# $hich $ou#d be e%er#astingDDit doth
not exist& 7f its o$n accord 'ust it e%er surpass itse#f ane$(
)ith your %a#ues and for'u#ae of good and e%i#, ye exercise po$er, ye
%a#uing ones? and that is your secret #o%e, and the spark#ing, tre'b#ing,
and o%erf#o$ing of your sou#s(
.ut a stronger po$er gro$eth out of your %a#ues, and a ne$ surpassing? by
it breaketh egg and eggDshe##(
;nd he $ho hath to be a creator in good and e%i#DD%eri#y, he hath first to
be a destroyer, and break %a#ues in pieces(
Thus doth the greatest e%i# pertain to the greatest good? that, ho$e%er,
is the creating good(DD
:et us SPE;W thereof, ye $isest ones, e%en though it be bad( To be si#ent
is $orseL a## suppressed truths beco'e poisonous(
;nd #et e%erything break up $hichDDcan break up by our truths& 9any a
house is sti## to be bui#t&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR,( T/E S8.:29E 7NES(
"a#' is the botto' of 'y sea? $ho $ou#d guess that it hideth dro##
'onsters&
8n'o%ed is 'y depth? but it spark#eth $ith s$i''ing enig'as and #aughters(
; sub#i'e one sa$ 2 toDday, a so#e'n one, a penitent of the spirit? 7h,
ho$ 'y sou# #aughed at his ug#iness&
)ith upraised breast, and #ike those $ho dra$ in their breath? thus did he
stand, the sub#i'e one, and in si#ence?
7Merhung $ith ug#y truths, the spoi# of his hunting, and rich in torn
rai'entL 'any thorns a#so hung on hi'DDbut 2 sa$ no rose(
Not yet had he #earned #aughing and beauty( G#oo'y did this hunter return
fro' the forest of kno$#edge(
Fro' the fight $ith $i#d beasts returned he ho'e? but e%en yet a $i#d
beast gazeth out of his seriousnessDDan unconUuered $i#d beast&
;s a tiger doth he e%er stand, on the point of springingL but 2 do not #ike
those strained sou#sL ungracious is 'y taste to$ards a## those se#fD
engrossed ones(
;nd ye te## 'e, friends, that there is to be no dispute about taste and
tastingS .ut a## #ife is a dispute about taste and tasting&
Taste? that is $eight at the sa'e ti'e, and sca#es and $eigherL and a#as
for e%ery #i%ing thing that $ou#d #i%e $ithout dispute about $eight and
sca#es and $eigher&
Shou#d he beco'e $eary of his sub#i'eness, this sub#i'e one, then on#y $i##
his beauty beginDDand then on#y $i## 2 taste hi' and find hi' sa%oury(
;nd on#y $hen he turneth a$ay fro' hi'se#f $i## he oMer#eap his o$n shado$
DDand %eri#y& into /2S sun(
Far too #ong did he sit in the shadeL the cheeks of the penitent of the
spirit beca'e pa#eL he a#'ost star%ed on his expectations(
"onte'pt is sti## in his eye, and #oathing hideth in his 'outh( To be
sure, he no$ resteth, but he hath not yet taken rest in the sunshine(
;s the ox ought he to doL and his happiness shou#d s'e## of the earth, and
not of conte'pt for the earth(
;s a $hite ox $ou#d 2 #ike to see hi', $hich, snorting and #o$ing, $a#keth
before the p#oughDshare? and his #o$ing shou#d a#so #aud a## that is
earth#y&
*ark is sti## his countenanceL the shado$ of his hand danceth upon it(
7Mershado$ed is sti## the sense of his eye(
/is deed itse#f is sti## the shado$ upon hi'? his doing obscureth the
doer( Not yet hath he o%erco'e his deed(
To be sure, 2 #o%e in hi' the shou#ders of the ox? but no$ do 2 $ant to
see a#so the eye of the ange#(
;#so his heroD$i## hath he sti## to un#earn? an exa#ted one sha## he be,
and not on#y a sub#i'e one?DDthe ether itse#f shou#d raise hi', the $i##D
#ess one&
/e hath subdued 'onsters, he hath so#%ed enig'as( .ut he shou#d a#so
redee' his 'onsters and enig'asL into hea%en#y chi#dren shou#d he transfor'
the'(
;s yet hath his kno$#edge not #earned to s'i#e, and to be $ithout jea#ousyL
as yet hath his gushing passion not beco'e ca#' in beauty(
,eri#y, not in satiety sha## his #onging cease and disappear, but in
beauty& Gracefu#ness be#ongeth to the 'unificence of the 'agnani'ous(
/is ar' across his head? thus shou#d the hero reposeL thus shou#d he a#so
sur'ount his repose(
.ut precise#y to the hero is .E;8TQ the hardest thing of a##( 8nattainab#e
is beauty by a## ardent $i##s(
; #itt#e 'ore, a #itt#e #ess? precise#y this is 'uch here, it is the 'ost
here(
To stand $ith re#axed 'usc#es and $ith unharnessed $i##? that is the
hardest for a## of you, ye sub#i'e ones&
)hen po$er beco'eth gracious and descendeth into the %isib#eDD2 ca## such
condescension, beauty(
;nd fro' no one do 2 $ant beauty so 'uch as fro' thee, thou po$erfu# one?
#et thy goodness be thy #ast se#fDconUuest(
;## e%i# do 2 accredit to thee? therefore do 2 desire of thee the good(
,eri#y, 2 ha%e often #aughed at the $eak#ings, $ho think the'se#%es good
because they ha%e cripp#ed pa$s&
The %irtue of the pi##ar sha#t thou stri%e after? 'ore beautifu# doth it
e%er beco'e, and 'ore gracefu#DDbut interna##y harder and 'ore sustainingDD
the higher it riseth(
Qea, thou sub#i'e one, one day sha#t thou a#so be beautifu#, and ho#d up
the 'irror to thine o$n beauty(
Then $i## thy sou# thri## $ith di%ine desiresL and there $i## be adoration
e%en in thy %anity&
For this is the secret of the sou#? $hen the hero hath abandoned it, then
on#y approacheth it in drea'sDDthe superhero(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR,2( T/E :;N* 7F "8:T8-E(
Too far did 2 f#y into the future? a horror seized upon 'e(
;nd $hen 2 #ooked around 'e, #o& there ti'e $as 'y so#e conte'porary(
Then did 2 f#y back$ards, ho'e$ardsDDand a#$ays faster( Thus did 2 co'e
unto you, ye presentDday 'en, and into the #and of cu#ture(
For the first ti'e brought 2 an eye to see you, and good desire? %eri#y,
$ith #onging in 'y heart did 2 co'e(
.ut ho$ did it turn out $ith 'eS ;#though so a#ar'edDD2 had yet to #augh&
Ne%er did 'ine eye see anything so 'ot#eyDco#oured&
2 #aughed and #aughed, $hi#e 'y foot sti## tre'b#ed, and 'y heart as $e##(
N/ere forsooth, is the ho'e of a## the paintpots,NDDsaid 2(
)ith fifty patches painted on faces and #i'bsDDso sat ye there to 'ine
astonish'ent, ye presentDday 'en&
;nd $ith fifty 'irrors around you, $hich f#attered your p#ay of co#ours,
and repeated it&
,eri#y, ye cou#d $ear no better 'asks, ye presentDday 'en, than your o$n
faces& )ho cou#dDD-E"7GN2SE you&
)ritten a## o%er $ith the characters of the past, and these characters a#so
penci##ed o%er $ith ne$ charactersDDthus ha%e ye concea#ed yourse#%es $e##
fro' a## decipherers&
;nd though one be a trier of the reins, $ho sti## be#ie%eth that ye ha%e
reins& 7ut of co#ours ye see' to be baked, and out of g#ued scraps(
;## ti'es and peop#es gaze di%ersDco#oured out of your %ei#sL a## custo's
and be#iefs speak di%ersDco#oured out of your gestures(
/e $ho $ou#d strip you of %ei#s and $rappers, and paints and gestures,
$ou#d just ha%e enough #eft to scare the cro$s(
,eri#y, 2 'yse#f a' the scared cro$ that once sa$ you naked, and $ithout
paintL and 2 f#e$ a$ay $hen the ske#eton og#ed at 'e(
-ather $ou#d 2 be a dayD#abourer in the netherD$or#d, and a'ong the shades
of the byDgone&DDFatter and fu##er than ye, are forsooth the netherD
$or#d#ings&
This, yea this, is bitterness to 'y bo$e#s, that 2 can neither endure you
naked nor c#othed, ye presentDday 'en&
;## that is unho'e#ike in the future, and $hate%er 'aketh strayed birds
shi%er, is %eri#y 'ore ho'e#ike and fa'i#iar than your Nrea#ity(N
For thus speak ye? N-ea# are $e $ho##y, and $ithout faith and
superstitionN? thus do ye p#u'e yourse#%esDDa#as& e%en $ithout p#u'es&
2ndeed, ho$ $ou#d ye be ;.:E to be#ie%e, ye di%ersDco#oured ones&DDye $ho
are pictures of a## that hath e%er been be#ie%ed&
Pera'bu#ating refutations are ye, of be#ief itse#f, and a dis#ocation of
a## thought( 8NT-8ST)7-T/Q 7NES? thus do X2X ca## you, ye rea# ones&
;## periods prate against one another in your spiritsL and the drea's and
pratings of a## periods $ere e%en rea#er than your a$akeness&
8nfruitfu# are ye? T/E-EF7-E do ye #ack be#ief( .ut he $ho had to create,
had a#$ays his presaging drea's and astra# pre'onitionsDDand be#ie%ed in
be#ie%ing&DD
/a#fDopen doors are ye, at $hich gra%eDdiggers $ait( ;nd this is Q78-
rea#ity? NE%erything deser%eth to perish(N
;#as, ho$ ye stand there before 'e, ye unfruitfu# onesL ho$ #ean your ribs&
;nd 'any of you sure#y ha%e had kno$#edge thereof(
9any a one hath said? NThere hath sure#y a God fi#ched so'ething fro' 'e
secret#y $hi#st 2 s#eptS ,eri#y, enough to 'ake a gir# for hi'se#f
therefro'&
N;'azing is the po%erty of 'y ribs&N thus hath spoken 'any a presentDday
'an(
Qea, ye are #aughab#e unto 'e, ye presentDday 'en& ;nd especia##y $hen ye
'ar%e# at yourse#%es&
;nd $oe unto 'e if 2 cou#d not #augh at your 'ar%e##ing, and had to s$a##o$
a## that is repugnant in your p#atters&
;s it is, ho$e%er, 2 $i## 'ake #ighter of you, since 2 ha%e to carry $hat
is hea%yL and $hat 'atter if beet#es and 9ayDbugs a#so a#ight on 'y #oad&
,eri#y, it sha## not on that account beco'e hea%ier to 'e& ;nd not fro'
you, ye presentDday 'en, sha## 'y great $eariness arise(DD
;h, $hither sha## 2 no$ ascend $ith 'y #onging& Fro' a## 'ountains do 2
#ook out for father#ands and 'other#ands(
.ut a ho'e ha%e 2 found no$here? unsett#ed a' 2 in a## cities, and
deca'ping at a## gates(
;#ien to 'e, and a 'ockery, are the presentDday 'en, to $ho' of #ate 'y
heart i'pe##ed 'eL and exi#ed a' 2 fro' father#ands and 'other#ands(
Thus do 2 #o%e on#y 'y "/2:*-ENMS :;N*, the undisco%ered in the re'otest
sea? for it do 2 bid 'y sai#s search and search(
8nto 'y chi#dren $i## 2 'ake a'ends for being the chi#d of 'y fathers? and
unto a## the futureDDfor T/2S presentDday&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR,22( 299;"8:;TE PE-"EPT27N(
)hen yesterDe%e the 'oon arose, then did 2 fancy it about to bear a sun?
so broad and tee'ing did it #ie on the horizon(
.ut it $as a #iar $ith its pregnancyL and sooner $i## 2 be#ie%e in the 'an
in the 'oon than in the $o'an(
To be sure, #itt#e of a 'an is he a#so, that ti'id nightDre%e##er( ,eri#y,
$ith a bad conscience doth he sta#k o%er the roofs(
For he is co%etous and jea#ous, the 'onk in the 'oonL co%etous of the
earth, and a## the joys of #o%ers(
Nay, 2 #ike hi' not, that to'Dcat on the roofs& /atefu# unto 'e are a##
that s#ink around ha#fDc#osed $indo$s&
Pious#y and si#ent#y doth he sta#k a#ong on the starDcarpets?DDbut 2 #ike
no #ightDtreading hu'an feet, on $hich not e%en a spur jing#eth(
E%ery honest oneMs step speakethL the cat ho$e%er, stea#eth a#ong o%er the
ground( :o& catD#ike doth the 'oon co'e a#ong, and dishonest#y(DD
This parab#e speak 2 unto you senti'enta# disse'b#ers, unto you, the Npure
discerners&N Qou do X2X ca##DDco%etous ones&
;#so ye #o%e the earth, and the earth#y? 2 ha%e di%ined you $e##&DDbut
sha'e is in your #o%e, and a bad conscienceDDye are #ike the 'oon&
To despise the earth#y hath your spirit been persuaded, but not your
bo$e#s? these, ho$e%er, are the strongest in you&
;nd no$ is your spirit asha'ed to be at the ser%ice of your bo$e#s, and
goeth byD$ays and #ying $ays to escape its o$n sha'e(
NThat $ou#d be the highest thing for 'eNDDso saith your #ying spirit unto
itse#fDDNto gaze upon #ife $ithout desire, and not #ike the dog, $ith
hangingDout tongue?
To be happy in gazing? $ith dead $i##, free fro' the grip and greed of
se#fishnessDDco#d and ashyDgrey a## o%er, but $ith intoxicated 'oonDeyes&
That $ou#d be the dearest thing to 'eNDDthus doth the seduced one seduce
hi'se#f,DDNto #o%e the earth as the 'oon #o%eth it, and $ith the eye on#y
to fee# its beauty(
;nd this do 2 ca## 299;"8:;TE perception of a## things? to $ant nothing
e#se fro' the', but to be a##o$ed to #ie before the' as a 'irror $ith a
hundred facets(NDD
7h, ye senti'enta# disse'b#ers, ye co%etous ones& Qe #ack innocence in
your desire? and no$ do ye defa'e desiring on that account&
,eri#y, not as creators, as procreators, or as jubi#ators do ye #o%e the
earth&
)here is innocenceS )here there is $i## to procreation( ;nd he $ho
seeketh to create beyond hi'se#f, hath for 'e the purest $i##(
)here is beautyS )here 2 98ST )2:: $ith 'y $ho#e )i##L $here 2 $i## #o%e
and perish, that an i'age 'ay not re'ain 'ere#y an i'age(
:o%ing and perishing? these ha%e rhy'ed fro' eternity( )i## to #o%e?
that is to be ready a#so for death( Thus do 2 speak unto you co$ards&
.ut no$ doth your e'ascu#ated og#ing profess to be Nconte'p#ation&N ;nd
that $hich can be exa'ined $ith co$ard#y eyes is to be christened
Nbeautifu#&N 7h, ye %io#ators of nob#e na'es&
.ut it sha## be your curse, ye i''acu#ate ones, ye pure discerners, that ye
sha## ne%er bring forth, e%en though ye #ie broad and tee'ing on the
horizon&
,eri#y, ye fi## your 'outh $ith nob#e $ords? and $e are to be#ie%e that
your heart o%erf#o$eth, ye cozenersS
.ut 9Q $ords are poor, conte'ptib#e, sta''ering $ords? g#ad#y do 2 pick up
$hat fa##eth fro' the tab#e at your repasts(
Qet sti## can 2 say there$ith the truthDDto disse'b#ers& Qea, 'y fishD
bones, she##s, and prick#y #ea%es sha##DDtick#e the noses of disse'b#ers&
.ad air is a#$ays about you and your repasts? your #asci%ious thoughts,
your #ies, and secrets are indeed in the air&
*are on#y to be#ie%e in yourse#%esDDin yourse#%es and in your in$ard parts&
/e $ho doth not be#ie%e in hi'se#f a#$ays #ieth(
; GodMs 'ask ha%e ye hung in front of you, ye Npure onesN? into a GodMs
'ask hath your execrab#e coi#ing snake cra$#ed(
,eri#y ye decei%e, ye Nconte'p#ati%e ones&N E%en Zarathustra $as once the
dupe of your god#ike exteriorL he did not di%ine the serpentMs coi# $ith
$hich it $as stuffed(
; GodMs sou#, 2 once thought 2 sa$ p#aying in your ga'es, ye pure
discerners& No better arts did 2 once drea' of than your arts&
SerpentsM fi#th and e%i# odour, the distance concea#ed fro' 'e? and that a
#izardMs craft pro$#ed thereabouts #asci%ious#y(
.ut 2 ca'e N2G/ unto you? then ca'e to 'e the day,DDand no$ co'eth it to
you,DDat an end is the 'oonMs #o%e affair&
See there& Surprised and pa#e doth it standDDbefore the rosy da$n&
For a#ready she co'eth, the g#o$ing one,DD/E- #o%e to the earth co'eth&
2nnocence and creati%e desire, is a## so#ar #o%e&
See there, ho$ she co'eth i'patient#y o%er the sea& *o ye not fee# the
thirst and the hot breath of her #o%eS
;t the sea $ou#d she suck, and drink its depths to her height? no$ riseth
the desire of the sea $ith its thousand breasts(
Wissed and sucked )78:* it be by the thirst of the sunL %apour )78:* it
beco'e, and height, and path of #ight, and #ight itse#f&
,eri#y, #ike the sun do 2 #o%e #ife, and a## deep seas(
;nd this 'eaneth T7 9E kno$#edge? a## that is deep sha## ascendDDto 'y
height&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR,222( S"/7:;-S(
)hen 2 #ay as#eep, then did a sheep eat at the i%yD$reath on 'y head,DDit
ate, and said thereby? NZarathustra is no #onger a scho#ar(N
2t said this, and $ent a$ay c#u'si#y and proud#y( ; chi#d to#d it to 'e(
2 #ike to #ie here $here the chi#dren p#ay, beside the ruined $a##, a'ong
thist#es and red poppies(
; scho#ar a' 2 sti## to the chi#dren, and a#so to the thist#es and red
poppies( 2nnocent are they, e%en in their $ickedness(
.ut to the sheep 2 a' no #onger a scho#ar? so $i##eth 'y #otDDb#essings
upon it&
For this is the truth? 2 ha%e departed fro' the house of the scho#ars, and
the door ha%e 2 a#so s#a''ed behind 'e(
Too #ong did 'y sou# sit hungry at their tab#e? not #ike the' ha%e 2 got
the knack of in%estigating, as the knack of nutDcracking(
Freedo' do 2 #o%e, and the air o%er fresh soi#L rather $ou#d 2 s#eep on oxD
skins than on their honours and dignities(
2 a' too hot and scorched $ith 'ine o$n thought? often is it ready to take
a$ay 'y breath( Then ha%e 2 to go into the open air, and a$ay fro' a##
dusty roo's(
.ut they sit coo# in the coo# shade? they $ant in e%erything to be 'ere#y
spectators, and they a%oid sitting $here the sun burneth on the steps(
:ike those $ho stand in the street and gape at the passersDby? thus do
they a#so $ait, and gape at the thoughts $hich others ha%e thought(
Shou#d one #ay ho#d of the', then do they raise a dust #ike f#ourDsacks,
and in%o#untari#y? but $ho $ou#d di%ine that their dust ca'e fro' corn,
and fro' the ye##o$ de#ight of the su''er fie#dsS
)hen they gi%e the'se#%es out as $ise, then do their petty sayings and
truths chi## 'e? in their $isdo' there is often an odour as if it ca'e
fro' the s$a'pL and %eri#y, 2 ha%e e%en heard the frog croak in it&
"#e%er are theyDDthey ha%e dexterous fingers? $hat doth 9Q si'p#icity
pretend to beside their 'u#tip#icity& ;## threading and knitting and
$ea%ing do their fingers understand? thus do they 'ake the hose of the
spirit&
Good c#ock$orks are they? on#y be carefu# to $ind the' up proper#y& Then
do they indicate the hour $ithout 'istake, and 'ake a 'odest noise thereby(
:ike 'i##stones do they $ork, and #ike pest#es? thro$ on#y seedDcorn unto
the'&DDthey kno$ $e## ho$ to grind corn s'a##, and 'ake $hite dust out of
it(
They keep a sharp eye on one another, and do not trust each other the best(
2ngenious in #itt#e artifices, they $ait for those $hose kno$#edge $a#keth
on #a'e feet,DD#ike spiders do they $ait(
2 sa$ the' a#$ays prepare their poison $ith precautionL and a#$ays did they
put g#ass g#o%es on their fingers in doing so(
They a#so kno$ ho$ to p#ay $ith fa#se diceL and so eager#y did 2 find the'
p#aying, that they perspired thereby(
)e are a#ien to each other, and their %irtues are e%en 'ore repugnant to 'y
taste than their fa#sehoods and fa#se dice(
;nd $hen 2 #i%ed $ith the', then did 2 #i%e abo%e the'( Therefore did they
take a dis#ike to 'e(
They $ant to hear nothing of any one $a#king abo%e their headsL and so they
put $ood and earth and rubbish bet$ixt 'e and their heads(
Thus did they deafen the sound of 'y tread? and #east ha%e 2 hitherto been
heard by the 'ost #earned(
;## 'ankindMs fau#ts and $eaknesses did they put bet$ixt the'se#%es and
'e?DDthey ca## it Nfa#se cei#ingN in their houses(
.ut ne%erthe#ess 2 $a#k $ith 'y thoughts ;.7,E their headsL and e%en shou#d
2 $a#k on 'ine o$n errors, sti## $ou#d 2 be abo%e the' and their heads(
For 'en are N7T eUua#? so speaketh justice( ;nd $hat 2 $i##, T/EQ 'ay not
$i##&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
RRR2R( P7ETS(
NSince 2 ha%e kno$n the body betterNDDsaid Zarathustra to one of his
discip#esDDNthe spirit hath on#y been to 'e sy'bo#ica##y spiritL and a##
the Mi'perishab#eMDDthat is a#so but a si'i#e(N
NSo ha%e 2 heard thee say once before,N ans$ered the discip#e, Nand then
thou addedst? M.ut the poets #ie too 'uch(M )hy didst thou say that the
poets #ie too 'uchSN
N)hySN said Zarathustra( NThou askest $hyS 2 do not be#ong to those $ho
'ay be asked after their )hy(
2s 'y experience but of yesterdayS 2t is #ong ago that 2 experienced the
reasons for 'ine opinions(
Shou#d 2 not ha%e to be a cask of 'e'ory, if 2 a#so $anted to ha%e 'y
reasons $ith 'eS
2t is a#ready too 'uch for 'e e%en to retain 'ine opinionsL and 'any a bird
f#ieth a$ay(
;nd so'eti'es, a#so, do 2 find a fugiti%e creature in 'y do%ecote, $hich is
a#ien to 'e, and tre'b#eth $hen 2 #ay 'y hand upon it(
.ut $hat did Zarathustra once say unto theeS That the poets #ie too 'uchS
DD.ut Zarathustra a#so is a poet(
.e#ie%est thou that he there spake the truthS )hy dost thou be#ie%e itSN
The discip#e ans$ered? N2 be#ie%e in Zarathustra(N .ut Zarathustra shook
his head and s'i#ed(DD
.e#ief doth not sanctify 'e, said he, #east of a## the be#ief in 'yse#f(
.ut granting that so'e one did say in a## seriousness that the poets #ie
too 'uch? he $as rightDD)E do #ie too 'uch(
)e a#so kno$ too #itt#e, and are bad #earners? so $e are ob#iged to #ie(
;nd $hich of us poets hath not adu#terated his $ineS 9any a poisonous
hotchpotch hath e%o#%ed in our ce##ars? 'any an indescribab#e thing hath
there been done(
;nd because $e kno$ #itt#e, therefore are $e p#eased fro' the heart $ith
the poor in spirit, especia##y $hen they are young $o'en&
;nd e%en of those things are $e desirous, $hich o#d $o'en te## one another
in the e%ening( This do $e ca## the eterna##y fe'inine in us(
;nd as if there $ere a specia# secret access to kno$#edge, $hich "/7WET/ 8P
for those $ho #earn anything, so do $e be#ie%e in the peop#e and in their
N$isdo'(N
This, ho$e%er, do a## poets be#ie%e? that $hoe%er pricketh up his ears
$hen #ying in the grass or on #one#y s#opes, #earneth so'ething of the
things that are bet$ixt hea%en and earth(
;nd if there co'e unto the' tender e'otions, then do the poets a#$ays think
that nature herse#f is in #o%e $ith the'?
;nd that she stea#eth to their ear to $hisper secrets into it, and a'orous
f#atteries? of this do they p#u'e and pride the'se#%es, before a##
'orta#s&
;h, there are so 'any things bet$ixt hea%en and earth of $hich on#y the
poets ha%e drea'ed&
;nd especia##y ;.7,E the hea%ens? for a## Gods are poetDsy'bo#isations,
poetDsophistications&
,eri#y, e%er are $e dra$n a#oftDDthat is, to the rea#' of the c#ouds? on
these do $e set our gaudy puppets, and then ca## the' Gods and Super'en?DD
;re not they #ight enough for those chairs&DDa## these Gods and Super'enSDD
;h, ho$ 2 a' $eary of a## the inadeUuate that is insisted on as actua#&
;h, ho$ 2 a' $eary of the poets&
)hen Zarathustra so spake, his discip#e resented it, but $as si#ent( ;nd
Zarathustra a#so $as si#entL and his eye directed itse#f in$ard#y, as if it
gazed into the far distance( ;t #ast he sighed and dre$ breath(DD
2 a' of toDday and heretofore, said he thereuponL but so'ething is in 'e
that is of the 'orro$, and the day fo##o$ing, and the hereafter(
2 beca'e $eary of the poets, of the o#d and of the ne$? superficia# are
they a## unto 'e, and sha##o$ seas(
They did not think sufficient#y into the depthL therefore their fee#ing did
not reach to the botto'(
So'e sensation of %o#uptuousness and so'e sensation of tediu'? these ha%e
as yet been their best conte'p#ation(
GhostDbreathing and ghostD$hisking, see'eth to 'e a## the jing#eDjang#ing
of their harpsL $hat ha%e they kno$n hitherto of the fer%our of tones&DD
They are a#so not pure enough for 'e? they a## 'udd#e their $ater that it
'ay see' deep(
;nd fain $ou#d they thereby pro%e the'se#%es reconci#ers? but 'ediaries
and 'ixers are they unto 'e, and ha#fDandDha#f, and i'pure&DD
;h, 2 cast indeed 'y net into their sea, and 'eant to catch good fishL but
a#$ays did 2 dra$ up the head of so'e ancient God(
Thus did the sea gi%e a stone to the hungry one( ;nd they the'se#%es 'ay
$e## originate fro' the sea(
"ertain#y, one findeth pear#s in the'? thereby they are the 'ore #ike hard
'o##uscs( ;nd instead of a sou#, 2 ha%e often found in the' sa#t s#i'e(
They ha%e #earned fro' the sea a#so its %anity? is not the sea the peacock
of peacocksS
E%en before the ug#iest of a## buffa#oes doth it spread out its tai#L ne%er
doth it tire of its #aceDfan of si#%er and si#k(
*isdainfu##y doth the buffa#o g#ance thereat, nigh to the sand $ith its
sou#, nigher sti## to the thicket, nighest, ho$e%er, to the s$a'p(
)hat is beauty and sea and peacockDsp#endour to it& This parab#e 2 speak
unto the poets(
,eri#y, their spirit itse#f is the peacock of peacocks, and a sea of
%anity&
Spectators, seeketh the spirit of the poetDDshou#d they e%en be
buffa#oes&DD
.ut of this spirit beca'e 2 $earyL and 2 see the ti'e co'ing $hen it $i##
beco'e $eary of itse#f(
Qea, changed ha%e 2 seen the poets, and their g#ance turned to$ards
the'se#%es(
Penitents of the spirit ha%e 2 seen appearingL they gre$ out of the
poets(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R:( G-E;T E,ENTS(
There is an is#e in the seaDDnot far fro' the /appy 2s#es of ZarathustraDD
on $hich a %o#cano e%er s'okethL of $hich is#e the peop#e, and especia##y
the o#d $o'en a'ongst the', say that it is p#aced as a rock before the gate
of the netherD$or#dL but that through the %o#cano itse#f the narro$ $ay
#eadeth do$n$ards $hich conducteth to this gate(
No$ about the ti'e that Zarathustra sojourned on the /appy 2s#es, it
happened that a ship anchored at the is#e on $hich standeth the s'oking
'ountain, and the cre$ $ent ashore to shoot rabbits( ;bout the noontide
hour, ho$e%er, $hen the captain and his 'en $ere together again, they sa$
sudden#y a 'an co'ing to$ards the' through the air, and a %oice said
distinct#y? N2t is ti'e& 2t is the highest ti'e&N .ut $hen the figure
$as nearest to the' @it f#e$ past Uuick#y, ho$e%er, #ike a shado$, in the
direction of the %o#canoA, then did they recognise $ith the greatest
surprise that it $as ZarathustraL for they had a## seen hi' before except
the captain hi'se#f, and they #o%ed hi' as the peop#e #o%e? in such $ise
that #o%e and a$e $ere co'bined in eUua# degree(
N.eho#d&N said the o#d he#'s'an, Nthere goeth Zarathustra to he##&N
;bout the sa'e ti'e that these sai#ors #anded on the fireDis#e, there $as a
ru'our that Zarathustra had disappearedL and $hen his friends $ere asked
about it, they said that he had gone on board a ship by night, $ithout
saying $hither he $as going(
Thus there arose so'e uneasiness( ;fter three days, ho$e%er, there ca'e
the story of the shipMs cre$ in addition to this uneasinessDDand then did
a## the peop#e say that the de%i# had taken Zarathustra( /is discip#es
#aughed, sure enough, at this ta#kL and one of the' said e%en? NSooner
$ou#d 2 be#ie%e that Zarathustra hath taken the de%i#(N .ut at the botto'
of their hearts they $ere a## fu## of anxiety and #onging? so their joy
$as great $hen on the fifth day Zarathustra appeared a'ongst the'(
;nd this is the account of ZarathustraMs inter%ie$ $ith the fireDdog?
The earth, said he, hath a skinL and this skin hath diseases( 7ne of these
diseases, for exa'p#e, is ca##ed N'an(N
;nd another of these diseases is ca##ed Nthe fireDdogN? concerning /29 'en
ha%e great#y decei%ed the'se#%es, and #et the'se#%es be decei%ed(
To fatho' this 'ystery did 2 go oMer the seaL and 2 ha%e seen the truth
naked, %eri#y& barefooted up to the neck(
No$ do 2 kno$ ho$ it is concerning the fireDdogL and #ike$ise concerning
a## the spouting and sub%ersi%e de%i#s, of $hich not on#y o#d $o'en are
afraid(
N8p $ith thee, fireDdog, out of thy depth&N cried 2, Nand confess ho$ deep
that depth is& )hence co'eth that $hich thou snortest upS
Thou drinkest copious#y at the sea? that doth thine e'bittered e#oUuence
betray& 2n sooth, for a dog of the depth, thou takest thy nourish'ent too
'uch fro' the surface&
;t the 'ost, 2 regard thee as the %entri#oUuist of the earth? and e%er,
$hen 2 ha%e heard sub%ersi%e and spouting de%i#s speak, 2 ha%e found the'
#ike thee? e'bittered, 'endacious, and sha##o$(
Qe understand ho$ to roar and obscure $ith ashes& Qe are the best
braggarts, and ha%e sufficient#y #earned the art of 'aking dregs boi#(
)here ye are, there 'ust a#$ays be dregs at hand, and 'uch that is spongy,
ho##o$, and co'pressed? it $anteth to ha%e freedo'(
MFreedo'M ye a## roar 'ost eager#y? but 2 ha%e un#earned the be#ief in
Mgreat e%ents,M $hen there is 'uch roaring and s'oke about the'(
;nd be#ie%e 'e, friend /u##aba#oo& The greatest e%entsDDare not our
noisiest, but our sti##est hours(
Not around the in%entors of ne$ noise, but around the in%entors of ne$
%a#ues, doth the $or#d re%o#%eL 2N;8*2.:Q it re%o#%eth(
;nd just o$n to it& :itt#e had e%er taken p#ace $hen thy noise and s'oke
passed a$ay( )hat, if a city did beco'e a 'u''y, and a statue #ay in the
'ud&
;nd this do 2 say a#so to the oMerthro$ers of statues? 2t is certain#y the
greatest fo##y to thro$ sa#t into the sea, and statues into the 'ud(
2n the 'ud of your conte'pt #ay the statue? but it is just its #a$, that
out of conte'pt, its #ife and #i%ing beauty gro$ again&
)ith di%iner features doth it no$ arise, seducing by its sufferingL and
%eri#y& it $i## yet thank you for oMerthro$ing it, ye sub%erters&
This counse#, ho$e%er, do 2 counse# to kings and churches, and to a## that
is $eak $ith age or %irtueDD#et yourse#%es be oMerthro$n& That ye 'ay
again co'e to #ife, and that %irtueDD'ay co'e to you&DDN
Thus spake 2 before the fireDdog? then did he interrupt 'e su##en#y, and
asked? N"hurchS )hat is thatSN
N"hurchSN ans$ered 2, Nthat is a kind of state, and indeed the 'ost
'endacious( .ut re'ain Uuiet, thou disse'b#ing dog& Thou sure#y kno$est
thine o$n species best&
:ike thyse#f the state is a disse'b#ing dogL #ike thee doth it #ike to
speak $ith s'oke and roaringDDto 'ake be#ie%e, #ike thee, that it speaketh
out of the heart of things(
For it seeketh by a## 'eans to be the 'ost i'portant creature on earth, the
stateL and peop#e think it so(N
)hen 2 had said this, the fireDdog acted as if 'ad $ith en%y( N)hat&N
cried he, Nthe 'ost i'portant creature on earthS ;nd peop#e think it soSN
;nd so 'uch %apour and terrib#e %oices ca'e out of his throat, that 2
thought he $ou#d choke $ith %exation and en%y(
;t #ast he beca'e ca#'er and his panting subsidedL as soon, ho$e%er, as he
$as Uuiet, 2 said #aughing#y?
NThou art angry, fireDdog? so 2 a' in the right about thee&
;nd that 2 'ay a#so 'aintain the right, hear the story of another fireDdogL
he speaketh actua##y out of the heart of the earth(
Go#d doth his breath exha#e, and go#den rain? so doth his heart desire(
)hat are ashes and s'oke and hot dregs to hi'&
:aughter f#itteth fro' hi' #ike a %ariegated c#oudL ad%erse is he to thy
garg#ing and spe$ing and grips in the bo$e#s&
The go#d, ho$e%er, and the #aughterDDthese doth he take out of the heart of
the earth? for, that thou 'ayst kno$ it,DDT/E /E;-T 7F T/E E;-T/ 2S 7F
G7:*(N
)hen the fireDdog heard this, he cou#d no #onger endure to #isten to 'e(
;bashed did he dra$ in his tai#, said Nbo$D$o$&N in a co$ed %oice, and
crept do$n into his ca%e(DD
Thus to#d Zarathustra( /is discip#es, ho$e%er, hard#y #istened to hi'? so
great $as their eagerness to te## hi' about the sai#ors, the rabbits, and
the f#ying 'an(
N)hat a' 2 to think of it&N said Zarathustra( N;' 2 indeed a ghostS
.ut it 'ay ha%e been 'y shado$( Qe ha%e sure#y heard so'ething of the
)anderer and his Shado$S
7ne thing, ho$e%er, is certain? 2 'ust keep a tighter ho#d of itL
other$ise it $i## spoi# 'y reputation(N
;nd once 'ore Zarathustra shook his head and $ondered( N)hat a' 2 to think
of it&N said he once 'ore(
N)hy did the ghost cry? M2t is ti'e& 2t is the highest ti'e&M
For )/;T is it thenDDthe highest ti'eSNDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R:2( T/E S77T/S;QE-(
ND;nd 2 sa$ a great sadness co'e o%er 'ankind( The best turned $eary of
their $orks(
; doctrine appeared, a faith ran beside it? M;## is e'pty, a## is a#ike,
a## hath been&M
;nd fro' a## hi##s there reDechoed? M;## is e'pty, a## is a#ike, a## hath
been&M
To be sure $e ha%e har%ested? but $hy ha%e a## our fruits beco'e rotten
and bro$nS )hat $as it fe## #ast night fro' the e%i# 'oonS
2n %ain $as a## our #abour, poison hath our $ine beco'e, the e%i# eye hath
singed ye##o$ our fie#ds and hearts(
;rid ha%e $e a## beco'eL and fire fa##ing upon us, then do $e turn dust
#ike ashes?DDyea, the fire itse#f ha%e $e 'ade a$eary(
;## our fountains ha%e dried up, e%en the sea hath receded( ;## the ground
trieth to gape, but the depth $i## not s$a##o$&
M;#as& $here is there sti## a sea in $hich one cou#d be dro$nedSM so
soundeth our p#aintDDacross sha##o$ s$a'ps(
,eri#y, e%en for dying ha%e $e beco'e too $earyL no$ do $e keep a$ake and
#i%e onDDin sepu#chres(N
Thus did Zarathustra hear a soothsayer speakL and the foreboding touched
his heart and transfor'ed hi'( Sorro$fu##y did he go about and $eari#yL
and he beca'e #ike unto those of $ho' the soothsayer had spoken(DD
,eri#y, said he unto his discip#es, a #itt#e $hi#e, and there co'eth the
#ong t$i#ight( ;#as, ho$ sha## 2 preser%e 'y #ight through it&
That it 'ay not s'other in this sorro$fu#ness& To re'oter $or#ds sha## it
be a #ight, and a#so to re'otest nights&
Thus did Zarathustra go about grie%ed in his heart, and for three days he
did not take any 'eat or drink? he had no rest, and #ost his speech( ;t
#ast it ca'e to pass that he fe## into a deep s#eep( /is discip#es,
ho$e%er, sat around hi' in #ong nightD$atches, and $aited anxious#y to see
if he $ou#d a$ake, and speak again, and reco%er fro' his aff#iction(
;nd this is the discourse that Zarathustra spake $hen he a$okeL his %oice,
ho$e%er, ca'e unto his discip#es as fro' afar?
/ear, 2 pray you, the drea' that 2 drea'ed, 'y friends, and he#p 'e to
di%ine its 'eaning&
; ridd#e is it sti## unto 'e, this drea'L the 'eaning is hidden in it and
encaged, and doth not yet f#y abo%e it on free pinions(
;## #ife had 2 renounced, so 2 drea'ed( NightD$atch'an and gra%eDguardian
had 2 beco'e, a#oft, in the #one 'ountainDfortress of *eath(
There did 2 guard his coffins? fu## stood the 'usty %au#ts of those
trophies of %ictory( 7ut of g#ass coffins did %anUuished #ife gaze upon
'e(
The odour of dustDco%ered eternities did 2 breathe? su#try and dustD
co%ered #ay 'y sou#( ;nd $ho cou#d ha%e aired his sou# there&
.rightness of 'idnight $as e%er around 'eL #oneso'eness co$ered beside herL
and as a third, deathDratt#e sti##ness, the $orst of 'y fe'a#e friends(
Weys did 2 carry, the rustiest of a## keysL and 2 kne$ ho$ to open $ith
the' the 'ost creaking of a## gates(
:ike a bitter#y angry croaking ran the sound through the #ong corridors
$hen the #ea%es of the gate opened? ungracious#y did this bird cry,
un$i##ing#y $as it a$akened(
.ut 'ore frightfu# e%en, and 'ore heartDstrang#ing $as it, $hen it again
beca'e si#ent and sti## a## around, and 2 a#one sat in that 'a#ignant
si#ence(
Thus did ti'e pass $ith 'e, and s#ip by, if ti'e there sti## $as? $hat do
2 kno$ thereof& .ut at #ast there happened that $hich a$oke 'e(
Thrice did there pea# pea#s at the gate #ike thunders, thrice did the
%au#ts resound and ho$# again? then did 2 go to the gate(
;#pa& cried 2, $ho carrieth his ashes unto the 'ountainS ;#pa& ;#pa& $ho
carrieth his ashes unto the 'ountainS
;nd 2 pressed the key, and pu##ed at the gate, and exerted 'yse#f( .ut not
a fingerMsDbreadth $as it yet open?
Then did a roaring $ind tear the fo#ds apart? $hist#ing, $hizzing, and
piercing, it thre$ unto 'e a b#ack coffin(
;nd in the roaring, and $hist#ing, and $hizzing the coffin burst up, and
spouted out a thousand pea#s of #aughter(
;nd a thousand caricatures of chi#dren, ange#s, o$#s, foo#s, and chi#dD
sized butterf#ies #aughed and 'ocked, and roared at 'e(
Fearfu##y $as 2 terrified thereby? it prostrated 'e( ;nd 2 cried $ith
horror as 2 neMer cried before(
.ut 'ine o$n crying a$oke 'e?DDand 2 ca'e to 'yse#f(DD
Thus did Zarathustra re#ate his drea', and then $as si#ent? for as yet he
kne$ not the interpretation thereof( .ut the discip#e $ho' he #o%ed 'ost
arose Uuick#y, seized ZarathustraMs hand, and said?
NThy #ife itse#f interpreteth unto us this drea', 7 Zarathustra&
;rt thou not thyse#f the $ind $ith shri## $hist#ing, $hich bursteth open
the gates of the fortress of *eathS
;rt thou not thyse#f the coffin fu## of 'anyDhued 'a#ices and ange#D
caricatures of #ifeS
,eri#y, #ike a thousand pea#s of chi#drenMs #aughter co'eth Zarathustra
into a## sepu#chres, #aughing at those nightD$atch'en and gra%eDguardians,
and $hoe%er e#se ratt#eth $ith sinister keys(
)ith thy #aughter $i#t thou frighten and prostrate the'? fainting and
reco%ering $i## de'onstrate thy po$er o%er the'(
;nd $hen the #ong t$i#ight co'eth and the 'orta# $eariness, e%en then $i#t
thou not disappear fro' our fir'a'ent, thou ad%ocate of #ife&
Ne$ stars hast thou 'ade us see, and ne$ nocturna# g#ories? %eri#y,
#aughter itse#f hast thou spread out o%er us #ike a 'anyDhued canopy(
No$ $i## chi#drenMs #aughter e%er fro' coffins f#o$L no$ $i## a strong $ind
e%er co'e %ictorious#y unto a## 'orta# $eariness? of this thou art thyse#f
the p#edge and the prophet&
,eri#y, T/EQ T/E9SE:,ES *2*ST T/78 *-E;9, thine ene'ies? that $as thy
sorest drea'(
.ut as thou a$okest fro' the' and ca'est to thyse#f, so sha## they a$aken
fro' the'se#%esDDand co'e unto thee&N
Thus spake the discip#eL and a## the others then thronged around
Zarathustra, grasped hi' by the hands, and tried to persuade hi' to #ea%e
his bed and his sadness, and return unto the'( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, sat
upright on his couch, $ith an absent #ook( :ike one returning fro' #ong
foreign sojourn did he #ook on his discip#es, and exa'ined their featuresL
but sti## he kne$ the' not( )hen, ho$e%er, they raised hi', and set hi'
upon his feet, beho#d, a## on a sudden his eye changedL he understood
e%erything that had happened, stroked his beard, and said $ith a strong
%oice?
N)e##& this hath just its ti'eL but see to it, 'y discip#es, that $e ha%e a
good repastL and $ithout de#ay& Thus do 2 'ean to 'ake a'ends for bad
drea's&
The soothsayer, ho$e%er, sha## eat and drink at 'y side? and %eri#y, 2
$i## yet sho$ hi' a sea in $hich he can dro$n hi'se#f&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra( Then did he gaze #ong into the face of the
discip#e $ho had been the drea'Dinterpreter, and shook his head(DD
R:22( -E*E9PT27N(
)hen Zarathustra $ent one day o%er the great bridge, then did the cripp#es
and beggars surround hi', and a hunchback spake thus unto hi'?
N.eho#d, Zarathustra& E%en the peop#e #earn fro' thee, and acUuire faith
in thy teaching? but for the' to be#ie%e fu##y in thee, one thing is sti##
needfu#DDthou 'ust first of a## con%ince us cripp#es& /ere hast thou no$ a
fine se#ection, and %eri#y, an opportunity $ith 'ore than one fore#ock&
The b#ind canst thou hea#, and 'ake the #a'e runL and fro' hi' $ho hath too
'uch behind, cou#dst thou $e##, a#so, take a$ay a #itt#eLDDthat, 2 think,
$ou#d be the right 'ethod to 'ake the cripp#es be#ie%e in Zarathustra&N
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, ans$ered thus unto hi' $ho so spake? )hen one taketh
his hu'p fro' the hunchback, then doth one take fro' hi' his spiritDDso do
the peop#e teach( ;nd $hen one gi%eth the b#ind 'an eyes, then doth he see
too 'any bad things on the earth? so that he curseth hi' $ho hea#ed hi'(
/e, ho$e%er, $ho 'aketh the #a'e 'an run, inf#icteth upon hi' the greatest
injuryL for hard#y can he run, $hen his %ices run a$ay $ith hi'DDso do the
peop#e teach concerning cripp#es( ;nd $hy shou#d not Zarathustra a#so
#earn fro' the peop#e, $hen the peop#e #earn fro' ZarathustraS
2t is, ho$e%er, the s'a##est thing unto 'e since 2 ha%e been a'ongst 'en,
to see one person #acking an eye, another an ear, and a third a #eg, and
that others ha%e #ost the tongue, or the nose, or the head(
2 see and ha%e seen $orse things, and di%ers things so hideous, that 2
shou#d neither #ike to speak of a## 'atters, nor e%en keep si#ent about
so'e of the'? na'e#y, 'en $ho #ack e%erything, except that they ha%e too
'uch of one thingDD'en $ho are nothing 'ore than a big eye, or a big 'outh,
or a big be##y, or so'ething e#se big,DDre%ersed cripp#es, 2 ca## such 'en(
;nd $hen 2 ca'e out of 'y so#itude, and for the first ti'e passed o%er this
bridge, then 2 cou#d not trust 'ine eyes, but #ooked again and again, and
said at #ast? NThat is an ear& ;n ear as big as a 'an&N 2 #ooked sti##
'ore attenti%e#yDDand actua##y there did 'o%e under the ear so'ething that
$as pitiab#y s'a## and poor and s#i'( ;nd in truth this i''ense ear $as
perched on a s'a## thin sta#kDDthe sta#k, ho$e%er, $as a 'an& ; person
putting a g#ass to his eyes, cou#d e%en recognise further a s'a## en%ious
countenance, and a#so that a b#oated sou##et dang#ed at the sta#k( The
peop#e to#d 'e, ho$e%er, that the big ear $as not on#y a 'an, but a great
'an, a genius( .ut 2 ne%er be#ie%ed in the peop#e $hen they spake of great
'enDDand 2 ho#d to 'y be#ief that it $as a re%ersed cripp#e, $ho had too
#itt#e of e%erything, and too 'uch of one thing(
)hen Zarathustra had spoken thus unto the hunchback, and unto those of $ho'
the hunchback $as the 'outhpiece and ad%ocate, then did he turn to his
discip#es in profound dejection, and said?
,eri#y, 'y friends, 2 $a#k a'ongst 'en as a'ongst the frag'ents and #i'bs
of hu'an beings&
This is the terrib#e thing to 'ine eye, that 2 find 'an broken up, and
scattered about, as on a batt#eD and butcherDground(
;nd $hen 'ine eye f#eeth fro' the present to the bygone, it findeth e%er
the sa'e? frag'ents and #i'bs and fearfu# chancesDDbut no 'en&
The present and the bygone upon earthDDah& 'y friendsDDthat is 9Q 'ost
unbearab#e troub#eL and 2 shou#d not kno$ ho$ to #i%e, if 2 $ere not a seer
of $hat is to co'e(
; seer, a purposer, a creator, a future itse#f, and a bridge to the future
DDand a#as& a#so as it $ere a cripp#e on this bridge? a## that is
Zarathustra(
;nd ye a#so asked yourse#%es often? N)ho is Zarathustra to usS )hat sha##
he be ca##ed by usSN ;nd #ike 'e, did ye gi%e yourse#%es Uuestions for
ans$ers(
2s he a pro'iserS 7r a fu#fi##erS ; conUuerorS 7r an inheritorS ;
har%estS 7r a p#oughshareS ; physicianS 7r a hea#ed oneS
2s he a poetS 7r a genuine oneS ;n e'ancipatorS 7r a subjugatorS ; good
oneS 7r an e%i# oneS
2 $a#k a'ongst 'en as the frag'ents of the future? that future $hich 2
conte'p#ate(
;nd it is a## 'y poetisation and aspiration to co'pose and co##ect into
unity $hat is frag'ent and ridd#e and fearfu# chance(
;nd ho$ cou#d 2 endure to be a 'an, if 'an $ere not a#so the co'poser, and
ridd#eDreader, and redee'er of chance&
To redee' $hat is past, and to transfor' e%ery N2t $asN into NThus $ou#d 2
ha%e it&NDDthat on#y do 2 ca## rede'ption&
)i##DDso is the e'ancipator and joyDbringer ca##ed? thus ha%e 2 taught
you, 'y friends& .ut no$ #earn this #ike$ise? the )i## itse#f is sti## a
prisoner(
)i##ing e'ancipateth? but $hat is that ca##ed $hich sti## putteth the
e'ancipator in chainsS
N2t $asN? thus is the )i##Ms teethDgnashing and #oneso'est tribu#ation
ca##ed( 2'potent to$ards $hat hath been doneDDit is a 'a#icious spectator
of a## that is past(
Not back$ard can the )i## $i##L that it cannot break ti'e and ti'eMs
desireDDthat is the )i##Ms #oneso'est tribu#ation(
)i##ing e'ancipateth? $hat doth )i##ing itse#f de%ise in order to get free
fro' its tribu#ation and 'ock at its prisonS
;h, a foo# beco'eth e%ery prisoner& Foo#ish#y de#i%ereth itse#f a#so the
i'prisoned )i##(
That ti'e doth not run back$ardDDthat is its ani'osity? NThat $hich $asN?
so is the stone $hich it cannot ro## ca##ed(
;nd thus doth it ro## stones out of ani'osity and i##Dhu'our, and taketh
re%enge on $hate%er doth not, #ike it, fee# rage and i##Dhu'our(
Thus did the )i##, the e'ancipator, beco'e a torturerL and on a## that is
capab#e of suffering it taketh re%enge, because it cannot go back$ard(
This, yea, this a#one is -E,ENGE itse#f? the )i##Ms antipathy to ti'e, and
its N2t $as(N
,eri#y, a great fo##y d$e##eth in our )i##L and it beca'e a curse unto a##
hu'anity, that this fo##y acUuired spirit&
T/E SP2-2T 7F -E,ENGE? 'y friends, that hath hitherto been 'anMs best
conte'p#ationL and $here there $as suffering, it $as c#ai'ed there $as
a#$ays pena#ty(
NPena#ty,N so ca##eth itse#f re%enge( )ith a #ying $ord it feigneth a good
conscience(
;nd because in the $i##er hi'se#f there is suffering, because he cannot
$i## back$ardsDDthus $as )i##ing itse#f, and a## #ife, c#ai'edDDto be
pena#ty&
;nd then did c#oud after c#oud ro## o%er the spirit, unti# at #ast 'adness
preached? NE%erything perisheth, therefore e%erything deser%eth to
perish&N
N;nd this itse#f is justice, the #a$ of ti'eDDthat he 'ust de%our his
chi#dren?N thus did 'adness preach(
N9ora##y are things ordered according to justice and pena#ty( 7h, $here is
there de#i%erance fro' the f#ux of things and fro' the MexistenceM of
pena#tySN Thus did 'adness preach(
N"an there be de#i%erance $hen there is eterna# justiceS ;#as, unro##ab#e
is the stone, M2t $asM? eterna# 'ust a#so be a## pena#ties&N Thus did
'adness preach(
NNo deed can be annihi#ated? ho$ cou#d it be undone by the pena#ty& This,
this is $hat is eterna# in the MexistenceM of pena#ty, that existence a#so
'ust be eterna##y recurring deed and gui#t&
8n#ess the )i## shou#d at #ast de#i%er itse#f, and )i##ing beco'e nonD
)i##ingDD?N but ye kno$, 'y brethren, this fabu#ous song of 'adness&
;$ay fro' those fabu#ous songs did 2 #ead you $hen 2 taught you? NThe )i##
is a creator(N
;## N2t $asN is a frag'ent, a ridd#e, a fearfu# chanceDDunti# the creating
)i## saith thereto? N.ut thus $ou#d 2 ha%e it(NDD
8nti# the creating )i## saith thereto? N.ut thus do 2 $i## it& Thus sha##
2 $i## it&N
.ut did it e%er speak thusS ;nd $hen doth this take p#aceS /ath the )i##
been unharnessed fro' its o$n fo##yS
/ath the )i## beco'e its o$n de#i%erer and joyDbringerS /ath it un#earned
the spirit of re%enge and a## teethDgnashingS
;nd $ho hath taught it reconci#iation $ith ti'e, and so'ething higher than
a## reconci#iationS
So'ething higher than a## reconci#iation 'ust the )i## $i## $hich is the
)i## to Po$erDD? but ho$ doth that take p#aceS )ho hath taught it a#so to
$i## back$ardsS
DD.ut at this point in his discourse it chanced that Zarathustra sudden#y
paused, and #ooked #ike a person in the greatest a#ar'( )ith terror in his
eyes did he gaze on his discip#esL his g#ances pierced as $ith arro$s their
thoughts and arrearDthoughts( .ut after a brief space he again #aughed,
and said soothed#y?
N2t is difficu#t to #i%e a'ongst 'en, because si#ence is so difficu#tDD
especia##y for a babb#er(NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra( The hunchback, ho$e%er, had #istened to the
con%ersation and had co%ered his face during the ti'eL but $hen he heard
Zarathustra #augh, he #ooked up $ith curiosity, and said s#o$#y?
N.ut $hy doth Zarathustra speak other$ise unto us than unto his discip#esSN
Zarathustra ans$ered? N)hat is there to be $ondered at& )ith hunchbacks
one 'ay $e## speak in a hunchbacked $ay&N
N,ery good,N said the hunchbackL Nand $ith pupi#s one 'ay $e## te## ta#es
out of schoo#(
.ut $hy doth Zarathustra speak other$ise unto his pupi#sDDthan unto
hi'se#fSNDD
R:222( 9;N:Q P-8*EN"E(
Not the height, it is the dec#i%ity that is terrib#e&
The dec#i%ity, $here the gaze shooteth *7)N);-*S, and the hand graspeth
8P);-*S( There doth the heart beco'e giddy through its doub#e $i##(
;h, friends, do ye di%ine a#so 'y heartMs doub#e $i##S
This, this is 9Q dec#i%ity and 'y danger, that 'y gaze shooteth to$ards the
su''it, and 'y hand $ou#d fain c#utch and #eanDDon the depth&
To 'an c#ingeth 'y $i##L $ith chains do 2 bind 'yse#f to 'an, because 2 a'
pu##ed up$ards to the Super'an? for thither doth 'ine other $i## tend(
;nd T/E-EF7-E do 2 #i%e b#ind#y a'ong 'en, as if 2 kne$ the' not? that 'y
hand 'ay not entire#y #ose be#ief in fir'ness(
2 kno$ not you 'en? this g#oo' and conso#ation is often spread around 'e(
2 sit at the gate$ay for e%ery rogue, and ask? )ho $isheth to decei%e 'eS
This is 'y first 'an#y prudence, that 2 a##o$ 'yse#f to be decei%ed, so as
not to be on 'y guard against decei%ers(
;h, if 2 $ere on 'y guard against 'an, ho$ cou#d 'an be an anchor to 'y
ba##& Too easi#y $ou#d 2 be pu##ed up$ards and a$ay&
This pro%idence is o%er 'y fate, that 2 ha%e to be $ithout foresight(
;nd he $ho $ou#d not #anguish a'ongst 'en, 'ust #earn to drink out of a##
g#assesL and he $ho $ou#d keep c#ean a'ongst 'en, 'ust kno$ ho$ to $ash
hi'se#f e%en $ith dirty $ater(
;nd thus spake 2 often to 'yse#f for conso#ation? N"ourage& "heer up& o#d
heart& ;n unhappiness hath fai#ed to befa## thee? enjoy that as thyDD
happiness&N
This, ho$e%er, is 'ine other 'an#y prudence? 2 a' 'ore forbearing to the
,;2N than to the proud(
2s not $ounded %anity the 'other of a## tragediesS )here, ho$e%er, pride
is $ounded, there there gro$eth up so'ething better than pride(
That #ife 'ay be fair to beho#d, its ga'e 'ust be $e## p#ayedL for that
purpose, ho$e%er, it needeth good actors(
Good actors ha%e 2 found a## the %ain ones? they p#ay, and $ish peop#e to
be fond of beho#ding the'DDa## their spirit is in this $ish(
They represent the'se#%es, they in%ent the'se#%esL in their neighbourhood 2
#ike to #ook upon #ifeDDit cureth of 'e#ancho#y(
Therefore a' 2 forbearing to the %ain, because they are the physicians of
'y 'e#ancho#y, and keep 'e attached to 'an as to a dra'a(
;nd further, $ho concei%eth the fu## depth of the 'odesty of the %ain 'an&
2 a' fa%ourab#e to hi', and sy'pathetic on account of his 'odesty(
Fro' you $ou#d he #earn his be#ief in hi'se#fL he feedeth upon your
g#ances, he eateth praise out of your hands(
Qour #ies doth he e%en be#ie%e $hen you #ie fa%ourab#y about hi'? for in
its depths sigheth his heart? N)hat a' X2XSN
;nd if that be the true %irtue $hich is unconscious of itse#fDD$e##, the
%ain 'an is unconscious of his 'odesty&DD
This is, ho$e%er, 'y third 'an#y prudence? 2 a' not put out of conceit
$ith the )2"WE* by your ti'orousness(
2 a' happy to see the 'ar%e#s the $ar' sun hatcheth? tigers and pa#'s and
ratt#eDsnakes(
;#so a'ongst 'en there is a beautifu# brood of the $ar' sun, and 'uch that
is 'ar%e##ous in the $icked(
2n truth, as your $isest did not see' to 'e so %ery $ise, so found 2 a#so
hu'an $ickedness be#o$ the fa'e of it(
;nd oft did 2 ask $ith a shake of the head? )hy sti## ratt#e, ye ratt#eD
snakesS
,eri#y, there is sti## a future e%en for e%i#& ;nd the $ar'est south is
sti## undisco%ered by 'an(
/o$ 'any things are no$ ca##ed the $orst $ickedness, $hich are on#y t$e#%e
feet broad and three 'onths #ong& So'e day, ho$e%er, $i## greater dragons
co'e into the $or#d(
For that the Super'an 'ay not #ack his dragon, the superdragon that is
$orthy of hi', there 'ust sti## 'uch $ar' sun g#o$ on 'oist %irgin forests&
7ut of your $i#d cats 'ust tigers ha%e e%o#%ed, and out of your poisonD
toads, crocodi#es? for the good hunter sha## ha%e a good hunt&
;nd %eri#y, ye good and just& 2n you there is 'uch to be #aughed at, and
especia##y your fear of $hat hath hitherto been ca##ed Nthe de%i#&N
So a#ien are ye in your sou#s to $hat is great, that to you the Super'an
$ou#d be F-2G/TF8: in his goodness&
;nd ye $ise and kno$ing ones, ye $ou#d f#ee fro' the so#arDg#o$ of the
$isdo' in $hich the Super'an joyfu##y batheth his nakedness&
Qe highest 'en $ho ha%e co'e $ithin 'y ken& this is 'y doubt of you, and 'y
secret #aughter? 2 suspect ye $ou#d ca## 'y Super'anDDa de%i#&
;h, 2 beca'e tired of those highest and best ones? fro' their NheightN did
2 #ong to be up, out, and a$ay to the Super'an&
; horror ca'e o%er 'e $hen 2 sa$ those best ones naked? then there gre$
for 'e the pinions to soar a$ay into distant futures(
2nto 'ore distant futures, into 'ore southern souths than e%er artist
drea'ed of? thither, $here Gods are asha'ed of a## c#othes&
.ut disguised do 2 $ant to see Q78, ye neighbours and fe##o$'en, and $e##D
attired and %ain and esti'ab#e, as Nthe good and justLNDD
;nd disguised $i## 2 'yse#f sit a'ongst youDDthat 2 'ay 92ST;WE you and
'yse#f? for that is 'y #ast 'an#y prudence(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R:2,( T/E ST2::EST /78-(
)hat hath happened unto 'e, 'y friendsS Qe see 'e troub#ed, dri%en forth,
un$i##ing#y obedient, ready to goDDa#as, to go a$ay fro' Q78&
Qea, once 'ore 'ust Zarathustra retire to his so#itude? but unjoyous#y
this ti'e doth the bear go back to his ca%e&
)hat hath happened unto 'eS )ho ordereth thisSDD;h, 'ine angry 'istress
$isheth it soL she spake unto 'e( /a%e 2 e%er na'ed her na'e to youS
Qesterday to$ards e%ening there spake unto 'e 9Q ST2::EST /78-? that is
the na'e of 'y terrib#e 'istress(
;nd thus did it happenDDfor e%erything 'ust 2 te## you, that your heart 'ay
not harden against the sudden#y departing one&
*o ye kno$ the terror of hi' $ho fa##eth as#eepSDD
To the %ery toes he is terrified, because the ground gi%eth $ay under hi',
and the drea' beginneth(
This do 2 speak unto you in parab#e( Qesterday at the sti##est hour did
the ground gi%e $ay under 'e? the drea' began(
The hourDhand 'o%ed on, the ti'epiece of 'y #ife dre$ breathDDne%er did 2
hear such sti##ness around 'e, so that 'y heart $as terrified(
Then $as there spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? NT/78 WN7)EST 2T,
Z;-;T/8ST-;SNDD
;nd 2 cried in terror at this $hispering, and the b#ood #eft 'y face? but
2 $as si#ent(
Then $as there once 'ore spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? NThou kno$est it,
Zarathustra, but thou dost not speak it&NDD
;nd at #ast 2 ans$ered, #ike one defiant? NQea, 2 kno$ it, but 2 $i## not
speak it&N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? NThou )2:T not,
ZarathustraS 2s this trueS "oncea# thyse#f not behind thy defiance&NDD
;nd 2 $ept and tre'b#ed #ike a chi#d, and said? N;h, 2 $ou#d indeed, but
ho$ can 2 do it& Exe'pt 'e on#y fro' this& 2t is beyond 'y po$er&N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? N)hat 'atter about
thyse#f, Zarathustra& Speak thy $ord, and succu'b&N
;nd 2 ans$ered? N;h, is it 9Q $ordS )ho a' X2XS 2 a$ait the $orthier
oneL 2 a' not $orthy e%en to succu'b by it(N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? N)hat 'atter about
thyse#fS Thou art not yet hu'b#e enough for 'e( /u'i#ity hath the hardest
skin(NDD
;nd 2 ans$ered? N)hat hath not the skin of 'y hu'i#ity endured& ;t the
foot of 'y height do 2 d$e##? ho$ high are 'y su''its, no one hath yet
to#d 'e( .ut $e## do 2 kno$ 'y %a##eys(N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? N7 Zarathustra, he $ho
hath to re'o%e 'ountains re'o%eth a#so %a##eys and p#ains(NDD
;nd 2 ans$ered? N;s yet hath 'y $ord not re'o%ed 'ountains, and $hat 2
ha%e spoken hath not reached 'an( 2 $ent, indeed, unto 'en, but not yet
ha%e 2 attained unto the'(N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? N)hat kno$est thou
T/E-E7F& The de$ fa##eth on the grass $hen the night is 'ost si#ent(NDD
;nd 2 ans$ered? NThey 'ocked 'e $hen 2 found and $a#ked in 'ine o$n pathL
and certain#y did 'y feet then tre'b#e(
;nd thus did they speak unto 'e? Thou forgottest the path before, no$ dost
thou a#so forget ho$ to $a#k&N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? N)hat 'atter about
their 'ockery& Thou art one $ho hast un#earned to obey? no$ sha#t thou
co''and&
Wno$est thou not $ho is 'ost needed by a##S /e $ho co''andeth great
things(
To execute great things is difficu#t? but the 'ore difficu#t task is to
co''and great things(
This is thy 'ost unpardonab#e obstinacy? thou hast the po$er, and thou
$i#t not ru#e(NDD
;nd 2 ans$ered? N2 #ack the #ionMs %oice for a## co''anding(N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e as a $hispering? N2t is the sti##est
$ords $hich bring the stor'( Thoughts that co'e $ith do%esM footsteps
guide the $or#d(
7 Zarathustra, thou sha#t go as a shado$ of that $hich is to co'e? thus
$i#t thou co''and, and in co''anding go fore'ost(NDD
;nd 2 ans$ered? N2 a' asha'ed(N
Then $as there again spoken unto 'e $ithout %oice? NThou 'ust yet beco'e a
chi#d, and be $ithout sha'e(
The pride of youth is sti## upon theeL #ate hast thou beco'e young? but he
$ho $ou#d beco'e a chi#d 'ust sur'ount e%en his youth(NDD
;nd 2 considered a #ong $hi#e, and tre'b#ed( ;t #ast, ho$e%er, did 2 say
$hat 2 had said at first( N2 $i## not(N
Then did a #aughing take p#ace a## around 'e( ;#as, ho$ that #aughing
#acerated 'y bo$e#s and cut into 'y heart&
;nd there $as spoken unto 'e for the #ast ti'e? N7 Zarathustra, thy fruits
are ripe, but thou art not ripe for thy fruits&
So 'ust thou go again into so#itude? for thou sha#t yet beco'e 'e##o$(NDD
;nd again $as there a #aughing, and it f#ed? then did it beco'e sti##
around 'e, as $ith a doub#e sti##ness( 2 #ay, ho$e%er, on the ground, and
the s$eat f#o$ed fro' 'y #i'bs(
DDNo$ ha%e ye heard a##, and $hy 2 ha%e to return into 'y so#itude(
Nothing ha%e 2 kept hidden fro' you, 'y friends(
.ut e%en this ha%e ye heard fro' 'e, )/7 is sti## the 'ost reser%ed of 'en
DDand $i## be so&
;h, 'y friends& 2 shou#d ha%e so'ething 'ore to say unto you& 2 shou#d
ha%e so'ething 'ore to gi%e unto you& )hy do 2 not gi%e itS ;' 2 then a
niggardSDD
)hen, ho$e%er, Zarathustra had spoken these $ords, the %io#ence of his
pain, and a sense of the nearness of his departure fro' his friends ca'e
o%er hi', so that he $ept a#oudL and no one kne$ ho$ to conso#e hi'( 2n
the night, ho$e%er, he $ent a$ay a#one and #eft his friends(
T/2-* P;-T(
NQe #ook a#oft $hen ye #ong for exa#tation, and 2 #ook do$n$ard because 2
a' exa#ted(
N)ho a'ong you can at the sa'e ti'e #augh and be exa#tedS
N/e $ho c#i'beth on the highest 'ountains, #augheth at a## tragic p#ays and
tragic rea#ities(NDDZ;-;T/8ST-;, 2(, N-eading and )riting(N
R:,( T/E );N*E-E-(
Then, $hen it $as about 'idnight, Zarathustra $ent his $ay o%er the ridge
of the is#e, that he 'ight arri%e ear#y in the 'orning at the other coastL
because there he 'eant to e'bark( For there $as a good roadstead there, in
$hich foreign ships a#so #iked to anchor? those ships took 'any peop#e
$ith the', $ho $ished to cross o%er fro' the /appy 2s#es( So $hen
Zarathustra thus ascended the 'ountain, he thought on the $ay of his 'any
so#itary $anderings fro' youth on$ards, and ho$ 'any 'ountains and ridges
and su''its he had a#ready c#i'bed(
2 a' a $anderer and 'ountainDc#i'ber, said he to his heart, 2 #o%e not the
p#ains, and it see'eth 2 cannot #ong sit sti##(
;nd $hate%er 'ay sti## o%ertake 'e as fate and experienceDDa $andering $i##
be therein, and a 'ountainDc#i'bing? in the end one experienceth on#y
onese#f(
The ti'e is no$ past $hen accidents cou#d befa## 'eL and $hat "78:* no$
fa## to 'y #ot $hich $ou#d not a#ready be 'ine o$n&
2t returneth on#y, it co'eth ho'e to 'e at #astDD'ine o$n Se#f, and such of
it as hath been #ong abroad, and scattered a'ong things and accidents(
;nd one thing 'ore do 2 kno$? 2 stand no$ before 'y #ast su''it, and
before that $hich hath been #ongest reser%ed for 'e( ;h, 'y hardest path
'ust 2 ascend& ;h, 2 ha%e begun 'y #oneso'est $andering&
/e, ho$e%er, $ho is of 'y nature doth not a%oid such an hour? the hour
that saith unto hi'? No$ on#y dost thou go the $ay to thy greatness&
Su''it and abyssDDthese are no$ co'prised together&
Thou goest the $ay to thy greatness? no$ hath it beco'e thy #ast refuge,
$hat $as hitherto thy #ast danger&
Thou goest the $ay to thy greatness? it 'ust no$ be thy best courage that
there is no #onger any path behind thee&
Thou goest the $ay to thy greatness? here sha## no one stea# after thee&
Thy foot itse#f hath effaced the path behind thee, and o%er it standeth
$ritten? 2'possibi#ity(
;nd if a## #adders henceforth fai# thee, then 'ust thou #earn to 'ount upon
thine o$n head? ho$ cou#dst thou 'ount up$ard other$iseS
8pon thine o$n head, and beyond thine o$n heart& No$ 'ust the gent#est in
thee beco'e the hardest(
/e $ho hath a#$ays 'uchDindu#ged hi'se#f, sickeneth at #ast by his 'uchD
indu#gence( Praises on $hat 'aketh hardy& 2 do not praise the #and $here
butter and honeyDDf#o$&
To #earn T7 :77W ;);Q F-79 onese#f, is necessary in order to see 9;NQ
T/2NGS?DDthis hardiness is needed by e%ery 'ountainDc#i'ber(
/e, ho$e%er, $ho is obtrusi%e $ith his eyes as a discerner, ho$ can he e%er
see 'ore of anything than its foreground&
.ut thou, 7 Zarathustra, $ou#dst %ie$ the ground of e%erything, and its
background? thus 'ust thou 'ount e%en abo%e thyse#fDDup, up$ards, unti#
thou hast e%en thy stars 8N*E- thee&
Qea& To #ook do$n upon 'yse#f, and e%en upon 'y stars? that on#y $ou#d 2
ca## 'y S8992T, that hath re'ained for 'e as 'y :;ST su''it&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra to hi'se#f $hi#e ascending, co'forting his heart
$ith harsh 'axi's? for he $as sore at heart as he had ne%er been before(
;nd $hen he had reached the top of the 'ountainDridge, beho#d, there #ay
the other sea spread out before hi'? and he stood sti## and $as #ong
si#ent( The night, ho$e%er, $as co#d at this height, and c#ear and starry(
2 recognise 'y destiny, said he at #ast, sad#y( )e##& 2 a' ready( No$
hath 'y #ast #oneso'eness begun(
;h, this so'bre, sad sea, be#o$ 'e& ;h, this so'bre nocturna# %exation&
;h, fate and sea& To you 'ust 2 no$ G7 *7)N&
.efore 'y highest 'ountain do 2 stand, and before 'y #ongest $andering?
therefore 'ust 2 first go deeper do$n than 2 e%er ascended?
