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CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches V100R001C00 Configuration Guide - IP Routing Issue 04 Date 2013-07-10

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches

V100R001C00

Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Issue

04

Date

2013-07-10

HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD.

Switches V100R001C00 Configuration Guide - IP Routing Issue 04 Date 2013-07-10 HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD.

Copyright © Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. 2013. All rights reserved.

No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written consent of Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

Trademarks and Permissions

and other Huawei trademarks are trademarks of Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. All other trademarks and trade names mentioned in this document are the property of their respective holders.

Notice

The purchased products, services and features are stipulated by the contract made between Huawei and the customer. All or part of the products, services and features described in this document may not be within the purchase scope or the usage scope. Unless otherwise specified in the contract, all statements, information, and recommendations in this document are provided "AS IS" without warranties, guarantees or representations of any kind, either express or implied.

The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Every effort has been made in the preparation of this document to ensure accuracy of the contents, but all statements, information, and recommendations in this document do not constitute a warranty of any kind, express or implied.

Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

Address:

Huawei Industrial Base Bantian, Longgang Shenzhen 518129 People's Republic of China

Website:

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

About This Document

About This Document

Intended Audience

This document provides the basic concepts, configuration procedures, and configuration examples for different application scenarios of the CE series switches, Topics covered include static routes, routing protocols (RIP, BGP,OSPF, and IS-IS), and routing policies.

This document is intended for:

l

Data configuration engineers

l

Commissioning engineers

l

Network monitoring engineers

l

System maintenance engineers

Symbol Conventions

The symbols that may be found in this document are defined as follows.

Symbol

Description

DANG ERIndicates a hazard with a high level or medium level of risk which, if not

Indicates a hazard with a high level or medium level of risk which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

W ARNINGIndicates a hazard with a low level of risk which, if not avoided, could result

Indicates a hazard with a low level of risk which, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injury.

CAUTIONIndicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in equipment damage, data

Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in equipment damage, data loss, performance deterioration, or unanticipated results.

TIPProvides a tip that may help you solve a problem or save time.

Provides a tip that may help you solve a problem or save time.

NOTEProvides additional information to emphasize or supplement important points in the main text.

Provides additional information to emphasize or supplement important points in the main text.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

About This Document

Command Conventions

The command conventions that may be found in this document are defined as follows.

Convention

Description

Boldface

 

The keywords of a command line are in boldface.

Italic

 

Command arguments are in italics.

[

]

Items (keywords or arguments) in brackets [ ] are optional.

{

x | y |

}

Optional items are grouped in braces and separated by vertical bars. One item is selected.

[

x | y |

]

Optional items are grouped in brackets and separated by vertical bars. One item is selected or no item is selected.

{

x | y |

} *

Optional items are grouped in braces and separated by vertical bars. A minimum of one item or a maximum of all items can be selected.

[

x | y |

] *

Optional items are grouped in brackets and separated by vertical bars. You can select one or several items, or select no item.

&<1-n>

 

The parameter before the & sign can be repeated 1 to n times.

#

A line starting with the # sign is comments.

Interface Numbering Conventions

Interface numbers used in this manual are examples. In device configuration, use the existing interface numbers on devices.

Change History

Updates between document issues are cumulative. Therefore, the latest document issue contains all updates made in previous issues.

Changes in Issue 04 (2013-07-10)

This version has the following updates:

The following information is modified:

l

5.15.4 Example for Configuring IS-IS Auto FRR

l

5.15.2 Example for Configuring IS-IS DIS Election

l

4.19.5 Example for Configuring Load Balancing Among OSPF Routes

l

6.2 BGP Features Supported by the Device

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

About This Document

l

2.9.4 Example for Configuring FRR for IPv4 Static Routes on the Public Network

l

2.8 Associating IPv4 Static Routes with NQA

l

5.6.3 Configuring Principles for Using Equal-Cost IS-IS Routes

l

4.9.4 Configuring External Route Selection Rules Compatible with RFC 1583

Changes in Issue 03 (2013-05-10)

This version has the following updates:

The following information is modified:

l

8.3.1 Example for Configuring an MCE Device

l

3.14.3 Example for Configuring Dynamic BFD for RIP

Changes in Issue 02 (2013-03-15)

This version has the following updates:

The following information is modified:

l 4.8 Configuring OSPF NSSA Areas

Changes in Issue 01 (2012-12-31)