DD*eeper do$n into pain than 2 e%er ascended, e%en into its darkest f#ood&
So $i##eth 'y fate( )e##& 2 a' ready(
)hence co'e the highest 'ountainsS so did 2 once ask( Then did 2 #earn
that they co'e out of the sea(
That testi'ony is inscribed on their stones, and on the $a##s of their
su''its( 7ut of the deepest 'ust the highest co'e to its height(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra on the ridge of the 'ountain $here it $as co#d?
$hen, ho$e%er, he ca'e into the %icinity of the sea, and at #ast stood
a#one a'ongst the c#iffs, then had he beco'e $eary on his $ay, and eagerer
than e%er before(
E%erything as yet s#eepeth, said heL e%en the sea s#eepeth( *ro$si#y and
strange#y doth its eye gaze upon 'e(
.ut it breatheth $ar'#yDD2 fee# it( ;nd 2 fee# a#so that it drea'eth( 2t
tosseth about drea'i#y on hard pi##o$s(
/ark& /ark& /o$ it groaneth $ith e%i# reco##ections& 7r e%i#
expectationsS
;h, 2 a' sad a#ong $ith thee, thou dusky 'onster, and angry $ith 'yse#f
e%en for thy sake(
;h, that 'y hand hath not strength enough& G#ad#y, indeed, $ou#d 2 free
thee fro' e%i# drea's&DD
;nd $hi#e Zarathustra thus spake, he #aughed at hi'se#f $ith 'e#ancho#y and
bitterness( )hat& Zarathustra, said he, $i#t thou e%en sing conso#ation to
the seaS
;h, thou a'iab#e foo#, Zarathustra, thou tooDb#ind#y confiding one& .ut
thus hast thou e%er been? e%er hast thou approached confident#y a## that
is terrib#e(
E%ery 'onster $ou#dst thou caress( ; $hiff of $ar' breath, a #itt#e soft
tuft on its pa$DD? and i''ediate#y $ert thou ready to #o%e and #ure it(
:7,E is the danger of the #oneso'est one, #o%e to anything, 2F 2T 7N:Q
:2,E& :aughab#e, %eri#y, is 'y fo##y and 'y 'odesty in #o%e&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra, and #aughed thereby a second ti'e( Then, ho$e%er,
he thought of his abandoned friendsDDand as if he had done the' a $rong
$ith his thoughts, he upbraided hi'se#f because of his thoughts( ;nd
forth$ith it ca'e to pass that the #augher $eptDD$ith anger and #onging
$ept Zarathustra bitter#y(
R:,2( T/E ,2S27N ;N* T/E EN2G9;(
!(
)hen it got abroad a'ong the sai#ors that Zarathustra $as on board the
shipDDfor a 'an $ho ca'e fro' the /appy 2s#es had gone on board a#ong $ith
hi',DDthere $as great curiosity and expectation( .ut Zarathustra kept
si#ent for t$o days, and $as co#d and deaf $ith sadnessL so that he neither
ans$ered #ooks nor Uuestions( 7n the e%ening of the second day, ho$e%er,
he again opened his ears, though he sti## kept si#ent? for there $ere 'any
curious and dangerous things to be heard on board the ship, $hich ca'e fro'
afar, and $as to go sti## further( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, $as fond of a##
those $ho 'ake distant %oyages, and dis#ike to #i%e $ithout danger( ;nd
beho#d& $hen #istening, his o$n tongue $as at #ast #oosened, and the ice of
his heart broke( Then did he begin to speak thus?
To you, the daring %enturers and ad%enturers, and $hoe%er hath e'barked
$ith cunning sai#s upon frightfu# seas,DD
To you the enig'aDintoxicated, the t$i#ightDenjoyers, $hose sou#s are
a##ured by f#utes to e%ery treacherous gu#f?
DDFor ye dis#ike to grope at a thread $ith co$ard#y handL and $here ye can
*2,2NE, there do ye hate to ";:"8:;TEDD
To you on#y do 2 te## the enig'a that 2 S;)DDthe %ision of the #oneso'est
one(DD
G#oo'i#y $a#ked 2 #ate#y in corpseDco#oured t$i#ightDDg#oo'i#y and stern#y,
$ith co'pressed #ips( Not on#y one sun had set for 'e(
; path $hich ascended daring#y a'ong bou#ders, an e%i#, #oneso'e path,
$hich neither herb nor shrub any #onger cheered, a 'ountainDpath, crunched
under the daring of 'y foot(
9ute#y 'arching o%er the scornfu# c#inking of pebb#es, tra'p#ing the stone
that #et it s#ip? thus did 'y foot force its $ay up$ards(
8p$ards?DDin spite of the spirit that dre$ it do$n$ards, to$ards the abyss,
the spirit of gra%ity, 'y de%i# and archDene'y(
8p$ards?DDa#though it sat upon 'e, ha#fDd$arf, ha#fD'o#eL para#ysed,
para#ysingL dripping #ead in 'ine ear, and thoughts #ike drops of #ead into
'y brain(
N7 Zarathustra,N it $hispered scornfu##y, sy##ab#e by sy##ab#e, Nthou stone
of $isdo'& Thou thre$est thyse#f high, but e%ery thro$n stone 'ustDDfa##&
7 Zarathustra, thou stone of $isdo', thou s#ingDstone, thou starDdestroyer&
Thyse#f thre$est thou so high,DDbut e%ery thro$n stoneDD'ust fa##&
"onde'ned of thyse#f, and to thine o$n stoning? 7 Zarathustra, far indeed
thre$est thou thy stoneDDbut upon T/QSE:F $i## it recoi#&N
Then $as the d$arf si#entL and it #asted #ong( The si#ence, ho$e%er,
oppressed 'eL and to be thus in pairs, one is %eri#y #oneso'er than $hen
a#one&
2 ascended, 2 ascended, 2 drea't, 2 thought,DDbut e%erything oppressed 'e(
; sick one did 2 rese'b#e, $ho' bad torture $earieth, and a $orse drea'
rea$akeneth out of his first s#eep(DD
.ut there is so'ething in 'e $hich 2 ca## courage? it hath hitherto s#ain
for 'e e%ery dejection( This courage at #ast bade 'e stand sti## and say?
N*$arf& Thou& 7r 2&NDD
For courage is the best s#ayer,DDcourage $hich ;TT;"WET/? for in e%ery
attack there is sound of triu'ph(
9an, ho$e%er, is the 'ost courageous ani'a#? thereby hath he o%erco'e
e%ery ani'a#( )ith sound of triu'ph hath he o%erco'e e%ery painL hu'an
pain, ho$e%er, is the sorest pain(
"ourage s#ayeth a#so giddiness at abysses? and $here doth 'an not stand at
abysses& 2s not seeing itse#fDDseeing abyssesS
"ourage is the best s#ayer? courage s#ayeth a#so fe##o$Dsuffering(
Fe##o$Dsuffering, ho$e%er, is the deepest abyss? as deep#y as 'an #ooketh
into #ife, so deep#y a#so doth he #ook into suffering(
"ourage, ho$e%er, is the best s#ayer, courage $hich attacketh? it s#ayeth
e%en death itse#fL for it saith? N);S T/;T #ifeS )e##& 7nce 'ore&N
2n such speech, ho$e%er, there is 'uch sound of triu'ph( /e $ho hath ears
to hear, #et hi' hear(DD
C(
N/a#t, d$arf&N said 2( NEither 2DDor thou& 2, ho$e%er, a' the stronger of
the t$o?DDthou kno$est not 'ine abys'a# thought& 2TDDcou#dst thou not
endure&N
Then happened that $hich 'ade 'e #ighter? for the d$arf sprang fro' 'y
shou#der, the prying sprite& ;nd it sUuatted on a stone in front of 'e(
There $as ho$e%er a gate$ay just $here $e ha#ted(
N:ook at this gate$ay& *$arf&N 2 continued, Nit hath t$o faces( T$o roads
co'e together here? these hath no one yet gone to the end of(
This #ong #ane back$ards? it continueth for an eternity( ;nd that #ong
#ane for$ardDDthat is another eternity(
They are antithetica# to one another, these roadsL they direct#y abut on
one another?DDand it is here, at this gate$ay, that they co'e together(
The na'e of the gate$ay is inscribed abo%e? MThis 9o'ent(M
.ut shou#d one fo##o$ the' furtherDDand e%er further and further on,
thinkest thou, d$arf, that these roads $ou#d be eterna##y antithetica#SNDD
NE%erything straight #ieth,N 'ur'ured the d$arf, conte'ptuous#y( N;##
truth is crookedL ti'e itse#f is a circ#e(N
NThou spirit of gra%ity&N said 2 $rathfu##y, Ndo not take it too #ight#y&
7r 2 sha## #et thee sUuat $here thou sUuattest, /a#tfoot,DDand 2 carried
thee /2G/&N
N7bser%e,N continued 2, NThis 9o'ent& Fro' the gate$ay, This 9o'ent, there
runneth a #ong eterna# #ane .;"W);-*S? behind us #ieth an eternity(
9ust not $hate%er ";N run its course of a## things, ha%e a#ready run a#ong
that #aneS 9ust not $hate%er ";N happen of a## things ha%e a#ready
happened, resu#ted, and gone byS
;nd if e%erything ha%e a#ready existed, $hat thinkest thou, d$arf, of This
9o'entS 9ust not this gate$ay a#soDDha%e a#ready existedS
;nd are not a## things c#ose#y bound together in such $ise that This 9o'ent
dra$eth a## co'ing things after itS "7NSEV8ENT:QDDitse#f a#soS
For $hate%er ";N run its course of a## things, a#so in this #ong #ane
78T);-*DD98ST it once 'ore run&DD
;nd this s#o$ spider $hich creepeth in the 'oon#ight, and this 'oon#ight
itse#f, and thou and 2 in this gate$ay $hispering together, $hispering of
eterna# thingsDD'ust $e not a## ha%e a#ready existedS
DD;nd 'ust $e not return and run in that other #ane out before us, that
#ong $eird #aneDD'ust $e not eterna##y returnSNDD
Thus did 2 speak, and a#$ays 'ore soft#y? for 2 $as afraid of 'ine o$n
thoughts, and arrearDthoughts( Then, sudden#y did 2 hear a dog /7): near
'e(
/ad 2 e%er heard a dog ho$# thusS 9y thoughts ran back( Qes& )hen 2 $as
a chi#d, in 'y 'ost distant chi#dhood?
DDThen did 2 hear a dog ho$# thus( ;nd sa$ it a#so, $ith hair brist#ing,
its head up$ards, tre'b#ing in the sti##est 'idnight, $hen e%en dogs
be#ie%e in ghosts?
DDSo that it excited 'y co''iseration( For just then $ent the fu## 'oon,
si#ent as death, o%er the houseL just then did it stand sti##, a g#o$ing
g#obeDDat rest on the f#at roof, as if on so'e oneMs property?DD
Thereby had the dog been terrified? for dogs be#ie%e in thie%es and
ghosts( ;nd $hen 2 again heard such ho$#ing, then did it excite 'y
co''iseration once 'ore(
)here $as no$ the d$arfS ;nd the gate$ayS ;nd the spiderS ;nd a## the
$hisperingS /ad 2 drea'tS /ad 2 a$akenedS MT$ixt rugged rocks did 2
sudden#y stand a#one, dreary in the dreariest 'oon#ight(
.8T T/E-E :;Q ; 9;N& ;nd there& The dog #eaping, brist#ing, $hiningDDno$
did it see 'e co'ingDDthen did it ho$# again, then did it "-Q?DDhad 2 e%er
heard a dog cry so for he#pS
;nd %eri#y, $hat 2 sa$, the #ike had 2 ne%er seen( ; young shepherd did 2
see, $rithing, choking, Uui%ering, $ith distorted countenance, and $ith a
hea%y b#ack serpent hanging out of his 'outh(
/ad 2 e%er seen so 'uch #oathing and pa#e horror on one countenanceS /e
had perhaps gone to s#eepS Then had the serpent cra$#ed into his throatDD
there had it bitten itse#f fast(
9y hand pu##ed at the serpent, and pu##ed?DDin %ain& 2 fai#ed to pu## the
serpent out of his throat( Then there cried out of 'e? N.ite& .ite&
2ts head off& .ite&NDDso cried it out of 'eL 'y horror, 'y hatred, 'y
#oathing, 'y pity, a## 'y good and 'y bad cried $ith one %oice out of 'e(DD
Qe daring ones around 'e& Qe %enturers and ad%enturers, and $hoe%er of you
ha%e e'barked $ith cunning sai#s on unexp#ored seas& Qe enig'aDenjoyers&
So#%e unto 'e the enig'a that 2 then behe#d, interpret unto 'e the %ision
of the #oneso'est one&
For it $as a %ision and a foresight?DD)/;T did 2 then beho#d in parab#eS
;nd )/7 is it that 'ust co'e so'e dayS
)/7 is the shepherd into $hose throat the serpent thus cra$#edS )/7 is the
'an into $hose throat a## the hea%iest and b#ackest $i## thus cra$#S
DDThe shepherd ho$e%er bit as 'y cry had ad'onished hi'L he bit $ith a
strong bite& Far a$ay did he spit the head of the serpentDD? and sprang
up(DD
No #onger shepherd, no #onger 'anDDa transfigured being, a #ightDsurrounded
being, that :;8G/E*& Ne%er on earth #aughed a 'an as /E #aughed&
7 'y brethren, 2 heard a #aughter $hich $as no hu'an #aughter,DDand no$
gna$eth a thirst at 'e, a #onging that is ne%er a##ayed(
9y #onging for that #aughter gna$eth at 'e? oh, ho$ can 2 sti## endure to
#i%e& ;nd ho$ cou#d 2 endure to die at present&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R:,22( 2N,7:8NT;-Q .:2SS(
)ith such enig'as and bitterness in his heart did Zarathustra sai# oMer the
sea( )hen, ho$e%er, he $as four dayDjourneys fro' the /appy 2s#es and fro'
his friends, then had he sur'ounted a## his painDD? triu'phant#y and $ith
fir' foot did he again accept his fate( ;nd then ta#ked Zarathustra in
this $ise to his exu#ting conscience?
;#one a' 2 again, and #ike to be so, a#one $ith the pure hea%en, and the
open seaL and again is the afternoon around 'e(
7n an afternoon did 2 find 'y friends for the first ti'eL on an afternoon,
a#so, did 2 find the' a second ti'e?DDat the hour $hen a## #ight beco'eth
sti##er(
For $hate%er happiness is sti## on its $ay Mt$ixt hea%en and earth, no$
seeketh for #odging a #u'inous sou#? )2T/ /;PP2NESS hath a## #ight no$
beco'e sti##er(
7 afternoon of 'y #ife& 7nce did 'y happiness a#so descend to the %a##ey
that it 'ight seek a #odging? then did it find those open hospitab#e
sou#s(
7 afternoon of 'y #ife& )hat did 2 not surrender that 2 'ight ha%e one
thing? this #i%ing p#antation of 'y thoughts, and this da$n of 'y highest
hope&
"o'panions did the creating one once seek, and chi#dren of /2S hope? and
#o, it turned out that he cou#d not find the', except he hi'se#f shou#d
first create the'(
Thus a' 2 in the 'idst of 'y $ork, to 'y chi#dren going, and fro' the'
returning? for the sake of his chi#dren 'ust Zarathustra perfect hi'se#f(
For in oneMs heart one #o%eth on#y oneMs chi#d and oneMs $orkL and $here
there is great #o%e to onese#f, then is it the sign of pregnancy? so ha%e
2 found it(
Sti## are 'y chi#dren %erdant in their first spring, standing nigh one
another, and shaken in co''on by the $inds, the trees of 'y garden and of
'y best soi#(
;nd %eri#y, $here such trees stand beside one another, there ;-E /appy
2s#es&
.ut one day $i## 2 take the' up, and put each by itse#f a#one? that it 'ay
#earn #oneso'eness and defiance and prudence(
Gnar#ed and crooked and $ith f#exib#e hardness sha## it then stand by the
sea, a #i%ing #ighthouse of unconUuerab#e #ife(
Qonder $here the stor's rush do$n into the sea, and the snout of the
'ountain drinketh $ater, sha## each on a ti'e ha%e his day and night
$atches, for /2S testing and recognition(
-ecognised and tested sha## each be, to see if he be of 'y type and
#ineage?DDif he be 'aster of a #ong $i##, si#ent e%en $hen he speaketh, and
gi%ing in such $ise that he T;WET/ in gi%ing?DD
DDSo that he 'ay one day beco'e 'y co'panion, a fe##o$Dcreator and fe##o$D
enjoyer $ith Zarathustra?DDsuch a one as $riteth 'y $i## on 'y tab#es, for
the fu##er perfection of a## things(
;nd for his sake and for those #ike hi', 'ust 2 perfect 9QSE:F? therefore
do 2 no$ a%oid 'y happiness, and present 'yse#f to e%ery 'isfortuneDDfor 9Q
fina# testing and recognition(
;nd %eri#y, it $ere ti'e that 2 $ent a$ayL and the $andererMs shado$ and
the #ongest tediu' and the sti##est hourDDha%e a## said unto 'e? N2t is
the highest ti'e&N
The $ord b#e$ to 'e through the keyho#e and said N"o'e&N The door sprang
subt#e#y open unto 'e, and said NGo&N
.ut 2 #ay enchained to 'y #o%e for 'y chi#dren? desire spread this snare
for 'eDDthe desire for #o%eDDthat 2 shou#d beco'e the prey of 'y chi#dren,
and #ose 'yse#f in the'(
*esiringDDthat is no$ for 'e to ha%e #ost 'yse#f( 2 P7SSESS Q78, 9Q
"/2:*-EN& 2n this possessing sha## e%erything be assurance and nothing
desire(
.ut brooding #ay the sun of 'y #o%e upon 'e, in his o$n juice ste$ed
Zarathustra,DDthen did shado$s and doubts f#y past 'e(
For frost and $inter 2 no$ #onged? N7h, that frost and $inter $ou#d again
'ake 'e crack and crunch&N sighed 2?DDthen arose icy 'ist out of 'e(
9y past burst its to'b, 'any pains buried a#i%e $oke upDD? fu##y s#ept had
they 'ere#y, concea#ed in corpseDc#othes(
So ca##ed e%erything unto 'e in signs? N2t is ti'e&N .ut 2DDheard not,
unti# at #ast 'ine abyss 'o%ed, and 'y thought bit 'e(
;h, abys'a# thought, $hich art 9Q thought& )hen sha## 2 find strength to
hear thee burro$ing, and no #onger tre'b#eS
To 'y %ery throat throbbeth 'y heart $hen 2 hear thee burro$ing& Thy
'uteness e%en is #ike to strang#e 'e, thou abys'a# 'ute one&
;s yet ha%e 2 ne%er %entured to ca## thee 8PL it hath been enough that 2DD
ha%e carried thee about $ith 'e& ;s yet ha%e 2 not been strong enough for
'y fina# #ionD$antonness and p#ayfu#ness(
Sufficient#y for'idab#e unto 'e hath thy $eight e%er been? but one day
sha## 2 yet find the strength and the #ionMs %oice $hich $i## ca## thee up&
)hen 2 sha## ha%e sur'ounted 'yse#f therein, then $i## 2 sur'ount 'yse#f
a#so in that $hich is greaterL and a ,2"T7-Q sha## be the sea# of 'y
perfection&DD
9ean$hi#e do 2 sai# a#ong on uncertain seasL chance f#attereth 'e, s'oothD
tongued chanceL for$ard and back$ard do 2 gazeDD, sti## see 2 no end(
;s yet hath the hour of 'y fina# strugg#e not co'e to 'eDDor doth it co'e
to 'e perhaps just no$S ,eri#y, $ith insidious beauty do sea and #ife gaze
upon 'e round about?
7 afternoon of 'y #ife& 7 happiness before e%entide& 7 ha%en upon high
seas& 7 peace in uncertainty& /o$ 2 distrust a## of you&
,eri#y, distrustfu# a' 2 of your insidious beauty& :ike the #o%er a' 2,
$ho distrusteth too s#eek s'i#ing(
;s he pusheth the bestDbe#o%ed before hi'DDtender e%en in se%erity, the
jea#ous oneDD, so do 2 push this b#issfu# hour before 'e(
;$ay $ith thee, thou b#issfu# hour& )ith thee hath there co'e to 'e an
in%o#untary b#iss& -eady for 'y se%erest pain do 2 here stand?DDat the
$rong ti'e hast thou co'e&
;$ay $ith thee, thou b#issfu# hour& -ather harbour thereDD$ith 'y
chi#dren& /asten& and b#ess the' before e%entide $ith 9Q happiness&
There, a#ready approacheth e%entide? the sun sinketh( ;$ayDD'y
happiness&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra( ;nd he $aited for his 'isfortune the $ho#e nightL
but he $aited in %ain( The night re'ained c#ear and ca#', and happiness
itse#f ca'e nigher and nigher unto hi'( To$ards 'orning, ho$e%er,
Zarathustra #aughed to his heart, and said 'ocking#y? N/appiness runneth
after 'e( That is because 2 do not run after $o'en( /appiness, ho$e%er,
is a $o'an(N
R:,222( .EF7-E S8N-2SE(
7 hea%en abo%e 'e, thou pure, thou deep hea%en& Thou abyss of #ight&
Gazing on thee, 2 tre'b#e $ith di%ine desires(
8p to thy height to toss 'yse#fDDthat is 9Q depth& 2n thy purity to hide
'yse#fDDthat is 92NE innocence&
The God %ei#eth his beauty? thus hidest thou thy stars( Thou speakest
not? T/8S proc#ai'est thou thy $isdo' unto 'e(
9ute oMer the raging sea hast thou risen for 'e toDdayL thy #o%e and thy
'odesty 'ake a re%e#ation unto 'y raging sou#(
2n that thou ca'est unto 'e beautifu#, %ei#ed in thy beauty, in that thou
spakest unto 'e 'ute#y, ob%ious in thy $isdo'?
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 fai# to di%ine a## the 'odesty of thy sou#& .EF7-E the sun
didst thou co'e unto 'eDDthe #oneso'est one(
)e ha%e been friends fro' the beginning? to us are grief, grueso'eness,
and ground co''onL e%en the sun is co''on to us(
)e do not speak to each other, because $e kno$ too 'uchDD? $e keep si#ent
to each other, $e s'i#e our kno$#edge to each other(
;rt thou not the #ight of 'y fireS /ast thou not the sisterDsou# of 'ine
insightS
Together did $e #earn e%erythingL together did $e #earn to ascend beyond
ourse#%es to ourse#%es, and to s'i#e unc#ouded#y?DD
DD8nc#ouded#y to s'i#e do$n out of #u'inous eyes and out of 'i#es of
distance, $hen under us constraint and purpose and gui#t stea' #ike rain(
;nd $andered 2 a#one, for )/;T did 'y sou# hunger by night and in
#abyrinthine pathsS ;nd c#i'bed 2 'ountains, )/79 did 2 e%er seek, if not
thee, upon 'ountainsS
;nd a## 'y $andering and 'ountainDc#i'bing? a necessity $as it 'ere#y, and
a 'akeshift of the unhandy one?DDto F:Q on#y, $anteth 'ine entire $i##, to
f#y into T/EE&
;nd $hat ha%e 2 hated 'ore than passing c#ouds, and $hate%er tainteth theeS
;nd 'ine o$n hatred ha%e 2 e%en hated, because it tainted thee&
The passing c#ouds 2 detestDDthose stea#thy cats of prey? they take fro'
thee and 'e $hat is co''on to usDDthe %ast unbounded QeaD and ;'enDsaying(
These 'ediators and 'ixers $e detestDDthe passing c#ouds? those ha#fDandD
ha#f ones, that ha%e neither #earned to b#ess nor to curse fro' the heart(
-ather $i## 2 sit in a tub under a c#osed hea%en, rather $i## 2 sit in the
abyss $ithout hea%en, than see thee, thou #u'inous hea%en, tainted $ith
passing c#ouds&
;nd oft ha%e 2 #onged to pin the' fast $ith the jagged go#dD$ires of
#ightning, that 2 'ight, #ike the thunder, beat the dru' upon their kett#eD
be##ies?DD
DD;n angry dru''er, because they rob 'e of thy Qea and ;'en&DDthou hea%en
abo%e 'e, thou pure, thou #u'inous hea%en& Thou abyss of #ight&DDbecause
they rob thee of 9Q Qea and ;'en(
For rather $i## 2 ha%e noise and thunders and te'pestDb#asts, than this
discreet, doubting catDreposeL and a#so a'ongst 'en do 2 hate 'ost of a##
the softDtreaders, and ha#fDandDha#f ones, and the doubting, hesitating,
passing c#ouds(
;nd Nhe $ho cannot b#ess sha## :E;-N to curse&NDDthis c#ear teaching dropt
unto 'e fro' the c#ear hea%enL this star standeth in 'y hea%en e%en in dark
nights(
2, ho$e%er, a' a b#esser and a QeaDsayer, if thou be but around 'e, thou
pure, thou #u'inous hea%en& Thou abyss of #ight&DDinto a## abysses do 2
then carry 'y beneficent QeaDsaying(
; b#esser ha%e 2 beco'e and a QeaDsayer? and therefore stro%e 2 #ong and
$as a stri%er, that 2 'ight one day get 'y hands free for b#essing(
This, ho$e%er, is 'y b#essing? to stand abo%e e%erything as its o$n
hea%en, its round roof, its azure be## and eterna# security? and b#essed
is he $ho thus b#esseth&
For a## things are baptized at the font of eternity, and beyond good and
e%i#L good and e%i# the'se#%es, ho$e%er, are but fugiti%e shado$s and da'p
aff#ictions and passing c#ouds(
,eri#y, it is a b#essing and not a b#asphe'y $hen 2 teach that Nabo%e a##
things there standeth the hea%en of chance, the hea%en of innocence, the
hea%en of hazard, the hea%en of $antonness(N
N7f /azardNDDthat is the o#dest nobi#ity in the $or#dL that ga%e 2 back to
a## thingsL 2 e'ancipated the' fro' bondage under purpose(
This freedo' and ce#estia# serenity did 2 put #ike an azure be## abo%e a##
things, $hen 2 taught that o%er the' and through the', no Neterna# )i##NDD
$i##eth(
This $antonness and fo##y did 2 put in p#ace of that )i##, $hen 2 taught
that N2n e%erything there is one thing i'possib#eDDrationa#ity&N
; :2TT:E reason, to be sure, a ger' of $isdo' scattered fro' star to starDD
this #ea%en is 'ixed in a## things? for the sake of fo##y, $isdo' is 'ixed
in a## things&
; #itt#e $isdo' is indeed possib#eL but this b#essed security ha%e 2 found
in a## things, that they preferDDto *;N"E on the feet of chance(
7 hea%en abo%e 'e& thou pure, thou #ofty hea%en& This is no$ thy purity
unto 'e, that there is no eterna# reasonDspider and reasonDcob$eb?DD
DDThat thou art to 'e a dancingDf#oor for di%ine chances, that thou art to
'e a tab#e of the Gods, for di%ine dice and diceDp#ayers&DD
.ut thou b#ushestS /a%e 2 spoken unspeakab#e thingsS /a%e 2 abused, $hen
2 'eant to b#ess theeS
7r is it the sha'e of being t$o of us that 'aketh thee b#ush&DD*ost thou
bid 'e go and be si#ent, because no$DD*;Q co'ethS
The $or#d is deep?DDand deeper than eMer the day cou#d read( Not
e%erything 'ay be uttered in presence of day( .ut day co'eth? so #et us
part&
7 hea%en abo%e 'e, thou 'odest one& thou g#o$ing one& 7 thou, 'y happiness
before sunrise& The day co'eth? so #et us part&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
R:2R( T/E .E*);-F2NG ,2-T8E(
!(
)hen Zarathustra $as again on the continent, he did not go straight$ay to
his 'ountains and his ca%e, but 'ade 'any $anderings and Uuestionings, and
ascertained this and thatL so that he said of hi'se#f jesting#y? N:o, a
ri%er that f#o$eth back unto its source in 'any $indings&N For he $anted
to #earn $hat had taken p#ace ;97NG 9EN during the inter%a#? $hether they
had beco'e greater or s'a##er( ;nd once, $hen he sa$ a ro$ of ne$ houses,
he 'ar%e##ed, and said?
N)hat do these houses 'eanS ,eri#y, no great sou# put the' up as its
si'i#e&
*id perhaps a si##y chi#d take the' out of its toyDboxS )ou#d that another
chi#d put the' again into the box&
;nd these roo's and cha'bersDDcan 9EN go out and in thereS They see' to be
'ade for si#k do##sL or for daintyDeaters, $ho perhaps #et others eat $ith
the'(N
;nd Zarathustra stood sti## and 'editated( ;t #ast he said sorro$fu##y?
NThere hath E,E-QT/2NG beco'e s'a##er&
E%ery$here do 2 see #o$er door$ays? he $ho is of 9Q type can sti## go
therethrough, butDDhe 'ust stoop&
7h, $hen sha## 2 arri%e again at 'y ho'e, $here 2 sha## no #onger ha%e to
stoopDDsha## no #onger ha%e to stoop .EF7-E T/E S9;:: 7NES&NDD;nd
Zarathustra sighed, and gazed into the distance(DD
The sa'e day, ho$e%er, he ga%e his discourse on the bed$arfing %irtue(
C(
2 pass through this peop#e and keep 'ine eyes open? they do not forgi%e 'e
for not en%ying their %irtues(
They bite at 'e, because 2 say unto the' that for s'a## peop#e, s'a##
%irtues are necessaryDDand because it is hard for 'e to understand that
s'a## peop#e are NE"ESS;-Q&
/ere a' 2 sti## #ike a cock in a strange far'Dyard, at $hich e%en the hens
peck? but on that account 2 a' not unfriend#y to the hens(
2 a' courteous to$ards the', as to$ards a## s'a## annoyancesL to be prick#y
to$ards $hat is s'a##, see'eth to 'e $isdo' for hedgehogs(
They a## speak of 'e $hen they sit around their fire in the e%eningDDthey
speak of 'e, but no one thinkethDDof 'e&
This is the ne$ sti##ness $hich 2 ha%e experienced? their noise around 'e
spreadeth a 'ant#e o%er 'y thoughts(
They shout to one another? N)hat is this g#oo'y c#oud about to do to usS
:et us see that it doth not bring a p#ague upon us&N
;nd recent#y did a $o'an seize upon her chi#d that $as co'ing unto 'e?
NTake the chi#dren a$ay,N cried she, Nsuch eyes scorch chi#drenMs sou#s(N
They cough $hen 2 speak? they think coughing an objection to strong $inds
DDthey di%ine nothing of the boisterousness of 'y happiness&
N)e ha%e not yet ti'e for ZarathustraNDDso they objectL but $hat 'atter
about a ti'e that Nhath no ti'eN for ZarathustraS
;nd if they shou#d a#together praise 'e, ho$ cou#d 2 go to s#eep on T/E2-
praiseS ; gird#e of spines is their praise unto 'e? it scratcheth 'e e%en
$hen 2 take it off(
;nd this a#so did 2 #earn a'ong the'? the praiser doeth as if he ga%e
backL in truth, ho$e%er, he $anteth 'ore to be gi%en hi'&
;sk 'y foot if their #auding and #uring strains p#ease it& ,eri#y, to such
'easure and ticktack, it #iketh neither to dance nor to stand sti##(
To s'a## %irtues $ou#d they fain #ure and #aud 'eL to the ticktack of s'a##
happiness $ou#d they fain persuade 'y foot(
2 pass through this peop#e and keep 'ine eyes openL they ha%e beco'e
S9;::E-, and e%er beco'e s'a##er?DDT/E -E;S7N T/E-E7F 2S T/E2- *7"T-2NE 7F
/;PP2NESS ;N* ,2-T8E(
For they are 'oderate a#so in %irtue,DDbecause they $ant co'fort( )ith
co'fort, ho$e%er, 'oderate %irtue on#y is co'patib#e(
To be sure, they a#so #earn in their $ay to stride on and stride for$ard?
that, 2 ca## their /7..:2NG(DDThereby they beco'e a hindrance to a## $ho
are in haste(
;nd 'any of the' go for$ard, and #ook back$ards thereby, $ith stiffened
necks? those do 2 #ike to run up against(
Foot and eye sha## not #ie, nor gi%e the #ie to each other( .ut there is
'uch #ying a'ong s'a## peop#e(
So'e of the' )2::, but 'ost of the' are )2::E*( So'e of the' are genuine,
but 'ost of the' are bad actors(
There are actors $ithout kno$ing it a'ongst the', and actors $ithout
intending itDD, the genuine ones are a#$ays rare, especia##y the genuine
actors(
7f 'an there is #itt#e here? therefore do their $o'en 'ascu#inise
the'se#%es( For on#y he $ho is 'an enough, $i##DDS;,E T/E )79;N in $o'an(
;nd this hypocrisy found 2 $orst a'ongst the', that e%en those $ho co''and
feign the %irtues of those $ho ser%e(
N2 ser%e, thou ser%est, $e ser%eNDDso chanteth here e%en the hypocrisy of
the ru#ersDDand a#as& if the first #ord be 7N:Q the first ser%ant&
;h, e%en upon their hypocrisy did 'ine eyesM curiosity a#ightL and $e## did
2 di%ine a## their f#yDhappiness, and their buzzing around sunny $indo$D
panes(
So 'uch kindness, so 'uch $eakness do 2 see( So 'uch justice and pity, so
'uch $eakness(
-ound, fair, and considerate are they to one another, as grains of sand are
round, fair, and considerate to grains of sand(
9odest#y to e'brace a s'a## happinessDDthat do they ca## Nsub'issionN& and
at the sa'e ti'e they peer 'odest#y after a ne$ s'a## happiness(
2n their hearts they $ant si'p#y one thing 'ost of a##? that no one hurt
the'( Thus do they anticipate e%ery oneMs $ishes and do $e## unto e%ery
one(
That, ho$e%er, is "7);-*2"E, though it be ca##ed N%irtue(NDD
;nd $hen they chance to speak harsh#y, those s'a## peop#e, then do X2X hear
therein on#y their hoarsenessDDe%ery draught of air 'aketh the' hoarse(
Shre$d indeed are they, their %irtues ha%e shre$d fingers( .ut they #ack
fists? their fingers do not kno$ ho$ to creep behind fists(
,irtue for the' is $hat 'aketh 'odest and ta'e? there$ith ha%e they 'ade
the $o#f a dog, and 'an hi'se#f 'anMs best do'estic ani'a#(
N)e set our chair in the 92*STNDDso saith their s'irking unto 'eDDNand as
far fro' dying g#adiators as fro' satisfied s$ine(N
That, ho$e%er, isDD9E*27"-2TQ, though it be ca##ed 'oderation(DD
F(
2 pass through this peop#e and #et fa## 'any $ords? but they kno$ neither
ho$ to take nor ho$ to retain the'(
They $onder $hy 2 ca'e not to re%i#e %enery and %iceL and %eri#y, 2 ca'e
not to $arn against pickpockets either&
They $onder $hy 2 a' not ready to abet and $het their $isdo'? as if they
had not yet enough of $iseacres, $hose %oices grate on 'ine ear #ike s#ateD
penci#s&
;nd $hen 2 ca## out? N"urse a## the co$ard#y de%i#s in you, that $ou#d
fain $hi'per and fo#d the hands and adoreNDDthen do they shout?
NZarathustra is god#ess(N
;nd especia##y do their teachers of sub'ission shout thisLDDbut precise#y
in their ears do 2 #o%e to cry? NQea& 2 ;9 Zarathustra, the god#ess&N
Those teachers of sub'ission& )here%er there is aught puny, or sick#y, or
scabby, there do they creep #ike #iceL and on#y 'y disgust pre%enteth 'e
fro' cracking the'(
)e##& This is 'y ser'on for T/E2- ears? 2 a' Zarathustra the god#ess, $ho
saith? N)ho is 'ore god#ess than 2, that 2 'ay enjoy his teachingSN
2 a' Zarathustra the god#ess? $here do 2 find 'ine eUua#S ;nd a## those
are 'ine eUua#s $ho gi%e unto the'se#%es their )i##, and di%est the'se#%es
of a## sub'ission(
2 a' Zarathustra the god#ess& 2 cook e%ery chance in 9Q pot( ;nd on#y
$hen it hath been Uuite cooked do 2 $e#co'e it as 9Q food(
;nd %eri#y, 'any a chance ca'e i'perious#y unto 'e? but sti## 'ore
i'perious#y did 'y )2:: speak unto it,DDthen did it #ie i'p#oring#y upon
its kneesDD
DD2'p#oring that it 'ight find ho'e and heart $ith 'e, and saying
f#attering#y? NSee, 7 Zarathustra, ho$ friend on#y co'eth unto friend&NDD
.ut $hy ta#k 2, $hen no one hath 92NE ears& ;nd so $i## 2 shout it out
unto a## the $inds?
Qe e%er beco'e s'a##er, ye s'a## peop#e& Qe cru'b#e a$ay, ye co'fortab#e
ones& Qe $i## yet perishDD
DD.y your 'any s'a## %irtues, by your 'any s'a## o'issions, and by your
'any s'a## sub'issions&
Too tender, too yie#ding? so is your soi#& .ut for a tree to beco'e
G-E;T, it seeketh to t$ine hard roots around hard rocks&
;#so $hat ye o'it $ea%eth at the $eb of a## the hu'an futureL e%en your
naught is a cob$eb, and a spider that #i%eth on the b#ood of the future(
;nd $hen ye take, then is it #ike stea#ing, ye s'a## %irtuous onesL but
e%en a'ong kna%es /7N78- saith that None sha## on#y stea# $hen one cannot
rob(N
N2t gi%eth itse#fNDDthat is a#so a doctrine of sub'ission( .ut 2 say unto
you, ye co'fortab#e ones, that 2T T;WET/ T7 2TSE:F, and $i## e%er take 'ore
and 'ore fro' you&
;h, that ye $ou#d renounce a## /;:FD$i##ing, and $ou#d decide for id#eness
as ye decide for action&
;h, that ye understood 'y $ord? N*o e%er $hat ye $i##DDbut first be such
as ";N )2::(
:o%e e%er your neighbour as yourse#%esDDbut first be such as :7,E
T/E9SE:,ESDD
DDSuch as #o%e $ith great #o%e, such as #o%e $ith great conte'pt&N Thus
speaketh Zarathustra the god#ess(DD
.ut $hy ta#k 2, $hen no one hath 92NE ears& 2t is sti## an hour too ear#y
for 'e here(
9ine o$n forerunner a' 2 a'ong this peop#e, 'ine o$n cockcro$ in dark
#anes(
.ut T/E2- hour co'eth& ;nd there co'eth a#so 'ine& /our#y do they beco'e
s'a##er, poorer, unfruitfu##er,DDpoor herbs& poor earth&
;nd S77N sha## they stand before 'e #ike dry grass and prairie, and %eri#y,
$eary of the'se#%esDDand panting for F2-E, 'ore than for $ater&
7 b#essed hour of the #ightning& 7 'ystery before noontide&DD-unning fires
$i## 2 one day 'ake of the', and hera#ds $ith f#a'ing tongues?DD
DD/era#d sha## they one day $ith f#a'ing tongues? 2t co'eth, it is nigh,
T/E G-E;T N77NT2*E&
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:( 7N T/E 7:2,ED978NT(
)inter, a bad guest, sitteth $ith 'e at ho'eL b#ue are 'y hands $ith his
friend#y handDshaking(
2 honour hi', that bad guest, but g#ad#y #ea%e hi' a#one( G#ad#y do 2 run
a$ay fro' hi'L and $hen one runneth )E::, then one escapeth hi'&
)ith $ar' feet and $ar' thoughts do 2 run $here the $ind is ca#'DDto the
sunny corner of 'ine o#i%eD'ount(
There do 2 #augh at 'y stern guest, and a' sti## fond of hi'L because he
c#eareth 'y house of f#ies, and Uuieteth 'any #itt#e noises(
For he suffereth it not if a gnat $anteth to buzz, or e%en t$o of the'L
a#so the #anes 'aketh he #oneso'e, so that the 'oon#ight is afraid there at
night(
; hard guest is he,DDbut 2 honour hi', and do not $orship, #ike the
tender#ings, the potDbe##ied fireDido#(
.etter e%en a #itt#e teethDchattering than ido#Dadoration&DDso $i##eth 'y
nature( ;nd especia##y ha%e 2 a grudge against a## ardent, stea'ing,
stea'y fireDido#s(
/i' $ho' 2 #o%e, 2 #o%e better in $inter than in su''erL better do 2 no$
'ock at 'ine ene'ies, and 'ore hearti#y, $hen $inter sitteth in 'y house(
/earti#y, %eri#y, e%en $hen 2 "-EEP into bedDD? there, sti## #augheth and
$antoneth 'y hidden happinessL e%en 'y decepti%e drea' #augheth(
2, aDDcreeperS Ne%er in 'y #ife did 2 creep before the po$erfu#L and if
e%er 2 #ied, then did 2 #ie out of #o%e( Therefore a' 2 g#ad e%en in 'y
$interDbed(
; poor bed $ar'eth 'e 'ore than a rich one, for 2 a' jea#ous of 'y po%erty(
;nd in $inter she is 'ost faithfu# unto 'e(
)ith a $ickedness do 2 begin e%ery day? 2 'ock at the $inter $ith a co#d
bath? on that account gru'b#eth 'y stern houseD'ate(
;#so do 2 #ike to tick#e hi' $ith a $axDtaper, that he 'ay fina##y #et the
hea%ens e'erge fro' ashyDgrey t$i#ight(
For especia##y $icked a' 2 in the 'orning? at the ear#y hour $hen the pai#
ratt#eth at the $e##, and horses neigh $ar'#y in grey #anes?DD
2'patient#y do 2 then $ait, that the c#ear sky 'ay fina##y da$n for 'e, the
sno$Dbearded $interDsky, the hoary one, the $hiteDhead,DD
DDThe $interDsky, the si#ent $interDsky, $hich often stif#eth e%en its sun&
*id 2 perhaps #earn fro' it the #ong c#ear si#enceS 7r did it #earn it
fro' 'eS 7r hath each of us de%ised it hi'se#fS
7f a## good things the origin is a thousandfo#d,DDa## good roguish things
spring into existence for joy? ho$ cou#d they a#$ays do soDDfor once on#y&
; good roguish thing is a#so the #ong si#ence, and to #ook, #ike the
$interDsky, out of a c#ear, roundDeyed countenance?DD
DD:ike it to stif#e oneMs sun, and oneMs inf#exib#e so#ar $i##? %eri#y,
this art and this $interDroguishness ha%e 2 #earnt )E::&
9y bestD#o%ed $ickedness and art is it, that 'y si#ence hath #earned not to
betray itse#f by si#ence(
"#attering $ith diction and dice, 2 out$it the so#e'n assistants? a##
those stern $atchers, sha## 'y $i## and purpose e#ude(
That no one 'ight see do$n into 'y depth and into 'ine u#ti'ate $i##DDfor
that purpose did 2 de%ise the #ong c#ear si#ence(
9any a shre$d one did 2 find? he %ei#ed his countenance and 'ade his $ater
'uddy, that no one 'ight see therethrough and thereunder(
.ut precise#y unto hi' ca'e the shre$der distrusters and nutDcrackers?
precise#y fro' hi' did they fish his bestDconcea#ed fish&
.ut the c#ear, the honest, the transparentDDthese are for 'e the $isest
si#ent ones? in the', so P-7F78N* is the depth that e%en the c#earest
$ater doth notDDbetray it(DD
Thou sno$Dbearded, si#ent, $interDsky, thou roundDeyed $hitehead abo%e 'e&
7h, thou hea%en#y si'i#e of 'y sou# and its $antonness&
;nd 98ST 2 not concea# 'yse#f #ike one $ho hath s$a##o$ed go#dDD#est 'y
sou# shou#d be ripped upS
98ST 2 not $ear sti#ts, that they 'ay 7,E-:77W 'y #ong #egsDDa## those
en%iers and injurers around 'eS
Those dingy, fireD$ar'ed, usedDup, greenDtinted, i##Dnatured sou#sDDho$
"78:* their en%y endure 'y happiness&
Thus do 2 sho$ the' on#y the ice and $inter of 'y peaksDDand N7T that 'y
'ountain $indeth a## the so#ar gird#es around it&
They hear on#y the $hist#ing of 'y $interDstor's? and kno$ N7T that 2 a#so
tra%e# o%er $ar' seas, #ike #onging, hea%y, hot southD$inds(
They co''iserate a#so 'y accidents and chances?DDbut 9Q $ord saith?
NSuffer the chance to co'e unto 'e? innocent is it as a #itt#e chi#d&N
/o$ "78:* they endure 'y happiness, if 2 did not put around it accidents,
and $interDpri%ations, and bearDskin caps, and en'ant#ing sno$f#akes&
DD2f 2 did not 'yse#f co''iserate their P2TQ, the pity of those en%iers and
injurers&
DD2f 2 did not 'yse#f sigh before the', and chatter $ith co#d, and
patient#y :ET 'yse#f be s$athed in their pity&
This is the $ise $aggishD$i## and goodD$i## of 'y sou#, that it "7N"E;:ET/
N7T its $inters and g#acia# stor'sL it concea#eth not its chi#b#ains
either(
To one 'an, #oneso'eness is the f#ight of the sick oneL to another, it is
the f#ight F-79 the sick ones(
:et the' /E;- 'e chattering and sighing $ith $interDco#d, a## those poor
sUuinting kna%es around 'e& )ith such sighing and chattering do 2 f#ee
fro' their heated roo's(
:et the' sy'pathise $ith 'e and sigh $ith 'e on account of 'y chi#b#ains?
N;t the ice of kno$#edge $i## he yet F-EEZE T7 *E;T/&NDDso they 'ourn(
9ean$hi#e do 2 run $ith $ar' feet hither and thither on 'ine o#i%eD'ount?
in the sunny corner of 'ine o#i%eD'ount do 2 sing, and 'ock at a## pity(DD
Thus sang Zarathustra(
:2( 7N P;SS2NGD.Q(
Thus s#o$#y $andering through 'any peop#es and di%ers cities, did
Zarathustra return by roundDabout roads to his 'ountains and his ca%e( ;nd
beho#d, thereby ca'e he una$ares a#so to the gate of the G-E;T "2TQ( /ere,
ho$e%er, a foa'ing foo#, $ith extended hands, sprang for$ard to hi' and
stood in his $ay( 2t $as the sa'e foo# $ho' the peop#e ca##ed Nthe ape of
Zarathustra?N for he had #earned fro' hi' so'ething of the expression and
'odu#ation of #anguage, and perhaps #iked a#so to borro$ fro' the store of
his $isdo'( ;nd the foo# ta#ked thus to Zarathustra?
7 Zarathustra, here is the great city? here hast thou nothing to seek and
e%erything to #ose(
)hy $ou#dst thou $ade through this 'ireS /a%e pity upon thy foot& Spit
rather on the gate of the city, andDDturn back&
/ere is the he## for anchoritesM thoughts? here are great thoughts seethed
a#i%e and boi#ed s'a##(
/ere do a## great senti'ents decay? here 'ay on#y ratt#eDboned sensations
ratt#e&
S'e##est thou not a#ready the sha'b#es and cookshops of the spiritS
Stea'eth not this city $ith the fu'es of s#aughtered spiritS
Seest thou not the sou#s hanging #ike #i'p dirty ragsSDD;nd they 'ake
ne$spapers a#so out of these rags&
/earest thou not ho$ spirit hath here beco'e a %erba# ga'eS :oathso'e
%erba# s$i## doth it %o'it forth&DD;nd they 'ake ne$spapers a#so out of
this %erba# s$i##(
They hound one another, and kno$ not $hither& They inf#a'e one another,
and kno$ not $hy& They tink#e $ith their pinchbeck, they jing#e $ith their
go#d(
They are co#d, and seek $ar'th fro' disti##ed $aters? they are inf#a'ed,
and seek coo#ness fro' frozen spiritsL they are a## sick and sore through
pub#ic opinion(
;## #usts and %ices are here at ho'eL but here there are a#so the %irtuousL
there is 'uch appointab#e appointed %irtue?DD
9uch appointab#e %irtue $ith scribeDfingers, and hardy sittingDf#esh and
$aitingDf#esh, b#essed $ith s'a## breastDstars, and padded, haunch#ess
daughters(
There is here a#so 'uch piety, and 'uch faithfu# spitt#eD#icking and
spitt#eDbacking, before the God of /osts(
NFro' on high,N drippeth the star, and the gracious spitt#eL for the high,
#ongeth e%ery star#ess boso'(
The 'oon hath its court, and the court hath its 'oonDca#%es? unto a##,
ho$e%er, that co'eth fro' the court do the 'endicant peop#e pray, and a##
appointab#e 'endicant %irtues(
N2 ser%e, thou ser%est, $e ser%eNDDso prayeth a## appointab#e %irtue to the
prince? that the 'erited star 'ay at #ast stick on the s#ender breast&
.ut the 'oon sti## re%o#%eth around a## that is earth#y? so re%o#%eth a#so
the prince around $hat is earth#iest of a##DDthat, ho$e%er, is the go#d of
the shop'an(
The God of the /osts of $ar is not the God of the go#den barL the prince
proposeth, but the shop'anDDdisposeth&
.y a## that is #u'inous and strong and good in thee, 7 Zarathustra& Spit
on this city of shop'en and return back&
/ere f#o$eth a## b#ood putrid#y and tepid#y and frothi#y through a## %eins?
spit on the great city, $hich is the great s#u' $here a## the scu' frotheth
together&
Spit on the city of co'pressed sou#s and s#ender breasts, of pointed eyes
and sticky fingersDD
DD7n the city of the obtrusi%e, the brazenDfaced, the penDde'agogues and
tongueDde'agogues, the o%erheated a'bitious?DD
)here e%erything 'ai'ed, i##Dfa'ed, #ustfu#, untrustfu#, o%erD'e##o$,
sick#yDye##o$ and seditious, festereth pernicious?DD
DDSpit on the great city and turn back&DD
/ere, ho$e%er, did Zarathustra interrupt the foa'ing foo#, and shut his
'outh(DD
Stop this at once& ca##ed out Zarathustra, #ong ha%e thy speech and thy
species disgusted 'e&
)hy didst thou #i%e so #ong by the s$a'p, that thou thyse#f hadst to beco'e
a frog and a toadS
F#o$eth there not a tainted, frothy, s$a'pDb#ood in thine o$n %eins, $hen
thou hast thus #earned to croak and re%i#eS
)hy $entest thou not into the forestS 7r $hy didst thou not ti## the
groundS 2s the sea not fu## of green is#andsS
2 despise thy conte'ptL and $hen thou $arnedst 'eDD$hy didst thou not $arn
thyse#fS
7ut of #o%e a#one sha## 'y conte'pt and 'y $arning bird take $ingL but not
out of the s$a'p&DD
They ca## thee 'ine ape, thou foa'ing foo#? but 2 ca## thee 'y gruntingD
pig,DDby thy grunting, thou spoi#est e%en 'y praise of fo##y(
)hat $as it that first 'ade thee gruntS .ecause no one sufficient#y
F:;TTE-E* thee?DDtherefore didst thou seat thyse#f beside this fi#th, that
thou 'ightest ha%e cause for 'uch grunting,DD
DDThat thou 'ightest ha%e cause for 'uch ,ENGE;N"E& For %engeance, thou
%ain foo#, is a## thy foa'ingL 2 ha%e di%ined thee $e##&
.ut thy foo#sMD$ord injureth 9E, e%en $hen thou art right& ;nd e%en if
ZarathustraMs $ord )E-E a hundred ti'es justified, thou $ou#dst e%erDD*7
$rong $ith 'y $ord&
Thus spake Zarathustra( Then did he #ook on the great city and sighed, and
$as #ong si#ent( ;t #ast he spake thus?
2 #oathe a#so this great city, and not on#y this foo#( /ere and thereDD
there is nothing to better, nothing to $orsen(
)oe to this great city&DD;nd 2 $ou#d that 2 a#ready sa$ the pi##ar of fire
in $hich it $i## be consu'ed&
For such pi##ars of fire 'ust precede the great noontide( .ut this hath
its ti'e and its o$n fate(DD
This precept, ho$e%er, gi%e 2 unto thee, in parting, thou foo#? )here one
can no #onger #o%e, there shou#d oneDDP;SS .Q&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra, and passed by the foo# and the great city(
:22( T/E ;P7ST;TES(
!(
;h, #ieth e%erything a#ready $ithered and grey $hich but #ate#y stood green
and 'anyDhued on this 'eado$& ;nd ho$ 'uch honey of hope did 2 carry hence
into 'y beehi%es&
Those young hearts ha%e a#ready a## beco'e o#dDDand not o#d e%en& on#y
$eary, ordinary, co'fortab#e?DDthey dec#are it? N)e ha%e again beco'e
pious(N
7f #ate did 2 see the' run forth at ear#y 'orn $ith %a#orous steps? but
the feet of their kno$#edge beca'e $eary, and no$ do they 'a#ign e%en their
'orning %a#our&
,eri#y, 'any of the' once #ifted their #egs #ike the dancerL to the' $inked
the #aughter of 'y $isdo'?DDthen did they bethink the'se#%es( Tust no$
ha%e 2 seen the' bent do$nDDto creep to the cross(
;round #ight and #iberty did they once f#utter #ike gnats and young poets(
; #itt#e o#der, a #itt#e co#der? and a#ready are they 'ystifiers, and
'u'b#ers and 'o##ycodd#es(
*id perhaps their hearts despond, because #oneso'eness had s$a##o$ed 'e
#ike a $ha#eS *id their ear perhaps hearken yearning#yD#ong for 'e 2N
,;2N, and for 'y tru'petDnotes and hera#dDca##sS
DD;h& E%er are there but fe$ of those $hose hearts ha%e persistent courage
and exuberanceL and in such re'aineth a#so the spirit patient( The rest,
ho$e%er, are "7);-*:Q(
The rest? these are a#$ays the great 'ajority, the co''onDp#ace, the
superf#uous, the farDtoo 'anyDDthose a## are co$ard#y&DD
/i' $ho is of 'y type, $i## a#so the experiences of 'y type 'eet on the
$ay? so that his first co'panions 'ust be corpses and buffoons(
/is second co'panions, ho$e%erDDthey $i## ca## the'se#%es his .E:2E,E-S,DD
$i## be a #i%ing host, $ith 'uch #o%e, 'uch fo##y, 'uch unbearded
%eneration(
To those be#ie%ers sha## he $ho is of 'y type a'ong 'en not bind his heartL
in those springDti'es and 'anyDhued 'eado$s sha## he not be#ie%e, $ho
kno$eth the fick#y faintDhearted hu'an species&
"78:* they do other$ise, then $ou#d they a#so )2:: other$ise( The ha#fD
andDha#f spoi# e%ery $ho#e( That #ea%es beco'e $ithered,DD$hat is there to
#a'ent about that&
:et the' go and fa## a$ay, 7 Zarathustra, and do not #a'ent& .etter e%en
to b#o$ a'ongst the' $ith rust#ing $inds,DD
DD.#o$ a'ongst those #ea%es, 7 Zarathustra, that e%erything )2T/E-E* 'ay
run a$ay fro' thee the faster&DD
C(
N)e ha%e again beco'e piousNDDso do those apostates confessL and so'e of
the' are sti## too pusi##ani'ous thus to confess(
8nto the' 2 #ook into the eye,DDbefore the' 2 say it unto their face and
unto the b#ush on their cheeks? Qe are those $ho again P-;Q&
2t is ho$e%er a sha'e to pray& Not for a##, but for thee, and 'e, and
$hoe%er hath his conscience in his head( For T/EE it is a sha'e to pray&
Thou kno$est it $e##? the faintDhearted de%i# in thee, $hich $ou#d fain
fo#d its ar's, and p#ace its hands in its boso', and take it easier?DDthis
faintDhearted de%i# persuadeth thee that Nthere 2S a God&N
T/E-E.Q, ho$e%er, dost thou be#ong to the #ightDdreading type, to $ho'
#ight ne%er per'itteth repose? no$ 'ust thou dai#y thrust thy head deeper
into obscurity and %apour&
;nd %eri#y, thou choosest the hour $e##? for just no$ do the nocturna#
birds again f#y abroad( The hour hath co'e for a## #ightDdreading peop#e,
the %esper hour and #eisure hour, $hen they do notDDNtake #eisure(N
2 hear it and s'e## it? it hath co'eDDtheir hour for hunt and procession,
not indeed for a $i#d hunt, but for a ta'e, #a'e, snuff#ing, softD
treadersM, softDprayersM hunt,DD
DDFor a hunt after susceptib#e si'p#etons? a## 'ouseDtraps for the heart
ha%e again been set& ;nd $hene%er 2 #ift a curtain, a nightD'oth rusheth
out of it(
*id it perhaps sUuat there a#ong $ith another nightD'othS For e%ery$here
do 2 s'e## s'a## concea#ed co''unitiesL and $here%er there are c#osets
there are ne$ de%otees therein, and the at'osphere of de%otees(
They sit for #ong e%enings beside one another, and say? N:et us again
beco'e #ike #itt#e chi#dren and say, Mgood God&MNDDruined in 'ouths and
sto'achs by the pious confectioners(
7r they #ook for #ong e%enings at a crafty, #urking crossDspider, that
preacheth prudence to the spiders the'se#%es, and teacheth that Nunder
crosses it is good for cob$ebDspinning&N
7r they sit a## day at s$a'ps $ith ang#eDrods, and on that account think
the'se#%es P-7F78N*L but $hoe%er fisheth $here there are no fish, 2 do not
e%en ca## hi' superficia#&
7r they #earn in god#yDgay sty#e to p#ay the harp $ith a hy'nDpoet, $ho
$ou#d fain harp hi'se#f into the heart of young gir#s?DDfor he hath tired
of o#d gir#s and their praises(
7r they #earn to shudder $ith a #earned se'iD'adcap, $ho $aiteth in
darkened roo's for spirits to co'e to hi'DDand the spirit runneth a$ay
entire#y&
7r they #isten to an o#d ro%ing ho$#DDand gro$#Dpiper, $ho hath #earnt fro'
the sad $inds the sadness of soundsL no$ pipeth he as the $ind, and
preacheth sadness in sad strains(
;nd so'e of the' ha%e e%en beco'e nightD$atch'en? they kno$ no$ ho$ to
b#o$ horns, and go about at night and a$aken o#d things $hich ha%e #ong
fa##en as#eep(
Fi%e $ords about o#d things did 2 hear yesterDnight at the gardenD$a##?
they ca'e fro' such o#d, sorro$fu#, arid nightD$atch'en(
NFor a father he careth not sufficient#y for his chi#dren? hu'an fathers
do this better&NDD
N/e is too o#d& /e no$ careth no 'ore for his chi#dren,NDDans$ered the
other nightD$atch'an(
N/;T/ he then chi#drenS No one can pro%e it un#ess he hi'se#f pro%e it& 2
ha%e #ong $ished that he $ou#d for once pro%e it thorough#y(N
NPro%eS ;s if /E had e%er pro%ed anything& Pro%ing is difficu#t to hi'L
he #ayeth great stress on oneMs .E:2E,2NG hi'(N
N;y& ;y& .e#ief sa%eth hi'L be#ief in hi'( That is the $ay $ith o#d
peop#e& So it is $ith us a#so&NDD
DDThus spake to each other the t$o o#d nightD$atch'en and #ightDscarers,
and tooted thereupon sorro$fu##y on their horns? so did it happen yesterD
night at the gardenD$a##(
To 'e, ho$e%er, did the heart $rithe $ith #aughter, and $as #ike to breakL
it kne$ not $here to go, and sunk into the 'idriff(
,eri#y, it $i## be 'y death yetDDto choke $ith #aughter $hen 2 see asses
drunken, and hear nightD$atch'en thus doubt about God(
/ath the ti'e not :7NG since passed for a## such doubtsS )ho 'ay no$adays
a$aken such o#d s#u'bering, #ightDshunning things&
)ith the o#d *eities hath it #ong since co'e to an end?DDand %eri#y, a good
joyfu# *eityDend had they&
They did not Nbeg#oo'N the'se#%es to deathDDthat do peop#e fabricate& 7n
the contrary, theyDD:;8G/E* the'se#%es to death once on a ti'e&
That took p#ace $hen the unGod#iest utterance ca'e fro' a God hi'se#fDDthe
utterance? NThere is but one God& Thou sha#t ha%e no other Gods before
'e&NDD
DD;n o#d gri'Dbeard of a God, a jea#ous one, forgot hi'se#f in such $ise?DD
;nd a## the Gods then #aughed, and shook upon their thrones, and exc#ai'ed?