Initial commercial release.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

Contents

About This Document

ii

1

IP Routing Basic Configuration

1

1.1 Displaying and Maintaining a Routing Table

2

1.2 Configuring IPv4 FRR

2

1.3 Configuring the ECMP Load Balancing Mode

3

1.4 Configuration Examples

4

1.4.1

Example for Configuring IPv4 FRR on the Public Network

4

2 Static Route Configuration

11

2.1 Static Route Overview

13

2.2 Static Route Features Supported by the Device

13

2.3 Default Configuration of Static Routes

14

2.4 Configuring IPv4 Static Routes

14

2.4.1 Creating IPv4 Static Routes

14

2.4.2 (Optional) Setting the Default Preference for IPv4 Static Routes

15

2.4.3 (Optional) Configuring Static Route Selection Based on Iteration Depth

16

2.4.4 Checking the Configuration

17

2.5 Configuring Dynamic BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

17

2.6 Configuring Static BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

18

2.7 Configuring FRR for IPv4 Static Routes

19

2.8 Associating IPv4 Static Routes with NQA

20

2.9 Configuration Examples

22

2.9.1 Example for Configuring IPv4 Static Routes

22

2.9.2 Example for Configuring Dynamic BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

26

2.9.3 Example for Configuring Static BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

29

2.9.4 Example for Configuring FRR for IPv4 Static Routes on the Public Network

31

2.9.5 Example for Configuring NQA for IPv4 Static Routes

36

3 RIP Configuration

44

3.1 RIP Overview

46

3.2 RIP Features Supported by the Device

46

3.3 Default Configuration

47

3.4 Configuring Basic RIP Functions

47

3.4.1

Enabling RIP

48

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

3.4.2 Enabling RIP on the Specified Network Segment

48

3.4.3 (Optional) Configuring RIP Neighbors on an NBMA Network

49

3.4.4 (Optional) Specifying the RIP Version

50

3.4.5 Checking the Configuration

51

3.5

Configuring RIP-2

51

3.5.1 Configuring RIP-2 Route Summarization

51

3.5.2 Configuring RIP-2 Packet Authentication

52

3.5.3 Checking the Configuration

53

3.6

Avoiding Routing Loops

53

3.6.1 Configuring Split Horizon

54

3.6.2 Configuring Poison Reverse

54

3.6.3 Checking the Configuration

55

3.7

Controlling RIP Routing

55

3.7.1 Configuring RIP Preference

55

3.7.2 Configuring Additional Metrics of an Interface

56

3.7.3 Setting the Maximum Number of Equal-Cost Routes

57

3.7.4 Checking the Configuration

57

3.8

Controlling RIP Route Advertisement

58

3.8.1 Configuring RIP to Advertise Default Routes

58

3.8.2 Disabling an Interface from Sending Update Packets

59

3.8.3 Configuring RIP to Import Routes

60

3.8.4 Checking the Configuration

61

3.9

Controlling Receiving of RIP Routing Information

61

3.9.1

Disabling an Interface from Receiving RIP Update Packets

61

3.9.2

Configuring RIP to Deny Host Routes

62

3.9.3

Configuring RIP to Filter Received Routes

63

3.9.4

Checking RIP Packets with Metric 0

63

3.9.5

Checking the Configuration

64

3.10

Improving RIP Network Performance

64

3.10.1 Configuring RIP Timers

65

3.10.2 Setting the Interval for Sending Update Packets and Maximum Number of Sent Packets

66

3.10.3 Setting the Maximum Length of RIP Packets

66

3.10.4 Configuring RIP to Check the Validity of Update Packets

67

3.10.5 Configuring RIP Triggered Update

68

3.10.6 Setting the Maximum Number of RIP Routes

69

3.10.7 Checking the Configuration

69

3.11

Configuring BFD for RIP

70

3.11.1 Configuring Dynamic BFD for RIP

70

3.11.2 Configuring Static BFD for RIP

72

3.12 Configuring the Network Management Function for RIP

74

3.13 Maintaining RIP

74

3.13.1

Resetting RIP

75

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

3.13.2

Clearing RIP Statistics

75

3.14

Configuration Examples

75

3.14.1 Example for Configuring Basic RIP Functions

76

3.14.2 Example for Importing Routes to RIP

79

3.14.3 Example for Configuring Dynamic BFD for RIP

83

3.15

Common Configuration Errors

88

3.15.1 Failed to Receive RIP Update Packets from Neighbors

88

3.15.2 Failed to Send RIP Update Packets to Neighbors

89

3.15.3 Route Flapping Occurs on a RIP Network

89

4 OSPF Configuration

91

4.1 OSPF Overview

93

4.2 OSPF Features Supported by the Device

96

4.3 Default Configuration

99

4.4 Configuring Basic OSPF Functions

100

4.4.1 Creating an OSPF Process

100

4.4.2 Creating an OSPF Area

101

4.4.3 Enable OSPF

102

4.4.4 Checking the Configuration

103

4.5

Setting Parameters for OSPF Neighbor Relationship

104

4.5.1 Setting the OSPF Packet Retransmission Limit

104

4.5.2 Configuring an Interface to Fill in the DD Packet with the Actual MTU

105

4.5.3 Checking the Configuration

105

4.6

Configuring OSPF Attributes in Different Types of Networks

106

4.6.1 Configuring Network Types of OSPF Interfaces

107

4.6.2 (Optional) Setting the DR Priority for the OSPF Interface of the Broadcast or NBMA Network Type

108

4.6.3 (Optional) Disabling the Function of Checking the Network Mask on a P2MP Network

109

4.6.4 Configuring Neighbors for NBMA Networks

109

4.6.5 (Optional) Configuring the Interval for Sending Poll Packets in NBMA Networks

110

4.6.6 Checking the Configuration

110

4.7

Configuring OSPF Stub Areas

111

4.7.1 Defining the Current Area to be a Stub Area

111

4.7.2 (Optional) Configuring Metrics of Default Routes Sent to Stub Areas

112

4.7.3 Checking the Configuration

113

4.8 Configuring OSPF NSSA Areas

113

4.9 Adjusting OSPF Route Selection

116

4.9.1

Setting the Link Cost for an OSPF Interface

116

4.9.2

Setting the Preference for Equal-cost OSPF Routes

117

4.9.3

Setting the Maximum Number of Equal-Cost Routes

118

4.9.4

Configuring External Route Selection Rules Compatible with RFC 1583

119

4.9.5

Checking the Configuration

119

4.10

Controlling OSPF Routing Information

120

4.10.1

Configuring OSPF to Import External Routes

120

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

4.10.2 Configuring OSPF to Advertise the Default Route to the OSPF Area

122

4.10.3 Configuring OSPF Route Aggregation

123

4.10.4 Configuring OSPF to Filter the Received Routes

124

4.10.5 Configuring OSPF to Filter the Routes to Be Advertised

125

4.10.6 Configuring OSPF to Filter ABR Type3 LSA

125

4.10.7 Checking the Configuration

126

4.11

Configuring OSPF IP FRR

126

4.11.1 Enabling OSPF IP FRR

127

4.11.2 (Optional) Blocking FRR on an OSPF Interface

128

4.11.3 Checking the Configuration

128

4.12

Configuring BFD for OSPF

129

4.12.1 Configuring Global BFD

129

4.12.2 Configuring BFD for OSPF Feature

130

4.12.3 (Optional) Preventing an Interface from Dynamically Setting Up a BFD Session

131

4.12.4 (Optional) Configuring BFD on the Specified Interface

131

4.12.5 Checking the Configuration

132

4.13

Configuring OSPF Fast Convergence

132

4.13.1 Setting the Convergence Priority of OSPF Routes

132

4.13.2 Setting the Interval for Sending Hello Packets

133

4.13.3 Setting the Dead Time of the Neighbor Relationship

134

4.13.4 Configuring Smart-discover

135

4.13.5 Setting the Interval for Updating LSAs

135

4.13.6 Setting the Interval for Receiving LSAs

137

4.13.7 Setting the Interval for the SPF Calculation

138

4.13.8 Checking the Configuration

139

4.14 Configuring OSPF GR Helper

139

4.15 Improving the Stability of an OSPF Network

140

4.15.1 Setting the Priority of OSPF

141

4.15.2 Configuring the Delay for Transmitting LSAs on the Interface

141

4.15.3 Configuring the Interval for Retransmitting LSAs

142

4.15.4 Configuring Secure Synchronization

142

4.15.5 Configuring Stub Routers

143

4.15.6 Suppressing an Interface from Receiving or Sending OSPF Packets

144

4.15.7 Checking the Configuration

144

4.16

Improving the Security of an OSPF Network

145

4.16.1 Configuring the Area Authentication Mode

145

4.16.2 Configuring the Interface Authentication Mode

146

4.16.3 Checking the Configuration

147

4.17 Configuring the Network Management Function of OSPF

148

4.18 Maintaining OSPF

148

4.18.1 Clearing OSPF

149

4.18.2 Resetting OSPF

149

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

4.19 Configuring Examples

150

4.19.1 Example for Configuring Basic OSPF Functions

150

4.19.2 Example for Configuring OSPF Stub Areas

155

4.19.3 Example for Configuring an NSSA Area

160

4.19.4 Example for Configuring DR Election of OSPF

165

4.19.5 Example for Configuring Load Balancing Among OSPF Routes

170

4.19.6 Example for Configuring OSPF IP FRR

175

4.19.7 Example for Configuring BFD for OSPF

181

5 IPv4 IS-IS Configuration

186

 