N2s it not just di%inity that there are Gods, but no GodSN
/e that hath an ear #et hi' hear(DD
Thus ta#ked Zarathustra in the city he #o%ed, $hich is surna'ed NThe Pied
"o$(N For fro' here he had but t$o days to tra%e# to reach once 'ore his
ca%e and his ani'a#sL his sou#, ho$e%er, rejoiced unceasing#y on account of
the nighness of his return ho'e(
:222( T/E -ET8-N /79E(
7 #oneso'eness& 9y /79E, #oneso'eness& Too #ong ha%e 2 #i%ed $i#d#y in
$i#d re'oteness, to return to thee $ithout tears&
No$ threaten 'e $ith the finger as 'others threatenL no$ s'i#e upon 'e as
'others s'i#eL no$ say just? N)ho $as it that #ike a $hir#$ind once rushed
a$ay fro' 'eSDD
DD)ho $hen departing ca##ed out? MToo #ong ha%e 2 sat $ith #oneso'enessL
there ha%e 2 un#earned si#ence&M T/;T hast thou #earned no$DDsure#yS
7 Zarathustra, e%erything do 2 kno$L and that thou $ert 97-E F7-S;WEN
a'ongst the 'any, thou uniUue one, than thou e%er $ert $ith 'e&
7ne thing is forsakenness, another 'atter is #oneso'eness? T/;T hast thou
no$ #earned& ;nd that a'ongst 'en thou $i#t e%er be $i#d and strange?
DD)i#d and strange e%en $hen they #o%e thee? for abo%e a## they $ant to be
T-E;TE* 2N*8:GENT:Q&
/ere, ho$e%er, art thou at ho'e and house $ith thyse#fL here canst thou
utter e%erything, and unboso' a## 'oti%esL nothing is here asha'ed of
concea#ed, congea#ed fee#ings(
/ere do a## things co'e caressing#y to thy ta#k and f#atter thee? for they
$ant to ride upon thy back( 7n e%ery si'i#e dost thou here ride to e%ery
truth(
8pright#y and open#y 'ayest thou here ta#k to a## things? and %eri#y, it
soundeth as praise in their ears, for one to ta#k to a## thingsDDdirect#y&
;nother 'atter, ho$e%er, is forsakenness( For, dost thou re'e'ber, 7
ZarathustraS )hen thy bird screa'ed o%erhead, $hen thou stoodest in the
forest, irreso#ute, ignorant $here to go, beside a corpse?DD
DD)hen thou spakest? M:et 'ine ani'a#s #ead 'e& 9ore dangerous ha%e 2
found it a'ong 'en than a'ong ani'a#s?MDDT/;T $as forsakenness&
;nd dost thou re'e'ber, 7 ZarathustraS )hen thou sattest in thine is#e, a
$e## of $ine gi%ing and granting a'ongst e'pty buckets, besto$ing and
distributing a'ongst the thirsty?
DD8nti# at #ast thou a#one sattest thirsty a'ongst the drunken ones, and
$ai#edst night#y? M2s taking not 'ore b#essed than gi%ingS ;nd stea#ing
yet 'ore b#essed than takingSMDDT/;T $as forsakenness&
;nd dost thou re'e'ber, 7 ZarathustraS )hen thy sti##est hour ca'e and
dro%e thee forth fro' thyse#f, $hen $ith $icked $hispering it said? MSpeak
and succu'b&MD
DD)hen it disgusted thee $ith a## thy $aiting and si#ence, and discouraged
thy hu'b#e courage? T/;T $as forsakenness&NDD
7 #oneso'eness& 9y ho'e, #oneso'eness& /o$ b#essed#y and tender#y
speaketh thy %oice unto 'e&
)e do not Uuestion each other, $e do not co'p#ain to each otherL $e go
together open#y through open doors(
For a## is open $ith thee and c#earL and e%en the hours run here on #ighter
feet( For in the dark, ti'e $eigheth hea%ier upon one than in the #ight(
/ere f#y open unto 'e a## beingMs $ords and $ordDcabinets? here a## being
$anteth to beco'e $ords, here a## beco'ing $anteth to #earn of 'e ho$ to
ta#k(
*o$n there, ho$e%erDDa## ta#king is in %ain& There, forgetting and
passingDby are the best $isdo'? T/;T ha%e 2 #earned no$&
/e $ho $ou#d understand e%erything in 'an 'ust hand#e e%erything( .ut for
that 2 ha%e too c#ean hands(
2 do not #ike e%en to inha#e their breathL a#as& that 2 ha%e #i%ed so #ong
a'ong their noise and bad breaths&
7 b#essed sti##ness around 'e& 7 pure odours around 'e& /o$ fro' a deep
breast this sti##ness fetcheth pure breath& /o$ it hearkeneth, this
b#essed sti##ness&
.ut do$n thereDDthere speaketh e%erything, there is e%erything 'isheard(
2f one announce oneMs $isdo' $ith be##s, the shop'en in the 'arketDp#ace
$i## outDjing#e it $ith pennies&
E%erything a'ong the' ta#kethL no one kno$eth any #onger ho$ to understand(
E%erything fa##eth into the $aterL nothing fa##eth any #onger into deep
$e##s(
E%erything a'ong the' ta#keth, nothing succeedeth any #onger and
acco'p#isheth itse#f( E%erything cack#eth, but $ho $i## sti## sit Uuiet#y
on the nest and hatch eggsS
E%erything a'ong the' ta#keth, e%erything is outDta#ked( ;nd that $hich
yesterday $as sti## too hard for ti'e itse#f and its tooth, hangeth toDday,
outcha'ped and outche$ed, fro' the 'ouths of the 'en of toDday(
E%erything a'ong the' ta#keth, e%erything is betrayed( ;nd $hat $as once
ca##ed the secret and secrecy of profound sou#s, be#ongeth toDday to the
streetDtru'peters and other butterf#ies(
7 hu'an hubbub, thou $onderfu# thing& Thou noise in dark streets& No$ art
thou again behind 'e?DD'y greatest danger #ieth behind 'e&
2n indu#ging and pitying #ay e%er 'y greatest dangerL and a## hu'an hubbub
$isheth to be indu#ged and to#erated(
)ith suppressed truths, $ith foo#Ms hand and befoo#ed heart, and rich in
petty #ies of pity?DDthus ha%e 2 e%er #i%ed a'ong 'en(
*isguised did 2 sit a'ongst the', ready to 'isjudge 9QSE:F that 2 'ight
endure T/E9, and $i##ing#y saying to 'yse#f? NThou foo#, thou dost not
kno$ 'en&N
7ne un#earneth 'en $hen one #i%eth a'ongst the'? there is too 'uch
foreground in a## 'enDD$hat can farDseeing, farD#onging eyes do T/E-E&
;nd, foo# that 2 $as, $hen they 'isjudged 'e, 2 indu#ged the' on that
account 'ore than 'yse#f, being habitua##y hard on 'yse#f, and often e%en
taking re%enge on 'yse#f for the indu#gence(
Stung a## o%er by poisonous f#ies, and ho##o$ed #ike the stone by 'any
drops of $ickedness? thus did 2 sit a'ong the', and sti## said to 'yse#f?
N2nnocent is e%erything petty of its pettiness&N
Especia##y did 2 find those $ho ca## the'se#%es Nthe good,N the 'ost
poisonous f#iesL they sting in a## innocence, they #ie in a## innocenceL
ho$ "78:* theyDDbe just to$ards 'e&
/e $ho #i%eth a'ongst the goodDDpity teacheth hi' to #ie( Pity 'aketh
stif#ing air for a## free sou#s( For the stupidity of the good is
unfatho'ab#e(
To concea# 'yse#f and 'y richesDDT/;T did 2 #earn do$n there? for e%ery
one did 2 sti## find poor in spirit( 2t $as the #ie of 'y pity, that 2
kne$ in e%ery one,
DDThat 2 sa$ and scented in e%ery one, $hat $as EN78G/ of spirit for hi',
and $hat $as T77 98"/&
Their stiff $ise 'en? 2 ca## the' $ise, not stiffDDthus did 2 #earn to
s#ur o%er $ords(
The gra%eDdiggers dig for the'se#%es diseases( 8nder o#d rubbish rest bad
%apours( 7ne shou#d not stir up the 'arsh( 7ne shou#d #i%e on 'ountains(
)ith b#essed nostri#s do 2 again breathe 'ountainDfreedo'( Freed at #ast
is 'y nose fro' the s'e## of a## hu'an hubbub&
)ith sharp breezes tick#ed, as $ith spark#ing $ine, SNEEZET/ 'y sou#DD
sneezeth, and shouteth se#fDcongratu#ating#y? N/ea#th to thee&N
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:2,( T/E T/-EE E,2: T/2NGS(
!(
2n 'y drea', in 'y #ast 'orningDdrea', 2 stood toDday on a pro'ontoryDD
beyond the $or#dL 2 he#d a pair of sca#es, and )E2G/E* the $or#d(
;#as, that the rosy da$n ca'e too ear#y to 'e? she g#o$ed 'e a$ake, the
jea#ous one& Tea#ous is she a#$ays of the g#o$s of 'y 'orningDdrea'(
9easurab#e by hi' $ho hath ti'e, $eighab#e by a good $eigher, attainab#e by
strong pinions, di%inab#e by di%ine nutDcrackers? thus did 'y drea' find
the $or#d?DD
9y drea', a bo#d sai#or, ha#fDship, ha#fDhurricane, si#ent as the
butterf#y, i'patient as the fa#con? ho$ had it the patience and #eisure
toDday for $or#dD$eighing&
*id 'y $isdo' perhaps speak secret#y to it, 'y #aughing, $ideDa$ake dayD
$isdo', $hich 'ocketh at a## Ninfinite $or#dsNS For it saith? N)here
force is, there beco'eth N89.E- the 'aster? it hath 'ore force(N
/o$ confident#y did 'y drea' conte'p#ate this finite $or#d, not ne$D
fang#ed#y, not o#dDfang#ed#y, not ti'id#y, not entreating#y?DD
DD;s if a big round app#e presented itse#f to 'y hand, a ripe go#den app#e,
$ith a coo##yDsoft, %e#%ety skin?DDthus did the $or#d present itse#f unto
'e?DD
DD;s if a tree nodded unto 'e, a broadDbranched, strongD$i##ed tree, cur%ed
as a rec#ine and a footDstoo# for $eary tra%e##ers? thus did the $or#d
stand on 'y pro'ontory?DD
DD;s if de#icate hands carried a casket to$ards 'eDDa casket open for the
de#ectation of 'odest adoring eyes? thus did the $or#d present itse#f
before 'e toDday?DD
DDNot ridd#e enough to scare hu'an #o%e fro' it, not so#ution enough to put
to s#eep hu'an $isdo'?DDa hu'an#y good thing $as the $or#d to 'e toDday, of
$hich such bad things are said&
/o$ 2 thank 'y 'orningDdrea' that 2 thus at toDdayMs da$n, $eighed the
$or#d& ;s a hu'an#y good thing did it co'e unto 'e, this drea' and heartD
co'forter&
;nd that 2 'ay do the #ike by day, and i'itate and copy its best, no$ $i##
2 put the three $orst things on the sca#es, and $eigh the' hu'an#y $e##(DD
/e $ho taught to b#ess taught a#so to curse? $hat are the three best
cursed things in the $or#dS These $i## 2 put on the sca#es(
,7:8PT878SNESS, P;SS27N F7- P7)E-, and SE:F2S/NESS? these three things
ha%e hitherto been best cursed, and ha%e been in $orst and fa#sest reputeDD
these three things $i## 2 $eigh hu'an#y $e##(
)e##& /ere is 'y pro'ontory, and there is the seaDD2T ro##eth hither unto
'e, shaggi#y and fa$ning#y, the o#d, faithfu#, hundredDheaded dogD'onster
that 2 #o%e&DD
)e##& /ere $i## 2 ho#d the sca#es o%er the $e#tering sea? and a#so a
$itness do 2 choose to #ook onDDthee, the anchoriteDtree, thee, the strongD
odoured, broadDarched tree that 2 #o%e&DD
7n $hat bridge goeth the no$ to the hereafterS .y $hat constraint doth the
high stoop to the #o$S ;nd $hat enjoineth e%en the highest sti##DDto gro$
up$ardsSDD
No$ stand the sca#es poised and at rest? three hea%y Uuestions ha%e 2
thro$n inL three hea%y ans$ers carrieth the other sca#e(
C(
,o#uptuousness? unto a## hairDshirted despisers of the body, a sting and
stakeL and, cursed as Nthe $or#d,N by a## back$or#ds'en? for it 'ocketh
and befoo#eth a## erring, 'isinferring teachers(
,o#uptuousness? to the rabb#e, the s#o$ fire at $hich it is burntL to a##
$or'y $ood, to a## stinking rags, the prepared heat and ste$ furnace(
,o#uptuousness? to free hearts, a thing innocent and free, the gardenD
happiness of the earth, a## the futureMs thanksDo%erf#o$ to the present(
,o#uptuousness? on#y to the $ithered a s$eet poisonL to the #ionD$i##ed,
ho$e%er, the great cordia#, and the re%erent#y sa%ed $ine of $ines(
,o#uptuousness? the great sy'bo#ic happiness of a higher happiness and
highest hope( For to 'any is 'arriage pro'ised, and 'ore than 'arriage,DD
DDTo 'any that are 'ore unkno$n to each other than 'an and $o'an?DDand $ho
hath fu##y understood /7) 8NWN7)N to each other are 'an and $o'an&
,o#uptuousness?DDbut 2 $i## ha%e hedges around 'y thoughts, and e%en around
'y $ords, #est s$ine and #ibertine shou#d break into 'y gardens&DD
Passion for po$er? the g#o$ing scourge of the hardest of the heartDhardL
the crue# torture reser%ed for the crue##est the'se#%esL the g#oo'y f#a'e
of #i%ing pyres(
Passion for po$er? the $icked gadf#y $hich is 'ounted on the %ainest
peop#esL the scorner of a## uncertain %irtueL $hich rideth on e%ery horse
and on e%ery pride(
Passion for po$er? the earthUuake $hich breaketh and upbreaketh a## that
is rotten and ho##o$L the ro##ing, ru'b#ing, puniti%e de'o#isher of $hited
sepu#chresL the f#ashing interrogati%eDsign beside pre'ature ans$ers(
Passion for po$er? before $hose g#ance 'an creepeth and croucheth and
drudgeth, and beco'eth #o$er than the serpent and the s$ine?DDunti# at #ast
great conte'pt crieth out of hi'DD,
Passion for po$er? the terrib#e teacher of great conte'pt, $hich preacheth
to their face to cities and e'pires? N;$ay $ith thee&NDDunti# a %oice
crieth out of the'se#%es? N;$ay $ith 9E&N
Passion for po$er? $hich, ho$e%er, 'ounteth a##uring#y e%en to the pure
and #oneso'e, and up to se#fDsatisfied e#e%ations, g#o$ing #ike a #o%e that
painteth purp#e fe#icities a##uring#y on earth#y hea%ens(
Passion for po$er? but $ho $ou#d ca## it P;SS27N, $hen the height #ongeth
to stoop for po$er& ,eri#y, nothing sick or diseased is there in such
#onging and descending&
That the #oneso'e height 'ay not for e%er re'ain #oneso'e and se#fD
sufficingL that the 'ountains 'ay co'e to the %a##eys and the $inds of the
heights to the p#ains?DD
7h, $ho cou#d find the right preno'en and honouring na'e for such #onging&
N.esto$ing %irtueNDDthus did Zarathustra once na'e the unna'ab#e(
;nd then it happened a#so,DDand %eri#y, it happened for the first ti'e&DD
that his $ord b#essed SE:F2S/NESS, the $ho#eso'e, hea#thy se#fishness, that
springeth fro' the po$erfu# sou#?DD
DDFro' the po$erfu# sou#, to $hich the high body appertaineth, the
handso'e, triu'phing, refreshing body, around $hich e%erything beco'eth a
'irror?
DDThe p#iant, persuasi%e body, the dancer, $hose sy'bo# and epito'e is the
se#fDenjoying sou#( 7f such bodies and sou#s the se#fDenjoy'ent ca##eth
itse#f N%irtue(N
)ith its $ords of good and bad doth such se#fDenjoy'ent she#ter itse#f as
$ith sacred gro%esL $ith the na'es of its happiness doth it banish fro'
itse#f e%erything conte'ptib#e(
;$ay fro' itse#f doth it banish e%erything co$ard#yL it saith? N.adDDT/;T
2S co$ard#y&N "onte'ptib#e see' to it the e%erDso#icitous, the sighing,
the co'p#aining, and $hoe%er pick up the 'ost trif#ing ad%antage(
2t despiseth a#so a## bitterDs$eet $isdo'? for %eri#y, there is a#so
$isdo' that b#oo'eth in the dark, a nightDshade $isdo', $hich e%er sigheth?
N;## is %ain&N
Shy distrust is regarded by it as base, and e%ery one $ho $anteth oaths
instead of #ooks and hands? a#so a## o%erDdistrustfu# $isdo',DDfor such is
the 'ode of co$ard#y sou#s(
.aser sti## it regardeth the obseUuious, doggish one, $ho i''ediate#y #ieth
on his back, the sub'issi%e oneL and there is a#so $isdo' that is
sub'issi%e, and doggish, and pious, and obseUuious(
/atefu# to it a#together, and a #oathing, is he $ho $i## ne%er defend
hi'se#f, he $ho s$a##o$eth do$n poisonous spitt#e and bad #ooks, the a##D
tooDpatient one, the a##Dendurer, the a##Dsatisfied one? for that is the
'ode of s#a%es(
)hether they be ser%i#e before Gods and di%ine spurnings, or before 'en and
stupid hu'an opinions? at ;:: kinds of s#a%es doth it spit, this b#essed
se#fishness&
.ad? thus doth it ca## a## that is spiritDbroken, and sordid#yDser%i#eDD
constrained, b#inking eyes, depressed hearts, and the fa#se sub'issi%e
sty#e, $hich kisseth $ith broad co$ard#y #ips(
;nd spurious $isdo'? so doth it ca## a## the $it that s#a%es, and hoaryD
headed and $eary ones affectL and especia##y a## the cunning, spuriousD
$itted, curiousD$itted foo#ishness of priests&
The spurious $ise, ho$e%er, a## the priests, the $or#dD$eary, and those
$hose sou#s are of fe'inine and ser%i#e natureDDoh, ho$ hath their ga'e a##
a#ong abused se#fishness&
;nd precise#y T/;T $as to be %irtue and $as to be ca##ed %irtueDDto abuse
se#fishness& ;nd Nse#f#essNDDso did they $ish the'se#%es $ith good reason,
a## those $or#dD$eary co$ards and crossDspiders&
.ut to a## those co'eth no$ the day, the change, the s$ord of judg'ent, T/E
G-E;T N77NT2*E? then sha## 'any things be re%ea#ed&
;nd he $ho proc#ai'eth the EG7 $ho#eso'e and ho#y, and se#fishness b#essed,
%eri#y, he, the prognosticator, speaketh a#so $hat he kno$eth? N.E/7:*, 2T
"79ET/, 2T 2S N2G/, T/E G-E;T N77NT2*E&N
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:,( T/E SP2-2T 7F G-;,2TQ(
!(
9y 'outhpieceDDis of the peop#e? too coarse#y and cordia##y do 2 ta#k for
;ngora rabbits( ;nd sti## stranger soundeth 'y $ord unto a## inkDfish and
penDfoxes(
9y handDDis a foo#Ms hand? $oe unto a## tab#es and $a##s, and $hate%er
hath roo' for foo#Ms sketching, foo#Ms scra$#ing&
9y footDDis a horseDfootL there$ith do 2 tra'p#e and trot o%er stick and
stone, in the fie#ds up and do$n, and a' bede%i##ed $ith de#ight in a##
fast racing(
9y sto'achDDis sure#y an eag#eMs sto'achS For it preferreth #a'bMs f#esh(
"ertain#y it is a birdMs sto'ach(
Nourished $ith innocent things, and $ith fe$, ready and i'patient to f#y,
to f#y a$ayDDthat is no$ 'y nature? $hy shou#d there not be so'ething of
birdDnature therein&
;nd especia##y that 2 a' hosti#e to the spirit of gra%ity, that is birdD
nature?DD%eri#y, dead#y hosti#e, supre'e#y hosti#e, origina##y hosti#e&
7h, $hither hath 'y hosti#ity not f#o$n and 'isf#o$n&
Thereof cou#d 2 sing a songDDand )2:: sing it? though 2 be a#one in an
e'pty house, and 'ust sing it to 'ine o$n ears(
7ther singers are there, to be sure, to $ho' on#y the fu## house 'aketh the
%oice soft, the hand e#oUuent, the eye expressi%e, the heart $akefu#?DD
those do 2 not rese'b#e(DD
C(
/e $ho one day teacheth 'en to f#y $i## ha%e shifted a## #and'arksL to hi'
$i## a## #and'arks the'se#%es f#y into the airL the earth $i## he christen
ane$DDas Nthe #ight body(N
The ostrich runneth faster than the fastest horse, but it a#so thrusteth
its head hea%i#y into the hea%y earth? thus is it $ith the 'an $ho cannot
yet f#y(
/ea%y unto hi' are earth and #ife, and so )2::ET/ the spirit of gra%ity&
.ut he $ho $ou#d beco'e #ight, and be a bird, 'ust #o%e hi'se#f?DDthus do
X2X teach(
Not, to be sure, $ith the #o%e of the sick and infected, for $ith the'
stinketh e%en se#fD#o%e&
7ne 'ust #earn to #o%e onese#fDDthus do 2 teachDD$ith a $ho#eso'e and
hea#thy #o%e? that one 'ay endure to be $ith onese#f, and not go ro%ing
about(
Such ro%ing about christeneth itse#f Nbrother#y #o%eNL $ith these $ords
hath there hitherto been the best #ying and disse'b#ing, and especia##y by
those $ho ha%e been burdenso'e to e%ery one(
;nd %eri#y, it is no co''and'ent for toDday and toD'orro$ to :E;-N to #o%e
onese#f( -ather is it of a## arts the finest, subt#est, #ast and
patientest(
For to its possessor is a## possession $e## concea#ed, and of a## treasureD
pits oneMs o$n is #ast exca%atedDDso causeth the spirit of gra%ity(
;#'ost in the crad#e are $e apportioned $ith hea%y $ords and $orths?
NgoodN and Ne%i#NDDso ca##eth itse#f this do$ry( For the sake of it $e are
forgi%en for #i%ing(
;nd therefore suffereth one #itt#e chi#dren to co'e unto one, to forbid
the' beti'es to #o%e the'se#%esDDso causeth the spirit of gra%ity(
;nd $eDD$e bear #oya##y $hat is apportioned unto us, on hard shou#ders,
o%er rugged 'ountains& ;nd $hen $e s$eat, then do peop#e say to us? NQea,
#ife is hard to bear&N
.ut 'an hi'se#f on#y is hard to bear& The reason thereof is that he
carrieth too 'any extraneous things on his shou#ders( :ike the ca'e#
knee#eth he do$n, and #etteth hi'se#f be $e## #aden(
Especia##y the strong #oadDbearing 'an in $ho' re%erence resideth( Too
'any ERT-;NE78S hea%y $ords and $orths #oadeth he upon hi'se#fDDthen
see'eth #ife to hi' a desert&
;nd %eri#y& 9any a thing a#so that is 78- 7)N is hard to bear& ;nd 'any
interna# things in 'an are #ike the oysterDDrepu#si%e and s#ippery and hard
to graspLD
So that an e#egant she##, $ith e#egant adorn'ent, 'ust p#ead for the'( .ut
this art a#so 'ust one #earn? to /;,E a she##, and a fine appearance, and
sagacious b#indness&
;gain, it decei%eth about 'any things in 'an, that 'any a she## is poor and
pitiab#e, and too 'uch of a she##( 9uch concea#ed goodness and po$er is
ne%er drea't ofL the choicest dainties find no tasters&
)o'en kno$ that, the choicest of the'? a #itt#e fatter a #itt#e #eanerDD
oh, ho$ 'uch fate is in so #itt#e&
9an is difficu#t to disco%er, and unto hi'se#f 'ost difficu#t of a##L often
#ieth the spirit concerning the sou#( So causeth the spirit of gra%ity(
/e, ho$e%er, hath disco%ered hi'se#f $ho saith? This is 9Q good and e%i#?
there$ith hath he si#enced the 'o#e and the d$arf, $ho say? NGood for a##,
e%i# for a##(N
,eri#y, neither do 2 #ike those $ho ca## e%erything good, and this $or#d
the best of a##( Those do 2 ca## the a##Dsatisfied(
;##Dsatisfiedness, $hich kno$eth ho$ to taste e%erything,DDthat is not the
best taste& 2 honour the refractory, fastidious tongues and sto'achs,
$hich ha%e #earned to say N2N and NQeaN and NNay(N
To che$ and digest e%erything, ho$e%erDDthat is the genuine s$ineDnature&
E%er to say QED;DDthat hath on#y the ass #earnt, and those #ike it&DD
*eep ye##o$ and hot redDDso $anteth 9Q tasteDDit 'ixeth b#ood $ith a##
co#ours( /e, ho$e%er, $ho $hite$asheth his house, betrayeth unto 'e a
$hite$ashed sou#(
)ith 'u''ies, so'e fa## in #o%eL others $ith phanto's? both a#ike hosti#e
to a## f#esh and b#oodDDoh, ho$ repugnant are both to 'y taste& For 2 #o%e
b#ood(
;nd there $i## 2 not reside and abide $here e%ery one spitteth and spe$eth?
that is no$ 9Q taste,DDrather $ou#d 2 #i%e a'ongst thie%es and perjurers(
Nobody carrieth go#d in his 'outh(
Sti## 'ore repugnant unto 'e, ho$e%er, are a## #ickspitt#esL and the 'ost
repugnant ani'a# of 'an that 2 found, did 2 christen NparasiteN? it $ou#d
not #o%e, and $ou#d yet #i%e by #o%e(
8nhappy do 2 ca## a## those $ho ha%e on#y one choice? either to beco'e
e%i# beasts, or e%i# beastDta'ers( ;'ongst such $ou#d 2 not bui#d 'y
tabernac#e(
8nhappy do 2 a#so ca## those $ho ha%e e%er to );2T,DDthey are repugnant to
'y tasteDDa## the to##Dgatherers and traders, and kings, and other
#andkeepers and shopkeepers(
,eri#y, 2 #earned $aiting a#so, and thorough#y so,DDbut on#y $aiting for
9QSE:F( ;nd abo%e a## did 2 #earn standing and $a#king and running and
#eaping and c#i'bing and dancing(
This ho$e%er is 'y teaching? he $ho $isheth one day to f#y, 'ust first
#earn standing and $a#king and running and c#i'bing and dancing?DDone doth
not f#y into f#ying&
)ith ropeD#adders #earned 2 to reach 'any a $indo$, $ith ni'b#e #egs did 2
c#i'b high 'asts? to sit on high 'asts of perception see'ed to 'e no s'a##
b#issLDD
DDTo f#icker #ike s'a## f#a'es on high 'asts? a s'a## #ight, certain#y,
but a great co'fort to castDa$ay sai#ors and shipD$recked ones&
.y di%ers $ays and $endings did 2 arri%e at 'y truthL not by one #adder did
2 'ount to the height $here 'ine eye ro%eth into 'y re'oteness(
;nd un$i##ing#y on#y did 2 ask 'y $ayDDthat $as a#$ays counter to 'y taste&
-ather did 2 Uuestion and test the $ays the'se#%es(
; testing and a Uuestioning hath been a## 'y tra%e##ing?DDand %eri#y, one
'ust a#so :E;-N to ans$er such Uuestioning& That, ho$e%er,DDis 'y taste?
DDNeither a good nor a bad taste, but 9Q taste, of $hich 2 ha%e no #onger
either sha'e or secrecy(
NThisDDis no$ 9Q $ay,DD$here is yoursSN Thus did 2 ans$er those $ho asked
'e Nthe $ay(N For T/E $ayDDit doth not exist&
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:,2( 7:* ;N* NE) T;.:ES(
!(
/ere do 2 sit and $ait, o#d broken tab#es around 'e and a#so ne$ ha#fD
$ritten tab#es( )hen co'eth 'ine hourS
DDThe hour of 'y descent, of 'y do$nDgoing? for once 'ore $i## 2 go unto
'en(
For that hour do 2 no$ $ait? for first 'ust the signs co'e unto 'e that it
is 92NE hourDDna'e#y, the #aughing #ion $ith the f#ock of do%es(
9ean$hi#e do 2 ta#k to 'yse#f as one $ho hath ti'e( No one te##eth 'e
anything ne$, so 2 te## 'yse#f 'ine o$n story(
C(
)hen 2 ca'e unto 'en, then found 2 the' resting on an o#d infatuation? a##
of the' thought they had #ong kno$n $hat $as good and bad for 'en(
;n o#d $eariso'e business see'ed to the' a## discourse about %irtueL and he
$ho $ished to s#eep $e## spake of NgoodN and NbadN ere retiring to rest(
This so'no#ence did 2 disturb $hen 2 taught that N7 7NE QET WN7)ET/ $hat is
good and bad?DDun#ess it be the creating one&
DD2t is he, ho$e%er, $ho createth 'anMs goa#, and gi%eth to the earth its
'eaning and its future? he on#y EFFE"TET/ it T/;T aught is good or bad(
;nd 2 bade the' upset their o#d acade'ic chairs, and $here%er that o#d
infatuation had satL 2 bade the' #augh at their great 'ora#ists, their
saints, their poets, and their Sa%iours(
;t their g#oo'y sages did 2 bid the' #augh, and $hoe%er had sat ad'onishing
as a b#ack scarecro$ on the tree of #ife(
7n their great gra%eDhigh$ay did 2 seat 'yse#f, and e%en beside the carrion
and %u#turesDDand 2 #aughed at a## their bygone and its 'e##o$ decaying
g#ory(
,eri#y, #ike penitentia# preachers and foo#s did 2 cry $rath and sha'e on
a## their greatness and s'a##ness( 7h, that their best is so %ery s'a##&
7h, that their $orst is so %ery s'a##& Thus did 2 #augh(
Thus did 'y $ise #onging, born in the 'ountains, cry and #augh in 'eL a
$i#d $isdo', %eri#y&DD'y great pinionDrust#ing #onging(
;nd oft did it carry 'e off and up and a$ay and in the 'idst of #aughterL
then f#e$ 2 Uui%ering #ike an arro$ $ith sunDintoxicated rapture?
DD7ut into distant futures, $hich no drea' hath yet seen, into $ar'er
souths than e%er scu#ptor concei%ed,DD$here gods in their dancing are
asha'ed of a## c#othes?
@That 2 'ay speak in parab#es and ha#t and sta''er #ike the poets? and
%eri#y 2 a' asha'ed that 2 ha%e sti## to be a poet&A
)here a## beco'ing see'ed to 'e dancing of Gods, and $antoning of Gods, and
the $or#d un#oosed and unbrid#ed and f#eeing back to itse#f?DD
DD;s an eterna# se#fDf#eeing and reDseeking of one another of 'any Gods, as
the b#essed se#fDcontradicting, reco''uning, and refraternising $ith one
another of 'any Gods?DD
)here a## ti'e see'ed to 'e a b#essed 'ockery of 'o'ents, $here necessity
$as freedo' itse#f, $hich p#ayed happi#y $ith the goad of freedo'?DD
)here 2 a#so found again 'ine o#d de%i# and archDene'y, the spirit of
gra%ity, and a## that it created? constraint, #a$, necessity and
conseUuence and purpose and $i## and good and e%i#?DD
For 'ust there not be that $hich is danced 7,E-, danced beyondS 9ust there
not, for the sake of the ni'b#e, the ni'b#est,DDbe 'o#es and c#u'sy
d$arfsSDD
F(
There $as it a#so $here 2 picked up fro' the path the $ord NSuper'an,N and
that 'an is so'ething that 'ust be surpassed(
DDThat 'an is a bridge and not a goa#DDrejoicing o%er his noontides and
e%enings, as ad%ances to ne$ rosy da$ns?
DDThe Zarathustra $ord of the great noontide, and $hate%er e#se 2 ha%e hung
up o%er 'en #ike purp#e e%eningDafterg#o$s(
,eri#y, a#so ne$ stars did 2 'ake the' see, a#ong $ith ne$ nightsL and o%er
c#oud and day and night, did 2 spread out #aughter #ike a gayDco#oured
canopy(
2 taught the' a## 9Q poetisation and aspiration? to co'pose and co##ect
into unity $hat is frag'ent in 'an, and ridd#e and fearfu# chanceLDD
DD;s co'poser, ridd#eDreader, and redee'er of chance, did 2 teach the' to
create the future, and a## that /;T/ .EENDDto redee' by creating(
The past of 'an to redee', and e%ery N2t $asN to transfor', unti# the )i##
saith? N.ut so did 2 $i## it& So sha## 2 $i## itDDN
DDThis did 2 ca## rede'ptionL this a#one taught 2 the' to ca##
rede'ption(DD
No$ do 2 a$ait 9Q rede'ptionDDthat 2 'ay go unto the' for the #ast ti'e(
For once 'ore $i## 2 go unto 'en? ;97NGST the' $i## 'y sun setL in dying
$i## 2 gi%e the' 'y choicest gift&
Fro' the sun did 2 #earn this, $hen it goeth do$n, the exuberant one? go#d
doth it then pour into the sea, out of inexhaustib#e riches,DD
DDSo that the poorest fisher'an ro$eth e%en $ith G7:*EN oars& For this did
2 once see, and did not tire of $eeping in beho#ding it(DD
:ike the sun $i## a#so Zarathustra go do$n? no$ sitteth he here and
$aiteth, o#d broken tab#es around hi', and a#so ne$ tab#esDDha#fD$ritten(
E(
.eho#d, here is a ne$ tab#eL but $here are 'y brethren $ho $i## carry it
$ith 'e to the %a##ey and into hearts of f#eshSDD
Thus de'andeth 'y great #o%e to the re'otest ones? .E N7T "7NS2*E-;TE 7F
T/Q NE2G/.78-& 9an is so'ething that 'ust be surpassed(
There are 'any di%ers $ays and 'odes of surpassing? see T/78 thereto& .ut
on#y a buffoon thinketh? N'an can a#so be 7,E-:E;PT(N
Surpass thyse#f e%en in thy neighbour? and a right $hich thou canst seize
upon, sha#t thou not a##o$ to be gi%en thee&
)hat thou doest can no one do to thee again( :o, there is no reUuita#(
/e $ho cannot co''and hi'se#f sha## obey( ;nd 'any a one ";N co''and
hi'se#f, but sti## sore#y #acketh se#fDobedience&
K(
Thus $isheth the type of nob#e sou#s? they desire to ha%e nothing
G-;T82T78S:Q, #east of a##, #ife(
/e $ho is of the popu#ace $isheth to #i%e gratuitous#yL $e others, ho$e%er,
to $ho' #ife hath gi%en itse#fDD$e are e%er considering )/;T $e can best
gi%e 2N -ET8-N&
;nd %eri#y, it is a nob#e dictu' $hich saith? N)hat #ife pro'iseth 8S,
that pro'ise $i## )E keepDDto #ife&N
7ne shou#d not $ish to enjoy $here one doth not contribute to the
enjoy'ent( ;nd one shou#d not )2S/ to enjoy&
For enjoy'ent and innocence are the 'ost bashfu# things( Neither #ike to
be sought for( 7ne shou#d /;,E the',DDbut one shou#d rather SEEW for gui#t
and pain&DD
P(
7 'y brethren, he $ho is a first#ing is e%er sacrificed( No$, ho$e%er, are
$e first#ings&
)e a## b#eed on secret sacrificia# a#tars, $e a## burn and broi# in honour
of ancient ido#s(
7ur best is sti## young? this exciteth o#d pa#ates( 7ur f#esh is tender,
our skin is on#y #a'bsM skin?DDho$ cou#d $e not excite o#d ido#Dpriests&
2N 78-SE:,ES d$e##eth he sti##, the o#d ido#Dpriest, $ho broi#eth our best
for his banUuet( ;h, 'y brethren, ho$ cou#d first#ings fai# to be
sacrifices&
.ut so $isheth our typeL and 2 #o%e those $ho do not $ish to preser%e
the'se#%es, the do$nDgoing ones do 2 #o%e $ith 'ine entire #o%e? for they
go beyond(DD
1(
To be trueDDthat ";N fe$ be& ;nd he $ho can, $i## not& :east of a##,
ho$e%er, can the good be true(
7h, those good ones& G77* 9EN NE,E- SPE;W T/E T-8T/( For the spirit, thus
to be good, is a 'a#ady(
They yie#d, those good ones, they sub'it the'se#%esL their heart repeateth,
their sou# obeyeth? /E, ho$e%er, $ho obeyeth, *7T/ N7T :2STEN T7 /29SE:F&
;## that is ca##ed e%i# by the good, 'ust co'e together in order that one
truth 'ay be born( 7 'y brethren, are ye a#so e%i# enough for T/2S truthS
The daring %enture, the pro#onged distrust, the crue# Nay, the tediu', the
cuttingDintoDtheDUuickDDho$ se#do' do T/ESE co'e together& 7ut of such
seed, ho$e%erDDis truth produced&
.ES2*E the bad conscience hath hitherto gro$n a## WN7):E*GE& .reak up,
break up, ye discerning ones, the o#d tab#es&
4(
)hen the $ater hath p#anks, $hen gang$ays and rai#ings oMerspan the strea',
%eri#y, he is not be#ie%ed $ho then saith? N;## is in f#ux(N
.ut e%en the si'p#etons contradict hi'( N)hatSN say the si'p#etons, Na##
in f#uxS P#anks and rai#ings are sti## 7,E- the strea'&
N7,E- the strea' a## is stab#e, a## the %a#ues of things, the bridges and
bearings, a## MgoodM and Me%i#M? these are a## ST;.:E&NDD
"o'eth, ho$e%er, the hard $inter, the strea'Dta'er, then #earn e%en the
$ittiest distrust, and %eri#y, not on#y the si'p#etons then say? NShou#d
not e%erythingDDST;N* ST2::SN
NFunda'enta##y standeth e%erything sti##NDDthat is an appropriate $inter
doctrine, good cheer for an unproducti%e period, a great co'fort for
$interDs#eepers and firesideD#oungers(
NFunda'enta##y standeth e%erything sti##NDD? but "7NT-;-Q thereto,
preacheth the tha$ing $ind&
The tha$ing $ind, a bu##ock, $hich is no p#oughing bu##ockDDa furious
bu##ock, a destroyer, $hich $ith angry horns breaketh the ice& The ice
ho$e%erDD.-E;WET/ G;NG);QS&
7 'y brethren, is not e%erything ;T P-ESENT 2N F:8RS /a%e not a## rai#ings
and gang$ays fa##en into the $aterS )ho $ou#d sti## /7:* 7N to NgoodN and
Ne%i#NS
N)oe to us& /ai# to us& The tha$ing $ind b#o$eth&NDDThus preach, 'y
brethren, through a## the streets&
0(
There is an o#d i##usionDDit is ca##ed good and e%i#( ;round soothsayers
and astro#ogers hath hitherto re%o#%ed the orbit of this i##usion(
7nce did one .E:2E,E in soothsayers and astro#ogersL and T/E-EF7-E did one
be#ie%e, NE%erything is fate? thou sha#t, for thou 'ust&N
Then again did one distrust a## soothsayers and astro#ogersL and T/E-EF7-E
did one be#ie%e, NE%erything is freedo'? thou canst, for thou $i##est&N
7 'y brethren, concerning the stars and the future there hath hitherto been
on#y i##usion, and not kno$#edgeL and T/E-EF7-E concerning good and e%i#
there hath hitherto been on#y i##usion and not kno$#edge&
!6(
NThou sha#t not rob& Thou sha#t not s#ay&NDDsuch precepts $ere once ca##ed
ho#yL before the' did one bo$ the knee and the head, and take off oneMs
shoes(
.ut 2 ask you? )here ha%e there e%er been better robbers and s#ayers in
the $or#d than such ho#y preceptsS
2s there not e%en in a## #ifeDDrobbing and s#ayingS ;nd for such precepts
to be ca##ed ho#y, $as not T-8T/ itse#f therebyDDs#ainS
DD7r $as it a ser'on of death that ca##ed ho#y $hat contradicted and
dissuaded fro' #ifeSDD7 'y brethren, break up, break up for 'e the o#d
tab#es&
!!(
2t is 'y sy'pathy $ith a## the past that 2 see it is abandoned,DD
DD;bandoned to the fa%our, the spirit and the 'adness of e%ery generation
that co'eth, and reinterpreteth a## that hath been as its bridge&
; great potentate 'ight arise, an artfu# prodigy, $ho $ith appro%a# and
disappro%a# cou#d strain and constrain a## the past, unti# it beca'e for
hi' a bridge, a harbinger, a hera#d, and a cockDcro$ing(
This ho$e%er is the other danger, and 'ine other sy'pathy?DDhe $ho is of
the popu#ace, his thoughts go back to his grandfather,DD$ith his
grandfather, ho$e%er, doth ti'e cease(
Thus is a## the past abandoned? for it 'ight so'e day happen for the
popu#ace to beco'e 'aster, and dro$n a## ti'e in sha##o$ $aters(
Therefore, 7 'y brethren, a NE) N7.2:2TQ is needed, $hich sha## be the
ad%ersary of a## popu#ace and potentate ru#e, and sha## inscribe ane$ the
$ord Nnob#eN on ne$ tab#es(
For 'any nob#e ones are needed, and 'any kinds of nob#e ones, F7- ; NE)
N7.2:2TQ& 7r, as 2 once said in parab#e? NThat is just di%inity, that
there are Gods, but no God&N
!C(
7 'y brethren, 2 consecrate you and point you to a ne$ nobi#ity? ye sha##
beco'e procreators and cu#ti%ators and so$ers of the futureLDD
DD,eri#y, not to a nobi#ity $hich ye cou#d purchase #ike traders $ith
tradersM go#dL for #itt#e $orth is a## that hath its price(
:et it not be your honour henceforth $hence ye co'e, but $hither ye go&
Qour )i## and your feet $hich seek to surpass youDD#et these be your ne$
honour&
,eri#y, not that ye ha%e ser%ed a princeDDof $hat account are princes no$&
DDnor that ye ha%e beco'e a bu#$ark to that $hich standeth, that it 'ay
stand 'ore fir'#y(
Not that your fa'i#y ha%e beco'e court#y at courts, and that ye ha%e
#earnedDDgayDco#oured, #ike the f#a'ingoDDto stand #ong hours in sha##o$
poo#s?
@For ;.2:2TQDtoDstand is a 'erit in courtiersL and a## courtiers be#ie%e
that unto b#essedness after death pertainethDDPE-92SS27NDtoDsit&A
Nor e%en that a Spirit ca##ed /o#y, #ed your forefathers into pro'ised
#ands, $hich 2 do not praise? for $here the $orst of a## trees gre$DDthe
cross,DDin that #and there is nothing to praise&DD
DD;nd %eri#y, $here%er this N/o#y SpiritN #ed its knights, a#$ays in such
ca'paigns didDDgoats and geese, and $ryheads and guyheads run F7-E97ST&DD
7 'y brethren, not back$ard sha## your nobi#ity gaze, but 78T);-*& Exi#es
sha## ye be fro' a## father#ands and forefatherD#ands&
Qour "/2:*-ENMS :;N* sha## ye #o%e? #et this #o%e be your ne$ nobi#ity,DD
the undisco%ered in the re'otest seas& For it do 2 bid your sai#s search
and search&
8nto your chi#dren sha## ye 9;WE ;9EN*S for being the chi#dren of your
fathers? a## the past sha## ye T/8S redee'& This ne$ tab#e do 2 p#ace
o%er you&
!F(
N)hy shou#d one #i%eS ;## is %ain& To #i%eDDthat is to thrash stra$L to
#i%eDDthat is to burn onese#f and yet not get $ar'(DD
Such ancient babb#ing sti## passeth for N$isdo'NL because it is o#d,
ho$e%er, and s'e##eth 'usti#y, T/E-EF7-E is it the 'ore honoured( E%en
'ou#d ennob#eth(DD
"hi#dren 'ight thus speak? they S/8N the fire because it hath burnt the'&
There is 'uch chi#dishness in the o#d books of $isdo'(
;nd he $ho e%er Nthrasheth stra$,N $hy shou#d he be a##o$ed to rai# at
thrashing& Such a foo# one $ou#d ha%e to 'uzz#e&
Such persons sit do$n to the tab#e and bring nothing $ith the', not e%en
good hunger?DDand then do they rai#? N;## is %ain&N
.ut to eat and drink $e##, 'y brethren, is %eri#y no %ain art& .reak up,
break up for 'e the tab#es of the ne%erDjoyous ones&
!E(
NTo the c#ean are a## things c#eanNDDthus say the peop#e( 2, ho$e%er, say
unto you? To the s$ine a## things beco'e s$inish&
Therefore preach the %isionaries and bo$edDheads @$hose hearts are a#so
bo$ed do$nA? NThe $or#d itse#f is a fi#thy 'onster(N
For these are a## unc#ean spiritsL especia##y those, ho$e%er, $ho ha%e no
peace or rest, un#ess they see the $or#d F-79 T/E .;"WS2*EDDthe
back$or#ds'en&
T7 T/7SE do 2 say it to the face, a#though it sound unp#easant#y? the
$or#d rese'b#eth 'an, in that it hath a backside,DDS7 98"/ is true&
There is in the $or#d 'uch fi#th? S7 98"/ is true& .ut the $or#d itse#f
is not therefore a fi#thy 'onster&
There is $isdo' in the fact that 'uch in the $or#d s'e##eth bad#y?
#oathing itse#f createth $ings, and fountainDdi%ining po$ers&
2n the best there is sti## so'ething to #oatheL and the best is sti##
so'ething that 'ust be surpassed&DD
7 'y brethren, there is 'uch $isdo' in the fact that 'uch fi#th is in the
$or#d&DD
!K(
Such sayings did 2 hear pious back$or#ds'en speak to their consciences, and
%eri#y $ithout $ickedness or gui#e,DDa#though there is nothing 'ore
gui#efu# in the $or#d, or 'ore $icked(
N:et the $or#d be as it is& -aise not a finger against it&N
N:et $hoe%er $i## choke and stab and skin and scrape the peop#e? raise not
a finger against it& Thereby $i## they #earn to renounce the $or#d(N
N;nd thine o$n reasonDDthis sha#t thou thyse#f stif#e and chokeL for it is
a reason of this $or#d,DDthereby $i#t thou #earn thyse#f to renounce the
$or#d(NDD
DDShatter, shatter, 7 'y brethren, those o#d tab#es of the pious& Tatter
the 'axi's of the $or#dD'a#igners&DD
!P(
N/e $ho #earneth 'uch un#earneth a## %io#ent cra%ingsNDDthat do peop#e no$
$hisper to one another in a## the dark #anes(
N)isdo' $earieth, nothing is $orth $hi#eL thou sha#t not cra%e&NDDthis ne$
tab#e found 2 hanging e%en in the pub#ic 'arkets(
.reak up for 'e, 7 'y brethren, break up a#so that NE) tab#e& The $earyD
oMDtheD$or#d put it up, and the preachers of death and the jai#er? for #o,
it is a#so a ser'on for s#a%ery?DD
.ecause they #earned bad#y and not the best, and e%erything too ear#y and
e%erything too fastL because they ;TE bad#y? fro' thence hath resu#ted
their ruined sto'achLDD
DDFor a ruined sto'ach, is their spirit? 2T persuadeth to death& For
%eri#y, 'y brethren, the spirit 2S a sto'ach&
:ife is a $e## of de#ight, but to hi' in $ho' the ruined sto'ach speaketh,
the father of aff#iction, a## fountains are poisoned(
To discern? that is *E:2G/T to the #ionD$i##ed& .ut he $ho hath beco'e
$eary, is hi'se#f 'ere#y N$i##edNL $ith hi' p#ay a## the $a%es(
;nd such is a#$ays the nature of $eak 'en? they #ose the'se#%es on their
$ay( ;nd at #ast asketh their $eariness? N)hy did $e e%er go on the $ayS
;## is indifferent&N
T7 T/E9 soundeth it p#easant to ha%e preached in their ears? NNothing is
$orth $hi#e& Qe sha## not $i##&N That, ho$e%er, is a ser'on for s#a%ery(
7 'y brethren, a fresh b#ustering $ind co'eth Zarathustra unto a## $ayD
$eary onesL 'any noses $i## he yet 'ake sneeze&
E%en through $a##s b#o$eth 'y free breath, and in into prisons and
i'prisoned spirits&
)i##ing e'ancipateth? for $i##ing is creating? so do 2 teach( ;nd 7N:Q
for creating sha## ye #earn&
;nd a#so the #earning sha## ye :E;-N on#y fro' 'e, the #earning $e##&DD/e
$ho hath ears #et hi' hear&
!1(
There standeth the boatDDthither goeth it o%er, perhaps into %ast
nothingnessDDbut $ho $i##eth to enter into this NPerhapsNS
None of you $ant to enter into the deathDboat& /o$ shou#d ye then be
)7-:*D)E;-Q ones&
)or#dD$eary ones& ;nd ha%e not e%en $ithdra$n fro' the earth& Eager did 2
e%er find you for the earth, a'orous sti## of your o$n earthD$eariness&
Not in %ain doth your #ip hang do$n?DDa s'a## $or#d#y $ish sti## sitteth
thereon& ;nd in your eyeDDf#oateth there not a c#oud#et of unforgotten
earth#y b#issS
There are on the earth 'any good in%entions, so'e usefu#, so'e p#easant?
for their sake is the earth to be #o%ed(
;nd 'any such good in%entions are there, that they are #ike $o'anMs
breasts? usefu# at the sa'e ti'e, and p#easant(
Qe $or#dD$eary ones, ho$e%er& Qe earthDid#ers& Qou, sha## one beat $ith
stripes& )ith stripes sha## one again 'ake you spright#y #i'bs(
For if ye be not in%a#ids, or decrepit creatures, of $ho' the earth is
$eary, then are ye s#y s#oths, or dainty, sneaking p#easureDcats( ;nd if
ye $i## not again -8N gai#y, then sha## yeDDpass a$ay&
To the incurab#e sha## one not seek to be a physician? thus teacheth
Zarathustra?DDso sha## ye pass a$ay&
.ut 'ore "78-;GE is needed to 'ake an end than to 'ake a ne$ %erse? that
do a## physicians and poets kno$ $e##(DD
!4(
7 'y brethren, there are tab#es $hich $eariness fra'ed, and tab#es $hich
s#othfu#ness fra'ed, corrupt s#othfu#ness? a#though they speak si'i#ar#y,
they $ant to be heard different#y(DD
See this #anguishing one& 7n#y a spanDbreadth is he fro' his goa#L but
fro' $eariness hath he #ain do$n obstinate#y in the dust, this bra%e one&
Fro' $eariness ya$neth he at the path, at the earth, at the goa#, and at
hi'se#f? not a step further $i## he go,DDthis bra%e one&
No$ g#o$eth the sun upon hi', and the dogs #ick at his s$eat? but he #ieth
there in his obstinacy and preferreth to #anguish?DD
DD; spanDbreadth fro' his goa#, to #anguish& ,eri#y, ye $i## ha%e to drag
hi' into his hea%en by the hair of his headDDthis hero&
.etter sti## that ye #et hi' #ie $here he hath #ain do$n, that s#eep 'ay
co'e unto hi', the co'forter, $ith coo#ing patterDrain(
:et hi' #ie, unti# of his o$n accord he a$akeneth,DDunti# of his o$n accord
he repudiateth a## $eariness, and $hat $eariness hath taught through hi'&
7n#y, 'y brethren, see that ye scare the dogs a$ay fro' hi', the id#e
sku#kers, and a## the s$ar'ing %er'in?DD
DD;## the s$ar'ing %er'in of the Ncu#tured,N thatDDfeast on the s$eat of
e%ery hero&DD
!0(
2 for' circ#es around 'e and ho#y boundariesL e%er fe$er ascend $ith 'e
e%er higher 'ountains? 2 bui#d a 'ountainDrange out of e%er ho#ier
'ountains(DD
.ut $here%er ye $ou#d ascend $ith 'e, 7 'y brethren, take care #est a
P;-;S2TE ascend $ith you&
; parasite? that is a repti#e, a creeping, cringing repti#e, that trieth
to fatten on your infir' and sore p#aces(
;nd T/2S is its art? it di%ineth $here ascending sou#s are $eary, in your
troub#e and dejection, in your sensiti%e 'odesty, doth it bui#d its
#oathso'e nest(
)here the strong are $eak, $here the nob#e are a##DtooDgent#eDDthere
bui#deth it its #oathso'e nestL the parasite #i%eth $here the great ha%e
s'a## soreDp#aces(
)hat is the highest of a## species of being, and $hat is the #o$estS The
parasite is the #o$est speciesL he, ho$e%er, $ho is of the highest species
feedeth 'ost parasites(
For the sou# $hich hath the #ongest #adder, and can go deepest do$n? ho$
cou#d there fai# to be 'ost parasites upon itSDD
DDThe 'ost co'prehensi%e sou#, $hich can run and stray and ro%e furthest in
itse#fL the 'ost necessary sou#, $hich out of joy f#ingeth itse#f into
chance?DD
DDThe sou# in .eing, $hich p#ungeth into .eco'ingL the possessing sou#,
$hich SEEWET/ to attain desire and #onging?DD
DDThe sou# f#eeing fro' itse#f, $hich o%ertaketh itse#f in the $idest
circuitL the $isest sou#, unto $hich fo##y speaketh 'ost s$eet#y?DD
DDThe sou# 'ost se#fD#o%ing, in $hich a## things ha%e their current and
counterDcurrent, their ebb and their f#o$?DDoh, ho$ cou#d T/E :7FT2EST S78:
fai# to ha%e the $orst parasitesS
C6(
7 'y brethren, a' 2 then crue#S .ut 2 say? )hat fa##eth, that sha## one
a#so push&
E%erything of toDdayDDit fa##eth, it decayethL $ho $ou#d preser%e it& .ut
2DD2 $ish a#so to push it&
Wno$ ye the de#ight $hich ro##eth stones into precipitous depthsSDDThose
'en of toDday, see just ho$ they ro## into 'y depths&
; pre#ude a' 2 to better p#ayers, 7 'y brethren& ;n exa'p#e& *7 according
to 'ine exa'p#e&
;nd hi' $ho' ye do not teach to f#y, teach 2 pray youDDT7 F;:: F;STE-&DD
C!(
2 #o%e the bra%e? but it is not enough to be a s$ords'an,DDone 'ust a#so
kno$ )/E-E7N to use s$ords'anship&
;nd often is it greater bra%ery to keep Uuiet and pass by, that T/E-E.Q one
'ay reser%e onese#f for a $orthier foe&
Qe sha## on#y ha%e foes to be hatedL but not foes to be despised? ye 'ust
be proud of your foes( Thus ha%e 2 a#ready taught(
For the $orthier foe, 7 'y brethren, sha## ye reser%e yourse#%es?
therefore 'ust ye pass by 'any a one,DD
DDEspecia##y 'any of the rabb#e, $ho din your ears $ith noise about peop#e
and peop#es(
Weep your eye c#ear of their For and ;gainst& There is there 'uch right,
'uch $rong? he $ho #ooketh on beco'eth $roth(
Therein %ie$ing, therein he$ingDDthey are the sa'e thing? therefore depart
into the forests and #ay your s$ord to s#eep&
Go Q78- $ays& and #et the peop#e and peop#es go theirs&DDg#oo'y $ays,
%eri#y, on $hich not a sing#e hope g#inteth any 'ore&
:et there the trader ru#e, $here a## that sti## g#ittereth isDDtradersM
go#d( 2t is the ti'e of kings no #onger? that $hich no$ ca##eth itse#f
the peop#e is un$orthy of kings(
See ho$ these peop#es the'se#%es no$ do just #ike the traders? they pick
up the s'a##est ad%antage out of a## kinds of rubbish&
They #ay #ures for one another, they #ure things out of one another,DDthat
they ca## Ngood neighbour#iness(N 7 b#essed re'ote period $hen a peop#e
said to itse#f? N2 $i## beDD9;STE- o%er peop#es&N
For, 'y brethren, the best sha## ru#e, the best a#so )2::ET/ to ru#e& ;nd
$here the teaching is different, thereDDthe best is :;"W2NG(
CC(
2f T/EQ hadDDbread for nothing, a#as& for $hat $ou#d T/EQ cry& Their
'aintain'entDDthat is their true entertain'entL and they sha## ha%e it
hard&
.easts of prey, are they? in their N$orkingNDDthere is e%en p#undering, in
their NearningNDDthere is e%en o%erreaching& Therefore sha## they ha%e it
hard&
.etter beasts of prey sha## they thus beco'e, subt#er, c#e%erer, 97-E 9;ND
:2WE? for 'an is the best beast of prey(
;## the ani'a#s hath 'an a#ready robbed of their %irtues? that is $hy of
a## ani'a#s it hath been hardest for 'an(
7n#y the birds are sti## beyond hi'( ;nd if 'an shou#d yet #earn to f#y,
a#as& T7 )/;T /E2G/TDD$ou#d his rapacity f#y&
CF(
Thus $ou#d 2 ha%e 'an and $o'an? fit for $ar, the oneL fit for 'aternity,
the otherL both, ho$e%er, fit for dancing $ith head and #egs(
;nd #ost be the day to us in $hich a 'easure hath not been danced( ;nd
fa#se be e%ery truth $hich hath not had #aughter a#ong $ith it&
CE(
Qour 'arriageDarranging? see that it be not a bad ;--;NG2NG& Qe ha%e
arranged too hasti#y? so there F7::7)ET/ therefro'DD'arriageDbreaking&
;nd better 'arriageDbreaking than 'arriageDbending, 'arriageD#ying&DDThus
spake a $o'an unto 'e? N2ndeed, 2 broke the 'arriage, but first did the
'arriage breakDD'e&
The bad#y paired found 2 e%er the 'ost re%engefu#? they 'ake e%ery one
suffer for it that they no #onger run sing#y(
7n that account $ant 2 the honest ones to say to one another? N)e #o%e
each other? #et us SEE T7 2T that $e 'aintain our #o%e& 7r sha## our
p#edging be b#underingSN
DDNGi%e us a set ter' and a s'a## 'arriage, that $e 'ay see if $e are fit
for the great 'arriage& 2t is a great 'atter a#$ays to be t$ain(N
Thus do 2 counse# a## honest onesL and $hat $ou#d be 'y #o%e to the
Super'an, and to a## that is to co'e, if 2 shou#d counse# and speak
other$ise&
Not on#y to propagate yourse#%es on$ards but 8P);-*SDDthereto, 7 'y
brethren, 'ay the garden of 'arriage he#p you&
CK(
/e $ho hath gro$n $ise concerning o#d origins, #o, he $i## at #ast seek
after the fountains of the future and ne$ origins(DD
7 'y brethren, not #ong $i## it be unti# NE) PE7P:ES sha## arise and ne$
fountains sha## rush do$n into ne$ depths(
For the earthUuakeDDit choketh up 'any $e##s, it causeth 'uch #anguishing?
but it bringeth a#so to #ight inner po$ers and secrets(
The earthUuake disc#oseth ne$ fountains( 2n the earthUuake of o#d peop#es
ne$ fountains burst forth(
;nd $hoe%er ca##eth out? N:o, here is a $e## for 'any thirsty ones, one
heart for 'any #onging ones, one $i## for 'any instru'entsN?DDaround hi'
co##ecteth a PE7P:E, that is to say, 'any atte'pting ones(
)ho can co''and, $ho 'ust obeyDDT/;T 2S T/E-E ;TTE9PTE*& ;h, $ith $hat
#ong seeking and so#%ing and fai#ing and #earning and reDatte'pting&
/u'an society? it is an atte'ptDDso 2 teachDDa #ong seeking? it seeketh
ho$e%er the ru#er&DD
DD;n atte'pt, 'y brethren& ;nd N7 NcontractN& *estroy, 2 pray you,
destroy that $ord of the softDhearted and ha#fDandDha#f&
CP(
7 'y brethren& )ith $ho' #ieth the greatest danger to the $ho#e hu'an
futureS 2s it not $ith the good and justSDD
DD;s those $ho say and fee# in their hearts? N)e a#ready kno$ $hat is good
and just, $e possess it a#soL $oe to those $ho sti## seek thereafter&
;nd $hate%er har' the $icked 'ay do, the har' of the good is the har'fu#est
har'&
;nd $hate%er har' the $or#dD'a#igners 'ay do, the har' of the good is the
har'fu#est har'&
7 'y brethren, into the hearts of the good and just #ooked so'e one once on
a ti'e, $ho said? NThey are the Pharisees(N .ut peop#e did not understand
hi'(
The good and just the'se#%es $ere not free to understand hi'L their spirit
$as i'prisoned in their good conscience( The stupidity of the good is
unfatho'ab#y $ise(
2t is the truth, ho$e%er, that the good 98ST be PhariseesDDthey ha%e no
choice&
The good 98ST crucify hi' $ho de%iseth his o$n %irtue& That 2S the truth&
The second one, ho$e%er, $ho disco%ered their countryDDthe country, heart
and soi# of the good and just,DDit $as he $ho asked? N)ho' do they hate
'ostSN
The "-E;T7-, hate they 'ost, hi' $ho breaketh the tab#es and o#d %a#ues,
the breaker,DDhi' they ca## the #a$Dbreaker(
For the goodDDthey ";NN7T createL they are a#$ays the beginning of the
end?DD
DDThey crucify hi' $ho $riteth ne$ %a#ues on ne$ tab#es, they sacrifice
8NT7 T/E9SE:,ES the futureDDthey crucify the $ho#e hu'an future&
The goodDDthey ha%e a#$ays been the beginning of the end(DD
C1(
7 'y brethren, ha%e ye a#so understood this $ordS ;nd $hat 2 once said of
the N#ast 'anNSDD
)ith $ho' #ieth the greatest danger to the $ho#e hu'an futureS 2s it not
$ith the good and justS
.-E;W 8P, .-E;W 8P, 2 P-;Q Q78, T/E G77* ;N* T8ST&DD7 'y brethren, ha%e ye
understood a#so this $ordS
C4(
Qe f#ee fro' 'eS Qe are frightenedS Qe tre'b#e at this $ordS
7 'y brethren, $hen 2 enjoined you to break up the good, and the tab#es of
the good, then on#y did 2 e'bark 'an on his high seas(
;nd no$ on#y co'eth unto hi' the great terror, the great out#ook, the great
sickness, the great nausea, the great seaDsickness(
Fa#se shores and fa#se securities did the good teach youL in the #ies of
the good $ere ye born and bred( E%erything hath been radica##y contorted
and distorted by the good(
.ut he $ho disco%ered the country of N'an,N disco%ered a#so the country of
N'anMs future(N No$ sha## ye be sai#ors for 'e, bra%e, patient&
Weep yourse#%es up beti'es, 'y brethren, #earn to keep yourse#%es up& The
sea stor'eth? 'any seek to raise the'se#%es again by you(
The sea stor'eth? a## is in the sea( )e##& "heer up& Qe o#d sea'anD
hearts&
)hat of father#and& T/2T/E- stri%eth our he#' $here our "/2:*-ENMS :;N*
is& Thither$ards, stor'ier than the sea, stor'eth our great #onging&DD
C0(
N)hy so hard&NDDsaid to the dia'ond one day the charcoa#L Nare $e then not
near re#ati%esSNDD
)hy so softS 7 'y brethrenL thus do X2X ask you? are ye then notDD'y
brethrenS
)hy so soft, so sub'issi%e and yie#dingS )hy is there so 'uch negation and
abnegation in your heartsS )hy is there so #itt#e fate in your #ooksS
;nd if ye $i## not be fates and inexorab#e ones, ho$ can ye one dayDD
conUuer $ith 'eS
;nd if your hardness $i## not g#ance and cut and chip to pieces, ho$ can ye
one dayDDcreate $ith 'eS
For the creators are hard( ;nd b#essedness 'ust it see' to you to press
your hand upon 'i##enniu's as upon $ax,DD
DD.#essedness to $rite upon the $i## of 'i##enniu's as upon brass,DDharder
than brass, nob#er than brass( Entire#y hard is on#y the nob#est(
This ne$ tab#e, 7 'y brethren, put 2 up o%er you? .E"79E /;-*&DD
F6(
7 thou, 'y )i##& Thou change of e%ery need, 9Q needfu#ness& Preser%e 'e
fro' a## s'a## %ictories&
Thou fatedness of 'y sou#, $hich 2 ca## fate& Thou 2nD'e& 7%erD'e&
Preser%e and spare 'e for one great fate&
;nd thy #ast greatness, 'y )i##, spare it for thy #astDDthat thou 'ayest be
inexorab#e 2N thy %ictory& ;h, $ho hath not succu'bed to his %ictory&
;h, $hose eye hath not bedi''ed in this intoxicated t$i#ight& ;h, $hose
foot hath not fa#tered and forgotten in %ictoryDDho$ to stand&DD
DDThat 2 'ay one day be ready and ripe in the great noontide? ready and
ripe #ike the g#o$ing ore, the #ightningDbearing c#oud, and the s$e##ing
'i#kDudder?DD
DD-eady for 'yse#f and for 'y 'ost hidden )i##? a bo$ eager for its arro$,
an arro$ eager for its star?DD
DD; star, ready and ripe in its noontide, g#o$ing, pierced, b#essed, by
annihi#ating sunDarro$s?DD
DD; sun itse#f, and an inexorab#e sunD$i##, ready for annihi#ation in
%ictory&
7 )i##, thou change of e%ery need, 9Q needfu#ness& Spare 'e for one great
%ictory&DDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:,22( T/E "7N,;:ES"ENT(
!(
7ne 'orning, not #ong after his return to his ca%e, Zarathustra sprang up
fro' his couch #ike a 'ad'an, crying $ith a frightfu# %oice, and acting as
if so'e one sti## #ay on the couch $ho did not $ish to rise( ZarathustraMs
%oice a#so resounded in such a 'anner that his ani'a#s ca'e to hi'
frightened, and out of a## the neighbouring ca%es and #urkingDp#aces a##
the creatures s#ipped a$ayDDf#ying, f#uttering, creeping or #eaping,
according to their %ariety of foot or $ing( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, spake
these $ords?