5.1 IS-IS

Overview

188

5.2 IS-IS (IPv4) Features Supported by the Device

188

5.3 Default Configuration

190

5.4 Configure Basic IS-IS Functions

191

5.4.1 Creating IS-IS Processes

191

5.4.2 Configuring a NET

192

5.4.3 Configuring the Device Level

192

5.4.4 Establishing IS-IS Neighbor Relationships

193

5.4.5 Checking the Configuration

196

5.5

Improving IS-IS Network Security

196

5.5.1 Configuring Interface Authentication

197

5.5.2 Configuring Area or Domain Authentication

198

5.5.3 Checking the Configuration

200

5.6

Controlling IS-IS Route Selection

200

5.6.1 Configuring a Preference Value for IS-IS

200

5.6.2 Configuring the Cost of an IS-IS Interface

201

5.6.3 Configuring Principles for Using Equal-Cost IS-IS Routes

204

5.6.4 Configuring IS-IS Route Leaking

205

5.6.5 Checking the Configuration

206

5.7

Controlling IS-IS Route Exchange

206

5.7.1 Configuring IS-IS to Advertise a Default Route

207

5.7.2 Configuring IS-IS to Import External Routes

208

5.7.3 Configuring IS-IS to Advertise Specified External Routes to an IS-IS Routing Domain

208

5.7.4 Adding Specified IS-IS Routes to the IP Routing Table

209

5.7.5 Checking the Configuration

210

5.8 Configuring IS-IS Route Summarization

210

5.9 Controlling IS-IS Route Convergence

211

5.9.1 Configuring Attributes for Hello Packets

211

5.9.2 Configuring Attributes for LSPs

213

5.9.3 Configuring Attributes for CSNPs

218

5.9.4 Setting the SPF Calculation Interval

219

5.9.5 Configuring Convergence Priorities for IS-IS Routes

220

5.9.6 Checking the Configuration

221

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

5.10 Configuring LSP Fragment Extension

221

5.11 Configuring a Mesh Group on an NBMA Network

222

5.12 Configuring IS-IS Reliability

223

5.12.1 Enabling IS-IS Auto FRR

223

5.12.2 Configuring Static BFD for IS-IS

225

5.12.3 Configuring Dynamic BFD for IS-IS

226

5.13 Configuring the Overload Bit for an IS-IS Device

229

5.14 Maintaining IS-IS

229

5.14.1 Resetting IS-IS

230

5.14.2 Suppressing IS-IS

230

5.14.3 Configuring IS-IS Host Name Mapping

231

5.15

Configuration Examples

232

5.15.1 Example for Configuring Basic IS-IS Functions

232

5.15.2 Example for Configuring IS-IS DIS Election

237

5.15.3 Example for Configuring IS-IS to Interact with BGP

242

5.15.4 Example for Configuring IS-IS Auto FRR

247

5.15.5 Example for Configuring Static BFD for IS-IS

255

5.15.6 Example for Configuring Dynamic BFD for IS-IS

259

5.16

Common Configuration Errors

265

5.16.1 Failed to Establish IS-IS Neighbor Relationships

266

5.16.2 A Device Cannot Learn IS-IS Routes from Its Neighbor

267

6 BGP Configuration

269

6.1 BGP Overview

271

6.2 BGP Features Supported by the Device

271

6.3 Default Configuration

275

6.4 Configuring Basic BGP Functions

275

6.4.1 Starting a BGP Process

276

6.4.2 Configuring BGP Peers

276

6.4.3 (Optional) Configuring a BGP Peer Group

278

6.4.4 Configuring BGP to Import Routes

279

6.4.5 Checking the Configuration

281

6.5

Configuring BGP Security

281

6.5.1 Configuring MD5 Authentication

282

6.5.2 Configuring Keychain Authentication

282

6.5.3 Configuring BGP GTSM

283

6.5.4 Checking the Configuration

284

6.6

Simplifying IBGP Network Connections

284

6.6.1 Configuring a BGP Route Reflector

285

6.6.2 Configuring a BGP Confederation

286

6.7

Configuring BGP Route Selection and Load Balancing

287

6.7.1 Configuring the BGP Priority

287

6.7.2 Configuring the Next_Hop Attribute

288

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

6.7.3 Configuring the PrefVal Attribute

289

6.7.4 Configuring the Default Local_Pref Attribute

290

6.7.5 Configuring the AS_Path Attribute

291

6.7.6 Configuring the MED Attribute

293

6.7.7 Configuring the BGP Community Attribute

294

6.7.8 Configuring BGP Load Balancing

296

6.7.9 Checking the Configuration

298

6.8

Controlling the Receiving and Advertisement of BGP Routes

298

6.8.1 Configuring a Routing Policy

299

6.8.2 Controlling the Advertisement of BGP Routes

299

6.8.3 Controlling the Receiving of BGP Routes

301

6.8.4 Configuring BGP Soft Reset

303

6.8.5 Checking the Configuration

304

6.9

Adjusting the BGP Network Convergence Speed

305

6.9.1

Configuring a BGP ConnectRetry Timer

305

6.9.2

Configuring BGP Keepalive and Hold Timers

306

6.9.3

Configuring a Update Message Timer

308

6.9.4

Disabling Rapid EBGP Connection Reset

309

6.9.5

Configuring BGP Route Dampening

309

6.9.6

Checking the Configuration

310

6.10

Configuring BGP Reliability

311

6.10.1 Configuring Association Between BGP and BFD

311

6.10.2 Configuring BGP Auto FRR

313

6.10.3 Configuring the BGP GR Helper Function

314

6.11 Configuring BGP Route Summarization

315

6.12 Configuring On-demand Route Advertisement

316

6.13 Configuring BGP to Advertise Default Routes to Peers

317

6.14 Configuring

MP-BGP

318

6.15 Maintaining

BGP

319

6.15.1 Resetting BGP Connections

319

6.15.2 Clearing BGP Statistics

320

6.16

Configuration Examples

321

6.16.1 Example for Configuring Basic BGP Functions

321

6.16.2 Example for Configuring Basic MBGP Functions

327

6.16.3 Example for Configuring BGP Load Balancing and the MED Attribute

335

6.16.4 Example for Configuring a BGP Route Reflector

339

6.16.5 Example for Configuring a BGP Confederation

345

6.16.6 Example for Configuring the BGP Community Attribute

353

6.16.7 Example for Configuring Prefix-based BGP ORF

357

6.16.8 Example for Configuring BGP Route Dampening

361

6.16.9 Example for Associating BGP with BFD

365

6.16.10 Example for Configuring BGP Auto FRR

370

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

Contents

7 Routing Policy Configuration

376

7.1 Routing Policy Overview

377

7.2 Routing Policy Features Supported by the Device

377

7.3 Filter Configuration

378

7.3.1 Configuring an IP Prefix List

379

7.3.2 Configuring an AS_Path Filter

380

7.3.3 Configuring a Community Filter

380

7.3.4 Configuring an Extended Community Filter

381

7.3.5 Configuring an RD Filter

382

7.4

Configuring a Routing Policy

382

7.4.1 Creating a Routing Policy

383

7.4.2 (Optional) Configuring an if-match Clause

383

7.4.3 (Optional) Configuring an apply Clause

385

7.4.4 Checking the Configuration

387

7.5 Maintaining the Routing Policy

387

7.6 Configuration Examples

388

7.6.1 Example for Filtering the Routes to Be Received or Advertised

388

7.6.2 Example for Applying a Routing Policy for Importing Routes

393

8 MCE Configuration

398

8.1 MCE Overview

399

8.2 Configuring an MCE Device

402

8.2.1 Configuring a VPN Instance

403

8.2.2 Configure Route Exchange Between an MCE Device and VPN Sites

405

8.2.3 Configure Route Exchange Between an MCE Device and a PE Device

411

8.2.4 Checking the Configuration

415

8.3

Configuration Examples

416

8.3.1

Example for Configuring an MCE Device

416

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

1 IP Routing Basic Configuration

1 IP Routing Basic Configuration

About This Chapter

You can configure IP routing to learn about basic parameters for IP routing.

1.1 Displaying and Maintaining a Routing Table

You can view routing tables to learn about the network topology and locate routing faults.

1.2 Configuring IPv4 FRR

IPv4 FRR applies to the services that are very sensitive to delay and packet loss on IPv4 networks.

1.3 Configuring the ECMP Load Balancing Mode

Equal-Cost Multi-Path routing (ECMP) implements load balancing and link backup.

1.4 Configuration Examples

This section provides examples for configuring IP routing, including networking requirements and configuration roadmap.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

1 IP Routing Basic Configuration

1.1 Displaying and Maintaining a Routing Table

You can view routing tables to learn about the network topology and locate routing faults.

Context

 

You can view routing table information to locate routing faults. The following describes the commands used to display and maintain routing table information.

The display commands can be used in all views. The reset commands are used in the user view.

If the switch imports a large number of routes, system performance may be affected when services are being processed because the routes consume a lot of system resources. To improve system security and reliability, configure a limit on the number of public route prefixes. When the number of public route prefixes exceeds the limit, an alarm is generated, prompting you to check whether unnecessary public route prefixes exist.

Procedure

l

Run the display ip routing-table command to check brief information about the active routes in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table verbose command to check detailed information about the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table ip-address [ mask | mask-length ] [ longer-match ] [ verbose ] command to check detailed information about the routes with the specified destination address in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table ip-address1 { mask1 | mask-length1 } ip-address2

mask2 | mask-length2 } [ verbose ] command to check detailed information about the routes within the specified destination address range in the IPv4 routing table.

{

l

Run the display ip routing-table ip-prefix ip-prefix-name [ verbose ] command to check detailed information about the routes that match the specified IP prefix list in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table protocol protocol [ inactive | verbose ] command to check detailed information about the routes discovered by the specified routing protocol in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table statistics command to check route statistics in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the reset ip routing-table statistics protocol [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ]

{

all | protocol } command to clear route statistics in the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the ip prefix limit number { alert-percent [ route-unchanged ] | simply-alert } command in the system view to set a limit on the number of IPv4 public route prefixes.

l

Run the ipv6 prefix limit number { alert-percent [ route-unchanged ] | simply-alert } command in the system view to set a limit on the number of IPv6 public route prefixes.

----End

1.2 Configuring IPv4 FRR

IPv4 FRR applies to the services that are very sensitive to delay and packet loss on IPv4 networks.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

1 IP Routing Basic Configuration

Applicable Environment

If a link failure occurs after FRR is enabled, the fault detection module reports the failure to the upper-layer routing system. The FRR module immediately uses a backup link to forward packets, minimizing the impact of the link failure on services.

CAUTIONminimizing the impact of the link failure on services. IPv4 FRR implements route backup among routes

IPv4 FRR implements route backup among routes of different routing protocols and may cause routing loops. Therefore, exercise caution when using IPv4 FRR.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring IPv4 FRR, complete the following task:

 

l

Configuring link layer protocol parameters and assigning IPv4 addresses to interfaces to ensure that the link layer protocol of the interfaces is Up

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

 

system-view

 

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Run:

ip frr

IPv4 FRR is enabled.

NOTE

NOTE

 

When FRR is configured in both the system view and the routing protocol view, FRR configured in the routing protocol view is used for route backup.

Step 3

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

Checking the Configuration

After IPv4 FRR is configured, run the following command to check the configuration.

Run the display ip routing-table verbose command to check detailed information about the backup outbound interfaces and backup next hops of routes in the routing table.

1.3 Configuring the ECMP Load Balancing Mode

Equal-Cost Multi-Path routing (ECMP) implements load balancing and link backup.