8p, abys'a# thought out of 'y depth& 2 a' thy cock and 'orning da$n, thou
o%ers#ept repti#e? 8p& 8p& 9y %oice sha## soon cro$ thee a$ake&
8nbind the fetters of thine ears? #isten& For 2 $ish to hear thee& 8p&
8p& There is thunder enough to 'ake the %ery gra%es #isten&
;nd rub the s#eep and a## the di'ness and b#indness out of thine eyes&
/ear 'e a#so $ith thine eyes? 'y %oice is a 'edicine e%en for those born
b#ind(
;nd once thou art a$ake, then sha#t thou e%er re'ain a$ake( 2t is not 9Q
custo' to a$ake greatDgrand'others out of their s#eep that 2 'ay bid the'DD
s#eep on&
Thou stirrest, stretchest thyse#f, $heezestS 8p& 8p& Not $heeze, sha#t
thou,DDbut speak unto 'e& Zarathustra ca##eth thee, Zarathustra the
god#ess&
2, Zarathustra, the ad%ocate of #i%ing, the ad%ocate of suffering, the
ad%ocate of the circuitDDthee do 2 ca##, 'y 'ost abys'a# thought&
Toy to 'e& Thou co'est,DD2 hear thee& 9ine abyss SPE;WET/, 'y #o$est
depth ha%e 2 turned o%er into the #ight&
Toy to 'e& "o'e hither& Gi%e 'e thy handDDha& #et be& aha&DD*isgust,
disgust, disgustDDa#as to 'e&
C(
/ard#y, ho$e%er, had Zarathustra spoken these $ords, $hen he fe## do$n as
one dead, and re'ained #ong as one dead( )hen ho$e%er he again ca'e to
hi'se#f, then $as he pa#e and tre'b#ing, and re'ained #yingL and for #ong
he $ou#d neither eat nor drink( This condition continued for se%en daysL
his ani'a#s, ho$e%er, did not #ea%e hi' day nor night, except that the
eag#e f#e$ forth to fetch food( ;nd $hat it fetched and foraged, it #aid
on ZarathustraMs couch? so that Zarathustra at #ast #ay a'ong ye##o$ and
red berries, grapes, rosy app#es, s$eetDs'e##ing herbage, and pineDcones(
;t his feet, ho$e%er, t$o #a'bs $ere stretched, $hich the eag#e had $ith
difficu#ty carried off fro' their shepherds(
;t #ast, after se%en days, Zarathustra raised hi'se#f upon his couch, took
a rosy app#e in his hand, s'e#t it and found its s'e## p#easant( Then did
his ani'a#s think the ti'e had co'e to speak unto hi'(
N7 Zarathustra,N said they, Nno$ hast thou #ain thus for se%en days $ith
hea%y eyes? $i#t thou not set thyse#f again upon thy feetS
Step out of thy ca%e? the $or#d $aiteth for thee as a garden( The $ind
p#ayeth $ith hea%y fragrance $hich seeketh for theeL and a## brooks $ou#d
#ike to run after thee(
;## things #ong for thee, since thou hast re'ained a#one for se%en daysDD
step forth out of thy ca%e& ;## things $ant to be thy physicians&
*id perhaps a ne$ kno$#edge co'e to thee, a bitter, grie%ous kno$#edgeS
:ike #ea%ened dough #ayest thou, thy sou# arose and s$e##ed beyond a## its
bounds(DDN
DD7 'ine ani'a#s, ans$ered Zarathustra, ta#k on thus and #et 'e #isten& 2t
refresheth 'e so to hear your ta#k? $here there is ta#k, there is the
$or#d as a garden unto 'e(
/o$ char'ing it is that there are $ords and tonesL are not $ords and tones
rainbo$s and see'ing bridges Mt$ixt the eterna##y separatedS
To each sou# be#ongeth another $or#dL to each sou# is e%ery other sou# a
backD$or#d(
;'ong the 'ost a#ike doth se'b#ance decei%e 'ost de#ightfu##y? for the
s'a##est gap is 'ost difficu#t to bridge o%er(
For 'eDDho$ cou#d there be an outsideDofD'eS There is no outside& .ut
this $e forget on hearing tonesL ho$ de#ightfu# it is that $e forget&
/a%e not na'es and tones been gi%en unto things that 'an 'ay refresh
hi'se#f $ith the'S 2t is a beautifu# fo##y, speakingL there$ith danceth
'an o%er e%erything(
/o$ #o%e#y is a## speech and a## fa#sehoods of tones& )ith tones danceth
our #o%e on %ariegated rainbo$s(DD
DDN7 Zarathustra,N said then his ani'a#s, Nto those $ho think #ike us,
things a## dance the'se#%es? they co'e and ho#d out the hand and #augh and
f#eeDDand return(
E%erything goeth, e%erything returnethL eterna##y ro##eth the $hee# of
existence( E%erything dieth, e%erything b#osso'eth forth againL eterna##y
runneth on the year of existence(
E%erything breaketh, e%erything is integrated ane$L eterna##y bui#deth
itse#f the sa'e house of existence( ;## things separate, a## things again
greet one anotherL eterna##y true to itse#f re'aineth the ring of
existence(
E%ery 'o'ent beginneth existence, around e%ery M/ereM ro##eth the ba##
MThere(M The 'idd#e is e%ery$here( "rooked is the path of eternity(NDD
DD7 ye $ags and barre#Dorgans& ans$ered Zarathustra, and s'i#ed once 'ore,
ho$ $e## do ye kno$ $hat had to be fu#fi##ed in se%en days?DD
DD;nd ho$ that 'onster crept into 'y throat and choked 'e& .ut 2 bit off
its head and spat it a$ay fro' 'e(
;nd yeDDye ha%e 'ade a #yreD#ay out of itS No$, ho$e%er, do 2 #ie here,
sti## exhausted $ith that biting and spittingDa$ay, sti## sick $ith 'ine
o$n sa#%ation(
;N* QE :77WE* 7N ;T 2T ;::S 7 'ine ani'a#s, are ye a#so crue#S *id ye
#ike to #ook at 'y great pain as 'en doS For 'an is the crue##est ani'a#(
;t tragedies, bu##Dfights, and crucifixions hath he hitherto been happiest
on earthL and $hen he in%ented his he##, beho#d, that $as his hea%en on
earth(
)hen the great 'an criethDD? i''ediate#y runneth the #itt#e 'an thither,
and his tongue hangeth out of his 'outh for %ery #usting( /e, ho$e%er,
ca##eth it his Npity(N
The #itt#e 'an, especia##y the poetDDho$ passionate#y doth he accuse #ife
in $ords& /earken to hi', but do not fai# to hear the de#ight $hich is in
a## accusation&
Such accusers of #ifeDDthe' #ife o%erco'eth $ith a g#ance of the eye(
NThou #o%est 'eSN saith the inso#ent oneL N$ait a #itt#e, as yet ha%e 2 no
ti'e for thee(N
To$ards hi'se#f 'an is the crue##est ani'a#L and in a## $ho ca## the'se#%es
NsinnersN and Nbearers of the crossN and Npenitents,N do not o%er#ook the
%o#uptuousness in their p#aints and accusations&
;nd 2 'yse#fDDdo 2 thereby $ant to be 'anMs accuserS ;h, 'ine ani'a#s,
this on#y ha%e 2 #earned hitherto, that for 'an his baddest is necessary
for his best,DD
DDThat a## that is baddest is the best P7)E-, and the hardest stone for the
highest creatorL and that 'an 'ust beco'e better ;N* badder?DD
Not to T/2S tortureDstake $as 2 tied, that 2 kno$ 'an is bad,DDbut 2 cried,
as no one hath yet cried?
N;h, that his baddest is so %ery s'a##& ;h, that his best is so %ery
s'a##&N
The great disgust at 'anDD2T strang#ed 'e and had crept into 'y throat?
and $hat the soothsayer had presaged? N;## is a#ike, nothing is $orth
$hi#e, kno$#edge strang#eth(N
; #ong t$i#ight #i'ped on before 'e, a fata##y $eary, fata##y intoxicated
sadness, $hich spake $ith ya$ning 'outh(
NEterna##y he returneth, the 'an of $ho' thou art $eary, the s'a## 'anNDDso
ya$ned 'y sadness, and dragged its foot and cou#d not go to s#eep(
; ca%ern, beca'e the hu'an earth to 'eL its breast ca%ed inL e%erything
#i%ing beca'e to 'e hu'an dust and bones and 'ou#dering past(
9y sighing sat on a## hu'an gra%es, and cou#d no #onger arise? 'y sighing
and Uuestioning croaked and choked, and gna$ed and nagged day and night?
DDN;h, 'an returneth eterna##y& The s'a## 'an returneth eterna##y&N
Naked had 2 once seen both of the', the greatest 'an and the s'a##est 'an?
a## too #ike one anotherDDa## too hu'an, e%en the greatest 'an&
;## too s'a##, e%en the greatest 'an&DDthat $as 'y disgust at 'an& ;nd the
eterna# return a#so of the s'a##est 'an&DDthat $as 'y disgust at a##
existence&
;h, *isgust& *isgust& *isgust&DDThus spake Zarathustra, and sighed and
shudderedL for he re'e'bered his sickness( Then did his ani'a#s pre%ent
hi' fro' speaking further(
N*o not speak further, thou con%a#escent&NDDso ans$ered his ani'a#s, Nbut
go out $here the $or#d $aiteth for thee #ike a garden(
Go out unto the roses, the bees, and the f#ocks of do%es& Especia##y,
ho$e%er, unto the singingDbirds, to #earn S2NG2NG fro' the'&
For singing is for the con%a#escentL the sound ones 'ay ta#k( ;nd $hen the
sound a#so $ant songs, then $ant they other songs than the con%a#escent(N
DDN7 ye $ags and barre#Dorgans, do be si#ent&N ans$ered Zarathustra, and
s'i#ed at his ani'a#s( N/o$ $e## ye kno$ $hat conso#ation 2 de%ised for
'yse#f in se%en days&
That 2 ha%e to sing once 'oreDDT/;T conso#ation did 2 de%ise for 'yse#f,
and T/2S con%a#escence? $ou#d ye a#so 'ake another #yreD#ay thereofSN
DDN*o not ta#k further,N ans$ered his ani'a#s once 'oreL Nrather, thou
con%a#escent, prepare for thyse#f first a #yre, a ne$ #yre&
For beho#d, 7 Zarathustra& For thy ne$ #ays there are needed ne$ #yres(
Sing and bubb#e o%er, 7 Zarathustra, hea# thy sou# $ith ne$ #ays? that
thou 'ayest bear thy great fate, $hich hath not yet been any oneMs fate&
For thine ani'a#s kno$ it $e##, 7 Zarathustra, $ho thou art and 'ust
beco'e? beho#d, T/78 ;-T T/E TE;"/E- 7F T/E ETE-N;: -ET8-N,DDthat is no$
T/Q fate&
That thou 'ust be the first to teach this teachingDDho$ cou#d this great
fate not be thy greatest danger and infir'ity&
.eho#d, $e kno$ $hat thou teachest? that a## things eterna##y return, and
ourse#%es $ith the', and that $e ha%e a#ready existed ti'es $ithout nu'ber,
and a## things $ith us(
Thou teachest that there is a great year of .eco'ing, a prodigy of a great
yearL it 'ust, #ike a sandDg#ass, e%er turn up ane$, that it 'ay ane$ run
do$n and run out?DD
DDSo that a## those years are #ike one another in the greatest and a#so in
the s'a##est, so that $e ourse#%es, in e%ery great year, are #ike ourse#%es
in the greatest and a#so in the s'a##est(
;nd if thou $ou#dst no$ die, 7 Zarathustra, beho#d, $e kno$ a#so ho$ thou
$ou#dst then speak to thyse#f?DDbut thine ani'a#s beseech thee not to die
yet&
Thou $ou#dst speak, and $ithout tre'b#ing, buoyant rather $ith b#iss, for a
great $eight and $orry $ou#d be taken fro' thee, thou patientest one&DD
MNo$ do 2 die and disappear,M $ou#dst thou say, Mand in a 'o'ent 2 a'
nothing( Sou#s are as 'orta# as bodies(
.ut the p#exus of causes returneth in $hich 2 a' intert$ined,DDit $i##
again create 'e& 2 'yse#f pertain to the causes of the eterna# return(
2 co'e again $ith this sun, $ith this earth, $ith this eag#e, $ith this
serpentDDN7T to a ne$ #ife, or a better #ife, or a si'i#ar #ife?
DD2 co'e again eterna##y to this identica# and se#fsa'e #ife, in its
greatest and its s'a##est, to teach again the eterna# return of a##
things,DD
DDTo speak again the $ord of the great noontide of earth and 'an, to
announce again to 'an the Super'an(
2 ha%e spoken 'y $ord( 2 break do$n by 'y $ord? so $i##eth 'ine eterna#
fateDDas announcer do 2 succu'b&
The hour hath no$ co'e for the do$nDgoer to b#ess hi'se#f( ThusDDEN*ET/
ZarathustraMs do$nDgoing(MNDD
)hen the ani'a#s had spoken these $ords they $ere si#ent and $aited, so
that Zarathustra 'ight say so'ething to the'? but Zarathustra did not hear
that they $ere si#ent( 7n the contrary, he #ay Uuiet#y $ith c#osed eyes
#ike a person s#eeping, a#though he did not s#eepL for he co''uned just
then $ith his sou#( The serpent, ho$e%er, and the eag#e, $hen they found
hi' si#ent in such $ise, respected the great sti##ness around hi', and
prudent#y retired(
:,222( T/E G-E;T :7NG2NG(
7 'y sou#, 2 ha%e taught thee to say NtoDdayN as Nonce on a ti'eN and
Nfor'er#y,N and to dance thy 'easure o%er e%ery /ere and There and Qonder(
7 'y sou#, 2 de#i%ered thee fro' a## byDp#aces, 2 brushed do$n fro' thee
dust and spiders and t$i#ight(
7 'y sou#, 2 $ashed the petty sha'e and the byDp#ace %irtue fro' thee, and
persuaded thee to stand naked before the eyes of the sun(
)ith the stor' that is ca##ed NspiritN did 2 b#o$ o%er thy surging seaL a##
c#ouds did 2 b#o$ a$ay fro' itL 2 strang#ed e%en the strang#er ca##ed
Nsin(N
7 'y sou#, 2 ga%e thee the right to say Nay #ike the stor', and to say Qea
as the open hea%en saith Qea? ca#' as the #ight re'ainest thou, and no$
$a#kest through denying stor's(
7 'y sou#, 2 restored to thee #iberty o%er the created and the uncreatedL
and $ho kno$eth, as thou kno$est, the %o#uptuousness of the futureS
7 'y sou#, 2 taught thee the conte'pt $hich doth not co'e #ike $or'Deating,
the great, the #o%ing conte'pt, $hich #o%eth 'ost $here it conte'neth 'ost(
7 'y sou#, 2 taught thee so to persuade that thou persuadest e%en the
grounds the'se#%es to thee? #ike the sun, $hich persuadeth e%en the sea to
its height(
7 'y sou#, 2 ha%e taken fro' thee a## obeying and kneeDbending and ho'ageD
payingL 2 ha%e 'yse#f gi%en thee the na'es, N"hange of needN and NFate(N
7 'y sou#, 2 ha%e gi%en thee ne$ na'es and gayDco#oured p#aythings, 2 ha%e
ca##ed thee NFateN and Nthe "ircuit of circuitsN and Nthe Na%e#Dstring of
ti'eN and Nthe ;zure be##(N
7 'y sou#, to thy do'ain ga%e 2 a## $isdo' to drink, a## ne$ $ines, and
a#so a## i''e'oria##y o#d strong $ines of $isdo'(
7 'y sou#, e%ery sun shed 2 upon thee, and e%ery night and e%ery si#ence
and e%ery #onging?DDthen gre$est thou up for 'e as a %ine(
7 'y sou#, exuberant and hea%y dost thou no$ stand forth, a %ine $ith
s$e##ing udders and fu## c#usters of bro$n go#den grapes?DD
DDFi##ed and $eighted by thy happiness, $aiting fro' superabundance, and
yet asha'ed of thy $aiting(
7 'y sou#, there is no$here a sou# $hich cou#d be 'ore #o%ing and 'ore
co'prehensi%e and 'ore extensi%e& )here cou#d future and past be c#oser
together than $ith theeS
7 'y sou#, 2 ha%e gi%en thee e%erything, and a## 'y hands ha%e beco'e e'pty
by thee?DDand no$& No$ sayest thou to 'e, s'i#ing and fu## of 'e#ancho#y?
N)hich of us o$eth thanksSDD
DD*oth the gi%er not o$e thanks because the recei%er recei%edS 2s
besto$ing not a necessityS 2s recei%ing notDDpityingSNDD
7 'y sou#, 2 understand the s'i#ing of thy 'e#ancho#y? thine o%erD
abundance itse#f no$ stretcheth out #onging hands&
Thy fu#ness #ooketh forth o%er raging seas, and seeketh and $aiteth? the
#onging of o%erDfu#ness #ooketh forth fro' the s'i#ing hea%en of thine
eyes&
;nd %eri#y, 7 'y sou#& )ho cou#d see thy s'i#ing and not 'e#t into tearsS
The ange#s the'se#%es 'e#t into tears through the o%erDgraciousness of thy
s'i#ing(
Thy graciousness and o%erDgraciousness, is it $hich $i## not co'p#ain and
$eep? and yet, 7 'y sou#, #ongeth thy s'i#ing for tears, and thy tre'b#ing
'outh for sobs(
N2s not a## $eeping co'p#ainingS ;nd a## co'p#aining, accusingSN Thus
speakest thou to thyse#fL and therefore, 7 'y sou#, $i#t thou rather s'i#e
than pour forth thy griefDD
DDThan in gushing tears pour forth a## thy grief concerning thy fu#ness,
and concerning the cra%ing of the %ine for the %intager and %intageDknife&
.ut $i#t thou not $eep, $i#t thou not $eep forth thy purp#e 'e#ancho#y,
then $i#t thou ha%e to S2NG, 7 'y sou#&DD.eho#d, 2 s'i#e 'yse#f, $ho
forete## thee this?
DDThou $i#t ha%e to sing $ith passionate song, unti# a## seas turn ca#' to
hearken unto thy #onging,DD
DD8nti# o%er ca#' #onging seas the bark g#ideth, the go#den 'ar%e#, around
the go#d of $hich a## good, bad, and 'ar%e##ous things frisk?DD
DD;#so 'any #arge and s'a## ani'a#s, and e%erything that hath #ight
'ar%e##ous feet, so that it can run on %io#etDb#ue paths,DD
DDTo$ards the go#den 'ar%e#, the spontaneous bark, and its 'aster? he,
ho$e%er, is the %intager $ho $aiteth $ith the dia'ond %intageDknife,DD
DDThy great de#i%erer, 7 'y sou#, the na'e#ess oneDDfor $ho' future songs
on#y $i## find na'es& ;nd %eri#y, a#ready hath thy breath the fragrance of
future songs,DD
DD;#ready g#o$est thou and drea'est, a#ready drinkest thou thirsti#y at a##
deep echoing $e##s of conso#ation, a#ready reposeth thy 'e#ancho#y in the
b#iss of future songs&DD
7 'y sou#, no$ ha%e 2 gi%en thee a##, and e%en 'y #ast possession, and a##
'y hands ha%e beco'e e'pty by thee?DDT/;T 2 .;*E T/EE S2NG, beho#d, that
$as 'y #ast thing to gi%e&
That 2 bade thee sing,DDsay no$, say? )/2"/ of us no$DDo$eth thanksSDD
.etter sti##, ho$e%er? sing unto 'e, sing, 7 'y sou#& ;nd #et 'e thank
thee&DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:2R( T/E SE"7N* *;N"EDS7NG(
!(
N2nto thine eyes gazed 2 #ate#y, 7 :ife? go#d sa$ 2 g#ea' in thy nightD
eyes,DD'y heart stood sti## $ith de#ight?
DD; go#den bark sa$ 2 g#ea' on darkened $aters, a sinking, drinking,
reb#inking, go#den s$ingDbark&
;t 'y danceDfrantic foot, dost thou cast a g#ance, a #aughing, Uuestioning,
'e#ting, thro$n g#ance?
T$ice on#y 'o%edst thou thy ratt#e $ith thy #itt#e handsDDthen did 'y feet
s$ing $ith danceDfury(DD
9y hee#s reared a#oft, 'y toes they hearkened,DDthee they $ou#d kno$? hath
not the dancer his earDDin his toe&
8nto thee did 2 spring? then f#edst thou back fro' 'y boundL and to$ards
'e $a%ed thy f#eeing, f#ying tresses round&
;$ay fro' thee did 2 spring, and fro' thy snaky tresses? then stoodst thou
there ha#fDturned, and in thine eye caresses(
)ith crooked g#ancesDDdost thou teach 'e crooked coursesL on crooked
courses #earn 'y feetDDcrafty fancies&
2 fear thee near, 2 #o%e thee farL thy f#ight a##ureth 'e, thy seeking
secureth 'e?DD2 suffer, but for thee, $hat $ou#d 2 not g#ad#y bear&
For thee, $hose co#dness inf#a'eth, $hose hatred 'is#eadeth, $hose f#ight
enchaineth, $hose 'ockeryDDp#eadeth?
DD)ho $ou#d not hate thee, thou great bindress, in$indress, te'ptress,
seekress, findress& )ho $ou#d not #o%e thee, thou innocent, i'patient,
$indDs$ift, chi#dDeyed sinner&
)hither pu##est thou 'e no$, thou paragon and to'boyS ;nd no$ foo#est thou
'e f#eeingL thou s$eet ro'p dost annoy&
2 dance after thee, 2 fo##o$ e%en faint traces #one#y( )here art thouS
Gi%e 'e thy hand& 7r thy finger on#y&
/ere are ca%es and thickets? $e sha## go astray&DD/a#t& Stand sti##&
Seest thou not o$#s and bats in f#uttering frayS
Thou bat& Thou o$#& Thou $ou#dst p#ay 'e fou#S )here are $eS Fro' the
dogs hast thou #earned thus to bark and ho$#(
Thou gnashest on 'e s$eet#y $ith #itt#e $hite teethL thine e%i# eyes shoot
out upon 'e, thy cur#y #itt#e 'ane fro' underneath&
This is a dance o%er stock and stone? 2 a' the hunter,DD$i#t thou be 'y
hound, or 'y cha'ois anonS
No$ beside 'e& ;nd Uuick#y, $icked#y springing& No$ up& ;nd o%er&DD;#as&
2 ha%e fa##en 'yse#f o%ers$inging&
7h, see 'e #ying, thou arrogant one, and i'p#oring grace& G#ad#y $ou#d 2
$a#k $ith theeDDin so'e #o%e#ier p#ace&
DD2n the paths of #o%e, through bushes %ariegated, Uuiet, tri'& 7r there
a#ong the #ake, $here go#dDfishes dance and s$i'&
Thou art no$ aD$earyS There abo%e are sheep and sunDset stripes? is it
not s$eet to s#eepDDthe shepherd pipesS
Thou art so %ery $earyS 2 carry thee thitherL #et just thine ar' sink&
;nd art thou thirstyDD2 shou#d ha%e so'ethingL but thy 'outh $ou#d not #ike
it to drink&DD
DD7h, that cursed, ni'b#e, supp#e serpent and #urkingD$itch& )here art
thou goneS .ut in 'y face do 2 fee# through thy hand, t$o spots and red
b#otches itch&
2 a' %eri#y $eary of it, e%er thy sheepish shepherd to be( Thou $itch, if
2 ha%e hitherto sung unto thee, no$ sha#t T/78DDcry unto 'e&
To the rhyth' of 'y $hip sha#t thou dance and cry& 2 forget not 'y $hipSDD
Not 2&NDD
C(
Then did :ife ans$er 'e thus, and kept thereby her fine ears c#osed?
N7 Zarathustra& "rack not so terrib#y $ith thy $hip& Thou kno$est sure#y
that noise ki##eth thought,DDand just no$ there ca'e to 'e such de#icate
thoughts(
)e are both of us genuine neMerDdoD$e##s and neMerDdoDi##s( .eyond good
and e%i# found $e our is#and and our green 'eado$DD$e t$o a#one& Therefore
'ust $e be friend#y to each other&
;nd e%en shou#d $e not #o%e each other fro' the botto' of our hearts,DD'ust
$e then ha%e a grudge against each other if $e do not #o%e each other
perfect#yS
;nd that 2 a' friend#y to thee, and often too friend#y, that kno$est thou?
and the reason is that 2 a' en%ious of thy )isdo'( ;h, this 'ad o#d foo#,
)isdo'&
2f thy )isdo' shou#d one day run a$ay fro' thee, ah& then $ou#d a#so 'y
#o%e run a$ay fro' thee Uuick#y(NDD
Thereupon did :ife #ook thoughtfu##y behind and around, and said soft#y?
N7 Zarathustra, thou art not faithfu# enough to 'e&
Thou #o%est 'e not near#y so 'uch as thou sayestL 2 kno$ thou thinkest of
soon #ea%ing 'e(
There is an o#d hea%y, hea%y, boo'ingDc#ock? it boo'eth by night up to thy
ca%e?DD
DD)hen thou hearest this c#ock strike the hours at 'idnight, then thinkest
thou bet$een one and t$e#%e thereonDD
DDThou thinkest thereon, 7 Zarathustra, 2 kno$ itDDof soon #ea%ing 'e&NDD
NQea,N ans$ered 2, hesitating#y, Nbut thou kno$est it a#soNDD;nd 2 said
so'ething into her ear, in a'ongst her confused, ye##o$, foo#ish tresses(
NThou WN7)EST that, 7 ZarathustraS That kno$eth no oneDDN
;nd $e gazed at each other, and #ooked at the green 'eado$ oMer $hich the
coo# e%ening $as just passing, and $e $ept together(DDThen, ho$e%er, $as
:ife dearer unto 'e than a## 'y )isdo' had e%er been(DD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
F(
7ne&
7 'an& Take heed&
T$o&
)hat saith deep 'idnightMs %oice indeedS
Three&
N2 s#ept 'y s#eepDD
Four&
NFro' deepest drea' 2M%e $oke and p#ead?DD
Fi%e&
NThe $or#d is deep,
Six&
N;nd deeper than the day cou#d read(
Se%en&
N*eep is its $oeDD
Eight&
NToyDDdeeper sti## than grief can be?
Nine&
N)oe saith? /ence& Go&
Ten&
N.ut joys a## $ant eternityDD
E#e%en&
N)ant deep profound eternity&N
T$e#%e&
:R( T/E SE,EN SE;:S(
@7- T/E QE; ;N* ;9EN :;Q(A
!(
2f 2 be a di%iner and fu## of the di%ining spirit $hich $andereth on high
'ountainDridges, Mt$ixt t$o seas,DD
)andereth Mt$ixt the past and the future as a hea%y c#oudDDhosti#e to
su#try p#ains, and to a## that is $eary and can neither die nor #i%e?
-eady for #ightning in its dark boso', and for the redee'ing f#ash of
#ight, charged $ith #ightnings $hich say Qea& $hich #augh Qea& ready for
di%ining f#ashes of #ightning?DD
DD.#essed, ho$e%er, is he $ho is thus charged& ;nd %eri#y, #ong 'ust he
hang #ike a hea%y te'pest on the 'ountain, $ho sha## one day kind#e the
#ight of the future&DD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
C(
2f e%er 'y $rath hath burst gra%es, shifted #and'arks, or ro##ed o#d
shattered tab#es into precipitous depths?
2f e%er 'y scorn hath scattered 'ou#dered $ords to the $inds, and if 2 ha%e
co'e #ike a beso' to crossDspiders, and as a c#eansing $ind to o#d charne#D
houses?
2f e%er 2 ha%e sat rejoicing $here o#d Gods #ie buried, $or#dDb#essing,
$or#dD#o%ing, beside the 'onu'ents of o#d $or#dD'a#igners?DD
DDFor e%en churches and GodsMDgra%es do 2 #o%e, if on#y hea%en #ooketh
through their ruined roofs $ith pure eyesL g#ad#y do 2 sit #ike grass and
red poppies on ruined churchesDD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
F(
2f e%er a breath hath co'e to 'e of the creati%e breath, and of the
hea%en#y necessity $hich co'pe##eth e%en chances to dance starDdances?
2f e%er 2 ha%e #aughed $ith the #aughter of the creati%e #ightning, to
$hich the #ong thunder of the deed fo##o$eth, gru'b#ing#y, but obedient#y?
2f e%er 2 ha%e p#ayed dice $ith the Gods at the di%ine tab#e of the earth,
so that the earth Uuaked and ruptured, and snorted forth fireDstrea's?DD
DDFor a di%ine tab#e is the earth, and tre'b#ing $ith ne$ creati%e dictu's
and diceDcasts of the Gods?
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
E(
2f e%er 2 ha%e drunk a fu## draught of the foa'ing spiceD and confectionD
bo$# in $hich a## things are $e## 'ixed?
2f e%er 'y hand hath 'ing#ed the furthest $ith the nearest, fire $ith
spirit, joy $ith sorro$, and the harshest $ith the kindest?
2f 2 'yse#f a' a grain of the sa%ing sa#t $hich 'aketh e%erything in the
confectionDbo$# 'ix $e##?DD
DDFor there is a sa#t $hich uniteth good $ith e%i#L and e%en the e%i#est is
$orthy, as spicing and as fina# o%erDfoa'ing?DD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
K(
2f 2 be fond of the sea, and a## that is sea#ike, and fondest of it $hen it
angri#y contradicteth 'e?
2f the exp#oring de#ight be in 'e, $hich i'pe##eth sai#s to the
undisco%ered, if the seafarerMs de#ight be in 'y de#ight?
2f e%er 'y rejoicing hath ca##ed out? NThe shore hath %anished,DDno$ hath
fa##en fro' 'e the #ast chainDD
The bound#ess roareth around 'e, far a$ay spark#e for 'e space and ti'e,DD
$e##& cheer up& o#d heart&NDD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
P(
2f 'y %irtue be a dancerMs %irtue, and if 2 ha%e often sprung $ith both
feet into go#denDe'era#d rapture?
2f 'y $ickedness be a #aughing $ickedness, at ho'e a'ong roseDbanks and
hedges of #i#ies?
DDFor in #aughter is a## e%i# present, but it is sanctified and abso#%ed by
its o$n b#iss?DD
;nd if it be 'y ;#pha and 7'ega that e%erything hea%y sha## beco'e #ight,
e%ery body a dancer, and e%ery spirit a bird? and %eri#y, that is 'y ;#pha
and 7'ega&DD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
1(
2f e%er 2 ha%e spread out a tranUui# hea%en abo%e 'e, and ha%e f#o$n into
'ine o$n hea%en $ith 'ine o$n pinions?
2f 2 ha%e s$u' p#ayfu##y in profound #u'inous distances, and if 'y
freedo'Ms a%ian $isdo' hath co'e to 'e?DD
DDThus ho$e%er speaketh a%ian $isdo'?DDN:o, there is no abo%e and no be#o$&
Thro$ thyse#f about,DDout$ard, back$ard, thou #ight one& Sing& speak no
'ore&
DD;re not a## $ords 'ade for the hea%yS *o not a## $ords #ie to the #ight
onesS Sing& speak no 'ore&NDD
7h, ho$ cou#d 2 not be ardent for Eternity, and for the 'arriageDring of
ringsDDthe ring of the returnS
Ne%er yet ha%e 2 found the $o'an by $ho' 2 shou#d #ike to ha%e chi#dren,
un#ess it be this $o'an $ho' 2 #o%e? for 2 #o%e thee, 7 Eternity&
F7- 2 :7,E T/EE, 7 ETE-N2TQ&
F78-T/ ;N* :;ST P;-T(
;h, $here in the $or#d ha%e there been greater fo##ies than $ith the
pitifu#S ;nd $hat in the $or#d hath caused 'ore suffering than the fo##ies
of the pitifu#S
)oe unto a## #o%ing ones $ho ha%e not an e#e%ation $hich is abo%e their
pity&
Thus spake the de%i# unto 'e, once on a ti'e? NE%er God hath his he##? it
is his #o%e for 'an(N
;nd #ate#y did 2 hear hi' say these $ords? NGod is dead? of his pity for
'an hath God died(NDDZ;-;T/8ST-;, 22(, NThe Pitifu#(N
:R2( T/E /7NEQ S;"-2F2"E(
DD;nd again passed 'oons and years o%er ZarathustraMs sou#, and he heeded
it notL his hair, ho$e%er, beca'e $hite( 7ne day $hen he sat on a stone in
front of his ca%e, and gazed ca#'#y into the distanceDDone there gazeth out
on the sea, and a$ay beyond sinuous abysses,DDthen $ent his ani'a#s
thoughtfu##y round about hi', and at #ast set the'se#%es in front of hi'(
N7 Zarathustra,N said they, Ngazest thou out perhaps for thy happinessSNDD
N7f $hat account is 'y happiness&N ans$ered he, N2 ha%e #ong ceased to
stri%e any 'ore for happiness, 2 stri%e for 'y $ork(NDDN7 Zarathustra,N
said the ani'a#s once 'ore, Nthat sayest thou as one $ho hath o%er'uch of
good things( :iest thou not in a skyDb#ue #ake of happinessSNDDNQe $ags,N
ans$ered Zarathustra, and s'i#ed, Nho$ $e## did ye choose the si'i#e& .ut
ye kno$ a#so that 'y happiness is hea%y, and not #ike a f#uid $a%e of
$ater? it presseth 'e and $i## not #ea%e 'e, and is #ike 'o#ten pitch(NDD
Then $ent his ani'a#s again thoughtfu##y around hi', and p#aced the'se#%es
once 'ore in front of hi'( N7 Zarathustra,N said they, Nit is conseUuent#y
F7- T/;T -E;S7N that thou thyse#f a#$ays beco'eth ye##o$er and darker,
a#though thy hair #ooketh $hite and f#axenS :o, thou sittest in thy
pitch&NDDN)hat do ye say, 'ine ani'a#sSN said Zarathustra, #aughingL
N%eri#y 2 re%i#ed $hen 2 spake of pitch( ;s it happeneth $ith 'e, so is it
$ith a## fruits that turn ripe( 2t is the /7NEQ in 'y %eins that 'aketh 'y
b#ood thicker, and a#so 'y sou# sti##er(NDDNSo $i## it be, 7 Zarathustra,N
ans$ered his ani'a#s, and pressed up to hi'L Nbut $i#t thou not toDday
ascend a high 'ountainS The air is pure, and toDday one seeth 'ore of the
$or#d than e%er(NDDNQea, 'ine ani'a#s,N ans$ered he, Nye counse# ad'irab#y
and according to 'y heart? 2 $i## toDday ascend a high 'ountain& .ut see
that honey is there ready to hand, ye##o$, $hite, good, iceDcoo#, go#denD
co'bDhoney( For kno$ that $hen a#oft 2 $i## 'ake the honeyDsacrifice(NDD
)hen Zarathustra, ho$e%er, $as a#oft on the su''it, he sent his ani'a#s
ho'e that had acco'panied hi', and found that he $as no$ a#one?DDthen he
#aughed fro' the botto' of his heart, #ooked around hi', and spake thus?
That 2 spake of sacrifices and honeyDsacrifices, it $as 'ere#y a ruse in
ta#king and %eri#y, a usefu# fo##y& /ere a#oft can 2 no$ speak freer than
in front of 'ountainDca%es and anchoritesM do'estic ani'a#s(
)hat to sacrifice& 2 sUuander $hat is gi%en 'e, a sUuanderer $ith a
thousand hands? ho$ cou#d 2 ca## thatDDsacrificingS
;nd $hen 2 desired honey 2 on#y desired bait, and s$eet 'ucus and 'uci#age,
for $hich e%en the 'ouths of gro$#ing bears, and strange, su#ky, e%i#
birds, $ater?
DDThe best bait, as hunts'en and fisher'en reUuire it( For if the $or#d be
as a g#oo'y forest of ani'a#s, and a p#easureDground for a## $i#d hunts'en,
it see'eth to 'e ratherDDand preferab#yDDa fatho'#ess, rich seaL
DD; sea fu## of 'anyDhued fishes and crabs, for $hich e%en the Gods 'ight
#ong, and 'ight be te'pted to beco'e fishers in it, and casters of nets,DD
so rich is the $or#d in $onderfu# things, great and s'a##&
Especia##y the hu'an $or#d, the hu'an sea?DDto$ards 2T do 2 no$ thro$ out
'y go#den ang#eDrod and say? 7pen up, thou hu'an abyss&
7pen up, and thro$ unto 'e thy fish and shining crabs& )ith 'y best bait
sha## 2 a##ure to 'yse#f toDday the strangest hu'an fish&
DD9y happiness itse#f do 2 thro$ out into a## p#aces far and $ide Mt$ixt
orient, noontide, and occident, to see if 'any hu'an fish $i## not #earn to
hug and tug at 'y happinessLDD
8nti#, biting at 'y sharp hidden hooks, they ha%e to co'e up unto 9Q
height, the 'ot#eyest abyssDground#ings, to the $ickedest of a## fishers of
'en(
For T/2S a' 2 fro' the heart and fro' the beginningDDdra$ing, hitherD
dra$ing, up$ardDdra$ing, upbringingL a dra$er, a trainer, a trainingD
'aster, $ho not in %ain counse##ed hi'se#f once on a ti'e? N.eco'e $hat
thou art&N
Thus 'ay 'en no$ co'e 8P to 'eL for as yet do 2 a$ait the signs that it is
ti'e for 'y do$nDgoingL as yet do 2 not 'yse#f go do$n, as 2 'ust do,
a'ongst 'en(
Therefore do 2 here $ait, crafty and scornfu# upon high 'ountains, no
i'patient one, no patient oneL rather one $ho hath e%en un#earnt patience,
DDbecause he no #onger Nsuffereth(N
For 'y fate gi%eth 'e ti'e? it hath forgotten 'e perhapsS 7r doth it sit
behind a big stone and catch f#iesS
;nd %eri#y, 2 a' $e##Ddisposed to 'ine eterna# fate, because it doth not
hound and hurry 'e, but #ea%eth 'e ti'e for 'erri'ent and 'ischiefL so that
2 ha%e toDday ascended this high 'ountain to catch fish(
*id e%er any one catch fish upon high 'ountainsS ;nd though it be a fo##y
$hat 2 here seek and do, it is better so than that do$n be#o$ 2 shou#d
beco'e so#e'n $ith $aiting, and green and ye##o$DD
DD; posturing $rathDsnorter $ith $aiting, a ho#y ho$#Dstor' fro' the
'ountains, an i'patient one that shouteth do$n into the %a##eys? N/earken,
e#se 2 $i## scourge you $ith the scourge of God&N
Not that 2 $ou#d ha%e a grudge against such $rathfu# ones on that account?
they are $e## enough for #aughter to 'e& 2'patient 'ust they no$ be, those
big a#ar'Ddru's, $hich find a %oice no$ or ne%er&
9yse#f, ho$e%er, and 'y fateDD$e do not ta#k to the Present, neither do $e
ta#k to the Ne%er? for ta#king $e ha%e patience and ti'e and 'ore than
ti'e( For one day 'ust it yet co'e, and 'ay not pass by(
)hat 'ust one day co'e and 'ay not pass byS 7ur great /azar, that is to
say, our great, re'ote hu'anDkingdo', the ZarathustraDkingdo' of a thousand
yearsDD
/o$ re'ote 'ay such Nre'otenessN beS )hat doth it concern 'eS .ut on that
account it is none the #ess sure unto 'eDD, $ith both feet stand 2 secure
on this groundL
DD7n an eterna# ground, on hard pri'ary rock, on this highest, hardest,
pri'ary 'ountainDridge, unto $hich a## $inds co'e, as unto the stor'D
parting, asking )hereS and )henceS and )hitherS
/ere #augh, #augh, 'y hearty, hea#thy $ickedness& Fro' high 'ountains cast
do$n thy g#ittering scornD#aughter& ;##ure for 'e $ith thy g#ittering the
finest hu'an fish&
;nd $hate%er be#ongeth unto 9E in a## seas, 'y inDandDforD'e in a## things
DDfish T/;T out for 'e, bring T/;T up to 'e? for that do 2 $ait, the
$ickedest of a## fishDcatchers(
7ut& out& 'y fishingDhook& 2n and do$n, thou bait of 'y happiness& *rip
thy s$eetest de$, thou honey of 'y heart& .ite, 'y fishingDhook, into the
be##y of a## b#ack aff#iction&
:ook out, #ook out, 'ine eye& 7h, ho$ 'any seas round about 'e, $hat
da$ning hu'an futures& ;nd abo%e 'eDD$hat rosy red sti##ness& )hat
unc#ouded si#ence&
:R22( T/E "-Q 7F *2ST-ESS(
The next day sat Zarathustra again on the stone in front of his ca%e,
$hi#st his ani'a#s ro%ed about in the $or#d outside to bring ho'e ne$
food,DDa#so ne$ honey? for Zarathustra had spent and $asted the o#d honey
to the %ery #ast partic#e( )hen he thus sat, ho$e%er, $ith a stick in his
hand, tracing the shado$ of his figure on the earth, and ref#ectingDD
%eri#y& not upon hi'se#f and his shado$,DDa## at once he start#ed and
shrank back? for he sa$ another shado$ beside his o$n( ;nd $hen he
hasti#y #ooked around and stood up, beho#d, there stood the soothsayer
beside hi', the sa'e $ho' he had once gi%en to eat and drink at his tab#e,
the proc#ai'er of the great $eariness, $ho taught? N;## is a#ike, nothing
is $orth $hi#e, the $or#d is $ithout 'eaning, kno$#edge strang#eth(N .ut
his face had changed since thenL and $hen Zarathustra #ooked into his eyes,
his heart $as start#ed once 'ore? so 'uch e%i# announce'ent and ashyDgrey
#ightnings passed o%er that countenance(
The soothsayer, $ho had percei%ed $hat $ent on in ZarathustraMs sou#, $iped
his face $ith his hand, as if he $ou#d $ipe out the i'pressionL the sa'e
did a#so Zarathustra( ;nd $hen both of the' had thus si#ent#y co'posed and
strengthened the'se#%es, they ga%e each other the hand, as a token that
they $anted once 'ore to recognise each other(
N)e#co'e hither,N said Zarathustra, Nthou soothsayer of the great
$eariness, not in %ain sha#t thou once ha%e been 'y 'ess'ate and guest(
Eat and drink a#so $ith 'e toDday, and forgi%e it that a cheerfu# o#d 'an
sitteth $ith thee at tab#e&NDDN; cheerfu# o#d 'anSN ans$ered the
soothsayer, shaking his head, Nbut $hoe%er thou art, or $ou#dst be, 7
Zarathustra, thou hast been here a#oft the #ongest ti'e,DDin a #itt#e $hi#e
thy bark sha## no #onger rest on dry #and&NDDN*o 2 then rest on dry #andSN
DDasked Zarathustra, #aughing(DDNThe $a%es around thy 'ountain,N ans$ered
the soothsayer, Nrise and rise, the $a%es of great distress and aff#iction?
they $i## soon raise thy bark a#so and carry thee a$ay(NDDThereupon $as
Zarathustra si#ent and $ondered(DDN*ost thou sti## hear nothingSN continued
the soothsayer? Ndoth it not rush and roar out of the depthSNDDZarathustra
$as si#ent once 'ore and #istened? then heard he a #ong, #ong cry, $hich
the abysses thre$ to one another and passed onL for none of the' $ished to
retain it? so e%i# did it sound(
NThou i## announcer,N said Zarathustra at #ast, Nthat is a cry of distress,
and the cry of a 'anL it 'ay co'e perhaps out of a b#ack sea( .ut $hat
doth hu'an distress 'atter to 'e& 9y #ast sin $hich hath been reser%ed for
'e,DDkno$est thou $hat it is ca##edSN
DDNP2TQ&N ans$ered the soothsayer fro' an o%erf#o$ing heart, and raised
both his hands a#oftDDN7 Zarathustra, 2 ha%e co'e that 2 'ay seduce thee to
thy #ast sin&NDD
;nd hard#y had those $ords been uttered $hen there sounded the cry once
'ore, and #onger and 'ore a#ar'ing than beforeDDa#so 'uch nearer( N/earest
thouS /earest thou, 7 ZarathustraSN ca##ed out the soothsayer, Nthe cry
concerneth thee, it ca##eth thee? "o'e, co'e, co'eL it is ti'e, it is the
highest ti'e&NDD
Zarathustra $as si#ent thereupon, confused and staggeredL at #ast he asked,
#ike one $ho hesitateth in hi'se#f? N;nd $ho is it that there ca##eth 'eSN
N.ut thou kno$est it, certain#y,N ans$ered the soothsayer $ar'#y, N$hy dost
thou concea# thyse#fS 2t is T/E /2G/E- 9;N that crieth for thee&N
NThe higher 'anSN cried Zarathustra, horrorDstricken? N$hat $anteth /ES
)hat $anteth /ES The higher 'an& )hat $anteth he hereSNDDand his skin
co%ered $ith perspiration(
The soothsayer, ho$e%er, did not heed ZarathustraMs a#ar', but #istened and
#istened in the do$n$ard direction( )hen, ho$e%er, it had been sti## there
for a #ong $hi#e, he #ooked behind, and sa$ Zarathustra standing tre'b#ing(
N7 Zarathustra,N he began, $ith sorro$fu# %oice, Nthou dost not stand there
#ike one $hose happiness 'aketh hi' giddy? thou $i#t ha%e to dance #est
thou tu'b#e do$n&
.ut a#though thou shou#dst dance before 'e, and #eap a## thy sideD#eaps, no
one 'ay say unto 'e? M.eho#d, here danceth the #ast joyous 'an&M
2n %ain $ou#d any one co'e to this height $ho sought /29 here? ca%es $ou#d
he find, indeed, and backDca%es, hidingDp#aces for hidden onesL but not
#ucky 'ines, nor treasureDcha'bers, nor ne$ go#dD%eins of happiness(
/appinessDDho$ indeed cou#d one find happiness a'ong such buriedDa#i%e and
so#itary ones& 9ust 2 yet seek the #ast happiness on the /appy 2s#es, and
far a$ay a'ong forgotten seasS
.ut a## is a#ike, nothing is $orth $hi#e, no seeking is of ser%ice, there
are no #onger any /appy 2s#es&NDD
Thus sighed the soothsayerL $ith his #ast sigh, ho$e%er, Zarathustra again
beca'e serene and assured, #ike one $ho hath co'e out of a deep chas' into
the #ight( NNay& Nay& Three ti'es Nay&N exc#ai'ed he $ith a strong
%oice, and stroked his beardDDNT/;T do 2 kno$ better& There are sti##
/appy 2s#es& Si#ence T/E-E7N, thou sighing sorro$Dsack&
"ease to sp#ash T/E-E7N, thou rainDc#oud of the forenoon& *o 2 not a#ready
stand here $et $ith thy 'isery, and drenched #ike a dogS
No$ do 2 shake 'yse#f and run a$ay fro' thee, that 2 'ay again beco'e dry?
thereat 'ayest thou not $onder& *o 2 see' to thee discourteousS /ere
ho$e%er is 9Q court(
.ut as regards the higher 'an? $e##& 2 sha## seek hi' at once in those
forests? F-79 T/EN"E ca'e his cry( Perhaps he is there hard beset by an
e%i# beast(
/e is in 9Q do'ain? therein sha## he recei%e no scath& ;nd %eri#y, there
are 'any e%i# beasts about 'e(NDD
)ith those $ords Zarathustra turned around to depart( Then said the
soothsayer? N7 Zarathustra, thou art a rogue&
2 kno$ it $e##? thou $ou#dst fain be rid of 'e& -ather $ou#dst thou run
into the forest and #ay snares for e%i# beasts&
.ut $hat good $i## it do theeS 2n the e%ening $i#t thou ha%e 'e again? in
thine o$n ca%e $i## 2 sit, patient and hea%y #ike a b#ockDDand $ait for
thee&N
NSo be it&N shouted back Zarathustra, as he $ent a$ay? Nand $hat is 'ine
in 'y ca%e be#ongeth a#so unto thee, 'y guest&
Shou#dst thou ho$e%er find honey therein, $e##& just #ick it up, thou
gro$#ing bear, and s$eeten thy sou#& For in the e%ening $e $ant both to be
in good spiritsL
DD2n good spirits and joyfu#, because this day hath co'e to an end& ;nd
thou thyse#f sha#t dance to 'y #ays, as 'y dancingDbear(
Thou dost not be#ie%e thisS Thou shakest thy headS )e##& "heer up, o#d
bear& .ut 2 a#soDDa' a soothsayer(N
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:R222( T;:W )2T/ T/E W2NGS(
!(
Ere Zarathustra had been an hour on his $ay in the 'ountains and forests,
he sa$ a## at once a strange procession( -ight on the path $hich he $as
about to descend ca'e t$o kings $a#king, bedecked $ith cro$ns and purp#e
gird#es, and %ariegated #ike f#a'ingoes? they dro%e before the' a #aden
ass( N)hat do these kings $ant in 'y do'ainSN said Zarathustra in
astonish'ent to his heart, and hid hi'se#f hasti#y behind a thicket( )hen
ho$e%er the kings approached to hi', he said ha#fDa#oud, #ike one speaking
on#y to hi'se#f? NStrange& Strange& /o$ doth this har'oniseS T$o kings
do 2 seeDDand on#y one ass&N
Thereupon the t$o kings 'ade a ha#tL they s'i#ed and #ooked to$ards the
spot $hence the %oice proceeded, and after$ards #ooked into each otherMs
faces( NSuch things do $e a#so think a'ong ourse#%es,N said the king on
the right, Nbut $e do not utter the'(N
The king on the #eft, ho$e%er, shrugged his shou#ders and ans$ered? NThat
'ay perhaps be a goatDherd( 7r an anchorite $ho hath #i%ed too #ong a'ong
rocks and trees( For no society at a## spoi#eth a#so good 'anners(N
NGood 'annersSN rep#ied angri#y and bitter#y the other king? N$hat then do
$e run out of the $ay ofS 2s it not Mgood 'annersMS 7ur Mgood societyMS
.etter, %eri#y, to #i%e a'ong anchorites and goatDherds, than $ith our
gi#ded, fa#se, o%erDrouged popu#aceDDthough it ca## itse#f Mgood society(M
DDThough it ca## itse#f Mnobi#ity(M .ut there a## is fa#se and fou#, abo%e
a## the b#oodDDthanks to o#d e%i# diseases and $orse curers(
The best and dearest to 'e at present is sti## a sound peasant, coarse,
artfu#, obstinate and enduring? that is at present the nob#est type(
The peasant is at present the bestL and the peasant type shou#d be 'aster&
.ut it is the kingdo' of the popu#aceDD2 no #onger a##o$ anything to be
i'posed upon 'e( The popu#ace, ho$e%erDDthat 'eaneth, hodgepodge(
Popu#aceDhodgepodge? therein is e%erything 'ixed $ith e%erything, saint
and s$ind#er, gent#e'an and Te$, and e%ery beast out of NoahMs ark(
Good 'anners& E%erything is fa#se and fou# $ith us( No one kno$eth any
#onger ho$ to re%erence? it is T/;T precise#y that $e run a$ay fro'( They
are fu#so'e obtrusi%e dogsL they gi#d pa#'D#ea%es(
This #oathing choketh 'e, that $e kings ourse#%es ha%e beco'e fa#se, draped
and disguised $ith the o#d faded po'p of our ancestors, sho$Dpieces for the
stupidest, the craftiest, and $hosoe%er at present trafficketh for po$er(
)e ;-E N7T the first 'enDDand ha%e ne%erthe#ess to ST;N* F7- the'? of this
i'posture ha%e $e at #ast beco'e $eary and disgusted(
Fro' the rabb#e ha%e $e gone out of the $ay, fro' a## those ba$#ers and
scribeDb#o$f#ies, fro' the traderDstench, the a'bitionDfidgeting, the bad
breathDD? fie, to #i%e a'ong the rabb#eL
DDFie, to stand for the first 'en a'ong the rabb#e& ;h, #oathing&
:oathing& :oathing& )hat doth it no$ 'atter about us kings&NDD
NThine o#d sickness seizeth thee,N said here the king on the #eft, Nthy
#oathing seizeth thee, 'y poor brother( Thou kno$est, ho$e%er, that so'e
one heareth us(N
2''ediate#y thereupon, Zarathustra, $ho had opened ears and eyes to this
ta#k, rose fro' his hidingDp#ace, ad%anced to$ards the kings, and thus
began?
N/e $ho hearkeneth unto you, he $ho g#ad#y hearkeneth unto you, is ca##ed
Zarathustra(
2 a' Zarathustra $ho once said? M)hat doth it no$ 'atter about kings&M
Forgi%e 'eL 2 rejoiced $hen ye said to each other? M)hat doth it 'atter
about us kings&M
/ere, ho$e%er, is 9Q do'ain and jurisdiction? $hat 'ay ye be seeking in 'y
do'ainS Perhaps, ho$e%er, ye ha%e F78N* on your $ay $hat X2X seek?
na'e#y, the higher 'an(N
)hen the kings heard this, they beat upon their breasts and said $ith one
%oice? N)e are recognised&
)ith the s$ord of thine utterance se%erest thou the thickest darkness of
our hearts( Thou hast disco%ered our distressL for #o& $e are on our $ay
to find the higher 'anDD
DDThe 'an that is higher than $e, a#though $e are kings( To hi' do $e
con%ey this ass( For the highest 'an sha## a#so be the highest #ord on
earth(
There is no sorer 'isfortune in a## hu'an destiny, than $hen the 'ighty of
the earth are not a#so the first 'en( Then e%erything beco'eth fa#se and
distorted and 'onstrous(
;nd $hen they are e%en the #ast 'en, and 'ore beast than 'an, then riseth
and riseth the popu#ace in honour, and at #ast saith e%en the popu#aceD
%irtue? M:o, 2 a#one a' %irtue&MNDD
)hat ha%e 2 just heardS ans$ered Zarathustra( )hat $isdo' in kings& 2 a'
enchanted, and %eri#y, 2 ha%e a#ready pro'ptings to 'ake a rhy'e thereon?DD
DDE%en if it shou#d happen to be a rhy'e not suited for e%ery oneMs ears(
2 un#earned #ong ago to ha%e consideration for #ong ears( )e## then& )e##
no$&
@/ere, ho$e%er, it happened that the ass a#so found utterance? it said
distinct#y and $ith 'a#e%o#ence, QDED;(A
MT$as onceDD'ethinks year one of our b#essed :ord,DD
*runk $ithout $ine, the Sybi# thus dep#ored?DD
N/o$ i## things go&
*ec#ine& *ec#ine& NeMer sank the $or#d so #o$&
-o'e no$ hath turned har#ot and har#otDste$,
-o'eMs "aesar a beast, and GodDDhath turned Te$&
C(
)ith those rhy'es of Zarathustra the kings $ere de#ightedL the king on the
right, ho$e%er, said? N7 Zarathustra, ho$ $e## it $as that $e set out to
see thee&
For thine ene'ies sho$ed us thy #ikeness in their 'irror? there #ookedst
thou $ith the gri'ace of a de%i#, and sneering#y? so that $e $ere afraid
of thee(
.ut $hat good did it do& ;#$ays didst thou prick us ane$ in heart and ear
$ith thy sayings( Then did $e say at #ast? )hat doth it 'atter ho$ he
#ook&
)e 'ust /E;- hi'L hi' $ho teacheth? MQe sha## #o%e peace as a 'eans to ne$
$ars, and the short peace 'ore than the #ong&M
No one e%er spake such $ar#ike $ords? M)hat is goodS To be bra%e is good(
2t is the good $ar that ha##o$eth e%ery cause(M
7 Zarathustra, our fathersM b#ood stirred in our %eins at such $ords? it
$as #ike the %oice of spring to o#d $ineDcasks(
)hen the s$ords ran a'ong one another #ike redDspotted serpents, then did
our fathers beco'e fond of #ifeL the sun of e%ery peace see'ed to the'
#anguid and #uke$ar', the #ong peace, ho$e%er, 'ade the' asha'ed(
/o$ they sighed, our fathers, $hen they sa$ on the $a## bright#y furbished,
driedDup s$ords& :ike those they thirsted for $ar( For a s$ord thirsteth
to drink b#ood, and spark#eth $ith desire(NDD
DD)hen the kings thus discoursed and ta#ked eager#y of the happiness of
their fathers, there ca'e upon Zarathustra no #itt#e desire to 'ock at
their eagerness? for e%ident#y they $ere %ery peaceab#e kings $ho' he sa$
before hi', kings $ith o#d and refined features( .ut he restrained
hi'se#f( N)e##&N said he, Nthither #eadeth the $ay, there #ieth the ca%e
of ZarathustraL and this day is to ha%e a #ong e%ening& ;t present,
ho$e%er, a cry of distress ca##eth 'e hasti#y a$ay fro' you(
2t $i## honour 'y ca%e if kings $ant to sit and $ait in it? but, to be
sure, ye $i## ha%e to $ait #ong&
)e##& )hat of that& )here doth one at present #earn better to $ait than
at courtsS ;nd the $ho#e %irtue of kings that hath re'ained unto the'DDis
it not ca##ed toDday? ;.2:2TQ to $aitSN
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:R2,( T/E :EE"/(
;nd Zarathustra $ent thoughtfu##y on, further and #o$er do$n, through
forests and past 'oory botto'sL as it happeneth, ho$e%er, to e%ery one $ho
'editateth upon hard 'atters, he trod thereby una$ares upon a 'an( ;nd #o,
there spurted into his face a## at once a cry of pain, and t$o curses and
t$enty bad in%ecti%es, so that in his fright he raised his stick and a#so
struck the trodden one( 2''ediate#y after$ards, ho$e%er, he regained his
co'posure, and his heart #aughed at the fo##y he had just co''itted(
NPardon 'e,N said he to the trodden one, $ho had got up enraged, and had
seated hi'se#f, Npardon 'e, and hear first of a## a parab#e(
;s a $anderer $ho drea'eth of re'ote things on a #oneso'e high$ay, runneth
una$ares against a s#eeping dog, a dog $hich #ieth in the sun?
DD;s both of the' then start up and snap at each other, #ike dead#y
ene'ies, those t$o beings 'orta##y frightenedDDso did it happen unto us(
;nd yet& ;nd yetDDho$ #itt#e $as #acking for the' to caress each other,
that dog and that #oneso'e one& ;re they not bothDD#oneso'e ones&N
DDN)hoe%er thou art,N said the trodden one, sti## enraged, Nthou treadest
a#so too nigh 'e $ith thy parab#e, and not on#y $ith thy foot&
:o& a' 2 then a dogSNDD;nd thereupon the sitting one got up, and pu##ed
his naked ar' out of the s$a'p( For at first he had #ain outstretched on
the ground, hidden and indiscernib#e, #ike those $ho #ie in $ait for s$a'pD
ga'e(
N.ut $hate%er art thou about&N ca##ed out Zarathustra in a#ar', for he sa$
a dea# of b#ood strea'ing o%er the naked ar',DDN$hat hath hurt theeS /ath
an e%i# beast bit thee, thou unfortunate oneSN
The b#eeding one #aughed, sti## angry, N)hat 'atter is it to thee&N said
he, and $as about to go on( N/ere a' 2 at ho'e and in 'y pro%ince( :et
hi' Uuestion 'e $hoe%er $i##? to a do#t, ho$e%er, 2 sha## hard#y ans$er(N
NThou art 'istaken,N said Zarathustra sy'pathetica##y, and he#d hi' fastL
Nthou art 'istaken( /ere thou art not at ho'e, but in 'y do'ain, and
therein sha## no one recei%e any hurt(
"a## 'e ho$e%er $hat thou $i#tDD2 a' $ho 2 'ust be( 2 ca## 'yse#f
Zarathustra(
)e##& 8p thither is the $ay to ZarathustraMs ca%e? it is not far,DD$i#t
thou not attend to thy $ounds at 'y ho'eS
2t hath gone bad#y $ith thee, thou unfortunate one, in this #ife? first a
beast bit thee, and thenDDa 'an trod upon thee&NDD
)hen ho$e%er the trodden one had heard the na'e of Zarathustra he $as
transfor'ed( N)hat happeneth unto 'e&N he exc#ai'ed, N)/7 preoccupieth 'e
so 'uch in this #ife as this one 'an, na'e#y Zarathustra, and that one
ani'a# that #i%eth on b#ood, the #eechS
For the sake of the #eech did 2 #ie here by this s$a'p, #ike a fisher, and
a#ready had 'ine outstretched ar' been bitten ten ti'es, $hen there biteth
a sti## finer #eech at 'y b#ood, Zarathustra hi'se#f&
7 happiness& 7 'irac#e& Praised be this day $hich enticed 'e into the
s$a'p& Praised be the best, the #i%est cuppingDg#ass, that at present
#i%ethL praised be the great conscienceD#eech Zarathustra&NDD
Thus spake the trodden one, and Zarathustra rejoiced at his $ords and their
refined re%erentia# sty#e( N)ho art thouSN asked he, and ga%e hi' his
hand, Nthere is 'uch to c#ear up and e#ucidate bet$een us, but a#ready
'ethinketh pure c#ear day is da$ning(N
N2 a' T/E SP2-2T8;::Q "7NS"2ENT278S 7NE,N ans$ered he $ho $as asked, Nand
in 'atters of the spirit it is difficu#t for any one to take it 'ore
rigorous#y, 'ore restricted#y, and 'ore se%ere#y than 2, except hi' fro'
$ho' 2 #earnt it, Zarathustra hi'se#f(
.etter kno$ nothing than ha#fDkno$ 'any things& .etter be a foo# on oneMs
o$n account, than a sage on other peop#eMs approbation& 2DDgo to the
basis?
DD)hat 'atter if it be great or s'a##S 2f it be ca##ed s$a'p or skyS ;
handbreadth of basis is enough for 'e, if it be actua##y basis and ground&
DD; handbreadth of basis? thereon can one stand( 2n the true kno$ingD
kno$#edge there is nothing great and nothing s'a##(N
NThen thou art perhaps an expert on the #eechSN asked ZarathustraL Nand
thou in%estigatest the #eech to its u#ti'ate basis, thou conscientious
oneSN
N7 Zarathustra,N ans$ered the trodden one, Nthat $ou#d be so'ething
i''enseL ho$ cou#d 2 presu'e to do so&
That, ho$e%er, of $hich 2 a' 'aster and kno$er, is the .-;2N of the #eech?
DDthat is 9Q $or#d&
;nd it is a#so a $or#d& Forgi%e it, ho$e%er, that 'y pride here findeth
expression, for here 2 ha%e not 'ine eUua#( Therefore said 2? Mhere a' 2
at ho'e(M
/o$ #ong ha%e 2 in%estigated this one thing, the brain of the #eech, so
that here the s#ippery truth 'ight no #onger s#ip fro' 'e& /ere is 9Q
do'ain&
DDFor the sake of this did 2 cast e%erything e#se aside, for the sake of
this did e%erything e#se beco'e indifferent to 'eL and c#ose beside 'y
kno$#edge #ieth 'y b#ack ignorance(
9y spiritua# conscience reUuireth fro' 'e that it shou#d be soDDthat 2
shou#d kno$ one thing, and not kno$ a## e#se? they are a #oathing unto 'e,
a## the se'iDspiritua#, a## the hazy, ho%ering, and %isionary(
)here 'ine honesty ceaseth, there a' 2 b#ind, and $ant a#so to be b#ind(
)here 2 $ant to kno$, ho$e%er, there $ant 2 a#so to be honestDDna'e#y,
se%ere, rigorous, restricted, crue# and inexorab#e(
.ecause T/78 once saidest, 7 Zarathustra? MSpirit is #ife $hich itse#f
cutteth into #ifeMLDDthat #ed and a##ured 'e to thy doctrine( ;nd %eri#y,
$ith 'ine o$n b#ood ha%e 2 increased 'ine o$n kno$#edge&N
DDN;s the e%idence indicateth,N broke in ZarathustraL for sti## $as the
b#ood f#o$ing do$n on the naked ar' of the conscientious one( For there
had ten #eeches bitten into it(
N7 thou strange fe##o$, ho$ 'uch doth this %ery e%idence teach 'eDDna'e#y,
thou thyse#f& ;nd not a##, perhaps, 'ight 2 pour into thy rigorous ear&
)e## then& )e part here& .ut 2 $ou#d fain find thee again( 8p thither is
the $ay to 'y ca%e? toDnight sha#t thou there by 'y $e#co'e guest&
Fain $ou#d 2 a#so 'ake a'ends to thy body for Zarathustra treading upon
thee $ith his feet? 2 think about that( Tust no$, ho$e%er, a cry of
distress ca##eth 'e hasti#y a$ay fro' thee(N
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:R,( T/E 9;G2"2;N(
!(
)hen ho$e%er Zarathustra had gone round a rock, then sa$ he on the sa'e
path, not far be#o$ hi', a 'an $ho thre$ his #i'bs about #ike a 'aniac, and
at #ast tu'b#ed to the ground on his be##y( N/a#t&N said then Zarathustra
to his heart, Nhe there 'ust sure#y be the higher 'an, fro' hi' ca'e that
dreadfu# cry of distress,DD2 $i## see if 2 can he#p hi'(N )hen, ho$e%er,
he ran to the spot $here the 'an #ay on the ground, he found a tre'b#ing
o#d 'an, $ith fixed eyesL and in spite of a## ZarathustraMs efforts to #ift
hi' and set hi' again on his feet, it $as a## in %ain( The unfortunate
one, a#so, did not see' to notice that so'e one $as beside hi'L on the
contrary, he continua##y #ooked around $ith 'o%ing gestures, #ike one
forsaken and iso#ated fro' a## the $or#d( ;t #ast, ho$e%er, after 'uch
tre'b#ing, and con%u#sion, and cur#ingDhi'se#fDup, he began to #a'ent thus?