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1 IP Routing Basic Configuration

Context

ECMP applies to the network where multiple links to the same destination are available. In the traditional routing technology, packets are forwarded to the destination through one link only; the other links are in backup or inactive state; switching between these links requires a certain period when dynamic routes are used. Different from the traditional routing technology, ECMP can use multiple links to increase transmission bandwidth and transmit data on a faulty link without any delay or packet loss.

Procedure

1.

Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

2.

Run:

load-balance ecmp

The ECMP view is displayed.

3.

Run:

ipv4 { src-ip | dst-ip | vlan | l4-src-port | l4-dst-port | protocol | src- interface } *

The ECMP load balancing mode of IPv4 packets is set.

By default, ECMP load balancing is performed on IPv4 packets based on the source IP address, destination IP address, and port number.

4.

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

Checking the Configuration

Run the display port forwarding-path src-ip src-ip-data dst-ip dst-ip-data command to check the outbound interface and statistics about packets that contain specified 5-tuple information.

1.4 Configuration Examples

This section provides examples for configuring IP routing, including networking requirements and configuration roadmap.

1.4.1 Example for Configuring IPv4 FRR on the Public Network

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 1-1, OSPF is configured on SwitchT, SwitchA, and SwitchC, and IS-IS is configured on SwitchT, SwitchB, and SwitchC. OSPF routes have a higher priority than IS-IS routes. Therefore, link B is the backup link of link A. Traffic must be rapidly switched from link A to link B when a fault occurs on link A.

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Figure 1-1 Networking diagram of configuring IPv4 FRR on the public network 10GE1/0/1 10GE1/0/2 VLANIF20
Figure 1-1 Networking diagram of configuring IPv4 FRR on the public network
10GE1/0/1
10GE1/0/2
VLANIF20
VLANIF40
192.168.10.2/24
192.168.11.2/24
10GE1/0/2
10GE1/0/2
SwitchA
VLANIF20
VLANIF40
192.168.10.1/24
192.168.11.1/24
Link A
SwitchT
SwitchC
10GE1/0/1
10GE1/0/1
Link B
VLANIF10
VLANIF60
10GE1/0/3
172.16.1.1/24
10GE1/0/3
172.17.1.1/24
VLANIF30
SwitchB
VLANIF50
192.168.20.1/24
192.168.21.1/24
10GE1/0/1
10GE1/0/2
VLANIF30
VLANIF50
192.168.20.2/24
192.168.21.2/24

Configuration Roadmap

Enable IPv4 FRR on the public network on SwitchT so that traffic can be rapidly switched to link B when a fault occurs on link A.

Procedure

Step 1

Create VLANs and add interfaces to the VLANs.

<HUAWEI> system-view [~HUAWEI] sysname SwitchT [~HUAWEI] commit [~SwitchT] vlan batch 10 20 30 [~SwitchT] interface 10ge 1/0/1 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/1] port link-type trunk [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/1] port trunk allow-pass vlan 10 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/1] quit [~SwitchT] interface 10ge 1/0/2 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/2] port link-type trunk [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/2] port trunk allow-pass vlan 20 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/2] quit [~SwitchT] interface 10ge 1/0/3 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/3] port link-type trunk [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/3] port trunk allow-pass vlan 30 [~SwitchT-10GE1/0/3] quit [~SwitchT] commit

The configurations of SwitchA, SwitchB, and SwitchC are similar to the configuration of SwitchT, and are not mentioned here.

Step 2

Assign IPv4 addresses to VLANIF interfaces.

[~SwitchT] interface vlanif 10 [~SwitchT-Vlanif10] ip address 172.16.1.1 24 [~SwitchT-Vlanif10] quit [~SwitchT] interface vlanif 20 [~SwitchT-Vlanif20] ip address 192.168.10.1 24 [~SwitchT-Vlanif20] quit [~SwitchT] interface vlanif 30 [~SwitchT-Vlanif30] ip address 192.168.20.1 24

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[~SwitchT-Vlanif30] quit [~SwitchT] commit

The configurations of SwitchA, SwitchB, and SwitchC are similar to the configuration of SwitchT, and are not mentioned here.

Step 3

Configure OSPF on SwitchT, SwitchA, and SwitchC.

#

Configure SwitchT.

[~SwitchT] ospf [~SwitchT-ospf-1] area 0 [~SwitchT-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchT-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 192.168.10.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchT-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] commit

#

Configure SwitchA.

[~SwitchA] ospf [~SwitchA-ospf-1] area 0 [~SwitchA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 192.168.10.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchA-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] commit

#

Configure SwitchC.

[~SwitchC] ospf [~SwitchC-ospf-1] area 0 [~SwitchC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 172.17.1.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.255 [~SwitchC-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] commit

Step 4

Configure IS-IS on SwitchT, SwitchB, and SwitchC.

# Configure SwitchT.

[~SwitchT] isis [~SwitchT-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0001.00 [~SwitchT-isis-1] quit [~SwitchT] interface vlanif 10 [~SwitchT-Vlanif10] isis enable 1 [~SwitchT-Vlanif10] quit [~SwitchT] interface vlanif 30 [~SwitchT-Vlanif30] isis enable 1 [~SwitchT-Vlanif30] commit [~SwitchT-Vlanif30] quit

# Configure SwitchB.

[~SwitchB] isis [~SwitchB-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0002.00 [~SwitchB-isis-1] quit [~SwitchB] interface vlanif 30 [~SwitchB-Vlanif30] isis enable 1 [~SwitchB-Vlanif30] quit [~SwitchB] interface vlanif 50 [~SwitchB-Vlanif50] isis enable 1 [~SwitchB-Vlanif50] commit [~SwitchB-Vlanif50] quit

# Configure SwitchC.

[~SwitchC] isis [~SwitchC-isis-1] network-entity 10.0000.0000.0003.00 [~SwitchC-isis-1] quit [~SwitchC] interface vlanif 50 [~SwitchC-Vlanif50] isis enable 1 [~SwitchC-Vlanif50] quit [~SwitchC] interface vlanif 60

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[~SwitchC-Vlanif60] isis enable 1 [~SwitchC-Vlanif60] commit [~SwitchC-Vlanif60] quit

Step 5

Check routing information.

#

Check the routes to destination 172.17.1.0 on SwitchT.