)ho $ar'Mth 'e, $ho #o%Mth 'e sti##S
Gi%e ardent fingers&
Gi%e heartening charcoa#D$ar'ers&
Prone, outstretched, tre'b#ing,
:ike hi', ha#f dead and co#d, $hose feet one $ar'MthDD
;nd shaken, ah& by unfa'i#iar fe%ers,
Shi%ering $ith sharpened, icyDco#d frostDarro$s,
.y thee pursued, 'y fancy&
2neffab#e& -econdite& SoreDfrightening&
Thou hunts'an Mhind the c#oudDbanks&
No$ #ightningDstruck by thee,
Thou 'ocking eye that 'e in darkness $atcheth?
DDThus do 2 #ie,
.end 'yse#f, t$ist 'yse#f, con%u#sed
)ith a## eterna# torture,
;nd s'itten
.y thee, crue##est hunts'an,
Thou unfa'i#iarDDG7*(((
S'ite deeper&
S'ite yet once 'ore&
Pierce through and rend 'y heart&
)hat 'eanMth this torture
)ith du##, indented arro$sS
)hy #ookMst thou hither,
7f hu'an pain not $eary,
)ith 'ischiefD#o%ing, god#y f#ashDg#ancesS
Not 'urder $i#t thou,
.ut torture, tortureS
For $hyDD9E torture,
Thou 'ischiefD#o%ing, unfa'i#iar GodSDD
/a& /a&
Thou stea#est nigh
2n 'idnightMs g#oo'y hourS(((
)hat $i#t thouS
Speak&
Thou cro$dst 'e, pressestDD
/a& no$ far too c#ose#y&
Thou hearst 'e breathing,
Thou oMerhearst 'y heart,
Thou e%er jea#ous one&
DD7f $hat, pray, e%er jea#ousS
7ff& 7ff&
For $hy the #adderS
)ou#dst thou GET 2NS
To heart inDc#a'berS
To 'ine o$n secretest
"onceptions inDc#a'berS
Sha'e#ess one& Thou unkno$n one&DDThief&
)hat seekst thou by thy stea#ingS
)hat seekst thou by thy hearkeningS
)hat seekst thou by thy torturingS
Thou torturer&
ThouDDhang'anDGod&
7r sha## 2, as the 'astiffs do,
-o## 'e before theeS
;nd cringing, enraptured, frantica#,
9y tai# friend#yDD$agg#e&
2n %ain&
Goad further&
"rue##est goader&
No dogDDthy ga'e just a' 2,
"rue##est hunts'an&
Thy proudest of capti%es,
Thou robber Mhind the c#oudDbanks(((
Speak fina##y&
Thou #ightningD%ei#ed one& Thou unkno$n one& Speak&
)hat $i#t thou, high$ayDa'busher, fro'DD9ES
)hat )2:T thou, unfa'i#iarDDGodS
)hatS
-anso'Dgo#dS
/o$ 'uch of ranso'Dgo#dS
So#icit 'uchDDthat bidMth 'y pride&
;nd be conciseDDthat bidMth 'ine other pride&
/a& /a&
9EDD$antst thouS 'eS
DDEntireS(((
/a& /a&
;nd torturest 'e, foo# that thou art,
*eadDtorturest Uuite 'y prideS
Gi%e :7,E to 'eDD$ho $ar'Mth 'e sti##S
)ho #o%Mth 'e sti##SD
Gi%e ardent fingers
Gi%e heartening charcoa#D$ar'ers,
Gi%e 'e, the #oneso'est,
The ice @ah& se%enDfo#d frozen ice
For %ery ene'ies,
For foes, doth 'ake one thirstA(
Gi%e, yie#d to 'e,
"rue##est foe,
DDT/QSE:F&DD
;$ay&
There f#ed he sure#y,
9y fina#, on#y co'rade,
9y greatest foe,
9ine unfa'i#iarDD
9y hang'anDGod&(((
DDNay&
"o'e thou back&
)2T/ a## of thy great tortures&
To 'e the #ast of #oneso'e ones,
7h, co'e thou back&
;## 'y hot tears in strea'#ets trick#e
Their course to thee&
;nd a## 'y fina# hearty fer%ourDD
8pDg#o$Mth to T/EE&
7h, co'e thou back,
9ine unfa'i#iar God& 'y P;2N&
9y fina# b#iss&
C(
DD/ere, ho$e%er, Zarathustra cou#d no #onger restrain hi'se#fL he took his
staff and struck the $ai#er $ith a## his 'ight( NStop this,N cried he to
hi' $ith $rathfu# #aughter, Nstop this, thou stageDp#ayer& Thou fa#se
coiner& Thou #iar fro' the %ery heart& 2 kno$ thee $e##&
2 $i## soon 'ake $ar' #egs to thee, thou e%i# 'agician? 2 kno$ $e## ho$DD
to 'ake it hot for such as thou&N
DDN:ea%e off,N said the o#d 'an, and sprang up fro' the ground, Nstrike 'e
no 'ore, 7 Zarathustra& 2 did it on#y for a'use'ent&
That kind of thing be#ongeth to 'ine art( Thee thyse#f, 2 $anted to put to
the proof $hen 2 ga%e this perfor'ance( ;nd %eri#y, thou hast $e##
detected 'e&
.ut thou thyse#fDDhast gi%en 'e no s'a## proof of thyse#f? thou art /;-*,
thou $ise Zarathustra& /ard strikest thou $ith thy Mtruths,M thy cudge#
forceth fro' 'eDDT/2S truth&N
DDNF#atter not,N ans$ered Zarathustra, sti## excited and fro$ning, Nthou
stageDp#ayer fro' the heart& Thou art fa#se? $hy speakest thouDDof truth&
Thou peacock of peacocks, thou sea of %anityL )/;T didst thou represent
before 'e, thou e%i# 'agicianL )/79 $as 2 'eant to be#ie%e in $hen thou
$ai#edst in such $iseSN
NT/E PEN2TENT 2N SP2-2T,N said the o#d 'an, Nit $as hi'DD2 representedL
thou thyse#f once de%isedst this expressionDD
DDThe poet and 'agician $ho at #ast turneth his spirit against hi'se#f, the
transfor'ed one $ho freezeth to death by his bad science and conscience(
;nd just ackno$#edge it? it $as #ong, 7 Zarathustra, before thou
disco%eredst 'y trick and #ie& Thou .E:2E,E*ST in 'y distress $hen thou
he#dest 'y head $ith both thy hands,DD
DD2 heard thee #a'ent M$e ha%e #o%ed hi' too #itt#e, #o%ed hi' too #itt#e&M
.ecause 2 so far decei%ed thee, 'y $ickedness rejoiced in 'e(N
NThou 'ayest ha%e decei%ed subt#er ones than 2,N said Zarathustra stern#y(
N2 a' not on 'y guard against decei%ersL 2 /;,E T7 .E $ithout precaution?
so $i##eth 'y #ot(
Thou, ho$e%er,DD98ST decei%e? so far do 2 kno$ thee& Thou 'ust e%er be
eUui%oca#, tri%oca#, Uuadri%oca#, and UuinUui%oca#& E%en $hat thou hast
no$ confessed, is not near#y true enough nor fa#se enough for 'e&
Thou bad fa#se coiner, ho$ cou#dst thou do other$ise& Thy %ery 'a#ady
$ou#dst thou $hite$ash if thou sho$ed thyse#f naked to thy physician(
Thus didst thou $hite$ash thy #ie before 'e $hen thou saidst? M2 did so
7N:Q for a'use'ent&M There $as a#so SE-278SNESS therein, thou ;-T
so'ething of a penitentDinDspirit&
2 di%ine thee $e##? thou hast beco'e the enchanter of a## the $or#dL but
for thyse#f thou hast no #ie or artifice #eft,DDthou art disenchanted to
thyse#f&
Thou hast reaped disgust as thy one truth( No $ord in thee is any #onger
genuine, but thy 'outh is so? that is to say, the disgust that c#ea%eth
unto thy 'outh(NDD
DDN)ho art thou at a##&N cried here the o#d 'agician $ith defiant %oice,
N$ho dareth to speak thus unto 9E, the greatest 'an no$ #i%ingSNDDand a
green f#ash shot fro' his eye at Zarathustra( .ut i''ediate#y after he
changed, and said sad#y?
N7 Zarathustra, 2 a' $eary of it, 2 a' disgusted $ith 'ine arts, 2 a' not
G-E;T, $hy do 2 disse'b#e& .ut thou kno$est it $e##DD2 sought for
greatness&
; great 'an 2 $anted to appear, and persuaded 'anyL but the #ie hath been
beyond 'y po$er( 7n it do 2 co##apse(
7 Zarathustra, e%erything is a #ie in 'eL but that 2 co##apseDDthis 'y
co##apsing is GEN82NE&NDD
N2t honoureth thee,N said Zarathustra g#oo'i#y, #ooking do$n $ith side#ong
g#ance, Nit honoureth thee that thou soughtest for greatness, but it
betrayeth thee a#so( Thou art not great(
Thou bad o#d 'agician, T/;T is the best and the honestest thing 2 honour in
thee, that thou hast beco'e $eary of thyse#f, and hast expressed it? M2 a'
not great(M
T/E-E2N do 2 honour thee as a penitentDinDspirit, and a#though on#y for the
t$ink#ing of an eye, in that one 'o'ent $ast thouDDgenuine(
.ut te## 'e, $hat seekest thou here in 9Q forests and rocksS ;nd if thou
hast put thyse#f in 9Q $ay, $hat proof of 'e $ou#dst thou ha%eSDD
DD)herein didst thou put 9E to the testSN
Thus spake Zarathustra, and his eyes spark#ed( .ut the o#d 'agician kept
si#ence for a $hi#eL then said he? N*id 2 put thee to the testS 2DDseek
on#y(
7 Zarathustra, 2 seek a genuine one, a right one, a si'p#e one, an
uneUui%oca# one, a 'an of perfect honesty, a %esse# of $isdo', a saint of
kno$#edge, a great 'an&
Wno$est thou it not, 7 ZarathustraS 2 SEEW Z;-;T/8ST-;(N
DD;nd here there arose a #ong si#ence bet$een the'? Zarathustra, ho$e%er,
beca'e profound#y absorbed in thought, so that he shut his eyes( .ut
after$ards co'ing back to the situation, he grasped the hand of the
'agician, and said, fu## of po#iteness and po#icy?
N)e##& 8p thither #eadeth the $ay, there is the ca%e of Zarathustra( 2n
it 'ayest thou seek hi' $ho' thou $ou#dst fain find(
;nd ask counse# of 'ine ani'a#s, 'ine eag#e and 'y serpent? they sha##
he#p thee to seek( 9y ca%e ho$e%er is #arge(
2 'yse#f, to be sureDD2 ha%e as yet seen no great 'an( That $hich is
great, the acutest eye is at present insensib#e to it( 2t is the kingdo'
of the popu#ace(
9any a one ha%e 2 found $ho stretched and inf#ated hi'se#f, and the peop#e
cried? M.eho#dL a great 'an&M .ut $hat good do a## be##o$s do& The $ind
co'eth out at #ast(
;t #ast bursteth the frog $hich hath inf#ated itse#f too #ong? then co'eth
out the $ind( To prick a s$o##en one in the be##y, 2 ca## good pasti'e(
/ear that, ye boys&
7ur toDday is of the popu#ace? $ho sti## WN7)ET/ $hat is great and $hat is
s'a##& )ho cou#d there seek successfu##y for greatness& ; foo# on#y? it
succeedeth $ith foo#s(
Thou seekest for great 'en, thou strange foo#S )ho T;8G/T that to theeS
2s toDday the ti'e for itS 7h, thou bad seeker, $hy dost thouDDte'pt
'eSNDD
Thus spake Zarathustra, co'forted in his heart, and $ent #aughing on his
$ay(
:R,2( 78T 7F SE-,2"E(
Not #ong, ho$e%er, after Zarathustra had freed hi'se#f fro' the 'agician,
he again sa$ a person sitting beside the path $hich he fo##o$ed, na'e#y a
ta##, b#ack 'an, $ith a haggard, pa#e countenance? T/2S 9;N grie%ed hi'
exceeding#y( N;#as,N said he to his heart, Nthere sitteth disguised
aff#ictionL 'ethinketh he is of the type of the priests? $hat do T/EQ $ant
in 'y do'ainS
)hat& /ard#y ha%e 2 escaped fro' that 'agician, and 'ust another
necro'ancer again run across 'y path,DD
DDSo'e sorcerer $ith #ayingDonDofDhands, so'e so'bre $onderD$orker by the
grace of God, so'e anointed $or#dD'a#igner, $ho', 'ay the de%i# take&
.ut the de%i# is ne%er at the p#ace $hich $ou#d be his right p#ace? he
a#$ays co'eth too #ate, that cursed d$arf and c#ubDfoot&NDD
Thus cursed Zarathustra i'patient#y in his heart, and considered ho$ $ith
a%erted #ook he 'ight s#ip past the b#ack 'an( .ut beho#d, it ca'e about
other$ise( For at the sa'e 'o'ent had the sitting one a#ready percei%ed
hi'L and not un#ike one $ho' an unexpected happiness o%ertaketh, he sprang
to his feet, and $ent straight to$ards Zarathustra(
N)hoe%er thou art, thou tra%e##er,N said he, Nhe#p a strayed one, a seeker,
an o#d 'an, $ho 'ay here easi#y co'e to grief&
The $or#d here is strange to 'e, and re'oteL $i#d beasts a#so did 2 hear
ho$#ingL and he $ho cou#d ha%e gi%en 'e protectionDDhe is hi'se#f no 'ore(
2 $as seeking the pious 'an, a saint and an anchorite, $ho, a#one in his
forest, had not yet heard of $hat a## the $or#d kno$eth at present(N
N)/;T doth a## the $or#d kno$ at presentSN asked Zarathustra( NPerhaps
that the o#d God no #onger #i%eth, in $ho' a## the $or#d once be#ie%edSN
NThou sayest it,N ans$ered the o#d 'an sorro$fu##y( N;nd 2 ser%ed that o#d
God unti# his #ast hour(
No$, ho$e%er, a' 2 out of ser%ice, $ithout 'aster, and yet not freeL
#ike$ise a' 2 no #onger 'erry e%en for an hour, except it be in
reco##ections(
Therefore did 2 ascend into these 'ountains, that 2 'ight fina##y ha%e a
festi%a# for 'yse#f once 'ore, as beco'eth an o#d pope and churchDfather?
for kno$ it, that 2 a' the #ast pope&DDa festi%a# of pious reco##ections
and di%ine ser%ices(
No$, ho$e%er, is he hi'se#f dead, the 'ost pious of 'en, the saint in the
forest, $ho praised his God constant#y $ith singing and 'u'b#ing(
/e hi'se#f found 2 no #onger $hen 2 found his cotDDbut t$o $o#%es found 2
therein, $hich ho$#ed on account of his death,DDfor a## ani'a#s #o%ed hi'(
Then did 2 haste a$ay(
/ad 2 thus co'e in %ain into these forests and 'ountainsS Then did 'y
heart deter'ine that 2 shou#d seek another, the 'ost pious of a## those $ho
be#ie%e not in GodDD, 'y heart deter'ined that 2 shou#d seek Zarathustra&N
Thus spake the hoary 'an, and gazed $ith keen eyes at hi' $ho stood before
hi'( Zarathustra ho$e%er seized the hand of the o#d pope and regarded it a
#ong $hi#e $ith ad'iration(
N:o& thou %enerab#e one,N said he then, N$hat a fine and #ong hand& That
is the hand of one $ho hath e%er dispensed b#essings( No$, ho$e%er, doth
it ho#d fast hi' $ho' thou seekest, 'e, Zarathustra(
2t is 2, the ungod#y Zarathustra, $ho saith? M)ho is ungod#ier than 2,
that 2 'ay enjoy his teachingSMND
Thus spake Zarathustra, and penetrated $ith his g#ances the thoughts and
arrearDthoughts of the o#d pope( ;t #ast the #atter began?
N/e $ho 'ost #o%ed and possessed hi' hath no$ a#so #ost hi' 'ostDD?
DD:o, 2 'yse#f a' sure#y the 'ost god#ess of us at presentS .ut $ho cou#d
rejoice at that&NDD
DDNThou ser%edst hi' to the #astSN asked Zarathustra thoughtfu##y, after a
deep si#ence, Nthou kno$est /7) he diedS 2s it true $hat they say, that
sy'pathy choked hi'L
DDThat he sa$ ho$ 9;N hung on the cross, and cou#d not endure itLDDthat his
#o%e to 'an beca'e his he##, and at #ast his deathSNDD
The o#d pope ho$e%er did not ans$er, but #ooked aside ti'id#y, $ith a
painfu# and g#oo'y expression(
N:et hi' go,N said Zarathustra, after pro#onged 'editation, sti## #ooking
the o#d 'an straight in the eye(
N:et hi' go, he is gone( ;nd though it honoureth thee that thou speakest
on#y in praise of this dead one, yet thou kno$est as $e## as 2 )/7 he $as,
and that he $ent curious $ays(N
NTo speak before three eyes,N said the o#d pope cheerfu##y @he $as b#ind of
one eyeA, Nin di%ine 'atters 2 a' 'ore en#ightened than Zarathustra
hi'se#fDDand 'ay $e## be so(
9y #o%e ser%ed hi' #ong years, 'y $i## fo##o$ed a## his $i##( ; good
ser%ant, ho$e%er, kno$eth e%erything, and 'any a thing e%en $hich a 'aster
hideth fro' hi'se#f(
/e $as a hidden God, fu## of secrecy( ,eri#y, he did not co'e by his son
other$ise than by secret $ays( ;t the door of his faith standeth adu#tery(
)hoe%er exto##eth hi' as a God of #o%e, doth not think high#y enough of
#o%e itse#f( *id not that God $ant a#so to be judgeS .ut the #o%ing one
#o%eth irrespecti%e of re$ard and reUuita#(
)hen he $as young, that God out of the 7rient, then $as he harsh and
re%engefu#, and bui#t hi'se#f a he## for the de#ight of his fa%ourites(
;t #ast, ho$e%er, he beca'e o#d and soft and 'e##o$ and pitifu#, 'ore #ike
a grandfather than a father, but 'ost #ike a tottering o#d grand'other(
There did he sit shri%e##ed in his chi'neyDcorner, fretting on account of
his $eak #egs, $or#dD$eary, $i##D$eary, and one day he suffocated of his
a##DtooDgreat pity(NDD
NThou o#d pope,N said here Zarathustra interposing, Nhast thou seen T/;T
$ith thine eyesS 2t cou#d $e## ha%e happened in that $ay? in that $ay,
;N* a#so other$ise( )hen Gods die they a#$ays die 'any kinds of death(
)e##& ;t a## e%ents, one $ay or otherDDhe is gone& /e $as counter to the
taste of 'ine ears and eyesL $orse than that 2 shou#d not #ike to say
against hi'(
2 #o%e e%erything that #ooketh bright and speaketh honest#y( .ut heDDthou
kno$est it, forsooth, thou o#d priest, there $as so'ething of thy type in
hi', the priestDtypeDDhe $as eUui%oca#(
/e $as a#so indistinct( /o$ he raged at us, this $rathDsnorter, because $e
understood hi' bad#y& .ut $hy did he not speak 'ore c#ear#yS
;nd if the fau#t #ay in our ears, $hy did he gi%e us ears that heard hi'
bad#yS 2f there $as dirt in our ears, $e##& $ho put it in the'S
Too 'uch 'iscarried $ith hi', this potter $ho had not #earned thorough#y&
That he took re%enge on his pots and creations, ho$e%er, because they
turned out bad#yDDthat $as a sin against G77* T;STE(
There is a#so good taste in piety? T/2S at #ast said? M;$ay $ith S8"/ a
God& .etter to ha%e no God, better to set up destiny on oneMs o$n account,
better to be a foo#, better to be God onese#f&MN
DDN)hat do 2 hear&N said then the o#d pope, $ith intent earsL N7
Zarathustra, thou art 'ore pious than thou be#ie%est, $ith such an
unbe#ief& So'e God in thee hath con%erted thee to thine ungod#iness(
2s it not thy piety itse#f $hich no #onger #etteth thee be#ie%e in a GodS
;nd thine o%erDgreat honesty $i## yet #ead thee e%en beyond good and e%i#&
.eho#d, $hat hath been reser%ed for theeS Thou hast eyes and hands and
'outh, $hich ha%e been predestined for b#essing fro' eternity( 7ne doth
not b#ess $ith the hand a#one(
Nigh unto thee, though thou professest to be the ungod#iest one, 2 fee# a
ha#e and ho#y odour of #ong benedictions? 2 fee# g#ad and grie%ed thereby(
:et 'e be thy guest, 7 Zarathustra, for a sing#e night& No$here on earth
sha## 2 no$ fee# better than $ith thee&NDD
N;'en& So sha## it be&N said Zarathustra, $ith great astonish'entL Nup
thither #eadeth the $ay, there #ieth the ca%e of Zarathustra(
G#ad#y, forsooth, $ou#d 2 conduct thee thither 'yse#f, thou %enerab#e oneL
for 2 #o%e a## pious 'en( .ut no$ a cry of distress ca##eth 'e hasti#y
a$ay fro' thee(
2n 'y do'ain sha## no one co'e to griefL 'y ca%e is a good ha%en( ;nd best
of a## $ou#d 2 #ike to put e%ery sorro$fu# one again on fir' #and and fir'
#egs(
)ho, ho$e%er, cou#d take T/Q 'e#ancho#y off thy shou#dersS For that 2 a'
too $eak( :ong, %eri#y, shou#d $e ha%e to $ait unti# so'e one reDa$oke thy
God for thee(
For that o#d God #i%eth no 'ore? he is indeed dead(NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:R,22( T/E 8G:2EST 9;N(
DD;nd again did ZarathustraMs feet run through 'ountains and forests, and
his eyes sought and sought, but no$here $as he to be seen $ho' they $anted
to seeDDthe sore#y distressed sufferer and crier( 7n the $ho#e $ay,
ho$e%er, he rejoiced in his heart and $as fu## of gratitude( N)hat good
things,N said he, Nhath this day gi%en 'e, as a'ends for its bad beginning&
)hat strange inter#ocutors ha%e 2 found&
;t their $ords $i## 2 no$ che$ a #ong $hi#e as at good cornL s'a## sha## 'y
teeth grind and crush the', unti# they f#o$ #ike 'i#k into 'y sou#&NDD
)hen, ho$e%er, the path again cur%ed round a rock, a## at once the
#andscape changed, and Zarathustra entered into a rea#' of death( /ere
brist#ed a#oft b#ack and red c#iffs, $ithout any grass, tree, or birdMs
%oice( For it $as a %a##ey $hich a## ani'a#s a%oided, e%en the beasts of
prey, except that a species of ug#y, thick, green serpent ca'e here to die
$hen they beca'e o#d( Therefore the shepherds ca##ed this %a##ey?
NSerpentDdeath(N
Zarathustra, ho$e%er, beca'e absorbed in dark reco##ections, for it see'ed
to hi' as if he had once before stood in this %a##ey( ;nd 'uch hea%iness
sett#ed on his 'ind, so that he $a#ked s#o$#y and a#$ays 'ore s#o$#y, and
at #ast stood sti##( Then, ho$e%er, $hen he opened his eyes, he sa$
so'ething sitting by the $ayside shaped #ike a 'an, and hard#y #ike a 'an,
so'ething nondescript( ;nd a## at once there ca'e o%er Zarathustra a great
sha'e, because he had gazed on such a thing( .#ushing up to the %ery roots
of his $hite hair, he turned aside his g#ance, and raised his foot that he
'ight #ea%e this i##Dstarred p#ace( Then, ho$e%er, beca'e the dead
$i#derness %oca#? for fro' the ground a noise $e##ed up, gurg#ing and
ratt#ing, as $ater gurg#eth and ratt#eth at night through stoppedDup $aterD
pipesL and at #ast it turned into hu'an %oice and hu'an speech?DDit sounded
thus?
NZarathustra& Zarathustra& -ead 'y ridd#e& Say, say& )/;T 2S T/E
-E,ENGE 7N T/E )2TNESSS
2 entice thee backL here is s'ooth ice& See to it, see to it, that thy
pride do not here break its #egs&
Thou thinkest thyse#f $ise, thou proud Zarathustra& -ead then the ridd#e,
thou hard nutDcracker,DDthe ridd#e that 2 a'& Say then? $ho a' X2X&N
DD)hen ho$e%er Zarathustra had heard these $ords,DD$hat think ye then took
p#ace in his sou#S P2TQ 7,E-";9E /29L and he sank do$n a## at once, #ike
an oak that hath #ong $ithstood 'any treeDfe##ers,DDhea%i#y, sudden#y, to
the terror e%en of those $ho 'eant to fe## it( .ut i''ediate#y he got up
again fro' the ground, and his countenance beca'e stern(
N2 kno$ thee $e##,N said he, $ith a brazen %oice, NT/78 ;-T T/E 98-*E-E- 7F
G7*& :et 'e go(
Thou cou#dst not EN*8-E hi' $ho behe#d T/EE,DD$ho e%er behe#d thee through
and through, thou ug#iest 'an( Thou tookest re%enge on this $itness&N
Thus spake Zarathustra and $as about to goL but the nondescript grasped at
a corner of his gar'ent and began ane$ to gurg#e and seek for $ords(
NStay,N said he at #astDD
DDNStay& *o not pass by& 2 ha%e di%ined $hat axe it $as that struck thee
to the ground? hai# to thee, 7 Zarathustra, that thou art again upon thy
feet&
Thou hast di%ined, 2 kno$ it $e##, ho$ the 'an fee#eth $ho ki##ed hi',DDthe
'urderer of God( Stay& Sit do$n here beside 'eL it is not to no purpose(
To $ho' $ou#d 2 go but unto theeS Stay, sit do$n& *o not ho$e%er #ook at
'e& /onour thusDD'ine ug#iness&
They persecute 'e? no$ art T/78 'y #ast refuge( N7T $ith their hatred,
N7T $ith their bai#iffsLDD7h, such persecution $ou#d 2 'ock at, and be
proud and cheerfu#&
/ath not a## success hitherto been $ith the $e##Dpersecuted onesS ;nd he
$ho persecuteth $e## #earneth readi#y to be 7.SEV8ENTDD$hen once he isDDput
behind& .ut it is their P2TQDD
DDTheir pity is it fro' $hich 2 f#ee a$ay and f#ee to thee( 7 Zarathustra,
protect 'e, thou, 'y #ast refuge, thou so#e one $ho di%inedst 'e?
DDThou hast di%ined ho$ the 'an fee#eth $ho ki##ed /29( Stay& ;nd if thou
$i#t go, thou i'patient one, go not the $ay that 2 ca'e( T/;T $ay is bad(
;rt thou angry $ith 'e because 2 ha%e a#ready racked #anguage too #ongS
.ecause 2 ha%e a#ready counse##ed theeS .ut kno$ that it is 2, the ug#iest
'an,
DD)ho ha%e a#so the #argest, hea%iest feet( )here X2X ha%e gone, the $ay
is bad( 2 tread a## paths to death and destruction(
.ut that thou passedst 'e by in si#ence, that thou b#ushedstDD2 sa$ it
$e##? thereby did 2 kno$ thee as Zarathustra(
E%ery one e#se $ou#d ha%e thro$n to 'e his a#'s, his pity, in #ook and
speech( .ut for thatDD2 a' not beggar enough? that didst thou di%ine(
For that 2 a' too -2"/, rich in $hat is great, frightfu#, ug#iest, 'ost
unutterab#e& Thy sha'e, 7 Zarathustra, /7N78-E* 'e&
)ith difficu#ty did 2 get out of the cro$d of the pitifu#,DDthat 2 'ight
find the on#y one $ho at present teacheth that Mpity is obtrusi%eMDD
thyse#f, 7 Zarathustra&
DD)hether it be the pity of a God, or $hether it be hu'an pity, it is
offensi%e to 'odesty( ;nd un$i##ingness to he#p 'ay be nob#er than the
%irtue that rusheth to do so(
T/;T ho$e%erDDna'e#y, pityDDis ca##ed %irtue itse#f at present by a## petty
peop#e?DDthey ha%e no re%erence for great 'isfortune, great ug#iness, great
fai#ure(
.eyond a## these do 2 #ook, as a dog #ooketh o%er the backs of thronging
f#ocks of sheep( They are petty, goodD$oo#ed, goodD$i##ed, grey peop#e(
;s the heron #ooketh conte'ptuous#y at sha##o$ poo#s, $ith back$ardDbent
head, so do 2 #ook at the throng of grey #itt#e $a%es and $i##s and sou#s(
Too #ong ha%e $e ackno$#edged the' to be right, those petty peop#e? S7 $e
ha%e at #ast gi%en the' po$er as $e##LDDand no$ do they teach that Mgood is
on#y $hat petty peop#e ca## good(M
;nd MtruthM is at present $hat the preacher spake $ho hi'se#f sprang fro'
the', that singu#ar saint and ad%ocate of the petty peop#e, $ho testified
of hi'se#f? M2DDa' the truth(M
That i''odest one hath #ong 'ade the petty peop#e great#y puffed up,DDhe
$ho taught no s'a## error $hen he taught? M2DDa' the truth(M
/ath an i''odest one e%er been ans$ered 'ore courteous#ySDDThou, ho$e%er, 7
Zarathustra, passedst hi' by, and saidst? MNay& Nay& Three ti'es Nay&M
Thou $arnedst against his errorL thou $arnedstDDthe first to do soDDagainst
pity?DDnot e%ery one, not none, but thyse#f and thy type(
Thou art asha'ed of the sha'e of the great suffererL and %eri#y $hen thou
sayest? MFro' pity there co'eth a hea%y c#oudL take heed, ye 'en&M
DD)hen thou teachest? M;## creators are hard, a## great #o%e is beyond
their pity?M 7 Zarathustra, ho$ $e## %ersed dost thou see' to 'e in
$eatherDsigns&
Thou thyse#f, ho$e%er,DD$arn thyse#f a#so against T/Q pity& For 'any are
on their $ay to thee, 'any suffering, doubting, despairing, dro$ning,
freezing onesDD
2 $arn thee a#so against 'yse#f( Thou hast read 'y best, 'y $orst ridd#e,
'yse#f, and $hat 2 ha%e done( 2 kno$ the axe that fe##eth thee(
.ut heDD/;* T7 die? he #ooked $ith eyes $hich behe#d E,E-QT/2NG,DDhe
behe#d 'enMs depths and dregs, a## his hidden igno'iny and ug#iness(
/is pity kne$ no 'odesty? he crept into 'y dirtiest corners( This 'ost
prying, o%erDintrusi%e, o%erDpitifu# one had to die(
/e e%er behe#d 9E? on such a $itness 2 $ou#d ha%e re%engeDDor not #i%e
'yse#f(
The God $ho behe#d e%erything, ;N* ;:S7 9;N? that God had to die& 9an
cannot EN*8-E it that such a $itness shou#d #i%e(N
Thus spake the ug#iest 'an( Zarathustra ho$e%er got up, and prepared to go
on? for he fe#t frozen to the %ery bo$e#s(
NThou nondescript,N said he, Nthou $arnedst 'e against thy path( ;s thanks
for it 2 praise 'ine to thee( .eho#d, up thither is the ca%e of
Zarathustra(
9y ca%e is #arge and deep and hath 'any cornersL there findeth he that is
'ost hidden his hidingDp#ace( ;nd c#ose beside it, there are a hundred
#urkingDp#aces and byDp#aces for creeping, f#uttering, and hopping
creatures(
Thou outcast, $ho hast cast thyse#f out, thou $i#t not #i%e a'ongst 'en and
'enMs pityS )e## then, do #ike 'e& Thus $i#t thou #earn a#so fro' 'eL
on#y the doer #earneth(
;nd ta#k first and fore'ost to 'ine ani'a#s& The proudest ani'a# and the
$isest ani'a#DDthey 'ight $e## be the right counse##ors for us both&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra and $ent his $ay, 'ore thoughtfu##y and s#o$#y e%en
than before? for he asked hi'se#f 'any things, and hard#y kne$ $hat to
ans$er(
N/o$ poor indeed is 'an,N thought he in his heart, Nho$ ug#y, ho$ $heezy,
ho$ fu## of hidden sha'e&
They te## 'e that 'an #o%eth hi'se#f( ;h, ho$ great 'ust that se#fD#o%e
be& /o$ 'uch conte'pt is opposed to it&
E%en this 'an hath #o%ed hi'se#f, as he hath despised hi'se#f,DDa great
#o%er 'ethinketh he is, and a great despiser(
No one ha%e 2 yet found $ho 'ore thorough#y despised hi'se#f? e%en T/;T is
e#e%ation( ;#as, $as T/2S perhaps the higher 'an $hose cry 2 heardS
2 #o%e the great despisers( 9an is so'ething that hath to be surpassed(NDD
:R,222( T/E ,7:8NT;-Q .EGG;-(
)hen Zarathustra had #eft the ug#iest 'an, he $as chi##ed and fe#t
#oneso'e? for 'uch co#dness and #oneso'eness ca'e o%er his spirit, so that
e%en his #i'bs beca'e co#der thereby( )hen, ho$e%er, he $andered on and
on, uphi## and do$n, at ti'es past green 'eado$s, though a#so so'eti'es
o%er $i#d stony couches $here for'er#y perhaps an i'patient brook had 'ade
its bed, then he turned a## at once $ar'er and heartier again(
N)hat hath happened unto 'eSN he asked hi'se#f, Nso'ething $ar' and #i%ing
Uuickeneth 'eL it 'ust be in the neighbourhood(
;#ready a' 2 #ess a#oneL unconscious co'panions and brethren ro%e around
'eL their $ar' breath toucheth 'y sou#(N
)hen, ho$e%er, he spied about and sought for the co'forters of his
#oneso'eness, beho#d, there $ere kine there standing together on an
e'inence, $hose proxi'ity and s'e## had $ar'ed his heart( The kine,
ho$e%er, see'ed to #isten eager#y to a speaker, and took no heed of hi' $ho
approached( )hen, ho$e%er, Zarathustra $as Uuite nigh unto the', then did
he hear p#ain#y that a hu'an %oice spake in the 'idst of the kine, and
apparent#y a## of the' had turned their heads to$ards the speaker(
Then ran Zarathustra up speedi#y and dro%e the ani'a#s asideL for he feared
that so'e one had here 'et $ith har', $hich the pity of the kine $ou#d
hard#y be ab#e to re#ie%e( .ut in this he $as decei%edL for beho#d, there
sat a 'an on the ground $ho see'ed to be persuading the ani'a#s to ha%e no
fear of hi', a peaceab#e 'an and PreacherDonDtheD9ount, out of $hose eyes
kindness itse#f preached( N)hat dost thou seek hereSN ca##ed out
Zarathustra in astonish'ent(
N)hat do 2 here seekSN ans$ered he? Nthe sa'e that thou seekest, thou
'ischiefD'akerL that is to say, happiness upon earth(
To that end, ho$e%er, 2 $ou#d fain #earn of these kine( For 2 te## thee
that 2 ha%e a#ready ta#ked ha#f a 'orning unto the', and just no$ $ere they
about to gi%e 'e their ans$er( )hy dost thou disturb the'S
Except $e be con%erted and beco'e as kine, $e sha## in no $ise enter into
the kingdo' of hea%en( For $e ought to #earn fro' the' one thing?
ru'inating(
;nd %eri#y, a#though a 'an shou#d gain the $ho#e $or#d, and yet not #earn
one thing, ru'inating, $hat $ou#d it profit hi'& /e $ou#d not be rid of
his aff#iction,
DD/is great aff#iction? that, ho$e%er, is at present ca##ed *2SG8ST( )ho
hath not at present his heart, his 'outh and his eyes fu## of disgustS
Thou a#so& Thou a#so& .ut beho#d these kine&NDD
Thus spake the PreacherDonDtheD9ount, and turned then his o$n #ook to$ards
ZarathustraDDfor hitherto it had rested #o%ing#y on the kineDD? then,
ho$e%er, he put on a different expression( N)ho is this $ith $ho' 2 ta#kSN
he exc#ai'ed frightened, and sprang up fro' the ground(
NThis is the 'an $ithout disgust, this is Zarathustra hi'se#f, the
sur'ounter of the great disgust, this is the eye, this is the 'outh, this
is the heart of Zarathustra hi'se#f(N
;nd $hi#st he thus spake he kissed $ith oMerf#o$ing eyes the hands of hi'
$ith $ho' he spake, and beha%ed a#together #ike one to $ho' a precious gift
and je$e# hath fa##en una$ares fro' hea%en( The kine, ho$e%er, gazed at it
a## and $ondered(
NSpeak not of 'e, thou strange oneL thou a'iab#e one&N said Zarathustra,
and restrained his affection, Nspeak to 'e first#y of thyse#f& ;rt thou
not the %o#untary beggar $ho once cast a$ay great riches,DD
DD)ho $as asha'ed of his riches and of the rich, and f#ed to the poorest to
besto$ upon the' his abundance and his heartS .ut they recei%ed hi' not(N
N.ut they recei%ed 'e not,N said the %o#untary beggar, Nthou kno$est it,
forsooth( So 2 $ent at #ast to the ani'a#s and to those kine(N
NThen #earnedst thou,N interrupted Zarathustra, Nho$ 'uch harder it is to
gi%e proper#y than to take proper#y, and that besto$ing $e## is an ;-TDDthe
#ast, subt#est 'asterDart of kindness(N
NEspecia##y no$adays,N ans$ered the %o#untary beggar? Nat present, that is
to say, $hen e%erything #o$ hath beco'e rebe##ious and exc#usi%e and
haughty in its 'annerDDin the 'anner of the popu#ace(
For the hour hath co'e, thou kno$est it forsooth, for the great, e%i#,
#ong, s#o$ 'obDandDs#a%eDinsurrection? it extendeth and extendeth&
No$ doth it pro%oke the #o$er c#asses, a## bene%o#ence and petty gi%ingL
and the o%errich 'ay be on their guard&
)hoe%er at present drip, #ike bu#gy bott#es out of a##DtooDs'a## necks?DDof
such bott#es at present one $i##ing#y breaketh the necks(
)anton a%idity, bi#ious en%y, care$orn re%enge, popu#aceDpride? a## these
struck 'ine eye( 2t is no #onger true that the poor are b#essed( The
kingdo' of hea%en, ho$e%er, is $ith the kine(N
N;nd $hy is it not $ith the richSN asked Zarathustra te'pting#y, $hi#e he
kept back the kine $hich sniffed fa'i#iar#y at the peacefu# one(
N)hy dost thou te'pt 'eSN ans$ered the other( NThou kno$est it thyse#f
better e%en than 2( )hat $as it dro%e 'e to the poorest, 7 ZarathustraS
)as it not 'y disgust at the richestS
DD;t the cu#prits of riches, $ith co#d eyes and rank thoughts, $ho pick up
profit out of a## kinds of rubbishDDat this rabb#e that stinketh to hea%en,
DD;t this gi#ded, fa#sified popu#ace, $hose fathers $ere pickpockets, or
carrionDcro$s, or ragDpickers, $ith $i%es co'p#iant, #e$d and forgetfu#?DD
for they are a## of the' not far different fro' har#otsDD
Popu#ace abo%e, popu#ace be#o$& )hat are MpoorM and MrichM at present&
That distinction did 2 un#earn,DDthen did 2 f#ee a$ay further and e%er
further, unti# 2 ca'e to those kine(N
Thus spake the peacefu# one, and puffed hi'se#f and perspired $ith his
$ords? so that the kine $ondered ane$( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, kept #ooking
into his face $ith a s'i#e, a## the ti'e the 'an ta#ked so se%ere#yDDand
shook si#ent#y his head(
NThou doest %io#ence to thyse#f, thou PreacherDonDtheD9ount, $hen thou
usest such se%ere $ords( For such se%erity neither thy 'outh nor thine eye
ha%e been gi%en thee(
Nor, 'ethinketh, hath thy sto'ach either? unto 2T a## such rage and hatred
and foa'ingDo%er is repugnant( Thy sto'ach $anteth softer things? thou
art not a butcher(
-ather see'est thou to 'e a p#antDeater and a rootD'an( Perhaps thou
grindest corn( "ertain#y, ho$e%er, thou art a%erse to f#esh#y joys, and
thou #o%est honey(N
NThou hast di%ined 'e $e##,N ans$ered the %o#untary beggar, $ith #ightened
heart( N2 #o%e honey, 2 a#so grind cornL for 2 ha%e sought out $hat
tasteth s$eet#y and 'aketh pure breath?
DD;#so $hat reUuireth a #ong ti'e, a dayMsD$ork and a 'outhMsD$ork for
gent#e id#ers and s#uggards(
Furthest, to be sure, ha%e those kine carried it? they ha%e de%ised
ru'inating and #ying in the sun( They a#so abstain fro' a## hea%y thoughts
$hich inf#ate the heart(N
DDN)e##&N said Zarathustra, Nthou shou#dst a#so see 92NE ani'a#s, 'ine
eag#e and 'y serpent,DDtheir #ike do not at present exist on earth(
.eho#d, thither #eadeth the $ay to 'y ca%e? be toDnight its guest( ;nd
ta#k to 'ine ani'a#s of the happiness of ani'a#s,DD
DD8nti# 2 'yse#f co'e ho'e( For no$ a cry of distress ca##eth 'e hasti#y
a$ay fro' thee( ;#so, shou#dst thou find ne$ honey $ith 'e, iceDco#d,
go#denDco'bDhoney, eat it&
No$, ho$e%er, take #ea%e at once of thy kine, thou strange one& thou
a'iab#e one& though it be hard for thee( For they are thy $ar'est friends
and preceptors&NDD
DDN7ne excepted, $ho' 2 ho#d sti## dearer,N ans$ered the %o#untary beggar(
NThou thyse#f art good, 7 Zarathustra, and better e%en than a co$&N
N;$ay, a$ay $ith thee& thou e%i# f#atterer&N cried Zarathustra
'ischie%ous#y, N$hy dost thou spoi# 'e $ith such praise and f#atteryDhoneyS
N;$ay, a$ay fro' 'e&N cried he once 'ore, and hea%ed his stick at the fond
beggar, $ho, ho$e%er, ran ni'b#y a$ay(
:R2R( T/E S/;*7)(
Scarce#y ho$e%er $as the %o#untary beggar gone in haste, and Zarathustra
again a#one, $hen he heard behind hi' a ne$ %oice $hich ca##ed out? NStay&
Zarathustra& *o $ait& 2t is 'yse#f, forsooth, 7 Zarathustra, 'yse#f, thy
shado$&N .ut Zarathustra did not $aitL for a sudden irritation ca'e o%er
hi' on account of the cro$d and the cro$ding in his 'ountains( N)hither
hath 'y #oneso'eness goneSN spake he(
N2t is %eri#y beco'ing too 'uch for 'eL these 'ountains s$ar'L 'y kingdo'
is no #onger of T/2S $or#dL 2 reUuire ne$ 'ountains(
9y shado$ ca##eth 'eS )hat 'atter about 'y shado$& :et it run after 'e&
2DDrun a$ay fro' it(N
Thus spake Zarathustra to his heart and ran a$ay( .ut the one behind
fo##o$ed after hi', so that i''ediate#y there $ere three runners, one after
the otherDDna'e#y, fore'ost the %o#untary beggar, then Zarathustra, and
third#y, and hind'ost, his shado$( .ut not #ong had they run thus $hen
Zarathustra beca'e conscious of his fo##y, and shook off $ith one jerk a##
his irritation and detestation(
N)hat&N said he, Nha%e not the 'ost #udicrous things a#$ays happened to us
o#d anchorites and saintsS
,eri#y, 'y fo##y hath gro$n big in the 'ountains& No$ do 2 hear six o#d
foo#sM #egs ratt#ing behind one another&
.ut doth Zarathustra need to be frightened by his shado$S ;#so, 'ethinketh
that after a## it hath #onger #egs thin 'ine(N
Thus spake Zarathustra, and, #aughing $ith eyes and entrai#s, he stood
sti## and turned round Uuick#yDDand beho#d, he a#'ost thereby thre$ his
shado$ and fo##o$er to the ground, so c#ose#y had the #atter fo##o$ed at
his hee#s, and so $eak $as he( For $hen Zarathustra scrutinised hi' $ith
his g#ance he $as frightened as by a sudden apparition, so s#ender,
s$arthy, ho##o$ and $ornDout did this fo##o$er appear(
N)ho art thouSN asked Zarathustra %ehe'ent#y, N$hat doest thou hereS ;nd
$hy ca##est thou thyse#f 'y shado$S Thou art not p#easing unto 'e(N
NForgi%e 'e,N ans$ered the shado$, Nthat it is 2L and if 2 p#ease thee not
DD$e##, 7 Zarathustra& therein do 2 ad'ire thee and thy good taste(
; $anderer a' 2, $ho ha%e $a#ked #ong at thy hee#sL a#$ays on the $ay, but
$ithout a goa#, a#so $ithout a ho'e? so that %eri#y, 2 #ack #itt#e of
being the eterna##y )andering Te$, except that 2 a' not eterna# and not a
Te$(
)hatS 9ust 2 e%er be on the $ayS )hir#ed by e%ery $ind, unsett#ed, dri%en
aboutS 7 earth, thou hast beco'e too round for 'e&
7n e%ery surface ha%e 2 a#ready sat, #ike tired dust ha%e 2 fa##en as#eep
on 'irrors and $indo$Dpanes? e%erything taketh fro' 'e, nothing gi%ethL 2
beco'e thinDD2 a' a#'ost eUua# to a shado$(
;fter thee, ho$e%er, 7 Zarathustra, did 2 f#y and hie #ongestL and though 2
hid 'yse#f fro' thee, 2 $as ne%erthe#ess thy best shado$? $here%er thou
hast sat, there sat 2 a#so(
)ith thee ha%e 2 $andered about in the re'otest, co#dest $or#ds, #ike a
phanto' that %o#untari#y haunteth $inter roofs and sno$s(
)ith thee ha%e 2 pushed into a## the forbidden, a## the $orst and the
furthest? and if there be anything of %irtue in 'e, it is that 2 ha%e had
no fear of any prohibition(
)ith thee ha%e 2 broken up $hate%er 'y heart re%eredL a## boundaryDstones
and statues ha%e 2 oMerthro$nL the 'ost dangerous $ishes did 2 pursue,DD
%eri#y, beyond e%ery cri'e did 2 once go(
)ith thee did 2 un#earn the be#ief in $ords and $orths and in great na'es(
)hen the de%i# casteth his skin, doth not his na'e a#so fa## a$ayS 2t is
a#so skin( The de%i# hi'se#f is perhapsDDskin(
MNothing is true, a## is per'ittedM? so said 2 to 'yse#f( 2nto the
co#dest $ater did 2 p#unge $ith head and heart( ;h, ho$ oft did 2 stand
there naked on that account, #ike a red crab&
;h, $here ha%e gone a## 'y goodness and a## 'y sha'e and a## 'y be#ief in
the good& ;h, $here is the #ying innocence $hich 2 once possessed, the
innocence of the good and of their nob#e #ies&
Too oft, %eri#y, did 2 fo##o$ c#ose to the hee#s of truth? then did it
kick 'e on the face( So'eti'es 2 'eant to #ie, and beho#d& then on#y did 2
hitDDthe truth(
Too 'uch hath beco'e c#ear unto 'e? no$ it doth not concern 'e any 'ore(
Nothing #i%eth any #onger that 2 #o%e,DDho$ shou#d 2 sti## #o%e 'yse#fS
MTo #i%e as 2 inc#ine, or not to #i%e at a##M? so do 2 $ishL so $isheth
a#so the ho#iest( .ut a#as& ho$ ha%e X2X sti##DDinc#inationS
/a%e X2XDDsti## a goa#S ; ha%en to$ards $hich 9Q sai# is setS
; good $indS ;h, he on#y $ho kno$eth )/2T/E- he sai#eth, kno$eth $hat $ind
is good, and a fair $ind for hi'(
)hat sti## re'aineth to 'eS ; heart $eary and f#ippantL an unstab#e $i##L
f#uttering $ingsL a broken backbone(
This seeking for 9Q ho'e? 7 Zarathustra, dost thou kno$ that this seeking
hath been 9Q ho'eDsickeningL it eateth 'e up(
M)/E-E isDD9Q ho'eSM For it do 2 ask and seek, and ha%e sought, but ha%e
not found it( 7 eterna# e%ery$here, 7 eterna# no$here, 7 eterna#DDinD
%ain&N
Thus spake the shado$, and ZarathustraMs countenance #engthened at his
$ords( NThou art 'y shado$&N said he at #ast sad#y(
NThy danger is not s'a##, thou free spirit and $anderer& Thou hast had a
bad day? see that a sti## $orse e%ening doth not o%ertake thee&
To such unsett#ed ones as thou, see'eth at #ast e%en a prisoner b#essed(
*idst thou e%er see ho$ captured cri'ina#s s#eepS They s#eep Uuiet#y, they
enjoy their ne$ security(
.e$are #est in the end a narro$ faith capture thee, a hard, rigorous
de#usion& For no$ e%erything that is narro$ and fixed seduceth and
te'pteth thee(
Thou hast #ost thy goa#( ;#as, ho$ $i#t thou forego and forget that #ossS
TherebyDDhast thou a#so #ost thy $ay&
Thou poor ro%er and ra'b#er, thou tired butterf#y& $i#t thou ha%e a rest
and a ho'e this e%eningS Then go up to 'y ca%e&
Thither #eadeth the $ay to 'y ca%e( ;nd no$ $i## 2 run Uuick#y a$ay fro'
thee again( ;#ready #ieth as it $ere a shado$ upon 'e(
2 $i## run a#one, so that it 'ay again beco'e bright around 'e( Therefore
'ust 2 sti## be a #ong ti'e 'erri#y upon 'y #egs( 2n the e%ening, ho$e%er,
there $i## beDDdancing $ith 'e&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:RR( N77NT2*E(
DD;nd Zarathustra ran and ran, but he found no one e#se, and $as a#one and
e%er found hi'se#f againL he enjoyed and Uuaffed his so#itude, and thought
of good thingsDDfor hours( ;bout the hour of noontide, ho$e%er, $hen the
sun stood exact#y o%er ZarathustraMs head, he passed an o#d, bent and
gnar#ed tree, $hich $as encirc#ed round by the ardent #o%e of a %ine, and
hidden fro' itse#fL fro' this there hung ye##o$ grapes in abundance,
confronting the $anderer( Then he fe#t inc#ined to Uuench a #itt#e thirst,
and to break off for hi'se#f a c#uster of grapes( )hen, ho$e%er, he had
a#ready his ar' outDstretched for that purpose, he fe#t sti## 'ore inc#ined
for so'ething e#seDDna'e#y, to #ie do$n beside the tree at the hour of
perfect noontide and s#eep(
This Zarathustra didL and no sooner had he #aid hi'se#f on the ground in
the sti##ness and secrecy of the %ariegated grass, than he had forgotten
his #itt#e thirst, and fe## as#eep( For as the pro%erb of Zarathustra
saith? N7ne thing is 'ore necessary than the other(N 7n#y that his eyes
re'ained open?DDfor they ne%er gre$ $eary of %ie$ing and ad'iring the tree
and the #o%e of the %ine( 2n fa##ing as#eep, ho$e%er, Zarathustra spake
thus to his heart?
N/ush& /ush& /ath not the $or#d no$ beco'e perfectS )hat hath happened
unto 'eS
;s a de#icate $ind danceth in%isib#y upon parUueted seas, #ight, featherD
#ight, soDDdanceth s#eep upon 'e(
No eye doth it c#ose to 'e, it #ea%eth 'y sou# a$ake( :ight is it, %eri#y,
featherD#ight(
2t persuadeth 'e, 2 kno$ not ho$, it toucheth 'e in$ard#y $ith a caressing
hand, it constraineth 'e( Qea, it constraineth 'e, so that 'y sou#
stretcheth itse#f out?DD
DD/o$ #ong and $eary it beco'eth, 'y strange sou#& /ath a se%enthDday
e%ening co'e to it precise#y at noontideS /ath it a#ready $andered too
#ong, b#issfu##y, a'ong good and ripe thingsS
2t stretcheth itse#f out, #ongDD#onger& it #ieth sti##, 'y strange sou#(
Too 'any good things hath it a#ready tastedL this go#den sadness oppresseth
it, it distorteth its 'outh(
DD;s a ship that putteth into the ca#'est co%e?DDit no$ dra$eth up to the
#and, $eary of #ong %oyages and uncertain seas( 2s not the #and 'ore
faithfu#S
;s such a ship huggeth the shore, tuggeth the shore?DDthen it sufficeth for
a spider to spin its thread fro' the ship to the #and( No stronger ropes
are reUuired there(
;s such a $eary ship in the ca#'est co%e, so do 2 a#so no$ repose, nigh to
the earth, faithfu#, trusting, $aiting, bound to it $ith the #ightest
threads(
7 happiness& 7 happiness& )i#t thou perhaps sing, 7 'y sou#S Thou #iest
in the grass( .ut this is the secret, so#e'n hour, $hen no shepherd
p#ayeth his pipe(
Take care& /ot noontide s#eepeth on the fie#ds( *o not sing& /ush& The
$or#d is perfect(
*o not sing, thou prairieDbird, 'y sou#& *o not e%en $hisper& :oDDhush&
The o#d noontide s#eepeth, it 'o%eth its 'outh? doth it not just no$ drink
a drop of happinessDD
DD;n o#d bro$n drop of go#den happiness, go#den $ineS So'ething $hisketh
o%er it, its happiness #augheth( ThusDD#augheth a God( /ush&DD
DDMFor happiness, ho$ #itt#e sufficeth for happiness&M Thus spake 2 once
and thought 'yse#f $ise( .ut it $as a b#asphe'y? T/;T ha%e 2 no$ #earned(
)ise foo#s speak better(
The #east thing precise#y, the gent#est thing, the #ightest thing, a
#izardMs rust#ing, a breath, a $hisk, an eyeDg#anceDD:2TT:E 'aketh up the
.EST happiness( /ush&
DD)hat hath befa##en 'e? /ark& /ath ti'e f#o$n a$ayS *o 2 not fa##S
/a%e 2 not fa##enDDhark& into the $e## of eternityS
DD)hat happeneth to 'eS /ush& 2t stingeth 'eDDa#asDDto the heartS To the
heart& 7h, break up, break up, 'y heart, after such happiness, after such
a sting&
DD)hatS /ath not the $or#d just no$ beco'e perfectS -ound and ripeS 7h,
for the go#den round ringDD$hither doth it f#yS :et 'e run after it&
Vuick&
/ushDDN @and here Zarathustra stretched hi'se#f, and fe#t that he $as
as#eep(A
N8p&N said he to hi'se#f, Nthou s#eeper& Thou noontide s#eeper& )e##
then, up, ye o#d #egs& 2t is ti'e and 'ore than ti'eL 'any a good stretch
of road is sti## a$aiting youDD
No$ ha%e ye s#ept your fi##L for ho$ #ong a ti'eS ; ha#fDeternity& )e##
then, up no$, 'ine o#d heart& For ho$ #ong after such a s#eep 'ayest thou
DDre'ain a$akeSN
@.ut then did he fa## as#eep ane$, and his sou# spake against hi' and
defended itse#f, and #ay do$n againADDN:ea%e 'e a#one& /ush& /ath not the
$or#d just no$ beco'e perfectS 7h, for the go#den round ba##&DD
NGet up,N said Zarathustra, Nthou #itt#e thief, thou s#uggard& )hat&
Sti## stretching thyse#f, ya$ning, sighing, fai#ing into deep $e##sS
)ho art thou then, 7 'y sou#&N @and here he beca'e frightened, for a
sunbea' shot do$n fro' hea%en upon his face(A
N7 hea%en abo%e 'e,N said he sighing, and sat upright, Nthou gazest at 'eS
Thou hearkenest unto 'y strange sou#S
)hen $i#t thou drink this drop of de$ that fe## do$n upon a## earth#y
things,DD$hen $i#t thou drink this strange sou#DD
DD)hen, thou $e## of eternity& thou joyous, a$fu#, noontide abyss& $hen
$i#t thou drink 'y sou# back into theeSN
Thus spake Zarathustra, and rose fro' his couch beside the tree, as if
a$akening fro' a strange drunkenness? and beho#d& there stood the sun
sti## exact#y abo%e his head( 7ne 'ight, ho$e%er, right#y infer therefro'
that Zarathustra had not then s#ept #ong(
:RR2( T/E G-EET2NG(
2t $as #ate in the afternoon on#y $hen Zarathustra, after #ong use#ess
searching and stro##ing about, again ca'e ho'e to his ca%e( )hen, ho$e%er,
he stood o%er against it, not 'ore than t$enty paces therefro', the thing
happened $hich he no$ #east of a## expected? he heard ane$ the great "-Q
7F *2ST-ESS( ;nd extraordinary& this ti'e the cry ca'e out of his o$n
ca%e( 2t $as a #ong, 'anifo#d, pecu#iar cry, and Zarathustra p#ain#y
distinguished that it $as co'posed of 'any %oices? a#though heard at a
distance it 'ight sound #ike the cry out of a sing#e 'outh(
Thereupon Zarathustra rushed for$ard to his ca%e, and beho#d& $hat a
spectac#e a$aited hi' after that concert& For there did they a## sit
together $ho' he had passed during the day? the king on the right and the
king on the #eft, the o#d 'agician, the pope, the %o#untary beggar, the
shado$, the inte##ectua##y conscientious one, the sorro$fu# soothsayer, and
the assL the ug#iest 'an, ho$e%er, had set a cro$n on his head, and had put
round hi' t$o purp#e gird#es,DDfor he #iked, #ike a## ug#y ones, to
disguise hi'se#f and p#ay the handso'e person( 2n the 'idst, ho$e%er, of
that sorro$fu# co'pany stood ZarathustraMs eag#e, ruff#ed and disUuieted,
for it had been ca##ed upon to ans$er too 'uch for $hich its pride had not
any ans$erL the $ise serpent ho$e%er hung round its neck(
;## this did Zarathustra beho#d $ith great astonish'entL then ho$e%er he
scrutinised each indi%idua# guest $ith courteous curiosity, read their
sou#s and $ondered ane$( 2n the 'eanti'e the asse'b#ed ones had risen fro'
their seats, and $aited $ith re%erence for Zarathustra to speak(
Zarathustra ho$e%er spake thus?
NQe despairing ones& Qe strange ones& So it $as Q78- cry of distress that
2 heardS ;nd no$ do 2 kno$ a#so $here he is to be sought, $ho' 2 ha%e
sought for in %ain toDday? T/E /2G/E- 9;NDD?
DD2n 'ine o$n ca%e sitteth he, the higher 'an& .ut $hy do 2 $onder& /a%e
not 2 'yse#f a##ured hi' to 'e by honeyDofferings and artfu# #ureDca##s of
'y happinessS
.ut it see'eth to 'e that ye are bad#y adapted for co'pany? ye 'ake one
anotherMs hearts fretfu#, ye that cry for he#p, $hen ye sit here togetherS
There is one that 'ust first co'e,
DD7ne $ho $i## 'ake you #augh once 'ore, a good jo%ia# buffoon, a dancer, a
$ind, a $i#d ro'p, so'e o#d foo#?DD$hat think yeS
Forgi%e 'e, ho$e%er, ye despairing ones, for speaking such tri%ia# $ords
before you, un$orthy, %eri#y, of such guests& .ut ye do not di%ine )/;T
'aketh 'y heart $anton?DD
DDQe yourse#%es do it, and your aspect, forgi%e it 'e& For e%ery one
beco'eth courageous $ho beho#deth a despairing one( To encourage a
despairing oneDDe%ery one thinketh hi'se#f strong enough to do so(
To 'yse#f ha%e ye gi%en this po$er,DDa good gift, 'ine honourab#e guests&
;n exce##ent guestMsDpresent& )e##, do not then upbraid $hen 2 a#so offer
you so'ething of 'ine(
This is 'ine e'pire and 'y do'inion? that $hich is 'ine, ho$e%er, sha##
this e%ening and tonight be yours( 9ine ani'a#s sha## ser%e you? #et 'y
ca%e be your restingDp#ace&
;t house and ho'e $ith 'e sha## no one despair? in 'y pur#ieus do 2
protect e%ery one fro' his $i#d beasts( ;nd that is the first thing $hich
2 offer you? security&
The second thing, ho$e%er, is 'y #itt#e finger( ;nd $hen ye ha%e T/;T,
then take the $ho#e hand a#so, yea, and the heart $ith it& )e#co'e here,
$e#co'e to you, 'y guests&N
Thus spake Zarathustra, and #aughed $ith #o%e and 'ischief( ;fter this
greeting his guests bo$ed once 'ore and $ere re%erentia##y si#entL the king
on the right, ho$e%er, ans$ered hi' in their na'e(
N7 Zarathustra, by the $ay in $hich thou hast gi%en us thy hand and thy
greeting, $e recognise thee as Zarathustra( Thou hast hu'b#ed thyse#f
before usL a#'ost hast thou hurt our re%erenceDD?
DD)ho ho$e%er cou#d ha%e hu'b#ed hi'se#f as thou hast done, $ith such
prideS T/;T up#ifteth us ourse#%esL a refresh'ent is it, to our eyes and
hearts(
To beho#d this, 'ere#y, g#ad#y $ou#d $e ascend higher 'ountains than this(
For as eager beho#ders ha%e $e co'eL $e $anted to see $hat brighteneth di'
eyes(
;nd #o& no$ is it a## o%er $ith our cries of distress( No$ are our 'inds
and hearts open and enraptured( :itt#e is #acking for our spirits to
beco'e $anton(
There is nothing, 7 Zarathustra, that gro$eth 'ore p#easing#y on earth than
a #ofty, strong $i##? it is the finest gro$th( ;n entire #andscape
refresheth itse#f at one such tree(
To the pine do 2 co'pare hi', 7 Zarathustra, $hich gro$eth up #ike theeDD
ta##, si#ent, hardy, so#itary, of the best, supp#est $ood, state#y,DD
DD2n the end, ho$e%er, grasping out for 2TS do'inion $ith strong, green
branches, asking $eighty Uuestions of the $ind, the stor', and $hate%er is
at ho'e on high p#acesL
DD;ns$ering 'ore $eighti#y, a co''ander, a %ictor& 7h& $ho shou#d not
ascend high 'ountains to beho#d such gro$thsS
;t thy tree, 7 Zarathustra, the g#oo'y and i##Dconstituted a#so refresh
the'se#%esL at thy #ook e%en the $a%ering beco'e steady and hea# their
hearts(
;nd %eri#y, to$ards thy 'ountain and thy tree do 'any eyes turn toDdayL a
great #onging hath arisen, and 'any ha%e #earned to ask? M)ho is
ZarathustraSM
;nd those into $hose ears thou hast at any ti'e dripped thy song and thy
honey? a## the hidden ones, the #oneDd$e##ers and the t$ainDd$e##ers, ha%e
si'u#taneous#y said to their hearts?
M*oth Zarathustra sti## #i%eS 2t is no #onger $orth $hi#e to #i%e,
e%erything is indifferent, e%erything is use#ess? or e#seDD$e 'ust #i%e
$ith Zarathustra&M
M)hy doth he not co'e $ho hath so #ong announced hi'se#fSM thus do 'any
peop#e askL Mhath so#itude s$a##o$ed hi' upS 7r shou#d $e perhaps go to
hi'SM
No$ doth it co'e to pass that so#itude itse#f beco'eth fragi#e and breaketh
open, #ike a gra%e that breaketh open and can no #onger ho#d its dead(
E%ery$here one seeth resurrected ones(
No$ do the $a%es rise and rise around thy 'ountain, 7 Zarathustra( ;nd
ho$e%er high be thy height, 'any of the' 'ust rise up to thee? thy boat
sha## not rest 'uch #onger on dry ground(
;nd that $e despairing ones ha%e no$ co'e into thy ca%e, and a#ready no
#onger despair?DDit is but a prognostic and a presage that better ones are
on the $ay to thee,DD
DDFor they the'se#%es are on the $ay to thee, the #ast re'nant of God a'ong
'enDDthat is to say, a## the 'en of great #onging, of great #oathing, of
great satiety,
DD;## $ho do not $ant to #i%e un#ess they #earn again to /7PEDDun#ess they
#earn fro' thee, 7 Zarathustra, the G-E;T hope&N
Thus spake the king on the right, and seized the hand of Zarathustra in
order to kiss itL but Zarathustra checked his %eneration, and stepped back
frightened, f#eeing as it $ere, si#ent#y and sudden#y into the far
distance( ;fter a #itt#e $hi#e, ho$e%er, he $as again at ho'e $ith his
guests, #ooked at the' $ith c#ear scrutinising eyes, and said?
N9y guests, ye higher 'en, 2 $i## speak p#ain #anguage and p#ain#y $ith
you( 2t is not for Q78 that 2 ha%e $aited here in these 'ountains(N
@NMP#ain #anguage and p#ain#ySM Good God&N said here the king on the #eft
to hi'se#fL None seeth he doth not kno$ the good 7ccidenta#s, this sage out
of the 7rient&
.ut he 'eaneth Mb#unt #anguage and b#unt#yMDD$e##& That is not the $orst
taste in these days&NA
NQe 'ay, %eri#y, a## of you be higher 'en,N continued ZarathustraL Nbut for
'eDDye are neither high enough, nor strong enough(
For 'e, that is to say, for the inexorab#e $hich is no$ si#ent in 'e, but
$i## not a#$ays be si#ent( ;nd if ye appertain to 'e, sti## it is not as
'y right ar'(
For he $ho hi'se#f standeth, #ike you, on sick#y and tender #egs, $isheth
abo%e a## to be T-E;TE* 2N*8:GENT:Q, $hether he be conscious of it or hide
it fro' hi'se#f(
9y ar's and 'y #egs, ho$e%er, 2 do not treat indu#gent#y, 2 *7 N7T T-E;T 9Q
);--27-S 2N*8:GENT:Q? ho$ then cou#d ye be fit for 9Q $arfareS
)ith you 2 shou#d spoi# a## 'y %ictories( ;nd 'any of you $ou#d tu'b#e
o%er if ye but heard the #oud beating of 'y dru's(
9oreo%er, ye are not sufficient#y beautifu# and $e##Dborn for 'e( 2
reUuire pure, s'ooth 'irrors for 'y doctrinesL on your surface e%en 'ine
o$n #ikeness is distorted(
7n your shou#ders presseth 'any a burden, 'any a reco##ectionL 'any a
'ischie%ous d$arf sUuatteth in your corners( There is concea#ed popu#ace
a#so in you(
;nd though ye be high and of a higher type, 'uch in you is crooked and
'isshapen( There is no s'ith in the $or#d that cou#d ha''er you right and
straight for 'e(
Qe are on#y bridges? 'ay higher ones pass o%er upon you& Qe signify
steps? so do not upbraid hi' $ho ascendeth beyond you into /2S height&
7ut of your seed there 'ay one day arise for 'e a genuine son and perfect
heir? but that ti'e is distant( Qe yourse#%es are not those unto $ho' 'y
heritage and na'e be#ong(
Not for you do 2 $ait here in these 'ountainsL not $ith you 'ay 2 descend
for the #ast ti'e( Qe ha%e co'e unto 'e on#y as a presage that higher ones
are on the $ay to 'e,DD
DDN7T the 'en of great #onging, of great #oathing, of great satiety, and
that $hich ye ca## the re'nant of GodL
DDNay& Nay& Three ti'es Nay& For 7T/E-S do 2 $ait here in these
'ountains, and $i## not #ift 'y foot fro' thence $ithout the'L
DDFor higher ones, stronger ones, triu'phanter ones, 'errier ones, for such
as are bui#t sUuare#y in body and sou#? :;8G/2NG :27NS 'ust co'e&
7 'y guests, ye strange onesDDha%e ye yet heard nothing of 'y chi#drenS
;nd that they are on the $ay to 'eS
*o speak unto 'e of 'y gardens, of 'y /appy 2s#es, of 'y ne$ beautifu#
raceDD$hy do ye not speak unto 'e thereofS
This guestsMDpresent do 2 so#icit of your #o%e, that ye speak unto 'e of 'y
chi#dren( For the' a' 2 rich, for the' 2 beca'e poor? $hat ha%e 2 not
surrendered,
DD)hat $ou#d 2 not surrender that 2 'ight ha%e one thing? T/ESE chi#dren,
T/2S #i%ing p#antation, T/ESE #ifeDtrees of 'y $i## and of 'y highest
hope&N
Thus spake Zarathustra, and stopped sudden#y in his discourse? for his
#onging ca'e o%er hi', and he c#osed his eyes and his 'outh, because of the
agitation of his heart( ;nd a## his guests a#so $ere si#ent, and stood
sti## and confounded? except on#y that the o#d soothsayer 'ade signs $ith
his hands and his gestures(
:RR22( T/E S8PPE-(
For at this point the soothsayer interrupted the greeting of Zarathustra
and his guests? he pressed for$ard as one $ho had no ti'e to #ose, seized
ZarathustraMs hand and exc#ai'ed? N.ut Zarathustra&
7ne thing is 'ore necessary than the other, so sayest thou thyse#f? $e##,
one thing is no$ 'ore necessary 8NT7 9E than a## others(
; $ord at the right ti'e? didst thou not in%ite 'e to T;.:ES ;nd here are
'any $ho ha%e 'ade #ong journeys( Thou dost not 'ean to feed us 'ere#y
$ith discoursesS
.esides, a## of you ha%e thought too 'uch about freezing, dro$ning,
suffocating, and other bodi#y dangers? none of you, ho$e%er, ha%e thought
of 9Q danger, na'e#y, perishing of hungerDN
@Thus spake the soothsayer( )hen ZarathustraMs ani'a#s, ho$e%er, heard
these $ords, they ran a$ay in terror( For they sa$ that a## they had
brought ho'e during the day $ou#d not be enough to fi## the one
soothsayer(A
N:ike$ise perishing of thirst,N continued the soothsayer( N;nd a#though 2
hear $ater sp#ashing here #ike $ords of $isdo'DDthat is to say, p#enteous#y
and un$earied#y, 2DD$ant )2NE&
Not e%ery one is a born $aterDdrinker #ike Zarathustra( Neither doth $ater
suit $eary and $ithered ones? )E deser%e $ineDD2T a#one gi%eth i''ediate
%igour and i'pro%ised hea#th&N
7n this occasion, $hen the soothsayer $as #onging for $ine, it happened
that the king on the #eft, the si#ent one, a#so found expression for once(
N)E took care,N said he, Nabout $ine, 2, a#ong $ith 'y brother the king on
the right? $e ha%e enough of $ine,DDa $ho#e assD#oad of it( So there is
nothing #acking but bread(N
N.read,N rep#ied Zarathustra, #aughing $hen he spake, Nit is precise#y
bread that anchorites ha%e not( .ut 'an doth not #i%e by bread a#one, but
a#so by the f#esh of good #a'bs, of $hich 2 ha%e t$o?
DDT/ESE sha## $e s#aughter Uuick#y, and cook spici#y $ith sage? it is so
that 2 #ike the'( ;nd there is a#so no #ack of roots and fruits, good
enough e%en for the fastidious and dainty,DDnor of nuts and other ridd#es
for cracking(
Thus $i## $e ha%e a good repast in a #itt#e $hi#e( .ut $hoe%er $ish to eat
$ith us 'ust a#so gi%e a hand to the $ork, e%en the kings( For $ith
Zarathustra e%en a king 'ay be a cook(N
This proposa# appea#ed to the hearts of a## of the', sa%e that the
%o#untary beggar objected to the f#esh and $ine and spices(
NTust hear this g#utton Zarathustra&N said he joking#y? Ndoth one go into
ca%es and high 'ountains to 'ake such repastsS
No$ indeed do 2 understand $hat he once taught us? .#essed be 'oderate
po%erty&M ;nd $hy he $isheth to do a$ay $ith beggars(N
N.e of good cheer,N rep#ied Zarathustra, Nas 2 a'( ;bide by thy custo's,
thou exce##ent one? grind thy corn, drink thy $ater, praise thy cooking,DD
if on#y it 'ake thee g#ad&
2 a' a #a$ on#y for 'ine o$nL 2 a' not a #a$ for a##( /e, ho$e%er, $ho
be#ongeth unto 'e 'ust be strong of bone and #ight of foot,DD
DDToyous in fight and feast, no su#ker, no Tohn oM *rea's, ready for the
hardest task as for the feast, hea#thy and ha#e(
The best be#ongeth unto 'ine and 'eL and if it be not gi%en us, then do $e
take it?DDthe best food, the purest sky, the strongest thoughts, the
fairest $o'en&NDD
Thus spake ZarathustraL the king on the right ho$e%er ans$ered and said?
NStrange& *id one e%er hear such sensib#e things out of the 'outh of a
$ise 'anS
;nd %eri#y, it is the strangest thing in a $ise 'an, if o%er and abo%e, he
be sti## sensib#e, and not an ass(N
Thus spake the king on the right and $onderedL the ass ho$e%er, $ith i##D
$i##, said QED; to his re'ark( This ho$e%er $as the beginning of that #ong
repast $hich is ca##ed NThe SupperN in the historyDbooks( ;t this there
$as nothing e#se spoken of but T/E /2G/E- 9;N(
:RR222( T/E /2G/E- 9;N(
!(
)hen 2 ca'e unto 'en for the first ti'e, then did 2 co''it the anchorite
fo##y, the great fo##y? 2 appeared on the 'arketDp#ace(
;nd $hen 2 spake unto a##, 2 spake unto none( 2n the e%ening, ho$e%er,
ropeDdancers $ere 'y co'panions, and corpsesL and 2 'yse#f a#'ost a corpse(
)ith the ne$ 'orning, ho$e%er, there ca'e unto 'e a ne$ truth? then did 2
#earn to say? N7f $hat account to 'e are 'arketDp#ace and popu#ace and
popu#aceDnoise and #ong popu#aceDears&N
Qe higher 'en, #earn T/2S fro' 'e? 7n the 'arketDp#ace no one be#ie%eth in
higher 'en( .ut if ye $i## speak there, %ery $e##& The popu#ace, ho$e%er,
b#inketh? N)e are a## eUua#(N
NQe higher 'en,NDDso b#inketh the popu#aceDDNthere are no higher 'en, $e
are a## eUua#L 'an is 'an, before GodDD$e are a## eUua#&N
.efore God&DDNo$, ho$e%er, this God hath died( .efore the popu#ace,
ho$e%er, $e $i## not be eUua#( Qe higher 'en, a$ay fro' the 'arketDp#ace&
C(
.efore God&DDNo$ ho$e%er this God hath died& Qe higher 'en, this God $as
your greatest danger(
7n#y since he #ay in the gra%e ha%e ye again arisen( No$ on#y co'eth the
great noontide, no$ on#y doth the higher 'an beco'eDD'aster&
/a%e ye understood this $ord, 7 'y brethrenS Qe are frightened? do your
hearts turn giddyS *oth the abyss here ya$n for youS *oth the he##Dhound
here ye#p at youS
)e##& Take heart& ye higher 'en& No$ on#y tra%ai#eth the 'ountain of the
hu'an future( God hath died? no$ do )E desireDDthe Super'an to #i%e(
F(
The 'ost carefu# ask toDday? N/o$ is 'an to be 'aintainedSN Zarathustra
ho$e%er asketh, as the first and on#y one? N/o$ is 'an to be S8-P;SSE*SN
The Super'an, 2 ha%e at heartL T/;T is the first and on#y thing to 'eDDand
N7T 'an? not the neighbour, not the poorest, not the sorriest, not the
best(DD
7 'y brethren, $hat 2 can #o%e in 'an is that he is an o%erDgoing and a
do$nDgoing( ;nd a#so in you there is 'uch that 'aketh 'e #o%e and hope(
2n that ye ha%e despised, ye higher 'en, that 'aketh 'e hope( For the
great despisers are the great re%erers(
2n that ye ha%e despaired, there is 'uch to honour( For ye ha%e not
#earned to sub'it yourse#%es, ye ha%e not #earned petty po#icy(
For toDday ha%e the petty peop#e beco'e 'aster? they a## preach sub'ission
and hu'i#ity and po#icy and di#igence and consideration and the #ong et
cetera of petty %irtues(
)hate%er is of the effe'inate type, $hate%er originateth fro' the ser%i#e
type, and especia##y the popu#aceD'ish'ash?DDT/;T $isheth no$ to be 'aster
of a## hu'an destinyDD7 disgust& *isgust& *isgust&
T/;T asketh and asketh and ne%er tireth? N/o$ is 'an to 'aintain hi'se#f
best, #ongest, 'ost p#easant#ySN TherebyDDare they the 'asters of toDday(
These 'asters of toDdayDDsurpass the', 7 'y brethrenDDthese petty peop#e?
T/EQ are the Super'anMs greatest danger&
Surpass, ye higher 'en, the petty %irtues, the petty po#icy, the sandDgrain
considerateness, the antDhi## tru'pery, the pitiab#e co'fortab#eness, the
Nhappiness of the greatest nu'berNDD&
;nd rather despair than sub'it yourse#%es( ;nd %eri#y, 2 #o%e you, because
ye kno$ not toDday ho$ to #i%e, ye higher 'en& For thus do QE #i%eDDbest&
E(
/a%e ye courage, 7 'y brethrenS ;re ye stoutDheartedS N7T the courage
before $itnesses, but anchorite and eag#e courage, $hich not e%en a God any
#onger beho#dethS
"o#d sou#s, 'u#es, the b#ind and the drunken, 2 do not ca## stoutDhearted(
/e hath heart $ho kno$eth fear, but ,;NV82S/ET/ itL $ho seeth the abyss,
but $ith P-2*E(
/e $ho seeth the abyss, but $ith eag#eMs eyes,DDhe $ho $ith eag#eMs ta#ons
G-;SPET/ the abyss? he hath courage(DD
K(
N9an is e%i#NDDso said to 'e for conso#ation, a## the $isest ones( ;h, if
on#y it be sti## true toDday& For the e%i# is 'anMs best force(
N9an 'ust beco'e better and e%i#erNDDso do X2X teach( The e%i#est is
necessary for the Super'anMs best(
2t 'ay ha%e been $e## for the preacher of the petty peop#e to suffer and be
burdened by 'enMs sin( 2, ho$e%er, rejoice in great sin as 'y great
"7NS7:;T27N(DD
Such things, ho$e%er, are not said for #ong ears( E%ery $ord, a#so, is not
suited for e%ery 'outh( These are fine farDa$ay things? at the' sheepMs
c#a$s sha## not grasp&
P(
Qe higher 'en, think ye that 2 a' here to put right $hat ye ha%e put $rongS
7r that 2 $ished henceforth to 'ake snugger couches for you sufferersS 7r
sho$ you rest#ess, 'is$andering, 'isc#i'bing ones, ne$ and easier
footpathsS
Nay& Nay& Three ti'es Nay& ;#$ays 'ore, a#$ays better ones of your type
sha## succu'b,DDfor ye sha## a#$ays ha%e it $orse and harder( Thus on#yDD
DDThus on#y gro$eth 'an a#oft to the height $here the #ightning striketh
and shattereth hi'? high enough for the #ightning&
To$ards the fe$, the #ong, the re'ote go forth 'y sou# and 'y seeking? of
$hat account to 'e are your 'any #itt#e, short 'iseries&
Qe do not yet suffer enough for 'e& For ye suffer fro' yourse#%es, ye ha%e
not yet suffered F-79 9;N( Qe $ou#d #ie if ye spake other$ise& None of
you suffereth fro' $hat X2X ha%e suffered(DD
1(
2t is not enough for 'e that the #ightning no #onger doeth har'( 2 do not
$ish to conduct it a$ay? it sha## #earnDDto $ork for 9E(DD
9y $isdo' hath accu'u#ated #ong #ike a c#oud, it beco'eth sti##er and
darker( So doeth a## $isdo' $hich sha## one day bear :2G/TN2NGS(DD
8nto these 'en of toDday $i## 2 not be :2G/T, nor be ca##ed #ight( T/E9DD
$i## 2 b#ind? #ightning of 'y $isdo'& put out their eyes&
4(
*o not $i## anything beyond your po$er? there is a bad fa#seness in those
$ho $i## beyond their po$er(
Especia##y $hen they $i## great things& For they a$aken distrust in great
things, these subt#e fa#seDcoiners and stageDp#ayers?DD
DD8nti# at #ast they are fa#se to$ards the'se#%es, sUuintDeyed, $hited
cankers, g#ossed o%er $ith strong $ords, parade %irtues and bri##iant fa#se
deeds(
Take good care there, ye higher 'en& For nothing is 'ore precious to 'e,
and rarer, than honesty(
2s this toDday not that of the popu#aceS The popu#ace ho$e%er kno$eth not
$hat is great and $hat is s'a##, $hat is straight and $hat is honest? it
is innocent#y crooked, it e%er #ieth(
0(
/a%e a good distrust toDday ye, higher 'en, ye enheartened ones& Qe openD
hearted ones& ;nd keep your reasons secret& For this toDday is that of
the popu#ace(
)hat the popu#ace once #earned to be#ie%e $ithout reasons, $ho cou#dDD
refute it to the' by 'eans of reasonsS
;nd on the 'arketDp#ace one con%inceth $ith gestures( .ut reasons 'ake the
popu#ace distrustfu#(
;nd $hen truth hath once triu'phed there, then ask yourse#%es $ith good
distrust? N)hat strong error hath fought for itSN
.e on your guard a#so against the #earned& They hate you, because they are
unproducti%e& They ha%e co#d, $ithered eyes before $hich e%ery bird is
unp#u'ed(
Such persons %aunt about not #ying? but inabi#ity to #ie is sti## far fro'
being #o%e to truth( .e on your guard&
Freedo' fro' fe%er is sti## far fro' being kno$#edge& -efrigerated spirits
2 do not be#ie%e in( /e $ho cannot #ie, doth not kno$ $hat truth is(
!6(
2f ye $ou#d go up high, then use your o$n #egs& *o not get yourse#%es
";--2E* a#oftL do not seat yourse#%es on other peop#eMs backs and heads&
Thou hast 'ounted, ho$e%er, on horsebackS Thou no$ ridest brisk#y up to
thy goa#S )e##, 'y friend& .ut thy #a'e foot is a#so $ith thee on
horseback&
)hen thou reachest thy goa#, $hen thou a#ightest fro' thy horse? precise#y
on thy /E2G/T, thou higher 'an,DDthen $i#t thou stu'b#e&
!!(
Qe creating ones, ye higher 'en& 7ne is on#y pregnant $ith oneMs o$n
chi#d(
*o not #et yourse#%es be i'posed upon or put upon& )ho then is Q78-
neighbourS E%en if ye act Nfor your neighbourNDDye sti## do not create for
hi'&
8n#earn, 2 pray you, this Nfor,N ye creating ones? your %ery %irtue
$isheth you to ha%e naught to do $ith NforN and Non account ofN and
Nbecause(N ;gainst these fa#se #itt#e $ords sha## ye stop your ears(
NFor oneMs neighbour,N is the %irtue on#y of the petty peop#e? there it is
said N#ike and #ike,N and Nhand $asheth handN?DDthey ha%e neither the right
nor the po$er for Q78- se#fDseeking&
2n your se#fDseeking, ye creating ones, there is the foresight and
foreseeing of the pregnant& )hat no oneMs eye hath yet seen, na'e#y, the
fruitDDthis, she#tereth and sa%eth and nourisheth your entire #o%e(
)here your entire #o%e is, na'e#y, $ith your chi#d, there is a#so your
entire %irtue& Qour $ork, your $i## is Q78- NneighbourN? #et no fa#se
%a#ues i'pose upon you&
!C(
Qe creating ones, ye higher 'en& )hoe%er hath to gi%e birth is sickL
$hoe%er hath gi%en birth, ho$e%er, is unc#ean(
;sk $o'en? one gi%eth birth, not because it gi%eth p#easure( The pain
'aketh hens and poets cack#e(
Qe creating ones, in you there is 'uch unc#ean#iness( That is because ye
ha%e had to be 'others(
; ne$ chi#d? oh, ho$ 'uch ne$ fi#th hath a#so co'e into the $or#d& Go
apart& /e $ho hath gi%en birth sha## $ash his sou#&
!F(
.e not %irtuous beyond your po$ers& ;nd seek nothing fro' yourse#%es
opposed to probabi#ity&
)a#k in the footsteps in $hich your fathersM %irtue hath a#ready $a#ked&
/o$ $ou#d ye rise high, if your fathersM $i## shou#d not rise $ith youS
/e, ho$e%er, $ho $ou#d be a first#ing, #et hi' take care #est he a#so
beco'e a #ast#ing& ;nd $here the %ices of your fathers are, there shou#d
ye not set up as saints&
/e $hose fathers $ere inc#ined for $o'en, and for strong $ine and f#esh of
$i#dboar s$ineL $hat $ou#d it be if he de'anded chastity of hi'se#fS
; fo##y $ou#d it be& 9uch, %eri#y, doth it see' to 'e for such a one, if
he shou#d be the husband of one or of t$o or of three $o'en(
;nd if he founded 'onasteries, and inscribed o%er their porta#s? NThe $ay
to ho#iness,NDD2 shou#d sti## say? )hat good is it& it is a ne$ fo##y&
/e hath founded for hi'se#f a penanceDhouse and refugeDhouse? 'uch good
'ay it do& .ut 2 do not be#ie%e in it(
2n so#itude there gro$eth $hat any one bringeth into itDDa#so the brute in
oneMs nature( Thus is so#itude inad%isab#e unto 'any(
/ath there e%er been anything fi#thier on earth than the saints of the
$i#dernessS ;-78N* T/E9 $as not on#y the de%i# #ooseDDbut a#so the s$ine(
!E(
Shy, asha'ed, a$k$ard, #ike the tiger $hose spring hath fai#edDDthus, ye
higher 'en, ha%e 2 often seen you s#ink aside( ; ";ST $hich ye 'ade had
fai#ed(
.ut $hat doth it 'atter, ye diceDp#ayers& Qe had not #earned to p#ay and
'ock, as one 'ust p#ay and 'ock& *o $e not e%er sit at a great tab#e of
'ocking and p#ayingS
;nd if great things ha%e been a fai#ure $ith you, ha%e ye yourse#%es
thereforeDDbeen a fai#ureS ;nd if ye yourse#%es ha%e been a fai#ure, hath
'an thereforeDDbeen a fai#ureS 2f 'an, ho$e%er, hath been a fai#ure? $e##
then& ne%er 'ind&
!K(
The higher its type, a#$ays the se#do'er doth a thing succeed( Qe higher
'en here, ha%e ye not a##DDbeen fai#uresS
.e of good cheerL $hat doth it 'atterS /o$ 'uch is sti## possib#e& :earn
to #augh at yourse#%es, as ye ought to #augh&
)hat $onder e%en that ye ha%e fai#ed and on#y ha#fDsucceeded, ye ha#fD
shattered ones& *oth notDD'anMs F8T8-E stri%e and strugg#e in youS
9anMs furthest, profoundest, starDhighest issues, his prodigious po$ersDDdo
not a## these foa' through one another in your %esse#S
)hat $onder that 'any a %esse# shattereth& :earn to #augh at yourse#%es,
as ye ought to #augh& Qe higher 'en, 7h, ho$ 'uch is sti## possib#e&
;nd %eri#y, ho$ 'uch hath a#ready succeeded& /o$ rich is this earth in
s'a##, good, perfect things, in $e##Dconstituted things&
Set around you s'a##, good, perfect things, ye higher 'en( Their go#den
'aturity hea#eth the heart( The perfect teacheth one to hope(
!P(
)hat hath hitherto been the greatest sin here on earthS )as it not the
$ord of hi' $ho said? N)oe unto the' that #augh no$&N
*id he hi'se#f find no cause for #aughter on the earthS Then he sought
bad#y( ; chi#d e%en findeth cause for it(
/eDDdid not #o%e sufficient#y? other$ise $ou#d he a#so ha%e #o%ed us, the
#aughing ones& .ut he hated and hooted usL $ai#ing and teethDgnashing did
he pro'ise us(
9ust one then curse i''ediate#y, $hen one doth not #o%eS ThatDDsee'eth to
'e bad taste( Thus did he, ho$e%er, this abso#ute one( /e sprang fro' the
popu#ace(
;nd he hi'se#f just did not #o%e sufficient#yL other$ise $ou#d he ha%e
raged #ess because peop#e did not #o%e hi'( ;## great #o%e doth not SEEW
#o%e?DDit seeketh 'ore(
Go out of the $ay of a## such abso#ute ones& They are a poor sick#y type,
a popu#aceDtype? they #ook at this #ife $ith i##D$i##, they ha%e an e%i#
eye for this earth(
Go out of the $ay of a## such abso#ute ones& They ha%e hea%y feet and
su#try hearts?DDthey do not kno$ ho$ to dance( /o$ cou#d the earth be
#ight to such ones&
!1(
Tortuous#y do a## good things co'e nigh to their goa#( :ike cats they
cur%e their backs, they purr in$ard#y $ith their approaching happiness,DD
a## good things #augh(
/is step betrayeth $hether a person a#ready $a#keth on /2S 7)N path? just
see 'e $a#k& /e, ho$e%er, $ho co'eth nigh to his goa#, danceth(
;nd %eri#y, a statue ha%e 2 not beco'e, not yet do 2 stand there stiff,
stupid and stony, #ike a pi##arL 2 #o%e fast racing(
;nd though there be on earth fens and dense aff#ictions, he $ho hath #ight
feet runneth e%en across the 'ud, and danceth, as upon $e##Ds$ept ice(
:ift up your hearts, 'y brethren, high, higher& ;nd do not forget your
#egs& :ift up a#so your #egs, ye good dancers, and better
sti##, if ye stand upon your heads&
!4(
This cro$n of the #aughter, this roseDgar#and cro$n? 2 'yse#f ha%e put on
this cro$n, 2 'yse#f ha%e consecrated 'y #aughter( No one e#se ha%e 2
found toDday potent enough for this(
Zarathustra the dancer, Zarathustra the #ight one, $ho beckoneth $ith his
pinions, one ready for f#ight, beckoning unto a## birds, ready and
prepared, a b#issfu##y #ightDspirited one?DD
Zarathustra the soothsayer, Zarathustra the soothD#augher, no i'patient
one, no abso#ute one, one $ho #o%eth #eaps and sideD#eapsL 2 'yse#f ha%e
put on this cro$n&
!0(
:ift up your hearts, 'y brethren, high, higher& ;nd do not forget your
#egs& :ift up a#so your #egs, ye good dancers, and better sti## if ye
stand upon your heads&
There are a#so hea%y ani'a#s in a state of happiness, there are c#ubDfooted
ones fro' the beginning( "urious#y do they exert the'se#%es, #ike an
e#ephant $hich endea%oureth to stand upon its head(
.etter, ho$e%er, to be foo#ish $ith happiness than foo#ish $ith 'isfortune,
better to dance a$k$ard#y than $a#k #a'e#y( So #earn, 2 pray you, 'y
$isdo', ye higher 'en? e%en the $orst thing hath t$o good re%erse sides,DD
DDE%en the $orst thing hath good dancingD#egs? so #earn, 2 pray you, ye
higher 'en, to put yourse#%es on your proper #egs&
So un#earn, 2 pray you, the sorro$Dsighing, and a## the popu#aceDsadness&
7h, ho$ sad the buffoons of the popu#ace see' to 'e toDday& This toDday,
ho$e%er, is that of the popu#ace(
C6(
*o #ike unto the $ind $hen it rusheth forth fro' its 'ountainDca%es? unto
its o$n piping $i## it danceL the seas tre'b#e and #eap under its
footsteps(
That $hich gi%eth $ings to asses, that $hich 'i#keth the #ionesses?DD
praised be that good, unru#y spirit, $hich co'eth #ike a hurricane unto a##
the present and unto a## the popu#ace,DD
DD)hich is hosti#e to thist#eDheads and puzz#eDheads, and to a## $ithered
#ea%es and $eeds?DDpraised be this $i#d, good, free spirit of the stor',
$hich danceth upon fens and aff#ictions, as upon 'eado$s&
)hich hateth the consu'pti%e popu#aceDdogs, and a## the i##Dconstituted,
su##en brood?DDpraised be this spirit of a## free spirits, the #aughing
stor', $hich b#o$eth dust into the eyes of a## the 'e#anopic and
'e#ancho#ic&
Qe higher 'en, the $orst thing in you is that ye ha%e none of you #earned
to dance as ye ought to danceDDto dance beyond yourse#%es& )hat doth it
'atter that ye ha%e fai#ed&
/o$ 'any things are sti## possib#e& So :E;-N to #augh beyond yourse#%es&
:ift up your hearts, ye good dancers, high& higher& ;nd do not forget the
good #aughter&
This cro$n of the #aughter, this roseDgar#and cro$n? to you 'y brethren do
2 cast this cro$n& :aughing ha%e 2 consecratedL ye higher 'en, :E;-N, 2
pray youDDto #augh&
:RR2,( T/E S7NG 7F 9E:;N"/7:Q(
!(
)hen Zarathustra spake these sayings, he stood nigh to the entrance of his
ca%eL $ith the #ast $ords, ho$e%er, he s#ipped a$ay fro' his guests, and
f#ed for a #itt#e $hi#e into the open air(
N7 pure odours around 'e,N cried he, N7 b#essed sti##ness around 'e& .ut
$here are 'ine ani'a#sS /ither, hither, 'ine eag#e and 'y serpent&
Te## 'e, 'ine ani'a#s? these higher 'en, a## of the'DDdo they perhaps not
S9E:: $e##S 7 pure odours around 'e& No$ on#y do 2 kno$ and fee# ho$ 2
#o%e you, 'ine ani'a#s(N
DD;nd Zarathustra said once 'ore? N2 #o%e you, 'ine ani'a#s&N The eag#e,
ho$e%er, and the serpent pressed c#ose to hi' $hen he spake these $ords,
and #ooked up to hi'( 2n this attitude $ere they a## three si#ent
together, and sniffed and sipped the good air $ith one another( For the
air here outside $as better than $ith the higher 'en(
C(
/ard#y, ho$e%er, had Zarathustra #eft the ca%e $hen the o#d 'agician got
up, #ooked cunning#y about hi', and said? N/e is gone&
;nd a#ready, ye higher 'enDD#et 'e tick#e you $ith this co'p#i'entary and
f#attering na'e, as he hi'se#f doethDDa#ready doth 'ine e%i# spirit of
deceit and 'agic attack 'e, 'y 'e#ancho#y de%i#,
DD)hich is an ad%ersary to this Zarathustra fro' the %ery heart? forgi%e
it for this& No$ doth it $ish to conjure before you, it hath just 2TS
hourL in %ain do 2 strugg#e $ith this e%i# spirit(
8nto a## of you, $hate%er honours ye #ike to assu'e in your na'es, $hether
ye ca## yourse#%es Mthe free spiritsM or Mthe conscientious,M or Mthe
penitents of the spirit,M or Mthe unfettered,M or Mthe great #ongers,MDD
DD8nto a## of you, $ho #ike 'e suffer F-79 T/E G-E;T :7;T/2NG, to $ho' the
o#d God hath died, and as yet no ne$ God #ieth in crad#es and s$add#ing
c#othesDDunto a## of you is 'ine e%i# spirit and 'agicDde%i# fa%ourab#e(
2 kno$ you, ye higher 'en, 2 kno$ hi',DD2 kno$ a#so this fiend $ho' 2 #o%e
in spite of 'e, this Zarathustra? he hi'se#f often see'eth to 'e #ike the
beautifu# 'ask of a saint,
DD:ike a ne$ strange 'u''ery in $hich 'ine e%i# spirit, the 'e#ancho#y
de%i#, de#ighteth?DD2 #o%e Zarathustra, so doth it often see' to 'e, for
the sake of 'ine e%i# spirit(DD
.ut a#ready doth 2T attack 'e and constrain 'e, this spirit of 'e#ancho#y,
this e%eningDt$i#ight de%i#? and %eri#y, ye higher 'en, it hath a
#ongingDD
DD7pen your eyes&DDit hath a #onging to co'e N;WE*, $hether 'a#e or fe'a#e,
2 do not yet kno$? but it co'eth, it constraineth 'e, a#as& open your
$its&
The day dieth out, unto a## things co'eth no$ the e%ening, a#so unto the
best thingsL hear no$, and see, ye higher 'en, $hat de%i#DD'an or $o'anDD
this spirit of e%eningD'e#ancho#y is&N
Thus spake the o#d 'agician, #ooked cunning#y about hi', and then seized
his harp(
F(
2n e%eningMs #i'pid air,
)hat ti'e the de$Ms soothings
8nto the earth do$npour,
2n%isib#y and unheardDD
For tender shoeDgear $ear
The soothing de$s, #ike a## thatMs kindDgent#eDD?
.ethinkst thou then, bethinkst thou, burning heart,
/o$ once thou thirstedest
For hea%enMs kind#y teardrops and de$Ms do$nDdroppings,
;## singed and $eary thirstedest,
)hat ti'e on ye##o$ grassDpath$ays
)icked, occidenta# sunny g#ances
Through so'bre trees about thee sported,
.#inding#y sunny g#o$Dg#ances, g#ad#yDhurtingS
N7f T-8T/ the $ooerS ThouSNDDso taunted theyD
NNay& 9ere#y poet&
; brute insidious, p#undering, gro%e##ing,
That aye 'ust #ie,
That $itting#y, $i#fu##y, aye 'ust #ie?
For booty #usting,
9ot#ey 'asked,
Se#fDhidden, shrouded,
/i'se#f his bootyD
/EDDof truth the $ooerS
Nay& 9ere foo#& 9ere poet&
Tust 'ot#ey speaking,
Fro' 'ask of foo# confused#y shouting,
"ircu'a'b#ing on fabricated $ordDbridges,
7n 'ot#ey rainbo$Darches,
MT$ixt the spurious hea%en#y,
;nd spurious earth#y,
-ound us ro%ing, round us soaring,DD
9E-E F77:& 9E-E P7ET&
/EDDof truth the $ooerS
Not sti##, stiff, s'ooth and co#d,
.eco'e an i'age,
; god#ike statue,
Set up in front of te'p#es,
;s a GodMs o$n doorDguard?
Nay& hosti#e to a## such truthfu#nessDstatues,
2n e%ery desert ho'e#ier than at te'p#es,
)ith cattish $antonness,
Through e%ery $indo$ #eaping
Vuick#y into chances,
E%ery $i#d forest aDsniffing,
Greedi#yD#onging#y, sniffing,
That thou, in $i#d forests,
M9ong the 'ot#eyDspeck#ed fierce creatures,
Shou#dest ro%e, sinfu#Dsound and fineDco#oured,
)ith #onging #ips s'acking,
.#essed#y 'ocking, b#essed#y he##ish, b#essed#y b#oodthirsty,
-obbing, sku#king, #yingDDro%ing?DD
7r unto eag#es #ike $hich fixed#y,
:ong ado$n the precipice #ook,
;do$n T/E2- precipice?DD
7h, ho$ they $hir# do$n no$,
Thereunder, therein,
To e%er deeper profoundness $hir#ing&DD
Then,
Sudden,
)ith ai' aright,
)ith Uui%ering f#ight,
7n :;9.W2NS pouncing,
/ead#ong do$n, soreDhungry,
For #a'bkins #onging,
Fierce Mgainst a## #a'bDspirits,
FuriousDfierce a## that #ook
Sheep#ike, or #a'beyed, or crispD$oo##y,
DDGrey, $ith #a'bsheep kind#iness&
E%en thus,
Eag#e#ike, panther#ike,
;re the poetMs desires,
;re T/2NE 7)N desires Mneath a thousand guises,
Thou foo#& Thou poet&
Thou $ho a## 'ankind %ie$edstDD
So God, as sheepDD?
The God T7 -EN* $ithin 'ankind,
;s the sheep in 'ankind,
;nd in rending :;8G/2NGDD
T/;T, T/;T is thine o$n b#essedness&
7f a panther and eag#eDDb#essedness&
7f a poet and foo#DDthe b#essedness&DD
2n e%eningMs #i'pid air,
)hat ti'e the 'oonMs sick#e,
Green, Mt$ixt the purp#eDg#o$ings,
;nd jea#ous, stea#Mth forth?
DD7f day the foe,
)ith e%ery step in secret,
The rosy gar#andDha''ocks
*o$nsick#ing, ti## theyM%e sunken
*o$n night$ards, faded, do$nsunken?DD
Thus had 2 sunken one day
Fro' 'ine o$n truthDinsanity,
Fro' 'ine o$n fer%id dayD#ongings,
7f day a$eary, sick of sunshine,
DDSunk do$n$ards, e%en$ards, shado$$ards?
.y one so#e trueness
;## scorched and thirsty?
DD.ethinkst thou sti##, bethinkst thou, burning heart,
/o$ then thou thirstedestSD
T/;T 2 S/78:* .;NNE* .E
F-79 ;:: T/E T-8ENESS&
9E-E F77:& 9E-E P7ET&
:RR,( S"2EN"E(
Thus sang the 'agicianL and a## $ho $ere present $ent #ike birds una$ares
into the net of his artfu# and 'e#ancho#y %o#uptuousness( 7n#y the
spiritua##y conscientious one had not been caught? he at once snatched the
harp fro' the 'agician and ca##ed out? N;ir& :et in good air& :et in
Zarathustra& Thou 'akest this ca%e su#try and poisonous, thou bad o#d
'agician&
Thou seducest, thou fa#se one, thou subt#e one, to unkno$n desires and
deserts( ;nd a#as, that such as thou shou#d ta#k and 'ake ado about the
T-8T/&
;#as, to a## free spirits $ho are not on their guard against S8"/
'agicians& 2t is a## o%er $ith their freedo'? thou teachest and te'ptest
back into prisons,DD
DDThou o#d 'e#ancho#y de%i#, out of thy #a'ent soundeth a #ure'ent? thou
rese'b#est those $ho $ith their praise of chastity secret#y in%ite to
%o#uptuousness&N
Thus spake the conscientious oneL the o#d 'agician, ho$e%er, #ooked about
hi', enjoying his triu'ph, and on that account put up $ith the annoyance
$hich the conscientious one caused hi'( N.e sti##&N said he $ith 'odest
%oice, Ngood songs $ant to reDecho $e##L after good songs one shou#d be
#ong si#ent(
Thus do a## those present, the higher 'en( Thou, ho$e%er, hast perhaps
understood but #itt#e of 'y songS 2n thee there is #itt#e of the 'agic
spirit(
NThou praisest 'e,N rep#ied the conscientious one, Nin that thou separatest
'e fro' thyse#fL %ery $e##& .ut, ye others, $hat do 2 seeS Qe sti## sit
there, a## of you, $ith #usting eyesDD?
Qe free spirits, $hither hath your freedo' gone& Qe a#'ost see' to 'e to
rese'b#e those $ho ha%e #ong #ooked at bad gir#s dancing naked? your sou#s
the'se#%es dance&
2n you, ye higher 'en, there 'ust be 'ore of that $hich the 'agician
ca##eth his e%i# spirit of 'agic and deceit?DD$e 'ust indeed be different(
;nd %eri#y, $e spake and thought #ong enough together ere Zarathustra ca'e
ho'e to his ca%e, for 'e not to be una$are that $e ;-E different(
)e SEEW different things e%en here a#oft, ye and 2( For 2 seek 'ore
SE"8-2TQL on that account ha%e 2 co'e to Zarathustra( For he is sti## the
'ost steadfast to$er and $i##DD
DDToDday, $hen e%erything tottereth, $hen a## the earth Uuaketh( Qe,
ho$e%er, $hen 2 see $hat eyes ye 'ake, it a#'ost see'eth to 'e that ye seek
97-E 2NSE"8-2TQ,
DD9ore horror, 'ore danger, 'ore earthUuake( Qe #ong @it a#'ost see'eth so
to 'eDDforgi%e 'y presu'ption, ye higher 'enADD
DDQe #ong for the $orst and dangerousest #ife, $hich frighteneth 9E 'ost,DD
for the #ife of $i#d beasts, for forests, ca%es, steep 'ountains and
#abyrinthine gorges(
;nd it is not those $ho #ead 78T 7F danger that p#ease you best, but those
$ho #ead you a$ay fro' a## paths, the 'is#eaders( .ut if such #onging in
you be ;"T8;:, it see'eth to 'e ne%erthe#ess to be 29P7SS2.:E(
For fearDDthat is 'anMs origina# and funda'enta# fee#ingL through fear
e%erything is exp#ained, origina# sin and origina# %irtue( Through fear
there gre$ a#so 9Q %irtue, that is to say? Science(
For fear of $i#d ani'a#sDDthat hath been #ongest fostered in 'an, inc#usi%e
of the ani'a# $hich he concea#eth and feareth in hi'se#f?DDZarathustra
ca##eth it Mthe beast inside(M
Such pro#onged ancient fear, at #ast beco'e subt#e, spiritua# and
inte##ectua#DDat present, 'e thinketh, it is ca##ed S"2EN"E(NDD
Thus spake the conscientious oneL but Zarathustra, $ho had just co'e back
into his ca%e and had heard and di%ined the #ast discourse, thre$ a handfu#
of roses to the conscientious one, and #aughed on account of his Ntruths(N
N)hy&N he exc#ai'ed, N$hat did 2 hear just no$S ,eri#y, it see'eth to 'e,
thou art a foo#, or e#se 2 'yse#f a' one? and Uuiet#y and Uuick#y $i## 2
Put thy MtruthM upside do$n(
For FE;-DDis an exception $ith us( "ourage, ho$e%er, and ad%enture, and
de#ight in the uncertain, in the unatte'ptedDD"78-;GE see'eth to 'e the
entire pri'iti%e history of 'an(
The $i#dest and 'ost courageous ani'a#s hath he en%ied and robbed of a##
their %irtues? thus on#y did he beco'eDD'an(
T/2S courage, at #ast beco'e subt#e, spiritua# and inte##ectua#, this hu'an
courage, $ith eag#eMs pinions and serpentMs $isdo'? T/2S, it see'eth to
'e, is ca##ed at presentDDN
NZ;-;T/8ST-;&N cried a## of the' there asse'b#ed, as if $ith one %oice, and
burst out at the sa'e ti'e into a great #aughterL there arose, ho$e%er,
fro' the' as it $ere a hea%y c#oud( E%en the 'agician #aughed, and said
$ise#y? N)e##& 2t is gone, 'ine e%i# spirit&
;nd did 2 not 'yse#f $arn you against it $hen 2 said that it $as a
decei%er, a #ying and decei%ing spiritS
Especia##y $hen it sho$eth itse#f naked( .ut $hat can X2X do $ith regard
to its tricks& /a%e X2X created it and the $or#dS
)e##& :et us be good again, and of good cheer& ;nd a#though Zarathustra
#ooketh $ith e%i# eyeDDjust see hi'& he dis#iketh 'eDD?
DDEre night co'eth $i## he again #earn to #o%e and #aud 'eL he cannot #i%e
#ong $ithout co''itting such fo##ies(
/EDD#o%eth his ene'ies? this art kno$eth he better than any one 2 ha%e
seen( .ut he taketh re%enge for itDDon his friends&N
Thus spake the o#d 'agician, and the higher 'en app#auded hi'L so that
Zarathustra $ent round, and 'ischie%ous#y and #o%ing#y shook hands $ith his
friends,DD#ike one $ho hath to 'ake a'ends and apo#ogise to e%ery one for
so'ething( )hen ho$e%er he had thereby co'e to the door of his ca%e, #o,
then had he again a #onging for the good air outside, and for his ani'a#s,
DDand $ished to stea# out(
:RR,2( ;97NG *;8G/TE-S 7F T/E *ESE-T(
!(
NGo not a$ay&N said then the $anderer $ho ca##ed hi'se#f ZarathustraMs
shado$, Nabide $ith usDDother$ise the o#d g#oo'y aff#iction 'ight again
fa## upon us(
No$ hath that o#d 'agician gi%en us of his $orst for our good, and #o& the
good, pious pope there hath tears in his eyes, and hath Uuite e'barked
again upon the sea of 'e#ancho#y(
Those kings 'ay $e## put on a good air before us sti##? for that ha%e T/EQ
#earned best of us a## at present& /ad they ho$e%er no one to see the', 2
$ager that $ith the' a#so the bad ga'e $ou#d again co''ence,DD
DDThe bad ga'e of drifting c#ouds, of da'p 'e#ancho#y, of curtained
hea%ens, of sto#en suns, of ho$#ing autu'nD$inds,
DDThe bad ga'e of our ho$#ing and crying for he#p& ;bide $ith us, 7
Zarathustra& /ere there is 'uch concea#ed 'isery that $isheth to speak,
'uch e%ening, 'uch c#oud, 'uch da'p air&
Thou hast nourished us $ith strong food for 'en, and po$erfu# pro%erbs? do
not #et the $eak#y, $o'an#y spirits attack us ane$ at dessert&
Thou a#one 'akest the air around thee strong and c#ear& *id 2 e%er find
any$here on earth such good air as $ith thee in thy ca%eS
9any #ands ha%e 2 seen, 'y nose hath #earned to test and esti'ate 'any
kinds of air? but $ith thee do 'y nostri#s taste their greatest de#ight&
8n#ess it be,DDun#ess it beDD, do forgi%e an o#d reco##ection& Forgi%e 'e
an o#d afterDdinner song, $hich 2 once co'posed a'ongst daughters of the
desert?DD
For $ith the' $as there eUua##y good, c#ear, 7rienta# airL there $as 2
furthest fro' c#oudy, da'p, 'e#ancho#y 7#dDEurope&
Then did 2 #o%e such 7rienta# 'aidens and other b#ue kingdo's of hea%en,
o%er $hich hang no c#ouds and no thoughts(
Qe $ou#d not be#ie%e ho$ char'ing#y they sat there, $hen they did not
dance, profound, but $ithout thoughts, #ike #itt#e secrets, #ike beribboned
ridd#es, #ike dessertDnutsDD
9anyDhued and foreign, forsooth& but $ithout c#ouds? ridd#es $hich can be
guessed? to p#ease such 'aidens 2 then co'posed an afterDdinner psa#'(N
Thus spake the $anderer $ho ca##ed hi'se#f ZarathustraMs shado$L and before
any one ans$ered hi', he had seized the harp of the o#d 'agician, crossed
his #egs, and #ooked ca#'#y and sage#y around hi'?DD$ith his nostri#s,
ho$e%er, he inha#ed the air s#o$#y and Uuestioning#y, #ike one $ho in ne$
countries tasteth ne$ foreign air( ;fter$ard he began to sing $ith a kind
of roaring(
C(
T/E *ESE-TS G-7)? )7E /29 )/7 *7T/ T/E9 /2*E&
DD/a&
So#e'n#y&
2n effect so#e'n#y&
; $orthy beginning&
;fric 'anner, so#e'n#y&
7f a #ion $orthy,
7r perhaps of a %irtuous ho$#D'onkeyDD
DD.ut itMs naught to you,
Qe friend#y da'se#s dear#y #o%ed,
;t $hose o$n feet to 'e,
The first occasion,
To a European under pa#'Dtrees,
; seat is no$ granted( Se#ah(
)onderfu#, tru#y&
/ere do 2 sit no$,
The desert nigh, and yet 2 a'
So far sti## fro' the desert,
E%en in naught yet deserted?
That is, 2M' s$a##o$ed do$n
.y this the s'a##est oasisDD?
DD2t opened up just ya$ning,
2ts #o%e#iest 'outh agape,
9ost s$eetDodoured of a## 'outh#ets?
Then fe## 2 right in,
-ight do$n, right throughDDin M'ong you,
Qe friend#y da'se#s dear#y #o%ed& Se#ah(
/ai#& hai#& to that $ha#e, fish#ike,
2f it thus for its guestMs con%enience
9ade things nice&DD@ye $e## kno$,
Sure#y, 'y #earned a##usionSA
/ai# to its be##y,
2f it had eMer
; such #o%e#iest oasisDbe##y
;s this is? though ho$e%er 2 doubt about it,
DD)ith this co'e 2 out of 7#dDEurope,
That doubtMth 'ore eager#y than doth any
E#der#y 'arried $o'an(
9ay the :ord i'pro%e it&
;'en&
/ere do 2 sit no$,
2n this the s'a##est oasis,
:ike a date indeed,
.ro$n, Uuite s$eet, go#dDsuppurating,
For rounded 'outh of 'aiden #onging,
.ut yet sti## 'ore for youthfu#, 'aid#ike,
2ceDco#d and sno$D$hite and incisory
Front teeth? and for such assured#y,
Pine the hearts a## of ardent dateDfruits( Se#ah(
To the thereDna'ed southDfruits no$,
Si'i#ar, a##DtooDsi'i#ar,
*o 2 #ie hereL by #itt#e
F#ying insects
-oundDsniff#ed and roundDp#ayed,
;nd a#so by yet #itt#er,
Foo#isher, and peccab#er
)ishes and phantasies,DD
En%ironed by you,
Qe si#ent, presentientest
9aidenDkittens,
*udu and Su#eika,
DD-78N*SP/2NRE*, that into one $ord
2 'ay cro$d 'uch fee#ing?
@Forgi%e 'e, 7 God,
;## such speechDsinning&A
DDSit 2 here the best of air sniff#ing,
Paradisa# air, tru#y,
.right and buoyant air, go#denD'ott#ed,
;s good#y air as e%er
Fro' #unar orb do$nfe##DD
.e it by hazard,
7r super%ened it by arrogancyS
;s the ancient poets re#ate it(
.ut doubter, 2M' no$ ca##ing it
2n Uuestion? $ith this do 2 co'e indeed
7ut of Europe,
That doubtMth 'ore eager#y than doth any
E#der#y 'arried $o'an(
9ay the :ord i'pro%e it&
;'en(
This the finest air drinking,
)ith nostri#s outDs$e##ed #ike gob#ets,
:acking future, #acking re'e'brances
Thus do 2 sit here, ye
Friend#y da'se#s dear#y #o%ed,
;nd #ook at the pa#'Dtree there,
/o$ it, to a danceDgir#, #ike,
*oth bo$ and bend and on its haunches bob,
DD7ne doth it too, $hen one %ie$Mth it #ong&DD
To a danceDgir# #ike, $ho as it see'Mth to 'e,
Too #ong, and dangerous#y persistent,
;#$ays, a#$ays, just on S2NG:E #eg hath stoodS
DDThen forgot she thereby, as it see'Mth to 'e,
The 7T/E- #egS
For %ain#y 2, at #east,
*id search for the a'issing
Fe##o$Dje$e#
DDNa'e#y, the other #egDD
2n the sanctified precincts,
Nigh her %ery dearest, %ery tenderest,
F#apping and f#uttering and f#ickering skirting(
Qea, if ye shou#d, ye beauteous friend#y ones,
Vuite take 'y $ord?
She hath, a#as& :7ST it&
/u& /u& /u& /u& /u&
2t is a$ay&
For e%er a$ay&
The other #eg&
7h, pity for that #o%e#iest other #eg&
)here 'ay it no$ tarry, a##Dforsaken $eepingS
The #oneso'est #egS
2n fear perhaps before a
Furious, ye##o$, b#ond and cur#ed
:eonine 'onsterS 7r perhaps e%en
Gna$ed a$ay, nibb#ed bad#yDD
9ost $retched, $oefu#& $oefu#& nibb#ed bad#y& Se#ah(
7h, $eep ye not,
Gent#e spirits&
)eep ye not, ye
*ateDfruit spirits& 9i#kDboso's&
Qe s$eet$oodDheart
Purse#ets&
)eep ye no 'ore,
Pa##id *udu&
.e a 'an, Su#eika& .o#d& .o#d&
DD7r e#se shou#d there perhaps
So'ething strengthening, heartDstrengthening,
/ere 'ost proper beS
So'e inspiring textS
So'e so#e'n exhortationSDD
/a& 8p no$& honour&
9ora# honour& European honour&
.#o$ again, continue,
.e##o$sDbox of %irtue&
/a&
7nce 'ore thy roaring,
Thy 'ora# roaring&
;s a %irtuous #ion
Nigh the daughters of deserts roaring&
DDFor %irtueMs outDho$#,
Qe %ery dearest 'aidens,
2s 'ore than e%ery
European fer%our, European hotDhunger&
;nd no$ do 2 stand here,
;s European,
2 canMt be different, GodMs he#p to 'e&
;'en&
T/E *ESE-TS G-7)? )7E /29 )/7 *7T/ T/E9 /2*E&
:RR,22( T/E ;);WEN2NG(
!(
;fter the song of the $anderer and shado$, the ca%e beca'e a## at once fu##
of noise and #aughter? and since the asse'b#ed guests a## spake
si'u#taneous#y, and e%en the ass, encouraged thereby, no #onger re'ained
si#ent, a #itt#e a%ersion and scorn for his %isitors ca'e o%er Zarathustra,
a#though he rejoiced at their g#adness( For it see'ed to hi' a sign of
con%a#escence( So he s#ipped out into the open air and spake to his
ani'a#s(
N)hither hath their distress no$ goneSN said he, and a#ready did he hi'se#f
fee# re#ie%ed of his petty disgustDDN$ith 'e, it see'eth that they ha%e
un#earned their cries of distress&
DDThough, a#as& not yet their crying(N ;nd Zarathustra stopped his ears,
for just then did the QED; of the ass 'ix strange#y $ith the noisy
jubi#ation of those higher 'en(
NThey are 'erry,N he began again, Nand $ho kno$ethS perhaps at their hostMs
expenseL and if they ha%e #earned of 'e to #augh, sti## it is not 9Q
#aughter they ha%e #earned(
.ut $hat 'atter about that& They are o#d peop#e? they reco%er in their
o$n $ay, they #augh in their o$n $ayL 'ine ears ha%e a#ready endured $orse
and ha%e not beco'e pee%ish(
This day is a %ictory? he a#ready yie#deth, he f#eeth, T/E SP2-2T 7F
G-;,2TQ, 'ine o#d archDene'y& /o$ $e## this day is about to end, $hich
began so bad#y and g#oo'i#y&
;nd it is ;.78T T7 end( ;#ready co'eth the e%ening? o%er the sea rideth
it hither, the good rider& /o$ it bobbeth, the b#essed one, the ho'eD
returning one, in its purp#e sadd#es&
The sky gazeth bright#y thereon, the $or#d #ieth deep( 7h, a## ye strange
ones $ho ha%e co'e to 'e, it is a#ready $orth $hi#e to ha%e #i%ed $ith 'e&N
Thus spake Zarathustra( ;nd again ca'e the cries and #aughter of the
higher 'en out of the ca%e? then began he ane$?
NThey bite at it, 'y bait taketh, there departeth a#so fro' the' their
ene'y, the spirit of gra%ity( No$ do they #earn to #augh at the'se#%es?
do 2 hear right#yS
9y %iri#e food taketh effect, 'y strong and sa%oury sayings? and %eri#y, 2
did not nourish the' $ith f#atu#ent %egetab#es& .ut $ith $arriorDfood,
$ith conUuerorDfood? ne$ desires did 2 a$aken(
Ne$ hopes are in their ar's and #egs, their hearts expand( They find ne$
$ords, soon $i## their spirits breathe $antonness(
Such food 'ay sure enough not be proper for chi#dren, nor e%en for #onging
gir#s o#d and young( 7ne persuadeth their bo$e#s other$iseL 2 a' not their
physician and teacher(
The *2SG8ST departeth fro' these higher 'enL $e##& that is 'y %ictory( 2n
'y do'ain they beco'e assuredL a## stupid sha'e f#eeth a$ayL they e'pty
the'se#%es(
They e'pty their hearts, good ti'es return unto the', they keep ho#iday and
ru'inate,DDthey beco'e T/;NWF8:(
T/;T do 2 take as the best sign? they beco'e thankfu#( Not #ong $i## it
be ere they de%ise festi%a#s, and put up 'e'oria#s to their o#d joys(
They are "7N,;:ES"ENTS&N Thus spake Zarathustra joyfu##y to his heart and
gazed out$ardL his ani'a#s, ho$e%er, pressed up to hi', and honoured his
happiness and his si#ence(
C(
;## on a sudden ho$e%er, ZarathustraMs ear $as frightened? for the ca%e
$hich had hitherto been fu## of noise and #aughter, beca'e a## at once
sti## as deathLDDhis nose, ho$e%er, s'e#t a s$eetDscented %apour and
incenseDodour, as if fro' burning pineDcones(
N)hat happenethS )hat are they aboutSN he asked hi'se#f, and sto#e up to
the entrance, that he 'ight be ab#e unobser%ed to see his guests( .ut
$onder upon $onder& $hat $as he then ob#iged to beho#d $ith his o$n eyes&
NThey ha%e a## of the' beco'e P278S again, they P-;Q, they are 'ad&NDDsaid
he, and $as astonished beyond 'easure( ;nd forsooth& a## these higher 'en,
the t$o kings, the pope out of ser%ice, the e%i# 'agician, the %o#untary
beggar, the $anderer and shado$, the o#d soothsayer, the spiritua##y
conscientious one, and the ug#iest 'anDDthey a## #ay on their knees #ike
chi#dren and credu#ous o#d $o'en, and $orshipped the ass( ;nd just then
began the ug#iest 'an to gurg#e and snort, as if so'ething unutterab#e in
hi' tried to find expressionL $hen, ho$e%er, he had actua##y found $ords,
beho#d& it $as a pious, strange #itany in praise of the adored and censed
ass( ;nd the #itany sounded thus?
;'en& ;nd g#ory and honour and $isdo' and thanks and praise and strength
be to our God, fro' e%er#asting to e%er#asting&
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
/e carrieth our burdens, he hath taken upon hi' the for' of a ser%ant, he
is patient of heart and ne%er saith NayL and he $ho #o%eth his God
chastiseth hi'(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
/e speaketh not? except that he e%er saith Qea to the $or#d $hich he
created? thus doth he exto# his $or#d( 2t is his artfu#ness that speaketh
not? thus is he rare#y found $rong(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
8nco'e#y goeth he through the $or#d( Grey is the fa%ourite co#our in $hich
he $rappeth his %irtue( /ath he spirit, then doth he concea# itL e%ery
one, ho$e%er, be#ie%eth in his #ong ears(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
)hat hidden $isdo' it is to $ear #ong ears, and on#y to say Qea and ne%er
Nay& /ath he not created the $or#d in his o$n i'age, na'e#y, as stupid as
possib#eS
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
Thou goest straight and crooked $aysL it concerneth thee #itt#e $hat
see'eth straight or crooked unto us 'en( .eyond good and e%i# is thy
do'ain( 2t is thine innocence not to kno$ $hat innocence is(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
:o& ho$ thou spurnest none fro' thee, neither beggars nor kings( Thou
sufferest #itt#e chi#dren to co'e unto thee, and $hen the bad boys decoy
thee, then sayest thou si'p#y, QED;(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
Thou #o%est sheDasses and fresh figs, thou art no foodDdespiser( ; thist#e
tick#eth thy heart $hen thou chancest to be hungry( There is the $isdo' of
a God therein(
DDThe ass, ho$e%er, here brayed QED;(
:RR,222( T/E ;SSDFEST2,;:(
!(
;t this p#ace in the #itany, ho$e%er, Zarathustra cou#d no #onger contro#
hi'se#fL he hi'se#f cried out QED;, #ouder e%en than the ass, and sprang
into the 'idst of his 'addened guests( N)hate%er are you about, ye gro$nD
up chi#drenSN he exc#ai'ed, pu##ing up the praying ones fro' the ground(
N;#as, if any one e#se, except Zarathustra, had seen you?
E%ery one $ou#d think you the $orst b#asphe'ers, or the %ery foo#ishest o#d
$o'en, $ith your ne$ be#ief&
;nd thou thyse#f, thou o#d pope, ho$ is it in accordance $ith thee, to
adore an ass in such a 'anner as GodSNDD
N7 Zarathustra,N ans$ered the pope, Nforgi%e 'e, but in di%ine 'atters 2 a'
'ore en#ightened e%en than thou( ;nd it is right that it shou#d be so(
.etter to adore God so, in this for', than in no for' at a##& Think o%er
this saying, 'ine exa#ted friend? thou $i#t readi#y di%ine that in such a
saying there is $isdo'(
/e $ho said MGod is a SpiritMDD'ade the greatest stride and s#ide hitherto
'ade on earth to$ards unbe#ief? such a dictu' is not easi#y a'ended again
on earth&
9ine o#d heart #eapeth and boundeth because there is sti## so'ething to
adore on earth( Forgi%e it, 7 Zarathustra, to an o#d, pious pontiffD
heart&DDN
DDN;nd thou,N said Zarathustra to the $anderer and shado$, Nthou ca##est
and thinkest thyse#f a free spiritS ;nd thou here practisest such ido#atry
and hiero#atryS
)orse %eri#y, doest thou here than $ith thy bad bro$n gir#s, thou bad, ne$
be#ie%er&N
N2t is sad enough,N ans$ered the $anderer and shado$, Nthou art right? but
ho$ can 2 he#p it& The o#d God #i%eth again, 7 Zarathustra, thou 'ayst say
$hat thou $i#t(
The ug#iest 'an is to b#a'e for it a##? he hath rea$akened hi'( ;nd if he
say that he once ki##ed hi', $ith Gods *E;T/ is a#$ays just a prejudice(N
DDN;nd thou,N said Zarathustra, Nthou bad o#d 'agician, $hat didst thou do&
)ho ought to be#ie%e any #onger in thee in this free age, $hen T/78
be#ie%est in such di%ine donkeyis'S
2t $as a stupid thing that thou didstL ho$ cou#dst thou, a shre$d 'an, do
such a stupid thing&N
N7 Zarathustra,N ans$ered the shre$d 'agician, Nthou art right, it $as a
stupid thing,DDit $as a#so repugnant to 'e(N
DDN;nd thou e%en,N said Zarathustra to the spiritua##y conscientious one,
Nconsider, and put thy finger to thy nose& *oth nothing go against thy
conscience hereS 2s thy spirit not too c#ean#y for this praying and the
fu'es of those de%oteesSN
NThere is so'ething therein,N said the spiritua##y conscientious one, and
put his finger to his nose, Nthere is so'ething in this spectac#e $hich
e%en doeth good to 'y conscience(
Perhaps 2 dare not be#ie%e in God? certain it is ho$e%er, that God see'eth
to 'e 'ost $orthy of be#ief in this for'(
God is said to be eterna#, according to the testi'ony of the 'ost pious?
he $ho hath so 'uch ti'e taketh his ti'e( ;s s#o$ and as stupid as
possib#e? T/E-E.Q can such a one ne%erthe#ess go %ery far(
;nd he $ho hath too 'uch spirit 'ight $e## beco'e infatuated $ith stupidity
and fo##y( Think of thyse#f, 7 Zarathustra&
Thou thyse#fDD%eri#y& e%en thou cou#dst $e## beco'e an ass through
superabundance of $isdo'(
*oth not the true sage $i##ing#y $a#k on the crookedest pathsS The
e%idence teacheth it, 7 Zarathustra,DDT/2NE 7)N e%idence&N
DDN;nd thou thyse#f, fina##y,N said Zarathustra, and turned to$ards the
ug#iest 'an, $ho sti## #ay on the ground stretching up his ar' to the ass
@for he ga%e it $ine to drinkA( NSay, thou nondescript, $hat hast thou
been about&
Thou see'est to 'e transfor'ed, thine eyes g#o$, the 'ant#e of the sub#i'e
co%ereth thine ug#iness? )/;T didst thou doS
2s it then true $hat they say, that thou hast again a$akened hi'S ;nd $hyS
)as he not for good reasons ki##ed and 'ade a$ay $ithS
Thou thyse#f see'est to 'e a$akened? $hat didst thou doS $hy didst T/78
turn roundS )hy didst T/78 get con%ertedS Speak, thou nondescript&N
N7 Zarathustra,N ans$ered the ug#iest 'an, Nthou art a rogue&
)hether /E yet #i%eth, or again #i%eth, or is thorough#y deadDD$hich of us
both kno$eth that bestS 2 ask thee(
7ne thing ho$e%er do 2 kno$,DDfro' thyse#f did 2 #earn it once, 7
Zarathustra? he $ho $anteth to ki## 'ost thorough#y, :;8G/ET/(
MNot by $rath but by #aughter doth one ki##MDDthus spakest thou once, 7
Zarathustra, thou hidden one, thou destroyer $ithout $rath, thou dangerous
saint,DDthou art a rogue&N
C(
Then, ho$e%er, did it co'e to pass that Zarathustra, astonished at such
'ere#y roguish ans$ers, ju'ped back to the door of his ca%e, and turning
to$ards a## his guests, cried out $ith a strong %oice?