<SwitchT> display ip routing-table 172.17.1.0 verbose Route Flags: R - relay, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Table : _public_ Summary Count : 2

Destination: 172.17.1.0/24 Protocol: OSPF Preference: 10 NextHop: 192.168.10.2 State: Active Adv Tag: 0 Label: NULL

Process ID: 1 Cost: 3 Neighbour: 0.0.0.0 Age: 00h00m07s Priority: low QoSInfo: 0xa98ac7

IndirectID: 0x40000041 RelayNextHop: 0.0.0.0 TunnelID: 0x0

Interface: Vlanif20 Flags: D

Destination: 172.17.1.0/24 Protocol: ISIS-L1 Preference: 15 NextHop: 192.168.20.2 State: Inactive Adv Tag: 0 Label: NULL

Process ID: 1 Cost: 30 Neighbour: 0.0.0.0 Age: 00h01m26s Priority: high QoSInfo: 0xa98ac7

IndirectID: 0x80000081 RelayNextHop: 0.0.0.0 TunnelID: 0x0

Interface: Vlanif30 Flags: 0

The routing table contains two routes to 172.17.1.0/24. OSPF routes have a higher priority than IS-IS routes. Therefore, the route with next hop 192.168.10.2 is the optimal route.

Step 6

Enable IPv4 FRR on the public network.

# Enable IPv4 FRR on the public network on SwitchT.

<SwitchT> system-view [~SwitchT] ip frr [~SwitchT] commit

# Check information about the backup outbound interface and backup next hop on SwitchT.

<SwitchT> display ip routing-table 172.17.1.0 verbose Route Flags: R - relay, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Table : _public_ Summary Count : 2

Destination: 172.17.1.0/24 Protocol: OSPF Preference: 10 NextHop: 192.168.10.2 State: Active Adv Tag: 0 Label: NULL IndirectID: 0x40000041 RelayNextHop: 0.0.0.0 TunnelID: 0x0 BkNextHop: 192.168.20.2 BkLabel: NULL BkPETunnelID: 0x0 BkIndirectID: 0x80000081

Process ID: 1 Cost: 3 Neighbour: 0.0.0.0 Age: 00h01m36s Priority: low QoSInfo: 0xa98ac7

Interface: Vlanif20 Flags: D BkInterface: Vlanif30 SecTunnelID: 0x0 BkPESecTunnelID: 0x0

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Destination: 172.17.1.0/24 Protocol: ISIS-L1 Preference: 15 NextHop: 192.168.20.2 State: Inactive Adv Tag: 0 Label: NULL IndirectID: 0x80000081 RelayNextHop: 0.0.0.0 TunnelID: 0x0

Process ID: 1 Cost: 30 Neighbour: 0.0.0.0 Age: 00h02m55s Priority: high QoSInfo: 0xa98ac7

Interface: Vlanif30 Flags: 0

The routing table contains the backup outbound interface and backup next hop of the route to 172.17.1.0/24. The IS-IS route becomes the backup route.

----End

Configuration Files

l

Configuration file of SwitchT

#

sysname SwitchT

#

ip frr

#

isis 1 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0001.00

#

interface Vlanif10 ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface Vlanif20 ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0

#

interface Vlanif30 ip address 192.168.20.1 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface 10GE1/0/1 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 10

#

interface 10GE1/0/2 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 20

#

interface 10GE1/0/3 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 30

#

ospf 1 area 0.0.0.0 network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 network 192.168.10.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l

Configuration file of SwitchA

#

sysname SwitchA

#

interface Vlanif20 ip address 192.168.10.2 255.255.255.0

#

interface Vlanif40 ip address 192.168.11.2 255.255.255.0

#

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interface 10GE1/0/1 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 20

#

interface 10GE1/0/2 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 40

#

ospf 1 area 0.0.0.0 network 192.168.10.0 0.0.0.255 network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.255

 

#

return

l

Configuration file of SwitchB

#

sysname SwitchB

#

isis 1 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0002.00

#

interface Vlanif30 ip address 192.168.20.2 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface Vlanif50 ip address 192.168.21.2 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface 10GE1/0/1 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 30

#

interface 10GE1/0/2 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 50

#

return

l

Configuration file of SwitchC

#

sysname SwitchC

#

isis 1 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0003.00

#

interface Vlanif40 ip address 192.168.11.1 255.255.255.0

#

interface Vlanif50 ip address 192.168.21.1 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface Vlanif60 ip address 172.17.1.1 255.255.255.0 isis enable 1

#

interface 10GE1/0/1 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 60

#

interface 10GE1/0/2 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 40

#

interface 10GE1/0/3 port link-type trunk port trunk allow-pass vlan 50

#

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ospf 1 area 0.0.0.0 network 172.17.1.0 0.0.0.255 network 192.168.11.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

2 Static Route Configuration

About This Chapter

Static routes apply to simple networks. Proper static routes can improve network performance and ensure bandwidth for important applications.

2.1 Static Route Overview

On a simple network, you only need to configure static routes to ensure that the network works properly. On a complex large-scale network, static routes ensure bandwidth for important

applications because they remain unchanged even when the topology changes.

2.2 Static Route Features Supported by the Device

The Switch supports the following static route features: IPv4 static routes, static default routes, bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD) for IPv4 static routes, NQA for IPv4 static routes, fast reroute (FRR) for IPv4 static routes, and static routes in VPN instances.

2.3 Default Configuration of Static Routes

This section describes the default configuration of static routes, which can be changed according to network requirements.

2.4 Configuring IPv4 Static Routes

On a network, you can accurately control route selection by configuring IPv4 static routes.

2.5 Configuring Dynamic BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

By configuring dynamic BFD to detect IPv4 static routes, you can enable devices to fast detect link changes, improving network reliability.

2.6 Configuring Static BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

Static BFD for IPv4 static routes enables a device to rapidly detect changes of a link to a destination address of a stack route, improving network reliability.

2.7 Configuring FRR for IPv4 Static Routes

FRR applies to IP services that are sensitive to packet delay and packet loss. FRR can be configured for IPv4 static routes to implement traffic protection by use of a backup link.

2.8 Associating IPv4 Static Routes with NQA

If devices do not support BFD, associate IPv4 static routes with NAQ so that NQA test instances can monitor the link status to improve network reliability.

2.9 Configuration Examples

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

This section provides configuration examples of static routes. Configuration examples explain networking requirements, networking diagram, configuration notes, configuration roadmap, and configuration procedure.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

2.1 Static Route Overview

On a simple network, you only need to configure static routes to ensure that the network works properly. On a complex large-scale network, static routes ensure bandwidth for important applications because they remain unchanged even when the topology changes.

2.2 Static Route Features Supported by the Device

The Switch supports the following static route features: IPv4 static routes, static default routes, bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD) for IPv4 static routes, NQA for IPv4 static routes, fast reroute (FRR) for IPv4 static routes, and static routes in VPN instances.

IPv4 Static Routes

IPv4 static routes are manually configured by the administrator. These routes ensure normal running of simple networks and ensure bandwidth for important applications.

Static Default Routes

If the destination IP address of a packet does not match any entry in the routing table, the packet

is forwarded using the default route. If no default route exists and the destination IP address of the packet does not match any entry in the routing table, the packet is discarded.

BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

Unlike dynamic routing protocols, static routes do not have a detection mechanism. When a fault

occurs on a network, the administrator needs to rectify the fault. BFD for static routes enables

a BFD session to monitor the status of the link of the static route on the public IPv4 network, implementing fault detection at the millisecond level.

NQA for IPv4 Static Routes

In real-world situations, the link status is monitored in real time for network stability. If an active link fails, traffic switches to a standby link to ensure non-stop traffic forwarding. The Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) probe function and BFD are usually used to detect link faults. In addition, Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) convergence helps reveal link faults. However, these methods are not applicable in certain situations, for example:

l

If only one link on the network needs to be monitored, ARP detection is not applicable.

l

If any device on the network does not support BFD, BFD is not applicable.

l

If either end of a link is a Layer 2 device, dynamic routing protocols cannot be deployed. As a result, IGP convergence is not applicable.

In these situations, NQA for IPv4 static routes can be configured to detect link faults. It can detect faults on links where Layer 2 devices reside and take effect even if only one of the two communicating devices supports NQA.

If a fault occurs, an NQA test instance can immediately detect the fault and instruct the system to delete the associated static route from the IP routing table. Traffic is then forwarded along another path.

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FRR for IPv4 Static Routes

On traditional IP networks, it takes the routing system several seconds to complete route convergence after a fault is detected. For services that require a low delay and low packet loss ratio, the convergence time of several seconds is intolerant because it may lead to service interruption. For example, voice over IP (VoIP) services are tolerant of interruption at the millisecond level. When a fault is detected at the physical layer or link layer, FRR for static routes implements convergence at the millisecond level, reducing the impact on services.

Static Routes in VPN Instances

The device supports static routes associated with VPN instances. The static routes associated with VPN instances are used to manage VPN routes.

2.3 Default Configuration of Static Routes

This section describes the default configuration of static routes, which can be changed according to network requirements.

Table 2-1 describes the default configuration of static routes.

Table 2-1 Default configuration of static routes

Parameter

Default Setting

Preference of static routes

60

2.4 Configuring IPv4 Static Routes

On a network, you can accurately control route selection by configuring IPv4 static routes.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring IPv4 static routes, complete the following task:

l Configuring link layer parameters and IP addresses for interfaces to ensure network-layer communication between neighbor nodes

Configuration Procedures

You can perform the following configuration tasks (excluding the task of Checking the Configuration) in any sequence as required.

2.4.1 Creating IPv4 Static Routes

Context

When creating static routes, you can specify both the outbound interface and next hop. Alternatively, you can specify only the outbound interface or next hop based on the outbound interface type.

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l

Specify the outbound interface for P2P interfaces.

l

Specify the next hop for non broadcast multiple access (NBMA) interfaces.

l

Specify the next hop for broadcast interfaces (for example, Ethernet interfaces).

If you specify the same preference for static routes to the same destination, you can implement load balancing among these routes. If you specify different preferences for static routes, you can implement route backup among the routes.

If the destination IP address and mask are set to all 0s, an IPv4 static default route is configured. By default, no IPv4 static default route is configured.

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

 
 

system-view

 

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Configure IPv4 static routes.

l

Run:

 

ip route-static ip-address { mask | mask-length } { nexthop-address | interface- type interface-number [ nexthop-address ] | vpn-instance vpn-instance-name nexthop-address } [ preference preference | tag tag ] * [ description text ]

 

l

Run:

 

ip route-static vpn-instance vpn-source-name destination-address { mask | mask- length } { nexthop-address [ public ] | interface-type interface-number

[

nexthop-address ] | vpn-instance vpn-instance-name nexthop-address }

[

preference preference | tag tag ] * [ description text ]

 
  NOTE

NOTE

 

To implement load balancing among an Ethernet interface's static route and other static routes, configure the outbound interface and next hop.

Step 3

Run:

 

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

2.4.2 (Optional) Setting the Default Preference for IPv4 Static Routes

Context

The default preference of IPv4 static routes affects route selection. When an IPv4 static route is configured, the default preference is used if no preference is specified for the static route.

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

Step 2

Run:

ip route-static default-preference preference

The default preference of static routes is set.

By default, the preference of static routes is 60.

NOTE

NOTE

 

After the default preference is reconfigured, the new default preference is valid only for new IPv4 static routes.

Step 3

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

2.4.3 (Optional) Configuring Static Route Selection Based on Iteration Depth

Context

 

Route iteration refers to the process of finding the directly-connected outbound interface based on the next hop of a route. The iteration depth indicates the number of times the system searches for routes. A smaller number of route iterations indicates a smaller iteration depth.

When there are multiple static routes with the same prefix but different iteration depths, the system selects the static route with the smallest iteration depth as the active route and delivers it to the FIB table after static route selection based on iteration depth is configured. The other static routes then become inactive. A smaller iteration depth indicates a more stable route.

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Run:

ip route-static selection-rule relay-depth

Static route selection based on iteration depth is configured.

By default, static routes are not selected based on iteration depth.

Step 3

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

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2.4.4 Checking the Configuration

Procedure

l

Run the display static routing-table command to check information about static routes.

l

Run the display ip routing-table command to check brief information about the IPv4 routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table verbose command to check detailed information about the IPv4 routing table.

----End

2.5 Configuring Dynamic BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

By configuring dynamic BFD to detect IPv4 static routes, you can enable devices to fast detect link changes, improving network reliability.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring dynamic BFD for IPv4 static routes, complete the following task:

 

l

Configuring link layer parameters and IP addresses for interfaces to ensure that the link layer protocol on the interfaces is Up

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

 

system-view

 

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Run:

bfd

BFD is enabled globally.

Step 3

Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

Step 4

(Optional) Run:

ip route-static default-bfd [ min-rx-interval min-rx-interval ] [ min-tx-interval min-tx-interval ] [ detect-multiplier multiplier ]

Global BFD parameters are configured for static routes.