N7 ye $ags, a## of you, ye buffoons& )hy do ye disse'b#e and disguise
yourse#%es before 'e&
/o$ the hearts of a## of you con%u#sed $ith de#ight and $ickedness, because
ye had at #ast beco'e again #ike #itt#e chi#drenDDna'e#y, pious,DD
DD.ecause ye at #ast did again as chi#dren doDDna'e#y, prayed, fo#ded your
hands and said Mgood GodM&
.ut no$ #ea%e, 2 pray you, T/2S nursery, 'ine o$n ca%e, $here toDday a##
chi#dishness is carried on( "oo# do$n, here outside, your hot chi#dD
$antonness and heartDtu'u#t&
To be sure? except ye beco'e as #itt#e chi#dren ye sha## not enter into
T/;T kingdo' of hea%en(N @;nd Zarathustra pointed a#oft $ith his hands(A
N.ut $e do not at a## $ant to enter into the kingdo' of hea%en? $e ha%e
beco'e 'en,DDS7 )E );NT T/E W2NG*79 7F E;-T/(N
F(
;nd once 'ore began Zarathustra to speak( N7 'y ne$ friends,N said he,DD
Nye strange ones, ye higher 'en, ho$ $e## do ye no$ p#ease 'e,DD
DDSince ye ha%e again beco'e joyfu#& Qe ha%e, %eri#y, a## b#osso'ed forth?
it see'eth to 'e that for such f#o$ers as you, NE) FEST2,;:S are reUuired(
DD; #itt#e %a#iant nonsense, so'e di%ine ser%ice and assDfesti%a#, so'e o#d
joyfu# Zarathustra foo#, so'e b#usterer to b#o$ your sou#s bright(
Forget not this night and this assDfesti%a#, ye higher 'en& T/;T did ye
de%ise $hen $ith 'e, that do 2 take as a good o'en,DDsuch things on#y the
con%a#escents de%ise&
;nd shou#d ye ce#ebrate it again, this assDfesti%a#, do it fro' #o%e to
yourse#%es, do it a#so fro' #o%e to 'e& ;nd in re'e'brance of 'e&N
Thus spake Zarathustra(
:RR2R( T/E *-8NWEN S7NG(
!(
9ean$hi#e one after another had gone out into the open air, and into the
coo#, thoughtfu# nightL Zarathustra hi'se#f, ho$e%er, #ed the ug#iest 'an
by the hand, that he 'ight sho$ hi' his nightD$or#d, and the great round
'oon, and the si#%ery $aterDfa##s near his ca%e( There they at #ast stood
sti## beside one anotherL a## of the' o#d peop#e, but $ith co'forted, bra%e
hearts, and astonished in the'se#%es that it $as so $e## $ith the' on
earthL the 'ystery of the night, ho$e%er, ca'e nigher and nigher to their
hearts( ;nd ane$ Zarathustra thought to hi'se#f? N7h, ho$ $e## do they
no$ p#ease 'e, these higher 'en&NDDbut he did not say it a#oud, for he
respected their happiness and their si#ence(DD
Then, ho$e%er, there happened that $hich in this astonishing #ong day $as
'ost astonishing? the ug#iest 'an began once 'ore and for the #ast ti'e to
gurg#e and snort, and $hen he had at #ength found expression, beho#d& there
sprang a Uuestion p#u'p and p#ain out of his 'outh, a good, deep, c#ear
Uuestion, $hich 'o%ed the hearts of a## $ho #istened to hi'(
N9y friends, a## of you,N said the ug#iest 'an, N$hat think yeS For the
sake of this dayDDX2X a' for the first ti'e content to ha%e #i%ed 'ine
entire #ife(
;nd that 2 testify so 'uch is sti## not enough for 'e( 2t is $orth $hi#e
#i%ing on the earth? one day, one festi%a# $ith Zarathustra, hath taught
'e to #o%e the earth(
M)as T/;TDD#ifeSM $i## 2 say unto death( M)e##& 7nce 'ore&M
9y friends, $hat think yeS )i## ye not, #ike 'e, say unto death? M)as
T/;TDD#ifeS For the sake of Zarathustra, $e##& 7nce 'ore&MNDD
Thus spake the ug#iest 'anL it $as not, ho$e%er, far fro' 'idnight( ;nd
$hat took p#ace then, think yeS ;s soon as the higher 'en heard his
Uuestion, they beca'e a## at once conscious of their transfor'ation and
con%a#escence, and of hi' $ho $as the cause thereof? then did they rush up
to Zarathustra, thanking, honouring, caressing hi', and kissing his hands,
each in his o$n pecu#iar $ayL so that so'e #aughed and so'e $ept( The o#d
soothsayer, ho$e%er, danced $ith de#ightL and though he $as then, as so'e
narrators suppose, fu## of s$eet $ine, he $as certain#y sti## fu##er of
s$eet #ife, and had renounced a## $eariness( There are e%en those $ho
narrate that the ass then danced? for not in %ain had the ug#iest 'an
pre%ious#y gi%en it $ine to drink( That 'ay be the case, or it 'ay be
other$iseL and if in truth the ass did not dance that e%ening, there
ne%erthe#ess happened then greater and rarer $onders than the dancing of an
ass $ou#d ha%e been( 2n short, as the pro%erb of Zarathustra saith? N)hat
doth it 'atter&N
C(
)hen, ho$e%er, this took p#ace $ith the ug#iest 'an, Zarathustra stood
there #ike one drunken? his g#ance du##ed, his tongue fa#tered and his
feet staggered( ;nd $ho cou#d di%ine $hat thoughts then passed through
ZarathustraMs sou#S ;pparent#y, ho$e%er, his spirit retreated and f#ed in
ad%ance and $as in re'ote distances, and as it $ere N$andering on high
'ountainDridges,N as it standeth $ritten, NMt$ixt t$o seas,
DD)andering Mt$ixt the past and the future as a hea%y c#oud(N Gradua##y,
ho$e%er, $hi#e the higher 'en he#d hi' in their ar's, he ca'e back to
hi'se#f a #itt#e, and resisted $ith his hands the cro$d of the honouring
and caring onesL but he did not speak( ;## at once, ho$e%er, he turned his
head Uuick#y, for he see'ed to hear so'ething? then #aid he his finger on
his 'outh and said? N"79E&N
;nd i''ediate#y it beca'e sti## and 'ysterious round aboutL fro' the depth
ho$e%er there ca'e up s#o$#y the sound of a c#ockDbe##( Zarathustra
#istened thereto, #ike the higher 'enL then, ho$e%er, #aid he his finger on
his 'outh the second ti'e, and said again? N"79E& "79E& 2T 2S GETT2NG 7N
T7 92*N2G/T&NDDand his %oice had changed( .ut sti## he had not 'o%ed fro'
the spot( Then it beca'e yet sti##er and 'ore 'ysterious, and e%erything
hearkened, e%en the ass, and ZarathustraMs nob#e ani'a#s, the eag#e and the
serpent,DD#ike$ise the ca%e of Zarathustra and the big coo# 'oon, and the
night itse#f( Zarathustra, ho$e%er, #aid his hand upon his 'outh for the
third ti'e, and said?
"79E& "79E& "79E& :ET 8S N7) );N*E-& 2T 2S T/E /78-? :ET 8S );N*E-
2NT7 T/E N2G/T&
F(
Qe higher 'en, it is getting on to 'idnight? then $i## 2 say so'ething
into your ears, as that o#d c#ockDbe## saith it into 'ine ear,DD
DD;s 'ysterious#y, as frightfu##y, and as cordia##y as that 'idnight c#ockD
be## speaketh it to 'e, $hich hath experienced 'ore than one 'an?
DD)hich hath a#ready counted the s'arting throbbings of your fathersM
heartsDDah& ah& ho$ it sigheth& ho$ it #augheth in its drea'& the o#d,
deep, deep 'idnight&
/ush& /ush& Then is there 'any a thing heard $hich 'ay not be heard by
dayL no$ ho$e%er, in the coo# air, $hen e%en a## the tu'u#t of your hearts
hath beco'e sti##,DD
DDNo$ doth it speak, no$ is it heard, no$ doth it stea# into o%er$akefu#,
nocturna# sou#s? ah& ah& ho$ the 'idnight sigheth& ho$ it #augheth in its
drea'&
DD/earest thou not ho$ it 'ysterious#y, frightfu##y, and cordia##y speaketh
unto T/EE, the o#d deep, deep 'idnightS
7 9;N, T;WE /EE*&
E(
)oe to 'e& )hither hath ti'e goneS /a%e 2 not sunk into deep $e##sS The
$or#d s#eepethDD
;h& ;h& The dog ho$#eth, the 'oon shineth( -ather $i## 2 die, rather
$i## 2 die, than say unto you $hat 'y 'idnightDheart no$ thinketh(
;#ready ha%e 2 died( 2t is a## o%er( Spider, $hy spinnest thou around 'eS
)i#t thou ha%e b#oodS ;h& ;h& The de$ fa##eth, the hour co'ethDD
DDThe hour in $hich 2 frost and freeze, $hich asketh and asketh and asketh?
N)ho hath sufficient courage for itS
DD)ho is to be 'aster of the $or#dS )ho is going to say? T/8S sha## ye
f#o$, ye great and s'a## strea's&N
DDThe hour approacheth? 7 'an, thou higher 'an, take heed& this ta#k is
for fine ears, for thine earsDD)/;T S;2T/ *EEP 92*N2G/TMS ,72"E 2N*EE*S
K(
2t carrieth 'e a$ay, 'y sou# danceth( *ayMsD$ork& *ayMsD$ork& )ho is to
be 'aster of the $or#dS
The 'oon is coo#, the $ind is sti##( ;h& ;h& /a%e ye a#ready f#o$n high
enoughS Qe ha%e danced? a #eg, ne%erthe#ess, is not a $ing(
Qe good dancers, no$ is a## de#ight o%er? $ine hath beco'e #ees, e%ery cup
hath beco'e britt#e, the sepu#chres 'utter(
Qe ha%e not f#o$n high enough? no$ do the sepu#chres 'utter? NFree the
dead& )hy is it so #ong nightS *oth not the 'oon 'ake us drunkenSN
Qe higher 'en, free the sepu#chres, a$aken the corpses& ;h, $hy doth the
$or' sti## burro$S There approacheth, there approacheth, the hour,DD
DDThere boo'eth the c#ockDbe##, there thri##eth sti## the heart, there
burro$eth sti## the $oodD$or', the heartD$or'( ;h& ;h& T/E )7-:* 2S
*EEP&
P(
S$eet #yre& S$eet #yre& 2 #o%e thy tone, thy drunken, ranuncu#ine tone&DD
ho$ #ong, ho$ far hath co'e unto 'e thy tone, fro' the distance, fro' the
ponds of #o%e&
Thou o#d c#ockDbe##, thou s$eet #yre& E%ery pain hath torn thy heart,
fatherDpain, fathersMDpain, forefathersMDpainL thy speech hath beco'e
ripe,DD
DD-ipe #ike the go#den autu'n and the afternoon, #ike 'ine anchorite heart
DDno$ sayest thou? The $or#d itse#f hath beco'e ripe, the grape turneth
bro$n,
DDNo$ doth it $ish to die, to die of happiness( Qe higher 'en, do ye not
fee# itS There $e##eth up 'ysterious#y an odour,
DD; perfu'e and odour of eternity, a rosyDb#essed, bro$n, go#dD$ineDodour
of o#d happiness,
DD7f drunken 'idnightDdeath happiness, $hich singeth? the $or#d is deep,
;N* *EEPE- T/;N T/E *;Q "78:* -E;*&
1(
:ea%e 'e a#one& :ea%e 'e a#one& 2 a' too pure for thee( Touch 'e not&
/ath not 'y $or#d just no$ beco'e perfectS
9y skin is too pure for thy hands( :ea%e 'e a#one, thou du##, do#tish,
stupid day& 2s not the 'idnight brighterS
The purest are to be 'asters of the $or#d, the #east kno$n, the strongest,
the 'idnightDsou#s, $ho are brighter and deeper than any day(
7 day, thou gropest for 'eS Thou fee#est for 'y happinessS For thee a' 2
rich, #oneso'e, a treasureDpit, a go#d cha'berS
7 $or#d, thou $antest 9ES ;' 2 $or#d#y for theeS ;' 2 spiritua# for theeS
;' 2 di%ine for theeS .ut day and $or#d, ye are too coarse,DD
DD/a%e c#e%erer hands, grasp after deeper happiness, after deeper
unhappiness, grasp after so'e GodL grasp not after 'e?
DD9ine unhappiness, 'y happiness is deep, thou strange day, but yet a' 2 no
God, no GodMsDhe##? *EEP 2S 2TS )7E(
4(
GodMs $oe is deeper, thou strange $or#d& Grasp at GodMs $oe, not at 'e&
)hat a' 2& ; drunken s$eet #yre,DD
DD; 'idnightD#yre, a be##Dfrog, $hich no one understandeth, but $hich 98ST
speak before deaf ones, ye higher 'en& For ye do not understand 'e&
Gone& Gone& 7 youth& 7 noontide& 7 afternoon& No$ ha%e co'e e%ening
and night and 'idnight,DDthe dog ho$#eth, the $ind?
DD2s the $ind not a dogS 2t $hineth, it barketh, it ho$#eth( ;h& ;h& ho$
she sigheth& ho$ she #augheth, ho$ she $heezeth and panteth, the 'idnight&
/o$ she just no$ speaketh sober#y, this drunken poetess& hath she perhaps
o%erdrunk her drunkennessS hath she beco'e o%era$akeS doth she ru'inateS
DD/er $oe doth she ru'inate o%er, in a drea', the o#d, deep 'idnightDDand
sti## 'ore her joy( For joy, a#though $oe be deep, T7Q 2S *EEPE- ST2::
T/;N G-2EF ";N .E(
0(
Thou grapeD%ine& )hy dost thou praise 'eS /a%e 2 not cut thee& 2 a'
crue#, thou b#eedestDD? $hat 'eaneth thy praise of 'y drunken crue#tyS
N)hate%er hath beco'e perfect, e%erything 'atureDD$anteth to die&N so
sayest thou( .#essed, b#essed be the %intnerMs knife& .ut e%erything
i''ature $anteth to #i%e? a#as&
)oe saith? N/ence& Go& ;$ay, thou $oe&N .ut e%erything that suffereth
$anteth to #i%e, that it 'ay beco'e 'ature and #i%e#y and #onging,
DD:onging for the further, the higher, the brighter( N2 $ant heirs,N so
saith e%erything that suffereth, N2 $ant chi#dren, 2 do not $ant 9QSE:F,NDD
Toy, ho$e%er, doth not $ant heirs, it doth not $ant chi#dren,DDjoy $anteth
itse#f, it $anteth eternity, it $anteth recurrence, it $anteth e%erything
eterna##yD#ikeDitse#f(
)oe saith? N.reak, b#eed, thou heart& )ander, thou #eg& Thou $ing, f#y&
7n$ard& up$ard& thou pain&N )e##& "heer up& 7 'ine o#d heart? )7E
S;2T/? N/EN"E& G7&N
!6(
Qe higher 'en, $hat think yeS ;' 2 a soothsayerS 7r a drea'erS 7r a
drunkardS 7r a drea'DreaderS 7r a 'idnightDbe##S
7r a drop of de$S 7r a fu'e and fragrance of eternityS /ear ye it notS
S'e## ye it notS Tust no$ hath 'y $or#d beco'e perfect, 'idnight is a#so
'idDday,DD
Pain is a#so a joy, curse is a#so a b#essing, night is a#so a sun,DDgo
a$ay& or ye $i## #earn that a sage is a#so a foo#(
Said ye e%er Qea to one joyS 7 'y friends, then said ye Qea a#so unto ;::
$oe( ;## things are en#inked, en#aced and ena'oured,DD
DD)anted ye e%er once to co'e t$iceL said ye e%er? NThou p#easest 'e,
happiness& 2nstant& 9o'ent&N then $anted ye ;:: to co'e back again&
DD;## ane$, a## eterna#, a## en#inked, en#aced and ena'oured, 7h, then did
ye :7,E the $or#d,DD
DDQe eterna# ones, ye #o%e it eterna##y and for a## ti'e? and a#so unto
$oe do ye say? /ence& Go& but co'e back& F7- T7QS ;:: );NTDDETE-N2TQ&
!!(
;## joy $anteth the eternity of a## things, it $anteth honey, it $anteth
#ees, it $anteth drunken 'idnight, it $anteth gra%es, it $anteth gra%eD
tearsM conso#ation, it $anteth gi#ded e%eningDredDD
DD)/;T doth not joy $ant& it is thirstier, heartier, hungrier, 'ore
frightfu#, 'ore 'ysterious, than a## $oe? it $anteth 2TSE:F, it biteth
into 2TSE:F, the ringMs $i## $ritheth in it,DD
DD2t $anteth #o%e, it $anteth hate, it is o%erDrich, it besto$eth, it
thro$eth a$ay, it beggeth for so'e one to take fro' it, it thanketh the
taker, it $ou#d fain be hated,DD
DDSo rich is joy that it thirsteth for $oe, for he##, for hate, for sha'e,
for the #a'e, for the )7-:*,DDfor this $or#d, 7h, ye kno$ it indeed&
Qe higher 'en, for you doth it #ong, this joy, this irrepressib#e, b#essed
joyDDfor your $oe, ye fai#ures& For fai#ures, #ongeth a## eterna# joy(
For joys a## $ant the'se#%es, therefore do they a#so $ant grief& 7
happiness, 7 pain& 7h break, thou heart& Qe higher 'en, do #earn it, that
joys $ant eternity(
DDToys $ant the eternity of ;:: things, they );NT *EEP, P-7F78N* ETE-N2TQ&
!C(
/a%e ye no$ #earned 'y songS /a%e ye di%ined $hat it $ou#d sayS )e##&
"heer up& Qe higher 'en, sing no$ 'y rounde#ay&
Sing no$ yourse#%es the song, the na'e of $hich is N7nce 'ore,N the
signification of $hich is N8nto a## eternity&NDDsing, ye higher 'en,
ZarathustraMs rounde#ay&
7 'an& Take heed&
)hat saith deep 'idnightMs %oice indeedS
N2 s#ept 'y s#eepDD,
NFro' deepest drea' 2M%e $oke, and p#ead?DD
NThe $or#d is deep,
N;nd deeper than the day cou#d read(
N*eep is its $oeDD,
NToyDDdeeper sti## than grief can be?
N)oe saith? /ence& Go&
N.ut joys a## $ant eternityD,
ND)ant deep, profound eternity&N
:RRR( T/E S2GN(
2n the 'orning, ho$e%er, after this night, Zarathustra ju'ped up fro' his
couch, and, ha%ing girded his #oins, he ca'e out of his ca%e g#o$ing and
strong, #ike a 'orning sun co'ing out of g#oo'y 'ountains(
NThou great star,N spake he, as he had spoken once before, Nthou deep eye
of happiness, $hat $ou#d be a## thy happiness if thou hadst not T/7SE for
$ho' thou shinest&
;nd if they re'ained in their cha'bers $hi#st thou art a#ready a$ake, and
co'est and besto$est and distributest, ho$ $ou#d thy proud 'odesty upbraid
for it&
)e##& they sti## s#eep, these higher 'en, $hi#st X2X a' a$ake? T/EQ are
not 'y proper co'panions& Not for the' do 2 $ait here in 'y 'ountains(
;t 'y $ork 2 $ant to be, at 'y day? but they understand not $hat are the
signs of 'y 'orning, 'y stepDDis not for the' the a$akeningDca##(
They sti## s#eep in 'y ca%eL their drea' sti## drinketh at 'y drunken
songs( The audient ear for 9EDDthe 7.E*2ENT ear, is yet #acking in their
#i'bs(N
DDThis had Zarathustra spoken to his heart $hen the sun arose? then #ooked
he inUuiring#y a#oft, for he heard abo%e hi' the sharp ca## of his eag#e(
N)e##&N ca##ed he up$ards, Nthus is it p#easing and proper to 'e( 9ine
ani'a#s are a$ake, for 2 a' a$ake(
9ine eag#e is a$ake, and #ike 'e honoureth the sun( )ith eag#eDta#ons doth
it grasp at the ne$ #ight( Qe are 'y proper ani'a#sL 2 #o%e you(
.ut sti## do 2 #ack 'y proper 'en&NDD
Thus spake ZarathustraL then, ho$e%er, it happened that a## on a sudden he
beca'e a$are that he $as f#ocked around and f#uttered around, as if by
innu'erab#e birds,DDthe $hizzing of so 'any $ings, ho$e%er, and the
cro$ding around his head $as so great that he shut his eyes( ;nd %eri#y,
there ca'e do$n upon hi' as it $ere a c#oud, #ike a c#oud of arro$s $hich
poureth upon a ne$ ene'y( .ut beho#d, here it $as a c#oud of #o%e, and
sho$ered upon a ne$ friend(
N)hat happeneth unto 'eSN thought Zarathustra in his astonished heart, and
s#o$#y seated hi'se#f on the big stone $hich #ay c#ose to the exit fro' his
ca%e( .ut $hi#e he grasped about $ith his hands, around hi', abo%e hi' and
be#o$ hi', and repe##ed the tender birds, beho#d, there then happened to
hi' so'ething sti## stranger? for he grasped thereby una$ares into a 'ass
of thick, $ar', shaggy hairL at the sa'e ti'e, ho$e%er, there sounded
before hi' a roar,DDa #ong, soft #ionDroar(
NT/E S2GN "79ET/,N said Zarathustra, and a change ca'e o%er his heart( ;nd
in truth, $hen it turned c#ear before hi', there #ay a ye##o$, po$erfu#
ani'a# at his feet, resting its head on his knee,DDun$i##ing to #ea%e hi'
out of #o%e, and doing #ike a dog $hich again findeth its o#d 'aster( The
do%es, ho$e%er, $ere no #ess eager $ith their #o%e than the #ionL and
$hene%er a do%e $hisked o%er its nose, the #ion shook its head and $ondered
and #aughed(
)hen a## this $ent on Zarathustra spake on#y a $ord? N9Q "/2:*-EN ;-E
N2G/, 9Q "/2:*-ENNDD, then he beca'e Uuite 'ute( /is heart, ho$e%er, $as
#oosed, and fro' his eyes there dropped do$n tears and fe## upon his hands(
;nd he took no further notice of anything, but sat there 'otion#ess,
$ithout repe##ing the ani'a#s further( Then f#e$ the do%es to and fro, and
perched on his shou#der, and caressed his $hite hair, and did not tire of
their tenderness and joyousness( The strong #ion, ho$e%er, #icked a#$ays
the tears that fe## on ZarathustraMs hands, and roared and gro$#ed shy#y(
Thus did these ani'a#s do(DD
;## this $ent on for a #ong ti'e, or a short ti'e? for proper#y speaking,
there is N7 ti'e on earth for such thingsDD( 9ean$hi#e, ho$e%er, the
higher 'en had a$akened in ZarathustraMs ca%e, and 'arsha##ed the'se#%es
for a procession to go to 'eet Zarathustra, and gi%e hi' their 'orning
greeting? for they had found $hen they a$akened that he no #onger tarried
$ith the'( )hen, ho$e%er, they reached the door of the ca%e and the noise
of their steps had preceded the', the #ion started %io#ent#yL it turned
a$ay a## at once fro' Zarathustra, and roaring $i#d#y, sprang to$ards the
ca%e( The higher 'en, ho$e%er, $hen they heard the #ion roaring, cried a##
a#oud as $ith one %oice, f#ed back and %anished in an instant(
Zarathustra hi'se#f, ho$e%er, stunned and strange, rose fro' his seat,
#ooked around hi', stood there astonished, inUuired of his heart, bethought
hi'se#f, and re'ained a#one( N)hat did 2 hearSN said he at #ast, s#o$#y,
N$hat happened unto 'e just no$SN
.ut soon there ca'e to hi' his reco##ection, and he took in at a g#ance a##
that had taken p#ace bet$een yesterday and toDday( N/ere is indeed the
stone,N said he, and stroked his beard, Non 2T sat 2 yesterD'ornL and here
ca'e the soothsayer unto 'e, and here heard 2 first the cry $hich 2 heard
just no$, the great cry of distress(
7 ye higher 'en, Q78- distress $as it that the o#d soothsayer foreto#d to
'e yesterD'orn,DD
DD8nto your distress did he $ant to seduce and te'pt 'e? M7 Zarathustra,M
said he to 'e, M2 co'e to seduce thee to thy #ast sin(M
To 'y #ast sinSN cried Zarathustra, and #aughed angri#y at his o$n $ords?
N)/;T hath been reser%ed for 'e as 'y #ast sinSN
DD;nd once 'ore Zarathustra beca'e absorbed in hi'se#f, and sat do$n again
on the big stone and 'editated( Sudden#y he sprang up,DD
NFE::7)DS8FFE-2NG& FE::7)DS8FFE-2NG )2T/ T/E /2G/E- 9EN&N he cried out,
and his countenance changed into brass( N)e##& T/;TDDhath had its ti'e&
9y suffering and 'y fe##o$DsufferingDD$hat 'atter about the'& *o 2 then
stri%e after /;PP2NESSS 2 stri%e after 'y )7-W&
)e##& The #ion hath co'e, 'y chi#dren are nigh, Zarathustra hath gro$n
ripe, 'ine hour hath co'e?DD
This is 9Q 'orning, 9Q day beginneth? ;-2SE N7), ;-2SE, T/78 G-E;T
N77NT2*E&NDD
Thus spake Zarathustra and #eft his ca%e, g#o$ing and strong, #ike a
'orning sun co'ing out of g#oo'y 'ountains(
;PPEN*2R(
N7TES 7N NT/8S SP;WE Z;-;T/8ST-;N .Q ;NT/7NQ 9( :8*7,2"2(
2 ha%e had so'e opportunities of studying the conditions under $hich
Nietzsche is read in Ger'any, France, and Eng#and, and 2 ha%e found that,
in each of these countries, students of his phi#osophy, as if actuated by
precise#y si'i#ar 'oti%es and desires, and 'is#ed by the sa'e 'istaken
tactics on the part of 'ost pub#ishers, a## proceed in the sa'e happyDgoD
#ucky sty#e $hen Ntaking hi' up(N They ha%e had it said to the' that he
$rote $ithout any syste', and they %ery natura##y conc#ude that it does not
'atter in the #east $hether they begin $ith his first, third, or #ast book,
pro%ided they can obtain a fe$ %ague ideas as to $hat his #eading and 'ost
sensationa# princip#es $ere(
No$, it is c#ear that the book $ith the 'ost 'ysterious, start#ing, or
suggesti%e tit#e, $i## a#$ays stand the best chance of being purchased by
those $ho ha%e no other criteria to guide the' in their choice than the
aspect of a tit#eDpageL and this exp#ains $hy NThus Spake ZarathustraN is
a#'ost a#$ays the first and often the on#y one of NietzscheMs books that
fa##s into the hands of the uninitiated(
The tit#e suggests a## kinds of 'ysteriesL a g#ance at the chapterDheadings
Uuick#y confir's the suspicions a#ready aroused, and the subDtit#e? N;
.ook for ;## and NoneN, genera##y succeeds in dissipating the #ast doubts
the prospecti%e purchaser 'ay entertain concerning his fitness for the book
or its fitness for hi'( ;nd $hat happensS
NThus Spake ZarathustraN is taken ho'eL the reader, $ho perchance 'ay kno$
no 'ore concerning Nietzsche than a 'agazine artic#e has to#d hi', tries to
read it and, understanding #ess than ha#f he reads, probab#y ne%er gets
further than the second or third part,DDand then on#y to fee# con%inced
that Nietzsche hi'se#f $as Nrather hazyN as to $hat he $as ta#king about(
Such chapters as NThe "hi#d $ith the 9irrorN, N2n the /appy 2s#esN, NThe
Gra%eDSong,N N2''acu#ate Perception,N NThe Sti##est /ourN, NThe Se%en
Sea#sN, and 'any others, are a#'ost utter#y de%oid of 'eaning to a## those
$ho do not kno$ so'ething of NietzscheMs #ife, his ai's and his
friendships(
;s a 'atter of fact, NThus Spake ZarathustraN, though it is unUuestionab#y
NietzscheMs opus 'agnu', is by no 'eans the first of NietzscheMs $orks that
the beginner ought to undertake to read( The author hi'se#f refers to it
as the deepest $ork e%er offered to the Ger'an pub#ic, and e#se$here speaks
of his other $ritings as being necessary for the understanding of it( .ut
$hen it is re'e'bered that in Zarathustra $e not on#y ha%e the history of
his 'ost inti'ate experiences, friendships, feuds, disappoint'ents,
triu'phs and the #ike, but that the %ery for' in $hich they are narrated is
one $hich tends rather to obscure than to thro$ #ight upon the', the
difficu#ties $hich 'eet the reader $ho starts Uuite unprepared $i## be seen
to be rea##y for'idab#e(
Zarathustra, then,DDthis shado$y, a##egorica# persona#ity, speaking in
a##egories and parab#es, and at ti'es not e%en refraining fro' re#ating his
o$n drea'sDDis a figure $e can understand but %ery i'perfect#y if $e ha%e
no kno$#edge of his creator and counterpart, Friedrich NietzscheL and it
$ere therefore $e##, pre%ious to our study of the 'ore abstruse parts of
this book, if $e $ere to turn to so'e authoritati%e book on NietzscheMs
#ife and $orks and to read a## that is there said on the subject( Those
$ho can read Ger'an $i## find an exce##ent guide, in this respect, in Frau
FoersterDNietzscheMs exhausti%e and high#y interesting biography of her
brother? N*as :eben Friedrich NietzscheMsN @pub#ished by Nau'annAL $hi#e
the $orks of *eussen, -aou# -ichter, and .aroness 2sabe##e %on 8ngerD
Sternberg, $i## be found to thro$ usefu# and necessary #ight upon 'any
Uuestions $hich it $ou#d be difficu#t for a sister to touch upon(
2n regard to the actua# phi#osophica# %ie$s expounded in this $ork, there
is an exce##ent $ay of c#earing up any difficu#ties they 'ay present, and
that is by an appea# to NietzscheMs other $orks( ;gain and again, of
course, he $i## be found to express hi'se#f so c#ear#y that a## reference
to his other $ritings 'ay be dispensed $ithL but $here this is not the
case, the ad%ice he hi'se#f gi%es is after a## the best to be fo##o$ed
here, %iz(?DDto regard such $orks as? NToyfu# ScienceN, N.eyond Good and
E%i#N, NThe Genea#ogy of 9ora#sN, NThe T$i#ight of the 2do#sN, NThe
;ntichristN, NThe )i## to Po$erN, etc(, etc(, as the necessary preparation
for NThus Spake ZarathustraN(
These directions, though they are by no 'eans si'p#e to carry out, see' at
#east to possess the Uua#ity of definiteness and straightfor$ardness(
NFo##o$ the' and a## $i## be c#ear,N 2 see' to i'p#y( .ut 2 regret to say
that this is not rea##y the case( For 'y experience te##s 'e that e%en
after the abo%e directions ha%e been fo##o$ed $ith the greatest possib#e
zea#, the student $i## sti## ha#t in perp#exity before certain passages in
the book before us, and $onder $hat they 'ean( No$, it is $ith the %ie$ of
gi%ing a #itt#e additiona# he#p to a## those $ho find the'se#%es in this
position that 2 proceed to put forth 'y o$n persona# interpretation of the
'ore abstruse passages in this $ork(
2n offering this #itt#e co''entary to the Nietzsche student, 2 shou#d #ike
it to be understood that 2 'ake no c#ai' as to its infa##ibi#ity or
indispensabi#ity( 2t represents but an atte'pt on 'y partDDa %ery feeb#e
one perhapsDDto gi%e the reader $hat #itt#e he#p 2 can in sur'ounting
difficu#ties $hich a #ong study of NietzscheMs #ife and $orks has enab#ed
'e, partia##y 2 hope, to o%erco'e(
(((
Perhaps it $ou#d be as $e## to start out $ith a broad and rapid sketch of
Nietzsche as a $riter on 9ora#s, E%o#ution, and Socio#ogy, so that the
reader 'ay be prepared to pick out for hi'se#f, so to speak, a## passages
in this $ork bearing in any $ay upon NietzscheMs %ie$s in those three
i'portant branches of kno$#edge(
@;(A Nietzsche and 9ora#ity(
2n 'ora#ity, Nietzsche starts out by adopting the position of the
re#ati%ist( /e says there are no abso#ute %a#ues NgoodN and Ne%i#NL these
are 'ere 'eans adopted by a## in order to acUuire po$er to 'aintain their
p#ace in the $or#d, or to beco'e supre'e( 2t is the #ionMs good to de%our
an ante#ope( 2t is the deadD#eaf butterf#yMs good to te## a foe a
fa#sehood( For $hen the deadD#eaf butterf#y is in danger, it c#ings to the
side of a t$ig, and $hat it says to its foe is practica##y this? N2 a' not
a butterf#y, 2 a' a dead #eaf, and can be of no use to thee(N This is a
#ie $hich is good to the butterf#y, for it preser%es it( 2n nature e%ery
species of organic being instincti%e#y adopts and practises those acts
$hich 'ost conduce to the pre%a#ence or supre'acy of its kind( 7nce the
'ost fa%ourab#e order of conduct is found, pro%ed efficient and
estab#ished, it beco'es the ru#ing 'ora#ity of the species that adopts it
and bears the' a#ong to %ictory( ;## species 'ust not and cannot %a#ue
a#ike, for $hat is the #ionMs good is the ante#opeMs e%i# and %ice %ersa(
"oncepts of good and e%i# are therefore, in their origin, 'ere#y a 'eans to
an end, they are expedients for acUuiring po$er(
;pp#ying this princip#e to 'ankind, Nietzsche attacked "hristian 'ora#
%a#ues( /e dec#ared the' to be, #ike a## other 'ora#s, 'ere#y an expedient
for protecting a certain type of 'an( 2n the case of "hristianity this
type $as, according to Nietzsche, a #o$ one(
"onf#icting 'ora# codes ha%e been no 'ore than the conf#icting $eapons of
different c#asses of 'enL for in 'ankind there is a continua# $ar bet$een
the po$erfu#, the nob#e, the strong, and the $e##Dconstituted on the one
side, and the i'potent, the 'ean, the $eak, and the i##Dconstituted on the
other( The $ar is a $ar of 'ora# princip#es( The 'ora#ity of the po$erfu#
c#ass, Nietzsche ca##s N7.:ED or 9;STE-D97-;:2TQL that of the $eak and
subordinate c#ass he ca##s S:;,ED97-;:2TQ( 2n the first 'ora#ity it is the
eag#e $hich, #ooking do$n upon a bro$sing #a'b, contends that Neating #a'b
is good(N 2n the second, the s#a%eD'ora#ity, it is the #a'b $hich, #ooking
up fro' the s$ard, b#eats dissenting#y? NEating #a'b is e%i#(N
@.(A The 9asterD and S#a%eD9ora#ity "o'pared(
The first 'ora#ity is acti%e, creati%e, *ionysian( The second is passi%e,
defensi%e,DDto it be#ongs the Nstrugg#e for existence(N
)here atte'pts ha%e not been 'ade to reconci#e the t$o 'ora#ities, they 'ay
be described as fo##o$s?DD;## is G77* in the nob#e 'ora#ity $hich proceeds
fro' strength, po$er, hea#th, $e##Dconstitutedness, happiness, and
a$fu#nessL for, the 'oti%e force behind the peop#e practising it is Nthe
strugg#e for po$er(N The antithesis Ngood and badN to this first c#ass
'eans the sa'e as Nnob#eN and Ndespicab#e(N N.adN in the 'asterD'ora#ity
'ust be app#ied to the co$ard, to a## acts that spring fro' $eakness, to
the 'an $ith Nan eye to the 'ain chance,N $ho $ou#d forsake e%erything in
order to #i%e(
)ith the second, the s#a%eD'ora#ity, the case is different( There,
inas'uch as the co''unity is an oppressed, suffering, une'ancipated, and
$eary one, a## T/;T $i## be he#d to be good $hich a##e%iates the state of
suffering( Pity, the ob#iging hand, the $ar' heart, patience, industry,
and hu'i#ityDDthese are unUuestionab#y the Uua#ities $e sha## here find
f#ooded $ith the #ight of appro%a# and ad'irationL because they are the
'ost 8SEF8: Uua#itiesDDL they 'ake #ife endurab#e, they are of assistance
in the Nstrugg#e for existenceN $hich is the 'oti%e force behind the peop#e
practising this 'ora#ity( To this c#ass, a## that is ;)F8: is bad, in fact
it is T/E e%i# par exce##ence( Strength, hea#th, superabundance of ani'a#
spirits and po$er, are regarded $ith hate, suspicion, and fear by the
subordinate c#ass(
No$ Nietzsche be#ie%ed that the first or the nob#eD'ora#ity conduced to an
ascent in the #ine of #ifeL because it $as creati%e and acti%e( 7n the
other hand, he be#ie%ed that the second or s#a%eD'ora#ity, $here it beca'e
para'ount, #ed to degeneration, because it $as passi%e and defensi%e,
$anting 'ere#y to keep those $ho practised it a#i%e( /ence his earnest
ad%ocacy of nob#eD'ora#ity(
@"(A Nietzsche and E%o#ution(
Nietzsche as an e%o#utionist 2 sha## ha%e occasion to define and discuss in
the course of these notes @see Notes on "hapter :,2(, par(!6, and on
"hapter :,22(A( For the present #et it suffice for us to kno$ that he
accepted the N*e%e#op'ent /ypothesisN as an exp#anation of the origin of
species? but he did not ha#t $here 'ost natura#ists ha%e ha#ted( /e by no
'eans regarded 'an as the highest possib#e being $hich e%o#ution cou#d
arri%e atL for though his physica# de%e#op'ent 'ay ha%e reached its #i'it,
this is not the case $ith his 'enta# or spiritua# attributes( 2f the
process be a factL if things ha%e .E"79E $hat they are, then, he contends,
$e 'ay describe no #i'it to 'anMs aspirations( 2f he strugg#ed up fro'
barbaris', and sti## 'ore re'ote#y fro' the #o$er Pri'ates, his idea#
shou#d be to surpass 'an hi'se#f and reach Super'an @see especia##y the
Pro#ogueA(
@*(A Nietzsche and Socio#ogy(
Nietzsche as a socio#ogist ai's at an aristocratic arrange'ent of society(
/e $ou#d ha%e us rear an idea# race( /onest and truthfu# in inte##ectua#
'atters, he cou#d not e%en think that 'en are eUua#( N)ith these preachers
of eUua#ity $i## 2 not be 'ixed up and confounded( For thus speaketh
justice unto 9E? M9en are not eUua#(MN /e sees precise#y in this
ineUua#ity a purpose to be ser%ed, a condition to be exp#oited( NE%ery
e#e%ation of the type M'an,MN he $rites in N.eyond Good and E%i#N, Nhas
hitherto been the $ork of an aristocratic societyDDand so $i## it a#$ays
beDDa society be#ie%ing in a #ong sca#e of gradations of rank and
differences of $orth a'ong hu'an beings(N
Those $ho are sufficient#y interested to desire to read his o$n detai#ed
account of the society he $ou#d fain estab#ish, $i## find an exce##ent
passage in ;phoris' K1 of NThe ;ntichristN(
(((
P;-T 2( T/E P-7:7G8E(
2n Part 2( inc#uding the Pro#ogue, no %ery great difficu#ties $i## appear(
ZarathustraMs habit of designating a $ho#e c#ass of 'en or a $ho#e schoo#
of thought by a sing#e fitting nickna'e 'ay perhaps #ead to a #itt#e
confusion at firstL but, as a ru#e, $hen the genera# drift of his argu'ents
is grasped, it reUuires but a s#ight effort of the i'agination to disco%er
$ho' he is referring to( 2n the ninth paragraph of the Pro#ogue, for
instance, it is Uuite ob%ious that N/erds'enN in the %erse N/erds'en, 2
say, etc(, etc(,N stands for a## those toDday $ho are the ad%ocates of
gregariousnessDDof the antDhi##( ;nd $hen our author says? N; robber
sha## Zarathustra be ca##ed by the herds'en,N it is c#ear that these $ords
'ay be taken a#'ost #itera##y fro' one $hose idea# $as the rearing of a
higher aristocracy( ;gain, Nthe good and just,N throughout the book, is
the expression used in referring to the se#fDrighteous of 'odern ti'es,DD
those $ho are Uuite sure that they kno$ a## that is to be kno$n concerning
good and e%i#, and are satisfied that the %a#ues their #itt#e $or#d of
tradition has handed do$n to the', are destined to ru#e 'ankind as #ong as
it #asts(
2n the #ast paragraph of the Pro#ogue, %erse 1, Zarathustra gi%es us a
foretaste of his teaching concerning the big and the #itt#e sagacities,
expounded subseUuent#y( /e says he $ou#d he $ere as $ise as his serpentL
this desire $i## be found exp#ained in the discourse entit#ed NThe
*espisers of the .odyN, $hich 2 sha## ha%e occasion to refer to #ater(
(((
T/E *2S"78-SES(
"hapter 2( The Three 9eta'orphoses(
This opening discourse is a parab#e in $hich Zarathustra disc#oses the
'enta# de%e#op'ent of a## creators of ne$ %a#ues( 2t is the story of a
#ife $hich reaches its consu''ation in attaining to a second ingenuousness
or in returning to chi#dhood( Nietzsche, the supposed anarchist, here
p#ain#y disc#ai's a## re#ationship $hate%er to anarchy, for he sho$s us
that on#y by bearing the burdens of the existing #a$ and sub'itting to it
patient#y, as the ca'e# sub'its to being #aden, does the free spirit
acUuire that ascendancy o%er tradition $hich enab#es hi' to 'eet and 'aster
the dragon NThou sha#t,NDDthe dragon $ith the %a#ues of a thousand years
g#ittering on its sca#es( There are t$o #essons in this discourse? first,
that in order to create one 'ust be as a #itt#e chi#dL second#y, that it is
on#y through existing #a$ and order that one attains to that height fro'
$hich ne$ #a$ and ne$ order 'ay be pro'u#gated(
"hapter 22( The ;cade'ic "hairs of ,irtue(
;#'ost the $ho#e of this is Uuite co'prehensib#e( 2t is a discourse
against a## those $ho confound %irtue $ith ta'eness and s'ug ease, and $ho
regard as %irtuous on#y that $hich pro'otes security and tends to deepen
s#eep(
"hapter 2,( The *espisers of the .ody(
/ere Zarathustra gi%es na'es to the inte##ect and the instinctsL he ca##s
the one Nthe #itt#e sagacityN and the #atter Nthe big sagacity(N
SchopenhauerMs teaching concerning the inte##ect is fu##y endorsed here(
N;n instru'ent of thy body is a#so thy #itt#e sagacity, 'y brother, $hich
thou ca##est Mspirit,MN says Zarathustra( Fro' beginning to end it is a
$arning to those $ho $ou#d think too #ight#y of the instincts and undu#y
exa#t the inte##ect and its deri%ati%es? -eason and 8nderstanding(
"hapter 2R( The Preachers of *eath(
This is an ana#ysis of the psycho#ogy of a## those $ho ha%e the Ne%i# eyeN
and are pessi'ists by %irtue of their constitutions(
"hapter R,( The Thousand and 7ne Goa#s(
2n this discourse Zarathustra opens his exposition of the doctrine of
re#ati%ity in 'ora#ity, and dec#ares a## 'ora#ity to be a 'ere 'eans to
po$er( Need#ess to say that %erses 0, !6, !!, and !C refer to the Greeks,
the Persians, the Te$s, and the Ger'ans respecti%e#y( 2n the penu#ti'ate
%erse he 'akes kno$n his disco%ery concerning the root of 'odern Nihi#is'
and indifference,DDi(e(, that 'odern 'an has no goa#, no ai', no idea#s
@see Note ;A(
"hapter R,222( 7#d and Qoung )o'en(
NietzscheMs %ie$s on $o'en ha%e either to be #o%ed at first sight or they
beco'e perhaps the greatest obstac#e in the $ay of those $ho other$ise
$ou#d be inc#ined to accept his phi#osophy( )o'en especia##y, of course,
ha%e been taught to dis#ike the', because it has been ru'oured that his
%ie$s are unfriend#y to the'se#%es( No$, to 'y 'ind, a## this is pure
'isunderstanding and error(
Ger'an phi#osophers, thanks to Schopenhauer, ha%e earned rather a bad na'e
for their %ie$s on $o'en( 2t is a#'ost i'possib#e for one of the' to $rite
a #ine on the subject, ho$e%er kind#y he 'ay do so, $ithout being suspected
of $ishing to open a crusade against the fair sex( *espite the fact,
therefore, that a## NietzscheMs %ie$s in this respect $ere dictated to hi'
by the profoundest #o%eL despite ZarathustraMs reser%ation in this
discourse, that N$ith $o'en nothing @that can be saidA is i'possib#e,N and
in the face of other o%er$he#'ing e%idence to the contrary, Nietzsche is
uni%ersa##y reported to ha%e 'is son pied dans #e p#at, $here the fe'a#e
sex is concerned( ;nd $hat is the funda'enta# doctrine $hich has gi%en
rise to so 'uch bitterness and a%ersionSDD9ere#y this? that the sexes are
at botto' ;NT;G7N2ST2"DDthat is to say, as different as b#ue is fro'
ye##o$, and that the best possib#e 'eans of rearing anything approaching a
desirab#e race is to preser%e and to foster this profound hosti#ity( )hat
Nietzsche stri%es to co'bat and to o%erthro$ is the 'odern de'ocratic
tendency $hich is s#o$#y #abouring to #e%e# a## thingsDDe%en the sexes(
/is Uuarre# is not $ith $o'enDD$hat indeed cou#d be 'ore undignifiedSDDit
is $ith those $ho $ou#d destroy the natura# re#ationship bet$een the sexes,
by 'odifying either the one or the other $ith a %ie$ to 'aking the' 'ore
a#ike( The hu'an $or#d is just as dependent upon $o'enMs po$ers as upon
'enMs( 2t is $o'enMs strongest and 'ost %a#uab#e instincts $hich he#p to
deter'ine $ho are to be the fathers of the next generation( .y destroying
these particu#ar instincts, that is to say by atte'pting to 'ascu#inise
$o'an, and to fe'inise 'en, $e jeopardise the future of our peop#e( The
genera# de'ocratic 'o%e'ent of 'odern ti'es, in its frantic strugg#e to
'itigate a## differences, is no$ in%ading e%en the $or#d of sex( 2t is
against this 'o%e'ent that Nietzsche raises his %oiceL he $ou#d ha%e $o'an
beco'e e%er 'ore $o'an and 'an beco'e e%er 'ore 'an( 7n#y thus, and he is
undoubted#y right, can their co'bined instincts #ead to the exce##ence of
hu'anity( -egarded in this #ight, a## his %ie$s on $o'an appear not on#y
necessary but just @see Note on "hapter :,2(, par( C!(A
2t is interesting to obser%e that the #ast #ine of the discourse, $hich has
so freUuent#y been used by $o'en as a $eapon against NietzscheMs %ie$s
concerning the', $as suggested to Nietzsche by a $o'an @see N*as :eben F(
NietzscheMsNA(
"hapter RR2( ,o#untary *eath(
2n regard to this discourse, 2 shou#d on#y #ike to point out that Nietzsche
had a particu#ar a%ersion to the $ord NsuicideNDDse#fD'urder( /e dis#iked
the e%i# it suggested, and in rechristening the act ,o#untary *eath, i(e(,
the death that co'es fro' no other hand than oneMs o$n, he $as desirous of
e#e%ating it to the position it he#d in c#assica# antiUuity @see ;phoris'
FP in NThe T$i#ight of the 2do#sNA(
"hapter RR22( The .esto$ing ,irtue(
;n i'portant aspect of NietzscheMs phi#osophy is brought to #ight in this
discourse( /is teaching, as is $e## kno$n, p#aces the ;ristote#ian 'an of
spirit, abo%e a## others in the natura# di%isions of 'an( The 'an $ith
o%erf#o$ing strength, both of 'ind and body, $ho 'ust discharge this
strength or perish, is the Nietzschean idea#( To such a 'an, gi%ing fro'
his o%erf#o$ beco'es a necessityL besto$ing de%e#ops into a 'eans of
existence, and this is the on#y gi%ing, the on#y charity, that Nietzsche
recognises( 2n paragraph F of the discourse, $e read ZarathustraMs hea#thy
exhortation to his discip#es to beco'e independent thinkers and to find
the'se#%es before they #earn any 'ore fro' hi' @see Notes on "hapters :,2(,
par( K, and :RR222(, pars( !6, !!A(
(((
P;-T 22(
"hapter RR222( The "hi#d $ith the 9irror(
Nietzsche te##s us here, in a poetica# for', ho$ deep#y grie%ed he $as by
the 'anifo#d 'isinterpretations and 'isunderstandings $hich $ere beco'ing
rife concerning his pub#ications( /e does not recognise hi'se#f in the
'irror of pub#ic opinion, and recoi#s terrified fro' the distorted
ref#ection of his features( 2n %erse C6 he gi%es us a hint $hich it $ere
$e## not to pass o%er too #ight#yL for, in the introduction to NThe
Genea#ogy of 9ora#sN @$ritten in !441A he finds it necessary to refer to
the 'atter again and $ith greater precision( The point is this, that a
creator of ne$ %a#ues 'eets $ith his surest and strongest obstac#es in the
%ery spirit of the #anguage $hich is at his disposa#( )ords, #ike a##
other 'anifestations of an e%o#%ing race, are sta'ped $ith the %a#ues that
ha%e #ong been para'ount in that race( No$, the origina# thinker $ho finds
hi'se#f co'pe##ed to use the current speech of his country in order to
i'part ne$ and hitherto untried %ie$s to his fe##o$s, i'poses a task upon
the natura# 'eans of co''unication $hich it is tota##y unfitted to
perfor',DDhence the obscurities and pro#ixities $hich are so freUuent#y 'et
$ith in the $ritings of origina# thinkers( 2n the N*a$n of *ayN, Nietzsche
actua##y cautions young $riters against T/E *;NGE- 7F ;::7)2NG T/E2-
T/78G/TS T7 .E 978:*E* .Q T/E )7-*S ;T T/E2- *2SP7S;:(
"hapter RR2,( 2n the /appy 2s#es(
)hi#e $riting this, Nietzsche is supposed to ha%e been thinking of the
is#and of 2schia $hich $as u#ti'ate#y destroyed by an earthUuake( /is
teaching here is Uuite c#ear( /e $as a'ong the first thinkers of Europe to
o%erco'e the pessi'is' $hich god#essness genera##y brings in its $ake( /e
points to creating as the surest sa#%ation fro' the suffering $hich is a
conco'itant of a## higher #ife( N)hat $ou#d there be to create,N he asks,
Nif there $ereDDGodsSN /is idea#, the Super'an, #ends hi' the cheerfu#ness
necessary to the o%erco'ing of that despair usua##y attendant upon
god#essness and upon the apparent ai'#essness of a $or#d $ithout a god(
"hapter RR2R( The Tarantu#as(
The tarantu#as are the Socia#ists and *e'ocrats( This discourse offers us
an ana#ysis of their 'enta# attitude( Nietzsche refuses to be confounded
$ith those resentfu# and re%engefu# ones $ho conde'n society F-79 .E:7),
and $hose criticis' is on#y suppressed en%y( NThere are those $ho preach
'y doctrine of #ife,N he says of the Nietzschean Socia#ists, Nand are at
the sa'e ti'e preachers of eUua#ity and tarantu#asN @see Notes on "hapter
R:( and "hapter :2(A(
"hapter RRR( The Fa'ous )ise 7nes(
This refers to a## those phi#osophers hitherto, $ho ha%e run in the harness
of estab#ished %a#ues and ha%e not risked their reputation $ith the peop#e
in pursuit of truth( The phi#osopher, ho$e%er, as Nietzsche understood
hi', is a 'an $ho creates ne$ %a#ues, and thus #eads 'ankind in a ne$
direction(
"hapter RRR222( The Gra%eDSong(
/ere Zarathustra sings about the idea#s and friendships of his youth(
,erses C1 to F! undoubted#y refer to -ichard )agner @see Note on "hapter
:R,(A(
"hapter RRR2,( Se#fDSurpassing(
2n this discourse $e get the best exposition in the $ho#e book of
NietzscheMs doctrine of the )i## to Po$er( 2 go into this Uuestion
thorough#y in the Note on "hapter :,22(
Nietzsche $as not an iconoc#ast fro' choice( Those $ho hasti#y c#ass hi'
$ith the anarchists @or the Progressi%ists of the #ast centuryA fai# to
understand the high estee' in $hich he a#$ays he#d both #a$ and discip#ine(
2n %erse E! of this 'ost decisi%e discourse he tru#y exp#ains his position
$hen he says? N(((he $ho hath to be a creator in good and e%i#DD%eri#y he
hath first to be a destroyer, and break %a#ues in pieces(N This teaching
in regard to se#fDcontro# is e%idence enough of his re%erence for #a$(
"hapter RRR,( The Sub#i'e 7nes(
These be#ong to a type $hich Nietzsche did not a#together dis#ike, but
$hich he $ou#d fain ha%e rendered 'ore subt#e and p#astic( 2t is the type
that takes #ife and itse#f too serious#y, that ne%er sur'ounts the ca'e#D
stage 'entioned in the first discourse, and that is obdurate#y sub#i'e and
earnest( To be ab#e to s'i#e $hi#e speaking of #ofty things and N7T T7 .E
7PP-ESSE* by the', is the secret of rea# greatness( /e $hose hand tre'b#es
$hen it #ays ho#d of a beautifu# thing, has the Uua#ity of re%erence,
$ithout the artistMs une'barrassed friendship $ith the beautifu#( /ence
the 'istakes $hich ha%e arisen in regard to confounding Nietzsche $ith his
extre'e opposites the anarchists and agitators( For $hat they dare to
touch and break $ith the i'pudence and irre%erence of the unappreciati%e,
he see's #ike$ise to touch and break,DDbut $ith other fingersDD$ith the
fingers of the #o%ing and une'barrassed artist $ho is on good ter's $ith
the beautifu# and $ho fee#s ab#e to create it and to enhance it $ith his
touch( The Uuestion of taste p#ays an i'portant part in NietzscheMs
phi#osophy, and %erses 0, !6 of this discourse exact#y state NietzscheMs
u#ti'ate %ie$s on the subject( 2n the NSpirit of Gra%ityN, he actua##y
cries?DDNNeither a good nor a bad taste, but 9Q taste, of $hich 2 ha%e no
#onger either sha'e or secrecy(N
"hapter RRR,2( The :and of "u#ture(
This is a poetica# epito'e of so'e of the scathing criticis' of scho#ars
$hich appears in the first of the NThoughts out of SeasonNDDthe po#e'ica#
pa'ph#et @$ritten in !41FA against *a%id Strauss and his schoo#( /e
reproaches his for'er co##eagues $ith being steri#e and sho$s the' that
their steri#ity is the resu#t of their not be#ie%ing in anything( N/e $ho
had to create, had a#$ays his presaging drea's and astra# pre'onitionsDDand
be#ie%ed in be#ie%ing&N @See Note on "hapter :RR,22(A 2n the #ast t$o
%erses he re%ea#s the nature of his a#truis'( /o$ far it differs fro' that
of "hristianity $e ha%e a#ready read in the discourse NNeighbourD:o%eN, but
here he te##s us definite#y the nature of his #o%e to 'ankindL he exp#ains
$hy he $as co'pe##ed to assai# the "hristian %a#ues of pity and excessi%e
#o%e of the neighbour, not on#y because they are s#a%eD%a#ues and therefore
tend to pro'ote degeneration @see Note .(A, but because he cou#d on#y #o%e
his chi#drenMs #and, the undisco%ered #and in a re'ote seaL because he
$ou#d fain retrie%e the errors of his fathers in his chi#dren(
"hapter RRR,22( 2''acu#ate Perception(
;n i'portant feature of NietzscheMs interpretation of :ife is disc#osed in
this discourse( ;s .uck#e suggests in his N2nf#uence of )o'en on the
Progress of Wno$#edgeN, the scientific spirit of the in%estigator is both
he#ped and supp#e'ented by the #atterMs e'otions and persona#ity, and the
di%orce of a## e'otiona#is' and indi%idua# te'pera'ent fro' science is a
fata# step to$ards steri#ity( Zarathustra abjures a## those $ho $ou#d fain
turn an 29PE-S7N;: eye upon nature and conte'p#ate her pheno'ena $ith that
pure objecti%ity to $hich the scientific idea#ists of toDday $ou#d so 'uch
#ike to attain( /e accuses such idea#ists of hypocrisy and gui#eL he says
they #ack innocence in their desires and therefore s#ander a## desiring(
"hapter RRR,222( Scho#ars(
This is a record of NietzscheMs fina# breach $ith his for'er co##eaguesDD
the scho#ars of Ger'any( ;#ready after the pub#ication of the N.irth of
TragedyN, nu'bers of Ger'an phi#o#ogists and professiona# phi#osophers had
denounced hi' as one $ho had strayed too far fro' their f#ock, and his
#ectures at the 8ni%ersity of .a#e $ere deserted in conseUuenceL but it $as
not unti# !410, $hen he fina##y se%ered a## connection $ith 8ni%ersity
$ork, that he 'ay be said to ha%e attained to the freedo' and independence
$hich sta'p this discourse(
"hapter RRR2R( Poets(
Peop#e ha%e so'eti'es said that Nietzsche had no sense of hu'our( 2 ha%e
no intention of defending hi' here against such foo#ish criticsL 2 shou#d
on#y #ike to point out to the reader that $e ha%e hi' here at his best,
poking fun at hi'se#f, and at his fe##o$Dpoets @see Note on "hapter :R222(,
pars( !P, !1, !4, !0, C6A(
"hapter R:( Great E%ents(
/ere $e see' to ha%e a puzz#e( Zarathustra hi'se#f, $hi#e re#ating his
experience $ith the fireDdog to his discip#es, fai#s to get the' interested
in his narrati%e, and $e a#so 'ay be on#y too ready to turn o%er these
pages under the i'pression that they are #itt#e 'ore than a 'ere phantasy
or poetica# f#ight( ZarathustraMs inter%ie$ $ith the fireDdog is, ho$e%er,
of great i'portance( 2n it $e find Nietzsche face to face $ith the
creature he 'ost sincere#y #oathesDDthe spirit of re%o#ution, and $e obtain
fresh hints concerning his hatred of the anarchist and rebe#( NMFreedo'M
ye a## roar 'ost eager#y,N he says to the fireDdog, Nbut 2 ha%e un#earned
the be#ief in MGreat E%entsM $hen there is 'uch roaring and s'oke about
the'( Not around the in%entors of ne$ noise, but around the in%entors of
ne$ %a#ues, doth the $or#d re%o#%eL 2N;8*2.:Q it re%o#%eth(N
"hapter R:2( The Soothsayer(
This refers, of course, to Schopenhauer( Nietzsche, as is $e## kno$n, $as
at one ti'e an ardent fo##o$er of Schopenhauer( /e o%erca'e Pessi'is' by
disco%ering an object in existenceL he sa$ the possibi#ity of raising
society to a higher #e%e# and preached the profoundest 7pti'is' in
conseUuence(
"hapter R:22( -ede'ption(
Zarathustra here addresses cripp#es( /e te##s the' of other cripp#esDDthe
G-E;T 9EN in this $or#d $ho ha%e one organ or facu#ty inordinate#y
de%e#oped at the cost of their other facu#ties( This is doubt#ess a
reference to a fact $hich is too often noticeab#e in the case of so 'any of
the $or#dMs giants in art, science, or re#igion( 2n %erse !0 $e are to#d
$hat Nietzsche ca##ed -ede'ptionDDthat is to say, the abi#ity to say of a##
that is past? NThus $ou#d 2 ha%e it(N The in abi#ity to say this, and the
resent'ent $hich resu#ts therefro', he regards as the source of a## our
fee#ings of re%enge, and a## our desires to punishDDpunish'ent 'eaning to
hi' 'ere#y a euphe'is' for the $ord re%enge, in%ented in order to sti## our
consciences( /e $ho can be proud of his ene'ies, $ho can be gratefu# to
the' for the obstac#es they ha%e put in his $ayL he $ho can regard his
$orst ca#a'ity as but the extra strain on the bo$ of his #ife, $hich is to
send the arro$ of his #onging e%en further than he cou#d ha%e hopedLDDthis
'an kno$s no re%enge, neither does he kno$ despair, he tru#y has found
rede'ption and can turn on the $orst in his #ife and e%en in hi'se#f, and
ca## it his best @see Notes on "hapter :,22(A(
"hapter R:222( 9an#y Prudence(
This discourse is %ery i'portant( 2n N.eyond Good and E%i#N $e hear often
enough that the se#ect and superior 'an 'ust $ear a 'ask, and here $e find
this injunction exp#ained( N;nd he $ho $ou#d not #anguish a'ongst 'en,
'ust #earn to drink out of a## g#asses? and he $ho $ou#d keep c#ean
a'ongst 'en, 'ust kno$ ho$ to $ash hi'se#f e%en $ith dirty $ater(N This, 2
%enture to suggest, reUuires so'e exp#anation( ;t a ti'e $hen
indi%idua#ity is supposed to be sho$n 'ost te##ing#y by putting boots on
oneMs hands and g#o%es on oneMs feet, it is so'e$hat refreshing to co'e
across a true indi%idua#ist $ho fee#s the chas' bet$een hi'se#f and others
so deep#y, that he 'ust perforce adapt hi'se#f to the' out$ard#y, at #east,
in a## respects, so that the inner difference shou#d be o%er#ooked(
Nietzsche practica##y te##s us here that it is not he $ho intentiona##y
$ears eccentric c#othes or does eccentric things $ho is tru#y the
indi%idua#ist( The profound 'an, $ho is by nature differentiated fro' his
fe##o$s, fee#s this difference too keen#y to ca## attention to it by any
out$ard sho$( /e is sha'efast and bashfu# $ith those $ho surround hi' and
$ishes not to be disco%ered by the', just as one instincti%e#y a%oids a##
#a%ish disp#ay of co'fort or $ea#th in the presence of a poor friend(
"hapter R:2,( The Sti##est /our(
This see's to 'e to gi%e an account of the great strugg#e $hich 'ust ha%e
taken p#ace in NietzscheMs sou# before he fina##y reso#%ed to 'ake kno$n
the 'ore esoteric portions of his teaching( 7ur deepest fee#ings cra%e
si#ence( There is a certain se#fDrespect in the serious 'an $hich 'akes
hi' ho#d his profoundest fee#ings sacred( .efore they are uttered they are
fu## of the 'odesty of a %irgin, and often the o#dest sage $i## b#ush #ike
a gir# $hen this %irginity is %io#ated by an indiscretion $hich forces hi'
to re%ea# his deepest thoughts(
(((
P;-T 222(
This is perhaps the 'ost i'portant of a## the four parts( 2f it contained
on#y NThe ,ision and the Enig'aN and NThe 7#d and Ne$ Tab#esN 2 shou#d
sti## be of this opinionL for in the for'er of these discourses $e 'eet
$ith $hat Nietzsche regarded as the cro$ning doctrine of his phi#osophy and
in NThe 7#d and Ne$ Tab#esN $e ha%e a %a#uab#e epito'e of practica##y a##
his #eading princip#es(
"hapter R:,2( The ,ision and the Enig'a(
NThe ,ision and the Enig'aN is perhaps an exa'p#e of Nietzsche in his 'ost
obscure %ein( )e 'ust kno$ ho$ persistent#y he in%eighed against the
oppressing and depressing inf#uence of 'anMs sense of gui#t and
consciousness of sin in order fu##y to grasp the significance of this
discourse( S#o$#y but sure#y, he thought the %a#ues of "hristianity and
Tudaic traditions had done their $ork in the 'inds of 'en( )hat $ere once
but expedients de%ised for the discip#ine of a certain portion of hu'anity,
had no$ passed into 'anMs b#ood and had beco'e instincts( This oppressi%e
and para#ysing sense of gui#t and of sin is $hat Nietzsche refers to $hen
he speaks of Nthe spirit of gra%ity(N This creature ha#fDd$arf, ha#fD'o#e,
$ho' he bears $ith hi' a certain distance on his c#i'b and fina##y defies,
and $ho' he ca##s his de%i# and archDene'y, is nothing 'ore than the hea%y
'i##stone Ngui#ty conscience,N together $ith the concept of sin $hich at
present hangs round the neck of 'en( To rise abo%e itDDto soarDDis the
'ost difficu#t of a## things toDday( Nietzsche is ab#e to think cheerfu##y
and opti'istica##y of the possibi#ity of #ife in this $or#d recurring again
and again, $hen he has once cast the d$arf fro' his shou#ders, and he
announces his doctrine of the Eterna# -ecurrence of a## things great and
s'a## to his archDene'y and in defiance of hi'(
That there is 'uch to be said for NietzscheMs hypothesis of the Eterna#
-ecurrence of a## things great and s'a##, nobody $ho has read the
#iterature on the subject $i## doubt for an instantL but it re'ains a %ery
daring conjecture not$ithstanding and e%en in its u#ti'ate effect, as a
dog'a, on the 'inds of 'en, 2 %enture to doubt $hether Nietzsche e%er
proper#y esti'ated its $orth @see Note on "hapter :,22(A(
)hat fo##o$s is c#ear enough( Zarathustra sees a young shepherd strugg#ing
on the ground $ith a snake ho#ding fast to the back of his throat( The
sage, assu'ing that the snake 'ust ha%e cra$#ed into the young 'anMs 'outh
$hi#e he #ay s#eeping, runs to his he#p and pu##s at the #oathso'e repti#e
$ith a## his 'ight, but in %ain( ;t #ast, in despair, Zarathustra appea#s
to the young 'anMs $i##( Wno$ing fu## $e## $hat a ghast#y operation he is
reco''ending, he ne%erthe#ess cries, N.ite& .ite& 2ts head off& .ite&N
as the on#y possib#e so#ution of the difficu#ty( The young shepherd bites,
and far a$ay he spits the snakeMs head, $hereupon he rises, NNo #onger
shepherd, no #onger 'anDDa transfigured being, a #ightDsurrounded being,
that :;8G/E*& Ne%er on earth #aughed a 'an as he #aughed&N
2n this parab#e the young shepherd is ob%ious#y the 'an of toDdayL the
snake that chokes hi' represents the stu#tifying and para#ysing socia#
%a#ues that threaten to shatter hu'anity, and the ad%ice N.ite& .ite&N is
but NietzscheMs exasperated cry to 'ankind to a#ter their %a#ues before it
is too #ate(
"hapter R:,22( 2n%o#untary .#iss(
This, #ike NThe )andererN, is one of the 'any introspecti%e passages in the
$ork, and is fu## of innuendos and hints as to the Nietzschean out#ook on
#ife(
"hapter R:,222( .efore Sunrise(
/ere $e ha%e a record of ZarathustraMs a%o$a# of opti'is', as a#so the
i'portant state'ent concerning N"hanceN or N;ccidentN @%erse C1A( Those
$ho are fa'i#iar $ith NietzscheMs phi#osophy $i## not reUuire to be to#d
$hat an i'portant ro#e his doctrine of chance p#ays in his teaching( The
Giant "hance has hitherto p#ayed $ith the puppet N'an,NDDthis is the fact
he cannot conte'p#ate $ith eUuani'ity( 9an sha## no$ exp#oit chance, he
says again and again, and 'ake it fa## on its knees before hi'& @See %erse
FF in N7n the 7#i%e 9ountN, and %erses 0D!6 in NThe .ed$arfing ,irtueNA(
"hapter R:2R( The .ed$arfing ,irtue(
This reUuires scarce#y any co''ent( 2t is a satire on 'odern 'an and his
be#itt#ing %irtues( 2n %erses CF and CE of the second part of the
discourse $e are re'inded of NietzscheMs po$erfu# indict'ent of the great
of toDday, in the ;ntichrist @;phoris' EFA?DDN;t present nobody has any
#onger the courage for separate rights, for rights of do'ination, for a
fee#ing of re%erence for hi'se#f and his eUua#s,DDF7- P;T/7S 7F
*2ST;N"E(((7ur po#itics are 97-.2* fro' this $ant of courage&DDThe