By default, the values of min-rx-interval, min-tx-interval, and detect-multiplier are 1000 ms, 1000 ms, and 3 respectively.

Step 5

Run:

ip route-static bfd interface-type interface-number nexthop-address [ local- address address ] [ min-rx-interval min-rx-interval | min-tx-interval min-tx- interval | detect-multiplier multiplier ] *

BFD parameters are configured for an IPv4 static route.

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Guide - IP Routing 2 Static Route Configuration NOTE If interface-type interface-number is not specified,

NOTE

If interface-type interface-number is not specified, local-address address must be specified.

If none of min-rx-interval, min-tx-interval, and detect-multiplier is specified, the global default values of BFD parameters are used.

Step 6

Run:

ip route-static ip-address { mask | mask-length } { nexthop-address | interface- type interface-number [ nexthop-address ] } [ preference preference | tag tag ] * bfd enable [ description text ]

A

public network static IPv4 route is bound to a BFD session.

Step 7

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

Checking the Configuration

Run the following command to check the configuration.

l Run the display bfd session { all | discriminator discr-value } [ verbose ] command to check information about the BFD session.

2.6 Configuring Static BFD for IPv4 Static Routes

Static BFD for IPv4 static routes enables a device to rapidly detect changes of a link to a destination address of a stack route, improving network reliability.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring static BFD for IPv4 static routes, complete the following tasks:

 

l

Configuring link layer parameters and IP addresses for interfaces to ensure network-layer communication between neighbor nodes

l

Configuring BFD sessions

 

For details, see "BFD Configuration" in the CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches - Configuration Guide - Reliability.

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

 

system-view

 

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Run:

ip route-static ip-address { mask | mask-length } { nexthop-address | interface- type interface-number [ nexthop-address ] } [ preference preference | tag tag ] * track bfd-session cfg-name [ description text ]

A public network static IPv4 route is bound to a BFD session.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

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NOTEGuide - IP Routing 2 Static Route Configuration Before binding a static route to a BFD

Before binding a static route to a BFD session, ensure that the BFD session and the static route reside on the same link.

Step 3

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

l Run the display bfd session all [ verbose ] command to check information about the BFD session.

2.7 Configuring FRR for IPv4 Static Routes

FRR applies to IP services that are sensitive to packet delay and packet loss. FRR can be configured for IPv4 static routes to implement traffic protection by use of a backup link.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring FRR for IPv4 static routes, complete the following task:

 

l

Configuring link layer parameters and IP addresses for interfaces to ensure that the link layer protocol on the interfaces is Up

Procedure

Step 1

Run:

 

system-view

 

The system view is displayed.

Step 2

Run:

ip route-static frr

FRR is enabled for public network IPv4 static routes.

NOTE

NOTE

 

FRR is implemented only on the static routes that are manually configured. That is, FRR cannot be implemented on iterated next hops.

To implement route backup by configuring FRR for static routes, specify different preferences for these static routes.

To enable FRR for an Ethernet interface's static route and other static routes, configure the outbound interface and next hop.

Step 3

Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

----End

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

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Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

l

Run the display ip routing-table verbose command to check detailed information about the backup outbound interfaces and backup next hops of routes in the routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table ip-address [ mask | mask-length ] [ longer-match ] verbose command to check detailed information about the backup outbound interfaces and backup next hops of the routes with specified destination address and mask in the routing table.

l

Run the display ip routing-table ip-address1 { mask1 | mask-length1 } ip-address2 { mask2 | mask-length2 } verbose command to check detailed information about the backup outbound interfaces and backup next hops of routes with specified IP address range in the routing table.

2.8 Associating IPv4 Static Routes with NQA

If devices do not support BFD, associate IPv4 static routes with NAQ so that NQA test instances can monitor the link status to improve network reliability.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before associating IPv4 static routes with NQA, complete the following task:

l Configuring link layer parameters for interfaces to ensure that the link layer protocol on the interfaces is Up

Procedure

Step 1

Configure an NQA ICMP test instance.

1. Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

2. Run:

nqa test-instance admin-name test-name

An NQA test instance is created, and the view of the test instance is displayed.

3. Run:

test-type icmp

The test type is set to ICMP.

3. Run: test-type icmp The test type is set to ICMP. NOTE When a static route

NOTE

When a static route is associated with an NQA test instance, only ICMP test instances are used to test whether there are reachable routes between the source and destination.

4. Run:

destination-address ipv4 ip-address

The destination address is set.

In an NQA test instance, you can specify an NQA server by running the destination- address command to configure a destination address for the NQA test instance.

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

5. (Optional) Run:

frequency interval

The interval for automatically performing an NQA test is set.

By default, no interval is set, that is, only one test is performed.

6. (Optional) Run:

probe-count number

The number of probes to be sent each time is set for the NQA test instance.

By default, the number of probes is 3.

By sending probes multiple times in an NQA test instance, you can accurately estimate network quality based on the collected statistics.

7. Run:

start

The NQA test instance is started.

The start command can configure an NQA test instance to be started immediately, at a specified time, after a specified delay, or every day. You can perform one of the following operations as required:

l

Run:

start now [ end { at [ yyyy/mm/dd ] hh:mm:ss | delay { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } | lifetime { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } } ]

The NQA test instance is started immediately.

l

Run:

start at [ yyyy/mm/dd ] hh:mm:ss [ end { at [ yyyy/mm/dd ] hh:mm:ss | delay { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } | lifetime { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } } ]

The NQA test instance is started at a specified time.

l

Run:

start delay { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } [ end { at [ yyyy/mm/dd ] hh:mm:ss | delay { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } | lifetime { seconds second | hh:mm:ss } } ]

The NQA test instance is started after a specified delay.

l

Run:

start daily hh:mm:ss to hh:mm:ss [ begin yyyy/mm/dd ] [ end yyyy/mm/dd ]

The NQA test instance is started every day.

Step 2

8. Run:

commit

The configuration is committed.

9. Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

Associate static routes with an NQA test instance.

1. Run:

ip route-static ip-address { mask | mask-length } { nexthop-address | interface- type interface-number [ nexthop-address ] } [ preference preference | tag tag ] * track nqa admin-name test-name [ description text ]

CloudEngine 6800&5800 Series Switches Configuration Guide - IP Routing

2 Static Route Configuration

IPv4 static routes are associated with an NQA test instance.