aristocracy of character has been under'ined 'ost crafti#y by the #ie of
the eUua#ity of sou#sL and if the be#ief in the Mpri%i#ege of the 'any,M
'akes re%o#utions and )2:: "7NT2N8E T7 9;WE the', it is "hristianity, #et
us not doubt it, it is "/-2ST2;N %a#uations, $hich trans#ate e%ery
re%o#ution 'ere#y into b#ood and cri'e&N @see a#so N.eyond Good and E%i#N,
pages !C6, !C!A( Nietzsche thought it $as a bad sign of the ti'es that
e%en ru#ers ha%e #ost the courage of their positions, and that a 'an of
Frederick the GreatMs po$er and distinguished gifts shou#d ha%e been ab#e
to say? N2ch bin der erste *iener des StaatesN @2 a' the first ser%ant of
the State(A To this utterance of the great so%ereign, %erse CE undoubted#y
refers( N"o$ardiceN and N9ediocrity,N are the na'es $ith $hich he #abe#s
'odern notions of %irtue and 'oderation(
2n Part 222(, $e get the senti'ents of the discourse N2n the /appy 2s#esN,
but perhaps in stronger ter's( 7nce again $e find Nietzsche thorough#y at
ease, if not cheerfu#, as an atheist, and speaking $ith %ertiginous daring
of 'aking chance go on its knees to hi'( 2n %erse C6, Zarathustra 'akes
yet another atte'pt at defining his entire#y antiDanarchica# attitude, and
un#ess such passages ha%e been co'p#ete#y o%er#ooked or de#iberate#y
ignored hitherto by those $ho $i## persist in #aying anarchy at his door,
it is i'possib#e to understand ho$ he e%er beca'e associated $ith that fou#
po#itica# party(
The #ast %erse introduces the expression, NT/E G-E;T N77NT2*E&N 2n the
poe' to be found at the end of N.eyond Good and E%i#N, $e 'eet $ith the
expression again, and $e sha## find it occurring ti'e and again in
NietzscheMs $orks( 2t $i## be found fu##y e#ucidated in the fifth part of
NThe T$i#ight of the 2do#sNL but for those $ho cannot refer to this book,
it $ere $e## to point out that Nietzsche ca##ed the present periodDDour
periodDDthe noon of 'anMs history( *a$n is behind us( The chi#dhood of
'ankind is o%er( No$ $e WN7)L there is no$ no #onger any excuse for
'istakes $hich $i## tend to botch and disfigure the type 'an( N)ith
respect to $hat is past,N he says, N2 ha%e, #ike a## discerning ones, great
to#eration, that is to say, GENE-78S se#fDcontro#(((.ut 'y fee#ing changes
sudden#y, and breaks out as soon as 2 enter the 'odern period, 78- period(
7ur age WN7)S(((N @See Note on "hapter :RR(A(
"hapter :2( 7n PassingDby(
/ere $e find Nietzsche confronted $ith his extre'e opposite, $ith hi'
therefore for $ho' he is 'ost freUuent#y 'istaken by the un$ary(
NZarathustraMs apeN he is ca##ed in the discourse( /e is one of those at
$hose hands Nietzsche had to suffer 'ost during his #ifeDti'e, and at $hose
hands his phi#osophy has suffered 'ost since his death( 2n this respect it
'ay see' a #itt#e tri%ia# to speak of extre'es 'eetingL but it is
$onderfu##y apt( 9any ha%e adopted NietzscheMs 'anneris's and $ordD
coinages, $ho had nothing in co''on $ith hi' beyond the ideas and
NbusinessN they p#agiarisedL but the superficia# obser%er and a #arge
portion of the pub#ic, not kno$ing of these things,DDnot kno$ing perhaps
that there are iconoc#asts $ho destroy out of #o%e and are therefore
creators, and that there are others $ho destroy out of resent'ent and
re%engefu#ness and $ho are therefore re%o#utionists and anarchists,DDare
prone to confound the t$o, to the detri'ent of the nob#er type(
2f $e no$ read $hat the foo# says to Zarathustra, and note the tricks of
speech he has borro$ed fro' hi'? if $e carefu##y fo##o$ the attitude he
assu'es, $e sha## understand $hy Zarathustra fina##y interrupts hi'( NStop
this at once,N Zarathustra cries, N#ong ha%e thy speech and thy species
disgusted 'e(((7ut of #o%e a#one sha## 'y conte'pt and 'y $arning bird take
$ingL .8T N7T 78T 7F T/E S);9P&N 2t $ere $e## if this discourse $ere taken
to heart by a## those $ho are too ready to associate Nietzsche $ith #esser
and noiser 'en,DD$ith 'ountebanks and 'u''ers(
"hapter :22( The ;postates(
2t is c#ear that this app#ies to a## those breath#ess and hasty Ntasters of
e%erything,N $ho p#unge too rash#y into the sea of independent thought and
Nheresy,N and $ho, ha%ing 'isca#cu#ated their strength, find it i'possib#e
to keep their head abo%e $ater( N; #itt#e o#der, a #itt#e co#der,N says
Nietzsche( They soon c#a'ber back to the con%entions of the age they
intended refor'ing( The French then say N#e diab#e se fait her'ite,N but
these 'en, as a ru#e, ha%e ne%er been de%i#s, neither do they beco'e
ange#sL for, in order to be rea##y good or e%i#, so'e strength and deep
breathing is reUuired( Those $ho are 'ore interested in supporting
orthodoxy than in being o%er nice concerning the kind of support they gi%e
it, often refer to these peop#e as e%idence in fa%our of the true faith(
"hapter :222( The -eturn /o'e(
This is an exa'p#e of a c#ass of $riting $hich 'ay be passed o%er too
#ight#y by those $ho' poetasters ha%e 'ade distrustfu# of poetry( Fro'
first to #ast it is extre'e#y %a#uab#e as an autobiographica# note( The
ine%itab#e superficia#ity of the rabb#e is contrasted $ith the peacefu# and
profound depths of the anchorite( /ere $e first get a direct hint
concerning NietzscheMs funda'enta# passionDDthe 'ain force behind a## his
ne$ %a#ues and scathing criticis' of existing %a#ues( 2n %erse F6 $e are
to#d that pity $as his greatest danger( The broad a#truis' of the #a$D
gi%er, thinking o%er %ast eras of ti'e, $as continua##y being pitted by
Nietzsche, in hi'se#f, against that transient and 'eaner sy'pathy for the
neighbour $hich he 'ore perhaps than any of his conte'poraries had suffered
fro', but $hich he $as certain in%o#%ed enor'ous dangers not on#y for
hi'se#f but a#so to the next and subseUuent generations @see Note .(, $here
NpityN is 'entioned a'ong the degenerate %irtuesA( :ater in the book $e
sha## see ho$ his profound co'passion #eads hi' into te'ptation, and ho$
frantica##y he strugg#es against it( 2n %erses F! and FC, he te##s us to
$hat extent he had to 'odify hi'se#f in order to be endured by his fe##o$s
$ho' he #o%ed @see a#so %erse !C in N9an#y PrudenceNA( NietzscheMs great
#o%e for his fe##o$s, $hich he confesses in the Pro#ogue, and $hich is at
the root of a## his teaching, see's rather to e#ude the discerning po$ers
of the a%erage phi#anthropist and 'odern 'an( /e cannot see the $ood for
the trees( ; phi#anthropy that sacrifices the 'inority of the presentDday
for the 'ajority constituting posterity, co'p#ete#y e%ades his 'enta#
grasp, and NietzscheMs phi#osophy, because it dec#ares "hristian %a#ues to
be a danger to the future of our kind, is therefore she#%ed as bruta#,
co#d, and hard @see Note on "hapter RRR,2(A( Nietzsche tried to be a##
things to a## 'enL he $as sufficient#y fond of his fe##o$s for that? in
the -eturn /o'e he describes ho$ he u#ti'ate#y returns to #one#iness in
order to reco%er fro' the effects of his experi'ent(
"hapter :2,( The Three E%i# Things(
Nietzsche is here co'p#ete#y in his e#e'ent( Three things hitherto bestD
cursed and 'ost ca#u'niated on earth, are brought for$ard to be $eighed(
,o#uptuousness, thirst of po$er, and se#fishness,DDthe three forces in
hu'anity $hich "hristianity has done 'ost to garb#e and bes'irch,DD
Nietzsche endea%ours to reinstate in their for'er p#aces of honour(
,o#uptuousness, or sensua# p#easure, is a dangerous thing to discuss
no$adays( 2f $e 'ention it $ith fa%our $e 'ay be regarded, ho$e%er
unjust#y, as the ad%ocate of sa%ages, satyrs, and pure sensua#ity( 2f $e
conde'n it, $e either go o%er to the Puritans or $e join those $ho are $ont
to co'e to tab#e $ith no edge to their appetites and $ho therefore gru'b#e
at a## good fare( There can be no doubt that the %a#ue of hea#thy innocent
%o#uptuousness, #ike the %a#ue of hea#th itse#f, 'ust ha%e been great#y
discounted by a## those $ho, resenting their inabi#ity to partake of this
$or#dMs goods, cried #ike St Pau#? N2 $ou#d that a## 'en $ere e%en as 2
'yse#f(N No$ NietzscheMs phi#osophy 'ight be ca##ed an atte'pt at gi%ing
back to hea#thy and nor'a# 'en innocence and a c#ean conscience in their
desiresDDN7T to app#aud the %u#gar sensua#ists $ho respond to e%ery
sti'u#us and $hose passions are out of handL not to te## the 'ean, se#fish
indi%idua#, $hose se#fishness is a po##ution @see ;phoris' FF, NT$i#ight of
the 2do#sNA, that he is right, nor to assure the $eak, the sick, and the
cripp#ed, that the thirst of po$er, $hich they gratify by exp#oiting the
happier and hea#thier indi%idua#s, is justifiedLDDbut to sa%e the c#ean
hea#thy 'an fro' the %a#ues of those around hi', $ho #ook at e%erything
through the 'ud that is in their o$n bodies,DDto gi%e hi', and hi' a#one, a
c#ean conscience in his 'anhood and the desires of his 'anhood( N*o 2
counse# you to s#ay your instinctsS 2 counse# to innocence in your
instincts(N 2n %erse 1 of the second paragraph @as in %erse 2 of paragraph
!0 in NThe 7#d and Ne$ Tab#esNA Nietzsche gi%es us a reason for his
occasiona# obscurity @see a#so %erses F to 1 of NPoetsNA( ;s 2 ha%e
a#ready pointed out, his phi#osophy is Uuite esoteric( 2t can ser%e no
purpose $ith the ordinary, 'ediocre type of 'an( 2, persona##y, can no
#onger ha%e any doubt that NietzscheMs on#y object, in that part of his
phi#osophy $here he bids his friends stand N.eyond Good and E%i#N $ith hi',
$as to sa%e higher 'en, $hose gro$th and scope 'ight be #i'ited by the too
strict obser%ance of 'odern %a#ues fro' foundering on the rocks of a
N"o'pro'iseN bet$een their o$n genius and traditiona# con%entions( The
on#y possib#e $ay in $hich the great 'an can achie%e greatness is by 'eans
of exceptiona# freedo'DDthe freedo' $hich assists hi' in experiencing
/29SE:F( ,erses C6 to F6 afford an exce##ent supp#e'ent to NietzscheMs
description of the attitude of the nob#e type to$ards the s#a%es in
;phoris' CP6 of the $ork N.eyond Good and E%i#N @see a#so Note .(A
"hapter :,( The Spirit of Gra%ity(
@See Note on "hapter R:,2(A 2n Part 22( of this discourse $e 'eet $ith a
doctrine not touched upon hitherto, sa%e indirect#yLDD2 refer to the
doctrine of se#fD#o%e( )e shou#d try to understand this perfect#y before
proceedingL for it is precise#y %ie$s of this sort $hich, after ha%ing been
cut out of the origina# context, are repeated far and $ide as interna#
e%idence pro%ing the genera# unsoundness of NietzscheMs phi#osophy(
;#ready in the #ast of the NThoughts out of SeasonN Nietzsche speaks as
fo##o$s about 'odern 'en? N(((these 'odern creatures $ish rather to be
hunted do$n, $ounded and torn to shreds, than to #i%e a#one $ith the'se#%es
in so#itary ca#'( ;#one $ith onese#f&DDthis thought terrifies the 'odern
sou#L it is his one anxiety, his one ghast#y fearN @Eng#ish Edition, page
!E!A( 2n his fe%erish scurry to find entertain'ent and di%ersion, $hether
in a no%e#, a ne$spaper, or a p#ay, the 'odern 'an conde'ns his o$n age
utter#yL for he sho$s that in his heart of hearts he despises hi'se#f( 7ne
cannot change a condition of this sort in a dayL to beco'e endurab#e to
onese#f an inner transfor'ation is necessary( Too #ong ha%e $e #ost
ourse#%es in our friends and entertain'ents to be ab#e to find ourse#%es so
soon at anotherMs bidding( N;nd %eri#y, it is no co''and'ent for toDday
and toD'orro$ to :E;-N to #o%e onese#f( -ather is it of a## arts the
finest, subt#est, #ast, and patientest(N
2n the #ast %erse Nietzsche cha##enges us to sho$ that our $ay is the right
$ay( 2n his teaching he does not coerce us, nor does he o%erpersuadeL he
si'p#y says? N2 a' a #a$ on#y for 'ine o$n, 2 a' not a #a$ for a##( This
DDis no$ 9Q $ay,DD$here is yoursSN
"hapter :,2( 7#d and Ne$ Tab#es( Par( C(
Nietzsche hi'se#f dec#ares this to be the 'ost decisi%e portion of the
$ho#e of NThus Spake ZarathustraN( 2t is a sort of epito'e of his #eading
doctrines( 2n %erse !C of the second paragraph, $e #earn ho$ he hi'se#f
$ou#d fain ha%e abandoned the poetica# 'ethod of expression had he not
kno$n on#y too $e## that the on#y chance a ne$ doctrine has of sur%i%ing,
no$adays, depends upon its being gi%en to the $or#d in so'e kind of artD
for'( Tust as prophets, centuries ago, often had to ha%e recourse to the
'ask of 'adness in order to 'itigate the hatred of those $ho did not and
cou#d not see as they didL so, toDday, the strugg#e for existence a'ong
opinions and %a#ues is so great, that an artDfor' is practica##y the on#y
garb in $hich a ne$ phi#osophy can dare to introduce itse#f to us(
Pars( F and E(
9any of the paragraphs $i## be found to be 'ere#y re'iniscent of for'er
discourses( For instance, par( F reca##s N-ede'ptionN( The #ast %erse of
par( E is i'portant( Freedo' $hich, as 2 ha%e pointed out before,
Nietzsche considered a dangerous acUuisition in inexperienced or un$orthy
hands, here recei%es its deathDb#o$ as a genera# desideratu'( 2n the first
Part $e read under NThe )ay of the "reating 7neN, that freedo' as an end in
itse#f does not concern Zarathustra at a##( /e says there? NFree fro'
$hatS )hat doth that 'atter to ZarathustraS "#ear#y, ho$e%er, sha## thine
eye ans$er 'e? free F7- )/;TSN ;nd in NThe .ed$arfing ,irtueN? N;h that
ye understood 'y $ord? M*o e%er $hat ye $i##DDbut first be such as ";N
)2::(MN
Par( K(
/ere $e ha%e a description of the kind of a#truis' Nietzsche exacted fro'
higher 'en( 2t is rea##y a co''ent upon NThe .esto$ing ,irtueN @see Note
on "hapter RR22(A(
Par( P(
This refers, of course, to the reception pioneers of NietzscheMs sta'p 'eet
$ith at the hands of their conte'poraries(
Par( 4(
Nietzsche teaches that nothing is stab#e,DDnot e%en %a#ues,DDnot e%en the
concepts good and e%i#( /e #ikens #ife unto a strea'( .ut footDbridges
and rai#ings span the strea', and they see' to stand fir'( 9any $i## be
re'inded of good and e%i# $hen they #ook upon these structuresL for thus
these sa'e %a#ues stand o%er the strea' of #ife, and #ife f#o$s on beneath
the' and #ea%es the' standing( )hen, ho$e%er, $inter co'es and the strea'
gets frozen, 'any inUuire? NShou#d not e%erythingDDST;N* ST2::S
Funda'enta##y e%erything standeth sti##(N .ut soon the spring co'eth and
$ith it the tha$D$ind( 2t breaks the ice, and the ice breaks do$n the
footDbridges and rai#ings, $hereupon e%erything is s$ept a$ay( This state
of affairs, according to Nietzsche, has no$ been reached( N7h, 'y
brethren, is not e%erything ;T P-ESENT 2N F:8RS /a%e not a## rai#ings and
footDbridges fa##en into the $aterS )ho $ou#d sti## /7:* 7N to MgoodM and
Me%i#MSN
Par( 0(
This is co'p#e'entary to the first three %erses of par( C(
Par( !6(
So far, this is perhaps the 'ost i'portant paragraph( 2t is a protest
against reading a 'ora# order of things in #ife( N:ife is so'ething
essentia##y i''ora#&N Nietzsche te##s us in the introduction to the N.irth
of TragedyN( E%en to ca## #ife Nacti%ity,N or to define it further as Nthe
continuous adjust'ent of interna# re#ations to externa# re#ations,N as
Spencer has it, Nietzsche characterises as a Nde'ocratic idiosyncracy(N /e
says to define it in this $ay, Nis to 'istake the true nature and function
of #ife, $hich is )i## to Po$er(((:ife is ESSENT2;::Q appropriation,
injury, conUuest of the strange and $eak, suppression, se%erity, obtrusion
of its o$n for's, incorporation and at #east, putting it 'i#dest,
exp#oitation(N ;daptation is 'ere#y a secondary acti%ity, a 'ere reD
acti%ity @see Note on "hapter :,22(A(
Pars( !!, !C(
These dea# $ith NietzscheMs princip#e of the desirabi#ity of rearing a
se#ect race( The bio#ogica# and historica# grounds for his insistence upon
this princip#e are, of course, 'anifo#d( Gobineau in his great $ork,
N:M2nega#ite des -aces /u'ainesN, #ays strong e'phasis upon the e%i#s $hich
arise fro' pro'iscuous and interDsocia# 'arriages( /e a#one $ou#d suffice
to carry NietzscheMs point against a## those $ho are opposed to the other
conditions, to the conditions $hich $ou#d ha%e sa%ed -o'e, $hich ha%e
'aintained the strength of the Te$ish race, and $hich are strict#y
'aintained by e%ery breeder of ani'a#s throughout the $or#d( *ar$in in his
re'arks re#ati%e to the degeneration of "8:T2,;TE* types of ani'a#s through
the action of pro'iscuous breeding, brings Gobineau support fro' the rea#'
of bio#ogy(
The #ast t$o %erses of par( !C $ere discussed in the Notes on "hapters
RRR,2( and :222(
Par( !F(
This, #ike the first part of NThe SoothsayerN, is ob%ious#y a reference to
the Schopenhauerian Pessi'is'(
Pars( !E, !K, !P, !1(
These are supp#e'entary to the discourse N.ack$or#dMsD'enN(
Par( !4(
)e 'ust be carefu# to separate this paragraph, in sense, fro' the pre%ious
four paragraphs( Nietzsche is sti## dea#ing $ith Pessi'is' hereL but it is
the pessi'is' of the heroDDthe 'an 'ost susceptib#e of a## to desperate
%ie$s of #ife, o$ing to the obstac#es that are arrayed against hi' in a
$or#d $here 'en of his kind are %ery rare and are continua##y being
sacrificed( 2t $as to sa%e this 'an that Nietzsche $rote( /erois' foi#ed,
th$arted, and $recked, hoping and fighting unti# the #ast, is at #ength
o%ertaken by despair, and renounces a## strugg#e for s#eep( This is not
the natura# or constitutiona# pessi'is' $hich proceeds fro' an unhea#thy
bodyDDthe dyspepticMs #ack of appetiteL it is rather the desperation of the
netted #ion that u#ti'ate#y stops a## 'o%e'ent, because the 'ore it 'o%es
the 'ore in%o#%ed it beco'es(
Par( C6(
N;## that increases po$er is good, a## that springs fro' $eakness is bad(
The $eak and i##Dconstituted sha## perish? first princip#e of our charity(
;nd one sha## a#so he#p the' thereto(N Nietzsche part#y di%ined the kind
of reception 'ora# %a#ues of this sta'p $ou#d 'eet $ith at the hands of the
effe'inate 'anhood of Europe( /ere $e see that he had anticipated the 'ost
#ike#y for' their criticis' $ou#d take @see a#so the #ast t$o %erses of
par( !1A(
Par( C!(
The first ten %erses, here, are re'iniscent of N)ar and )arriorsN and of
NThe F#ies in the 9arketDP#ace(N ,erses !! and !C, ho$e%er, are
particu#ar#y i'portant( There is a strong argu'ent in fa%our of the sharp
differentiation of castes and of races @and e%en of sexesL see Note on
"hapter R,222(A running a## through NietzscheMs $ritings( .ut sharp
differentiation a#so i'p#ies antagonis' in so'e for' or otherDDhence
NietzscheMs fears for 'odern 'en( )hat 'odern 'en desire abo%e a##, is
peace and the cessation of pain( .ut neither great races nor great castes
ha%e e%er been bui#t up in this $ay( N)ho sti## $anteth to ru#eSN
Zarathustra asks in the NPro#ogueN( N)ho sti## $anteth to obeyS .oth are
too burdenso'e(N This is rapid#y beco'ing e%erybodyMs attitude toDday(
The ta'e 'ora# reading of the face of nature, together $ith such de'ocratic
interpretations of #ife as those suggested by /erbert Spencer, are signs of
a physio#ogica# condition $hich is the re%erse of that bounding and
irresponsib#e hea#thiness in $hich harder and 'ore tragic %a#ues ru#e(
Par( CE(
This shou#d be read in conjunction $ith N"hi#d and 9arriageN( 2n the fifth
%erse $e sha## recognise our o#d friend N9arriage on the tenDyears syste',N
$hich George 9eredith suggested so'e years ago( This, ho$e%er, 'ust not be
taken too #itera##y( 2 do not think NietzscheMs profoundest %ie$s on
'arriage $ere e%er intended to be gi%en o%er to the pub#ic at a##, at #east
not for the present( They appear in the biography by his sister, and
a#though their $isdo' is unUuestionab#e, the nature of the refor's he
suggests render it i'possib#e for the' to beco'e popu#ar just no$(
Pars( CP, C1(
See Note on NThe Pro#ogueN(
Par( C4(
Nietzsche $as not an iconoc#ast fro' predi#ection( No bitterness or e'pty
hate dictated his %ituperations against existing %a#ues and against the
dog'as of his parents and forefathers( /e kne$ too $e## $hat these things
'eant to the 'i##ions $ho profess the', to approach the task of uprooting
the' $ith #e%ity or e%en $ith haste( /e sa$ $hat 'odern anarchists and
re%o#utionists do N7T seeDDna'e#y, that 'an is in danger of actua#
destruction $hen his custo's and %a#ues are broken( 2 need hard#y point
out, therefore, ho$ deep#y he $as conscious of the responsibi#ity he thre$
upon our shou#ders $hen he in%ited us to reconsider our position( The
#ines in this paragraph are e%idence enough of his earnestness(
"hapter :,22( The "on%a#escent(
)e 'eet $ith se%era# puzz#es here( Zarathustra ca##s hi'se#f the ad%ocate
of the circ#e @the Eterna# -ecurrence of a## thingsA, and he ca##s this
doctrine his abys'a# thought( 2n the #ast %erse of the first paragraph,
ho$e%er, after hai#ing his deepest thought, he cries? N*isgust, disgust,
disgust&N )e kno$ NietzscheMs idea# 'an $as that N$or#dDappro%ing,
exuberant, and %i%acious creature, $ho has not on#y #earnt to co'pro'ise
and arrange $ith that $hich $as and is, but $ishes to ha%e it again, ;S 2T
);S ;N* 2S, for a## eternity insatiab#y ca##ing out da capo, not on#y to
hi'se#f, but to the $ho#e piece and p#ayN @see Note on "hapter R:22(A( .ut
if one ask onese#f $hat the conditions to such an attitude are, one $i##
rea#ise i''ediate#y ho$ utter#y different Nietzsche $as fro' his idea#(
The 'an $ho insatiab#y cries da capo to hi'se#f and to the $ho#e of his
'iseDenDscene, 'ust be in a position to desire e%ery incident in his #ife
to be repeated, not once, but again and again eterna##y( No$, NietzscheMs
#ife had been too fu## of disappoint'ents, i##ness, unsuccessfu# strugg#es,
and snubs, to a##o$ of his thinking of the Eterna# -ecurrence $ithout
#oathingDDhence probab#y the $ords of the #ast %erse(
2n %erses !K and !P, $e ha%e Nietzsche dec#aring hi'se#f an e%o#utionist in
the broadest senseDDthat is to say, that he be#ie%es in the *e%e#op'ent
/ypothesis as the description of the process by $hich species ha%e
originated( No$, to understand his position correct#y $e 'ust sho$ his
re#ationship to the t$o greatest of 'odern e%o#utionistsDD*ar$in and
Spencer( ;s a phi#osopher, ho$e%er, Nietzsche does not stand or fa## by
his objections to the *ar$inian or Spencerian cos'ogony( /e ne%er #aid
c#ai' to a %ery profound kno$#edge of bio#ogy, and his criticis' is far
'ore %a#uab#e as the attitude of a fresh 'ind than as that of a specia#ist
to$ards the Uuestion( 9oreo%er, in his objections 'any difficu#ties are
raised $hich are not sett#ed by an appea# to either of the 'en abo%e
'entioned( )e ha%e gi%en NietzscheMs definition of #ife in the Note on
"hapter :,2(, par( !6( Sti##, there re'ains a hope that *ar$in and
Nietzsche 'ay so'e day beco'e reconci#ed by a ne$ description of the
processes by $hich %arieties occur( The appearance of %arieties a'ong
ani'a#s and of Nsporting p#antsN in the %egetab#e kingdo', is sti##
shrouded in 'ystery, and the Uuestion $hether this is not precise#y the
ground on $hich *ar$in and Nietzsche $i## 'eet, is an interesting one( The
for'er says in his N7rigin of SpeciesN, concerning the causes of
%ariabi#ity? N(((there are t$o factors, na'e#y, the nature of the
organis', and the nature of the conditions( T/E F7-9E- SEE9S T7 .E 98"/
T/E 97-E 29P7-T;NT @The ita#ics are 'ine(A, for near#y si'i#ar %ariations
so'eti'es arise under, as far as $e can judge, dissi'i#ar conditionsL and
on the other hand, dissi'i#ar %ariations arise under conditions $hich
appear to be near#y unifor'(N Nietzsche, recognising this sa'e truth,
$ou#d ascribe practica##y a## the i'portance to the Nhighest functionaries
in the organis', in $hich the #ifeD$i## appears as an acti%e and for'ati%e
princip#e,N and except in certain cases @$here passi%e organis's a#one are
concernedA $ou#d not gi%e such a pro'inent p#ace to the inf#uence of
en%iron'ent( ;daptation, according to hi', is 'ere#y a secondary acti%ity,
a 'ere reDacti%ity, and he is therefore Uuite opposed to SpencerMs
definition? N:ife is the continuous adjust'ent of interna# re#ations to
externa# re#ations(N ;gain in the 'oti%e force behind ani'a# and p#ant
#ife, Nietzsche disagrees $ith *ar$in( /e transfor's the NStrugg#e for
ExistenceNDDthe passi%e and in%o#untary conditionDDinto the NStrugg#e for
Po$er,N $hich is acti%e and creati%e, and 'uch 'ore in har'ony $ith
*ar$inMs o$n %ie$, gi%en abo%e, concerning the i'portance of the organis'
itse#f( The change is one of such farDreaching i'portance that $e cannot
dispose of it in a breath, as a 'ere p#ay upon $ords( N9uch is reckoned
higher than #ife itse#f by the #i%ing one(N Nietzsche says that to speak
of the acti%ity of #ife as a Nstrugg#e for existence,N is to state the case
inadeUuate#y( /e $arns us not to confound 9a#thus $ith nature( There is
so'ething 'ore than this strugg#e bet$een the organic beings on this earthL
$ant, $hich is supposed to bring this strugg#e about, is not so co''on as
is supposedL so'e other force 'ust be operati%e( The )i## to Po$er is this
force, Nthe instinct of se#fDpreser%ation is on#y one of the indirect and
'ost freUuent resu#ts thereof(N ; certain #ack of acu'en in psycho#ogica#
Uuestions and the condition of affairs in Eng#and at the ti'e *ar$in $rote,
'ay both, according to Nietzsche, ha%e induced the reno$ned natura#ist to
describe the forces of nature as he did in his N7rigin of SpeciesN(
2n %erses C4, C0, and F6 of the second portion of this discourse $e 'eet
$ith a doctrine $hich, at first sight, see's to be 'ere#y N#e 'anoir a
#Men%ers,N indeed one Eng#ish critic has actua##y said of Nietzsche, that
NThus Spake ZarathustraN is no 'ore than a co'pendiu' of 'odern %ie$s and
'axi's turned upside do$n( Exa'ining these heterodox pronounce'ents a
#itt#e 'ore c#ose#y, ho$e%er, $e 'ay possib#y percei%e their truth(
-egarding good and e%i# as pure#y re#ati%e %a#ues, it stands to reason that
$hat 'ay be bad or e%i# in a gi%en 'an, re#ati%e to a certain en%iron'ent,
'ay actua##y be good if not high#y %irtuous in hi' re#ati%e to a certain
other en%iron'ent( 2f this hypothetica# 'an represent the ascending #ine
of #ifeDDthat is to say, if he pro'ise a## that $hich is highest in a
GraecoD-o'an sense, then it is #ike#y that he $i## be conde'ned as $icked
if introduced into the society of 'en representing the opposite and
descending #ine of #ife(
.y depri%ing a 'an of his $ickednessDD'ore particu#ar#y no$adaysDD
therefore, one 'ay un$itting#y be doing %io#ence to the greatest in hi'(
2t 'ay be an outrage against his $ho#eness, just as the #oppingDoff of a
#eg $ou#d be( Fortunate#y, the natura# soDca##ed N$ickednessN of higher
'en has in a certain 'easure been ab#e to resist this #opping process $hich
successi%e s#a%eD'ora#ities ha%e practisedL but signs are not $anting $hich
sho$ that the nob#est $ickedness is fast %anishing fro' societyDDthe
$ickedness of courage and deter'inationDDand that Nietzsche had good
reasons for crying? N;h, that @'anMsA baddest is so %ery s'a##& ;h, that
his best is so %ery s'a##( )hat is goodS To be bra%e is good& 2t is the
good $ar $hich ha##o$eth e%ery cause&N @see a#so par( K, N/igher 9anNA(
"hapter :R( The Se%en Sea#s(
This is a fina# paean $hich Zarathustra sings to Eternity and the 'arriageD
ring of rings, the ring of the Eterna# -ecurrence(
(((
P;-T 2,(
2n 'y opinion this part is NietzscheMs open a%o$a# that a## his phi#osophy,
together $ith a## his hopes, enthusiastic outbursts, b#asphe'ies,
pro#ixities, and obscurities, $ere 'ere#y so 'any gifts #aid at the feet of
higher 'en( /e had no desire to sa%e the $or#d( )hat he $ished to
deter'ine $as? )ho is to be 'aster of the $or#dS This is a %ery different
thing( /e ca'e to sa%e higher 'enLDDto gi%e the' that freedo' by $hich,
a#one, they can de%e#op and reach their zenith @see Note on "hapter :2,(,
endA( 2t has been argued, and $ith considerab#e force, that no such
phi#osophy is reUuired by higher 'en, that, as a 'atter of fact, higher
'en, by %irtue of their constitutions a#$ays, do stand .eyond Good and
E%i#, and ne%er a##o$ anything to stand in the $ay of their co'p#ete
gro$th( Nietzsche, ho$e%er, $as e%ident#y not so confident about this( /e
$ou#d probab#y ha%e argued that $e on#y see the successfu# cases( .eing a
great 'an hi'se#f, he $as $e## a$are of the dangers threatening greatness
in our age( 2n N.eyond Good and E%i#N he $rites? NThere are fe$ pains so
grie%ous as to ha%e seen, di%ined, or experienced ho$ an exceptiona# 'an
has 'issed his $ay and deteriorated(((N /e kne$ Nfro' his painfu##est
reco##ections on $hat $retched obstac#es pro'ising de%e#op'ents of the
highest rank ha%e hitherto usua##y gone to pieces, broken do$n, sunk, and
beco'e conte'ptib#e(N No$ in Part 2,( $e sha## find that his strongest
te'ptation to descend to the fee#ing of NpityN for his conte'poraries, is
the Ncry for he#pN $hich he hears fro' the #ips of the higher 'en exposed
to the dreadfu# danger of their 'odern en%iron'ent(
"hapter :R2( The /oney Sacrifice(
2n the fourteenth %erse of this discourse Nietzsche defines the so#e'n duty
he i'posed upon hi'se#f? N.eco'e $hat thou art(N Sure#y the criticis'
$hich has been directed against this 'axi' 'ust a## fa## to the ground $hen
it is re'e'bered, once and for a##, that NietzscheMs teaching $as ne%er
intended to be other than an esoteric one( N2 a' a #a$ on#y for 'ine o$n,N
he says e'phatica##y, N2 a' not a #a$ for a##(N 2t is of the greatest
i'portance to hu'anity that its highest indi%idua#s shou#d be a##o$ed to
attain to their fu## de%e#op'entL for, on#y by 'eans of its heroes can the
hu'an race be #ed for$ard step by step to higher and yet higher #e%e#s(
N.eco'e $hat thou artN app#ied to a##, of course, beco'es a %icious 'axi'L
it is to be hoped, ho$e%er, that $e 'ay #earn in ti'e that the sa'e action
perfor'ed by a gi%en nu'ber of 'en, #oses its identity precise#y that sa'e
nu'ber of ti'es(DDNVuod #icet To%i, non #icet bo%i(N
;t the #ast eight %erses 'any readers 'ay be te'pted to #augh( 2n Eng#and
$e a#'ost a#$ays #augh $hen a 'an takes hi'se#f serious#y at anything sa%e
sport( ;nd there is of course no reason $hy the reader shou#d not be
hi#arious(DD; certain greatness is reUuisite, both in order to be sub#i'e
and to ha%e re%erence for the sub#i'e( Nietzsche earnest#y be#ie%ed that
the ZarathustraDkingdo'DDhis dynasty of a thousand yearsDD$ou#d one day
co'eL if he had not be#ie%ed it so earnest#y, if e%ery artist in fact had
not be#ie%ed so earnest#y in his /azar, $hether of ten, fifteen, a hundred,
or a thousand years, $e shou#d ha%e #ost a## our higher 'enL they $ou#d
ha%e beco'e pessi'ists, suicides, or 'erchants( 2f the 'inor poet and
phi#osopher has 'ade us shy of the prophetic seriousness $hich
characterized an 2saiah or a Tere'iah, it is sure#y our #oss and the 'inor
poetMs gain(
"hapter :R22( The "ry of *istress(
)e no$ 'eet $ith Zarathustra in extraordinary circu'stances( /e is
confronted $ith Schopenhauer and te'pted by the o#d Soothsayer to co''it
the sin of pity( N2 ha%e co'e that 2 'ay seduce thee to thy #ast sin&N
says the Soothsayer to Zarathustra( 2t $i## be re'e'bered that in
SchopenhauerMs ethics, pity is e#e%ated to the highest p#ace a'ong the
%irtues, and %ery consistent#y too, seeing that the )e#tanschauung is a
pessi'istic one( Schopenhauer appea#s to NietzscheMs deepest and strongest
senti'entDDhis sy'pathy for higher 'en( N)hy dost thou concea# thyse#fSN
he cries( N2t is T/E /2G/E- 9;N that ca##eth for thee&N Zarathustra is
a#'ost o%erco'e by the SoothsayerMs p#eading, as he had been once a#ready
in the past, but he resists hi' step by step( ;t #ength he can $ithstand
hi' no #onger, and, on the p#ea that the higher 'an is on his ground and
therefore under his protection, Zarathustra departs in search of hi',
#ea%ing SchopenhauerDDa higher 'an in NietzscheMs opinionDDin the ca%e as a
guest(
"hapter :R222( Ta#k $ith the Wings(
7n his $ay Zarathustra 'eets t$o 'ore higher 'en of his ti'eL t$o kings
cross his path( They are abo%e the a%erage 'odern typeL for their
instincts te## the' $hat rea# ru#ing is, and they despise the 'ockery $hich
they ha%e been taught to ca## N-eigning(N N)e ;-E N7T the first 'en,N they
say, Nand ha%e ne%erthe#ess to ST;N* F7- the'? of this i'posture ha%e $e
at #ast beco'e $eary and disgusted(N 2t is the kings $ho te## Zarathustra?
NThere is no sorer 'isfortune in a## hu'an destiny than $hen the 'ighty of
the earth are not a#so the first 'en( There e%erything beco'eth fa#se and
distorted and 'onstrous(N The kings are a#so asked by Zarathustra to
accept the she#ter of his ca%e, $hereupon he proceeds on his $ay(
"hapter :R2,( The :eech(
;'ong the higher 'en $ho' Zarathustra $ishes to sa%e, is a#so the
scientific specia#istDDthe 'an $ho honest#y and scrupu#ous#y pursues his
in%estigations, as *ar$in did, in one depart'ent of kno$#edge( N2 #o%e hi'
$ho #i%eth in order to kno$, and seeketh to kno$ in order that the Super'an
'ay hereafter #i%e( Thus seeketh he his o$n do$nDgoing(N NThe spiritua##y
conscientious one,N he is ca##ed in this discourse( Zarathustra steps on
hi' una$ares, and the s#a%e of science, b#eeding fro' the %io#ence he has
done to hi'se#f by his se#fDi'posed task, speaks proud#y of his #itt#e
sphere of kno$#edgeDDhis #itt#e handMs breadth of ground on ZarathustraMs
territory, phi#osophy( N)here 'ine honesty ceaseth,N says the true
scientific specia#ist, Nthere a' 2 b#ind and $ant a#so to be b#ind( )here
2 $ant to kno$, ho$e%er, there $ant 2 a#so to be honestDDna'e#y, se%ere,
rigorous, restricted, crue#, and inexorab#e(N Zarathustra great#y
respecting this 'an, in%ites hi' too to the ca%e, and then %anishes in
ans$er to another cry for he#p(
"hapter :R,( The 9agician(
The 9agician is of course an artist, and NietzscheMs inti'ate kno$#edge of
perhaps the greatest artist of his age rendered the se#ection of )agner, as
the type in this discourse, a#'ost ine%itab#e( 9ost readers $i## be
acUuainted $ith the facts re#ating to NietzscheMs and )agnerMs friendship
and u#ti'ate separation( ;s a boy and a youth Nietzsche had sho$n such a
re'arkab#e gift for 'usic that it had been a Uuestion at one ti'e $hether
he shou#d not perhaps gi%e up e%erything e#se in order to de%e#op this
gift, but he beca'e a scho#ar not$ithstanding, a#though he ne%er entire#y
ga%e up co'posing, and p#aying the piano( )hi#e sti## in his teens, he
beca'e acUuainted $ith )agnerMs 'usic and gre$ passionate#y fond of it(
:ong before he 'et )agner he 'ust ha%e idea#ised hi' in his 'ind to an
extent $hich on#y a profound#y artistic nature cou#d ha%e been capab#e of(
Nietzsche a#$ays had high idea#s for hu'anity( 2f one $ere asked $hether,
throughout his 'any changes, there $as yet one ai', one direction, and one
hope to $hich he he#d fast, one $ou#d be forced to rep#y in the affir'ati%e
and dec#are that ai', direction, and hope to ha%e been Nthe e#e%ation of
the type 'an(N No$, $hen Nietzsche 'et )agner he $as actua##y casting
about for an incarnation of his drea's for the Ger'an peop#e, and $e ha%e
on#y to re'e'ber his youth @he $as t$entyDone $hen he $as introduced to
)agnerA, his #o%e of )agnerMs 'usic, and the undoubted po$er of the great
'usicianMs persona#ity, in order to rea#ise ho$ %ery uncritica# his
attitude 'ust ha%e been in the first f#ood of his enthusias'( ;gain, $hen
the friendship ripened, $e cannot $e## i'agine Nietzsche, the younger 'an,
being anything #ess than intoxicated by his seniorMs attention and #o%e,
and $e are therefore not surprised to find hi' pressing )agner for$ard as
the great -efor'er and Sa%iour of 'ankind( N)agner in .ayreuthN @Eng#ish
Edition, !060A gi%es us the best proof of NietzscheMs infatuation, and
a#though signs are not $anting in this essay $hich sho$ ho$ c#ear#y and
e%en crue##y he $as subDconscious#y Ntaking stockN of his friendDDe%en
then, the $ork is a record of $hat great #o%e and ad'iration can do in the
$ay of endo$ing the object of oneMs affection $ith a## the Uua#ities and
idea#s that a ferti#e i'agination can concei%e(
)hen the b#o$ ca'e it $as therefore a## the 'ore se%ere( Nietzsche at
#ength rea#ised that the friend of his fancy and the rea# -ichard )agnerDD
the co'poser of Parsifa#DD$ere not oneL the fact da$ned upon hi' s#o$#yL
disappoint'ent upon disappoint'ent, re%e#ation after re%e#ation, u#ti'ate#y
brought it ho'e to hi', and though his best instincts $ere natura##y
opposed to it at first, the re%u#sion of fee#ing at #ast beca'e too strong
to be ignored, and Nietzsche $as p#unged into the b#ackest despair( Qears
after his break $ith )agner, he $rote NThe "ase of )agnerN, and NNietzsche
contra )agnerN, and these $orks are $ith us to pro%e the sincerity and
depth of his %ie$s on the 'an $ho $as the greatest e%ent of his #ife(
The poe' in this discourse is, of course, re'iniscent of )agnerMs o$n
poetica# 'anner, and it 'ust be re'e'bered that the $ho#e $as $ritten
subseUuent to NietzscheMs fina# break $ith his friend( The dia#ogue
bet$een Zarathustra and the 9agician re%ea#s pretty fu##y $hat it $as that
Nietzsche gre$ to #oathe so intense#y in )agner,DD%iz(, his pronounced
histrionic tendencies, his disse'b#ing po$ers, his inordinate %anity, his
eUui%oca#ness, his fa#seness( N2t honoureth thee,N says Zarathustra, Nthat
thou soughtest for greatness, but it betrayeth thee a#so( Thou art not
great(N The 9agician is ne%erthe#ess sent as a guest to ZarathustraMs
ca%eL for, in his heart, Zarathustra be#ie%ed unti# the end that the
9agician $as a higher 'an broken by 'odern %a#ues(
"hapter :R,2( 7ut of Ser%ice(
Zarathustra no$ 'eets the #ast pope, and, in a poetica# for', $e get
NietzscheMs description of the course Tudais' and "hristianity pursued
before they reached their fina# breakDup in ;theis', ;gnosticis', and the
#ike( The God of a strong, $ar#ike raceDDthe God of 2srae#DDis a jea#ous,
re%engefu# God( /e is a po$er that can be pictured and endured on#y by a
hardy and courageous race, a race rich enough to sacrifice and to #ose in
sacrifice( The i'age of this God degenerates $ith the peop#e that
appropriate it, and gradua##y /e beco'es a God of #o%eDDNsoft and 'e##o$,N
a #o$er 'idd#eDc#ass deity, $ho is Npitifu#(N /e can no #onger be a God
$ho reUuires sacrifice, for $e ourse#%es are no #onger rich enough for
that( The tab#es are therefore turned upon /i'L /E 'ust sacrifice to us(
/is pity beco'es so great that he actua##y does sacrifice so'ething to usDD
/is on#y begotten Son( Such a process carried to its #ogica# conc#usions
'ust u#ti'ate#y end in /is o$n destruction, and thus $e find the pope
dec#aring that God $as one day suffocated by /is a##DtooDgreat pity( )hat
fo##o$s is c#ear enough( Zarathustra recognises another higher 'an in the
exDpope and sends hi' too as a guest to the ca%e(
"hapter :R,22( The 8g#iest 9an(
This discourse contains perhaps the bo#dest of NietzscheMs suggestions
concerning ;theis', as $e## as so'e extre'e#y penetrating re'arks upon the
senti'ent of pity( Zarathustra co'es across the repu#si%e creature sitting
on the $ayside, and $hat does he doS /e 'anifests the on#y correct
fee#ings that can be 'anifested in the presence of any great 'iseryDDthat
is to say, sha'e, re%erence, e'barrass'ent( Nietzsche detested the
obtrusi%e and gushing pity that goes up to 'isery $ithout a b#ush either on
its cheek or in its heartDDthe pity $hich is on#y another for' of se#fD
g#orification( NThank God that 2 a' not #ike thee&NDDon#y this se#fD
g#orifying senti'ent can #end a $e##Dconstituted 'an the i'pudence to S/7)
his pity for the cripp#e and the i##Dconstituted( 2n the presence of the
ug#iest 'an Nietzsche b#ushes,DDhe b#ushes for his raceL his o$n particu#ar
kind of a#truis'DDthe a#truis' that 'ight ha%e pre%ented the existence of
this 'anDDstrikes hi' $ith a## its force( /e $i## ha%e the $or#d
other$ise( /e $i## ha%e a $or#d $here one need not b#ush for oneMs
fe##o$sDDhence his appea# to us to #o%e on#y our chi#drenMs #and, the #and
undisco%ered in the re'otest sea(
Zarathustra ca##s the ug#iest 'an the 'urderer of God& "ertain#y, this is
one aspect of a certain kind of ;theis'DDthe ;theis' of the 'an $ho re%eres
beauty to such an extent that his o$n ug#iness, $hich outrages hi', 'ust be
concea#ed fro' e%ery eye #est it shou#d not be respected as Zarathustra
respected it( 2f there be a God, /e too 'ust be e%aded( /is pity 'ust be
foi#ed( .ut God is ubiUuitous and o'niscient( Therefore, for the rea##y
G-E;T ug#y 'an, /e 'ust not exist( NTheir pity 2S it fro' $hich 2 f#ee
a$ay,N he saysDDthat is to say? N2t is fro' their $ant of re%erence and
#ack of sha'e in presence of 'y great 'isery&N The ug#iest 'an despises
hi'se#fL but Zarathustra said in his Pro#ogue? N2 #o%e the great despisers
because they are the great adorers, and arro$s of #onging for the other
shore(N /e therefore honours the ug#iest 'an? sees height in his se#fD
conte'pt, and in%ites hi' to join the other higher 'en in the ca%e(
"hapter :R,222( The ,o#untary .eggar(
2n this discourse, $e undoubted#y ha%e the idea# .uddhist, if not Gauta'a
.uddha hi'se#f( Nietzsche had the greatest respect for .uddhis', and
a#'ost $here%er he refers to it in his $orks, it is in ter's of praise( /e
recognised that though .uddhis' is undoubted#y a re#igion for decadents,
its decadent %a#ues e'anate fro' the higher and not, as in "hristianity,
fro' the #o$er grades of society( 2n ;phoris' C6 of NThe ;ntichristN, he
co'pares it exhausti%e#y $ith "hristianity, and the resu#t of his
in%estigation is %ery 'uch in fa%our of the o#der re#igion( Sti##, he
recognised a 'ost decided .uddhistic inf#uence in "hristMs teaching, and
the $ords in %erses C0, F6, and F! are %ery re'iniscent of his %ie$s in
regard to the "hristian Sa%ior(
The figure of "hrist has been introduced often enough into fiction, and
'any scho#ars ha%e undertaken to $rite /is #ife according to their o$n
#ights, but fe$ perhaps ha%e e%er atte'pted to present /i' to us bereft of
a## those characteristics $hich a #ack of the sense of har'ony has attached
to /is person through the ages in $hich /is doctrines ha%e been taught(
No$ Nietzsche disagreed entire#y $ith -enanMs %ie$, that "hrist $as N#e
grand 'aitre en ironieNL in ;phoris' F! of NThe ;ntichristN, he says that
he @NietzscheA a#$ays purged his picture of the /u'b#e Nazarene of a##
those bitter and spitefu# outbursts $hich, in %ie$ of the strugg#e the
first "hristians $ent through, 'ay %ery $e## ha%e been added to the
origina# character by ;po#ogists and Sectarians $ho, at that ti'e, cou#d
i## afford to consider nice psycho#ogica# points, seeing that $hat they
needed, abo%e a##, $as a $rang#ing and abusi%e deity( These t$o
conf#icting ha#%es in the character of the "hrist of the Gospe#s, $hich no
sound psycho#ogy can e%er reconci#e, Nietzsche a#$ays kept distinct in his
o$n 'indL he cou#d not credit the sa'e 'an $ith senti'ents so'eti'es so
nob#e and at other ti'es so %u#gar, and in presenting us $ith this ne$
portrait of the Sa%iour, purged of a## i'purities, Nietzsche rendered
'i#itary honours to a foe, $hich far exceed in $orth a## that /is 'ost
ardent discip#es ha%e e%er c#ai'ed for /i'( 2n %erse CP $e are %i%id#y
re'inded of /erbert SpencerMs $ords NM:e 'ariage de con%enanceM is
#ega#ised prostitution(N
"hapter :R2R( The Shado$(
/ere $e ha%e a description of that courageous and $ay$ard spirit that
#itera##y haunts the footsteps of e%ery great thinker and e%ery great
#eaderL so'eti'es $ith the resu#t that it #oses a## ai's, a## hopes, and
a## trust in a definite goa#( 2t is the case of the bra%est and 'ost
broadD'inded 'en of toDday( These #itera##y shado$ the 'ost daring
'o%e'ents in the science and art of their generationL they co'p#ete#y #ose
their bearings and actua##y find the'se#%es, in the end, $ithout a $ay, a
goa#, or a ho'e( N7n e%ery surface ha%e 2 a#ready sat&(((2 beco'e thin, 2
a' a#'ost eUua# to a shado$&N ;t #ast, in despair, such 'en do indeed cry
out? NNothing is trueL a## is per'itted,N and then they beco'e 'ere
$reckage( NToo 'uch hath beco'e c#ear unto 'e? no$ nothing 'attereth to
'e any 'ore( Nothing #i%eth any #onger that 2 #o%e,DDho$ shou#d 2 sti##
#o%e 'yse#f& /a%e 2 sti## a goa#S )here is 9Q ho'eSN Zarathustra
rea#ises the danger threatening such a 'an( NThy danger is not s'a##, thou
free spirit and $anderer,N he says( NThou hast had a bad day( See that a
sti## $orse e%ening doth not o%ertake thee&N The danger Zarathustra refers
to is precise#y this, that e%en a prison 'ay see' a b#essing to such a 'an(
;t #east the bars keep hi' in a p#ace of restL a p#ace of confine'ent, at
its $orst, is rea#( N.e$are #est in the end a narro$ faith capture thee,N
says Zarathustra, Nfor no$ e%erything that is narro$ and fixed seduceth and
te'pteth thee(N
"hapter :RR( Noontide(
;t the noon of #ife Nietzsche said he entered the $or#dL $ith hi' 'an ca'e
of age( )e are no$ he#d responsib#e for our actionsL our o#d guardians,
the gods and de'iDgods of our youth, the superstitions and fears of our
chi#dhood, $ithdra$L the fie#d #ies open before usL $e #i%ed through our
'orning $ith but one 'asterDDchanceDDL #et us see to it that $e 9;WE our
afternoon our o$n @see Note R:2R(, Part 222(A(
"hapter :RR2( The Greeting(
/ere 2 think 2 'ay c#ai' that 'y contention in regard to the purpose and
ai' of the $ho#e of NietzscheMs phi#osophy @as stated at the beginning of
'y Notes on Part 2,(A is co'p#ete#y uphe#d( /e fought for Na## $ho do not
$ant to #i%e, un#ess they #earn again to /7PEDDun#ess T/EQ #earn @fro' hi'A
the G-E;T hope&N ZarathustraMs address to his guests sho$s c#ear#y enough
ho$ he $ished to he#p the'? N2 *7 N7T T-E;T 9Q );--27-S 2N*8:GENT:Q,N he
says? Nho$ then cou#d ye be fit for 9Q $arfareSN /e rebukes and spurns
the', no $ord of #o%e co'es fro' his #ips( E#se$here he says a 'an shou#d
be a hard bed to his friend, thus a#one can he be of use to hi'( Nietzsche
$ou#d be a hard bed to higher 'en( /e $ou#d 'ake the' harderL for, in
order to be a #a$ unto hi'se#f, 'an 'ust possess the reUuisite hardness(
N2 $ait for higher ones, stronger ones, 'ore triu'phant ones, 'errier ones,
for such as are bui#t sUuare#y in body and sou#(N /e says in par( P of
N/igher 9anN?DD
NQe higher 'en, think ye that 2 a' here to put right $hat ye ha%e put
$rongS 7r that 2 $ished henceforth to 'ake snugger couches for you
sufferersS 7r sho$ you rest#ess, 'is$andering, 'isc#i'bing ones ne$ and
easier footpathsSN
NNay& Nay& Three ti'es nay& ;#$ays 'ore, a#$ays better ones of your type
sha## succu'bDDfor ye sha## a#$ays ha%e it $orse and harder(N
"hapter :RR22( The Supper(
2n the first se%en %erses of this discourse, 2 cannot he#p seeing a gent#e
a##usion to SchopenhauerMs habits as a bonD%i%ant( For a pessi'ist, be it
re'e'bered, Schopenhauer #ed Uuite an extraordinary #ife( /e ate $e##,
#o%ed $e##, p#ayed the f#ute $e##, and 2 be#ie%e he s'oked the best cigars(
)hat fo##o$s is c#ear enough(
"hapter :RR222( The /igher 9an( Par( !(
Nietzsche ad'its, here, that at one ti'e he had thought of appea#ing to the
peop#e, to the cro$d in the 'arketDp#ace, but that he had u#ti'ate#y to
abandon the task( /e bids higher 'en depart fro' the 'arketDp#ace(
Par( F(
/ere $e are to#d Uuite p#ain#y $hat c#ass of 'en actua##y o$e a## their
i'pu#ses and desires to the instinct of se#fDpreser%ation( The strugg#e
for existence is indeed the on#y spur in the case of such peop#e( To the'
it 'atters not in $hat shape or condition 'an be preser%ed, pro%ided on#y
he sur%i%e( The transcendenta# 'axi' that N:ife per se is preciousN is the
ru#ing 'axi' here(
Par( E(
2n the Note on "hapter :,22( @endA 2 speak of NietzscheMs e#e%ation of the
%irtue, "ourage, to the highest p#ace a'ong the %irtues( /ere he te##s
higher 'en the c#ass of courage he expects fro' the'(
Pars( K, P(
These ha%e a#ready been referred to in the Notes on "hapters :,22( @endA
and :RR2(
Par( 1(
2 suggest that the #ast %erse in this paragraph strong#y confir's the %ie$
that NietzscheMs teaching $as a#$ays 'eant by hi' to be esoteric and for
higher 'an a#one(
Par( 0(
2n the #ast %erse, here, another shaft of #ight is thro$n upon the
2''acu#ate Perception or soDca##ed Npure objecti%ityN of the scientific
'ind( NFreedo' fro' fe%er is sti## far fro' being kno$#edge(N )here a
'anMs e'otions cease to acco'pany hi' in his in%estigations, he is not
necessari#y nearer the truth( Says Spencer, in the Preface to his
;utobiography?DDN2n the genesis of a syste' of thought, the e'otiona#
nature is a #arge factor? perhaps as #arge a factor as the inte##ectua#
natureN @see pages !FE, !E! of ,o#( 2(, NThoughts out of SeasonNA(
Pars( !6, !!(
)hen $e approach NietzscheMs phi#osophy $e 'ust be prepared to be
independent thinkersL in fact, the greatest %irtue of his $orks is perhaps
the subt#ety $ith $hich they i'pose the ob#igation upon one of thinking
a#one, of scoring off oneMs o$n bat, and of shifting inte##ectua##y for
onese#f(
Par( !F(
N2 a' a rai#ing a#ongside the torrentL $hoe%er is ab#e to grasp 'e, 'ay
grasp 'e& Qour crutch, ho$e%er, 2 a' not(N These t$o paragraphs are an
exhortation to higher 'en to beco'e independent(
Par( !K(
/ere Nietzsche perhaps exaggerates the i'portance of heredity( ;s,
ho$e%er, the Uuestion is by no 'eans one on $hich $e are a## agreed, $hat
he says is not $ithout %a#ue(
; %ery i'portant princip#e in NietzscheMs phi#osophy is enunciated in the
first %erse of this paragraph( NThe higher its type, a#$ays the se#do'er
doth a thing succeedN @see page 4C of N.eyond Good and E%i#NA( Those $ho,
#ike so'e po#itica# econo'ists, ta#k in a businessD#ike $ay about the
terrific $aste of hu'an #ife and energy, de#iberate#y o%er#ook the fact
that the $aste 'ost to be dep#ored usua##y occurs a'ong higher indi%idua#s(
Econo'y $as ne%er precise#y one of natureMs #eading princip#es( ;## this
senti'enta# $ai#ing o%er the #arger proportion of fai#ures than successes
in hu'an #ife, does not see' to take into account the fact that it is the
rarest thing on earth for a high#y organised being to attain to the fu##est
de%e#op'ent and acti%ity of a## its functions, si'p#y because it is so
high#y organised( The b#ind )i## to Po$er in nature therefore stands in
urgent need of direction by 'an(
Pars( !P, !1, !4, !0, C6(
These paragraphs dea# $ith NietzscheMs protest against the de'ocratic
seriousness @Pobe#ernstA of 'odern ti'es( N;## good things #augh,N he
says, and his fina# co''and to the higher 'en is, N:E;-N, 2 pray youDDto
#augh(N ;## that is G77*, in NietzscheMs sense, is cheerfu#( To be ab#e
to crack a joke about oneMs deepest fee#ings is the greatest test of their
%a#ue( The 'an $ho does not #augh, #ike the 'an $ho does not 'ake faces,
is a#ready a buffoon at heart(
N)hat hath hitherto been the greatest sin here on earthS )as it not the
$ord of hi' $ho said? M)oe unto the' that #augh no$&M *id he hi'se#f find
no cause for #aughter on the earthS Then he sought bad#y( ; chi#d e%en
findeth cause for it(N
"hapter :RR2,( The Song of 9e#ancho#y(
;fter his address to the higher 'en, Zarathustra goes out into the open to
reco%er hi'se#f( 9ean$hi#e the 'agician @)agnerA, seizing the opportunity
in order to dra$ the' a## into his net once 'ore, sings the Song of
9e#ancho#y(
"hapter :RR,( Science(
The on#y one to resist the N'e#ancho#y %o#uptuousnessN of his art, is the
spiritua##y conscientious oneDDthe scientific specia#ist of $ho' $e read in
the discourse entit#ed NThe :eechN( /e takes the harp fro' the 'agician
and cries for air, $hi#e repro%ing the 'usician in the sty#e of NThe "ase
of )agnerN( )hen the 'agician reta#iates by saying that the spiritua##y
conscientious one cou#d ha%e understood #itt#e of his song, the #atter
rep#ies? NThou praisest 'e in that thou separatest 'e fro' thyse#f(N The
speech of the scientific 'an to his fe##o$ higher 'en is $e## $orth
studying( .y 'eans of it, Nietzsche pays a high tribute to the honesty of
the true specia#ist, $hi#e, in representing hi' as the on#y one $ho can
resist the de'oniaca# inf#uence of the 'agicianMs 'usic, he e#e%ates hi' at
a stroke, abo%e a## those present( Zarathustra and the spiritua##y
conscientious one join issue at the end on the Uuestion of the proper p#ace
of NfearN in 'anMs history, and Nietzsche a%ai#s hi'se#f of the opportunity
in order to restate his %ie$s concerning the re#ation of courage to
hu'anity( 2t is precise#y because courage has p#ayed the 'ost i'portant
part in our de%e#op'ent that he $ou#d not see it %anish fro' a'ong our
%irtues toDday( N(((courage see'eth to 'e the entire pri'iti%e history of
'an(N
"hapter :RR,2( ;'ong the *aughters of the *esert(
This te##s its o$n ta#e(
"hapter :RR,22( The ;$akening(
2n this discourse, Nietzsche $ishes to gi%e his fo##o$ers a $arning( /e
thinks he has so far he#ped the' that they ha%e beco'e con%a#escent, that
ne$ desires are a$akened in the' and that ne$ hopes are in their ar's and
#egs( .ut he 'istakes the nature of the change( True, he has he#ped the',
he has gi%en the' back $hat they 'ost need, i(e(, be#ief in be#ie%ingDDthe
confidence in ha%ing confidence in so'ething, but ho$ do they use itS This
be#ief in faith, if one can so express it $ithout see'ing tauto#ogica#, has
certain#y been restored to the', and in the first f#ood of their enthusias'
they use it by bo$ing do$n and $orshipping an ass& )hen $riting this
passage, Nietzsche $as ob%ious#y thinking of the accusations $hich $ere
#e%e##ed at the ear#y "hristians by their pagan conte'poraries( 2t is $e##
kno$n that they $ere supposed not on#y to be eaters of hu'an f#esh but a#so
assD$orshippers, and a'ong the -o'an graffiti, the 'ost fa'ous is the one
found on the Pa#atino, sho$ing a 'an $orshipping a cross on $hich is
suspended a figure $ith the head of an ass @see 9inucius Fe#ix, N7cta%iusN
2R(L Tacitus, N/istoriaeN %( FL Tertu##ian, N;po#ogiaN, etc(A( NietzscheMs
ob%ious 'ora#, ho$e%er, is that great scientists and thinkers, once they
ha%e reached the $a## encirc#ing scepticis' and ha%e thereby #earned to
reco%er their confidence in the act of be#ie%ing, as such, usua##y 'anifest
the change in their out#ook by fa##ing %icti's to the narro$est and 'ost
superstitious of creeds( So 'uch for the introduction of the ass as an
object of $orship(
No$, $ith regard to the actua# ser%ice and ;ssDFesti%a#, no reader $ho
happens to be acUuainted $ith the re#igious history of the 9idd#e ;ges $i##
fai# to see the a##usion here to the asinaria festa $hich $ere by no 'eans
unco''on in France, Ger'any, and e#se$here in Europe during the thirteenth,
fourteenth, and fifteenth centuries(
"hapter :RR,222( The ;ssDFesti%a#(
;t #ength, in the 'idd#e of their feast, Zarathustra bursts in upon the'
and rebukes the' sound#y( .ut he does not do so #ongL in the ;ssDFesti%a#,
it sudden#y occurs to hi', that he is concerned $ith a cere'ony that 'ay
not be $ithout its purpose, as so'ething foo#ish but necessaryDDa
recreation for $ise 'en( /e is therefore high#y p#eased that the higher
'en ha%e a## b#osso'ed forthL they therefore reUuire ne$ festi%a#s,DDN;
#itt#e %a#iant nonsense, so'e di%ine ser%ice and assDfesti%a#, so'e o#d
joyfu# Zarathustra foo#, so'e b#usterer to b#o$ their sou#s bright(N
/e te##s the' not to forget that night and the assDfesti%a#, for Nsuch
things on#y the con%a#escent de%ise& ;nd shou#d ye ce#ebrate it again,N he
conc#udes, Ndo it fro' #o%e to yourse#%es, do it a#so fro' #o%e to 'e& ;nd
in re'e'brance of 9E&N
"hapter :RR2R( The *runken Song(
2t $ere the height of presu'ption to atte'pt to fix any particu#ar
interpretation of 'y o$n to the $ords of this song( )ith $hat has gone
before, the reader, $hi#e reading it as poetry, shou#d be ab#e to seek and
find his o$n 'eaning in it( The doctrine of the Eterna# -ecurrence appears
for the #ast ti'e here, in an artDfor'( Nietzsche #ays stress upon the
fact that a## happiness, a## de#ight, #ongs for repetitions, and just as a
chi#d cries N;gain& ;gain&N to the adu#t $ho happens to be a'using hi'L so
the 'an $ho sees a 'eaning, and a joyfu# 'eaning, in existence 'ust a#so
cry N;gain&N and yet N;gain&N to a## his #ife(
"hapter :RRR( The Sign(
2n this discourse, Nietzsche disassociates hi'se#f fina##y fro' the higher
'en, and by the sy'bo# of the #ion, $ishes to con%ey to us that he has $on
o%er and 'astered the best and the 'ost terrib#e in nature( That great
po$er and tenderness are kin, $as a#ready his be#ief in !41KDDeight years
before he $rote this speech, and $hen the birds and the #ion co'e to hi',
it is because he is the e'bodi'ent of the t$o Uua#ities( ;## that is
terrib#e and great in nature, the higher 'en are not yet prepared forL for
they retreat horrorDstricken into the ca%e $hen the #ion springs at the'L
but Zarathustra 'akes not a 'o%e to$ards the'( /e $as te'pted to the' on
the pre%ious day, he says, but NThat hath had its ti'e& 9y suffering and
'y fe##o$ suffering,DD$hat 'atter about the'& *o 2 then stri%e after
/;PP2NESSS 2 stri%e after 'y $ork& )e##& the #ion hath co'e, 'y chi#dren
are nigh( Zarathustra hath gro$n ripe( 9Q day beginneth? ;-2SE N7),
;-2SE, T/78 G-E;T N77N*;Q&N
(((
The abo%e 2 kno$ to be open to 'uch criticis'( 2 sha## be gratefu# to a##
those $ho $i## be kind enough to sho$ 'e $here and ho$ 2 ha%e gone $rongL
but 2 shou#d #ike to point out that, as they stand, 2 ha%e not gi%en to
these Notes by any 'eans their fina# for'(
;NT/7NQ 9( :8*7,2"2(
:ondon, February !060(
End of this Project Gutenberg Etext of Thus Spake Zarathustra by Friedrich
Nietzsche

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