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Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 252)

Sectionalism: North vs. South

Work Period - Military Conict


Hypothesis outline

H.W. - Military Conict Hypothesis


Outline due May 23rd
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1790
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1807
Embargo
Act
American Foreign Policy
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1830
Indian
Removal
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1807
Embargo
Act
Indian Removal
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1846
US war
w/ Mexico
1845
Texas
annexed
1830
Indian
Removal
1803
Louisiana
Purchase
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1819
US gains
Florida
1807
Embargo
Act
Manifest Destiny
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality
To understand what caused the Civil War, you need to know the sectional di!erences that divided them.
(Hart 252)
Sectionalism
(Hart 252)
Sectionalism
An excessive devotion of
interest to one particular section
of a country.
(Hart 252)
Sectionalism
First start with the South
Economics
(Hart 252)
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
Plantation
Owners
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
Plantation
Owners
White Farmers & Workers
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
Plantation
Owners
White Farmers & Workers
African-American Slaves
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
Plantation
Owners
White Farmers & Workers
African-American Slaves
25%
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
Plantation
Owners
White Farmers & Workers
African-American Slaves
75%
Only 25% of Southerners owned slaves. 75% of Southerners were not slave owners.
South is based on a slave economy. As long as the slave economy could be preserved, the South had little incentive to make progress economically or
culturally.

The South grew, but it did not develop.
After the American Revolution
(1781)....prices for tobacco, rice, and
indigo dropped. When crop prices fell, the
demand for and the price of slaves also
went down.

(Growth of the Cotton Industry)
By the early 1790s...the use of slaves had
begun to decline...Discouraged planters
were buying fewer slaves, and even
letting some go free.

(Hart 256)
(Hart 262)
How does the map on Hart 262 showing agriculture in America in 1860 compare to the map of the Southern colonies here in 1750?
(Hart 256)
Eli Whitney
(Hart 256)
Eli Whitney
Cotton Gin
Inventor
Separated the seeds
from the cotton
ber.
(Hart 256)
Cotton Gin 1793
A single person can now process 50 lbs. of cotton/day.
Separates the cotton ber from the seed.
Impact of the Cotton Gin
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
1793
Cotton Gin
invented

Cotton Exports

1800: $5 million (7% of U.S. exports)



1860: $191 million (57% of U.S. exports)
0
40,000,000
80,000,000
120,000,000
160,000,000
200,000,000
1800 1860
U.S. Cotton Exports

Cotton Exports

1800: $5 million (7% of U.S. exports)



1860: $191 million (57% of U.S. exports)
0
40,000,000
80,000,000
120,000,000
160,000,000
200,000,000
1800 1860
U.S. Cotton Exports
$5 million
$191 million

Cotton Exports

1800: $5 million (7% of U.S. exports)



1860: $191 million (57% of U.S. exports)

Southern cotton accounted for 70 percent of the raw material fueling Britain's industrial revolution
Other Colonies U.S.

Southern cotton accounted for 70 percent of the raw material fueling Britain's industrial revolution
Other Colonies U.S.

Southern cotton accounted for 70 percent of the raw material fueling Britain's industrial revolution
North-South Economic Connection

By 1860, northern textile mills imported nearly 100 percent of their cotton from the South.
Southern Colonies
North-South Economic Connection

By 1860, northern textile mills imported nearly 100 percent of their cotton from the South.
If we treat the North and South as separate nations,
the South would stand as the fourth most prosperous
nation of the world in 1860....more prosperous than
France, Germany, Denmark, or any of the countries in
Europe except England.

-- Robert Fogel
(Hart 272)
Southern Economics

With white southerners putting all their $ into land and slaves, they had little interest in building factories (History Alive pg. 257).

12 wealthiest counties in the U.S. located in the South


South purchased $30 million of mid- western food and $150 million of northern manufactured goods.

"What would happen if no cotton was furnished for
three years? England would topple headlong and
carry the whole civilized world with her. No, you dare
not make war on cotton! No power on earth dares
make war upon it. Cotton is King."

-- Senator James Henry Hammond of South Carolina (1858)
(Hart 262)




Raising cotton in the same elds year after
year soon wore out the soil. In search of fresh
fertile soil, cotton planters pushed west.
(Hart 256)
(Hart 273)
(Hart 273)
Stephen F. Austin
1. Had to choose only moral
and hardworking settlers...

2) The settlers had to become
Mexican citizens...

3) Had to ....join the Catholic
Church.

(Hart 201)
Similar to what Americans asked of Native Americans. Assimilate.
Stephen F. Austin
1. Had to choose only moral
and hardworking settlers...

2) The settlers had to become
Mexican citizens...

3) Had to ....join the Catholic
Church.

(Hart 201)
Mexican-Texas Settlers Agreement (1827)
Similar to what Americans asked of Native Americans. Assimilate.
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
1793
Cotton Gin
invented
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
1793
Cotton Gin
invented
1830
Indian
Removal Act
0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
1793
Cotton Gin
invented
1830
Indian
Removal Act
1844
U.S. Annexation
of Texas
SLAVE LABOR
SLAVE LABOR
U.S. Slave Population
U.S. Slave Population
U.S. Slave Population
U.S. Slave Population
Anyone know which was the rst state to secede from the Union?

Eli Whitney
Eli Whitney
Cotton Gin
Effect:
Cotton production
booms & becomes
protable to grow.

Demand for more
land and slaves
increases.

Northern textile
manufacturing
surges to life.


Sectionalism
An excessive devotion of
interest to one particular section
of a country.
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1846
US war
w/ Mexico
1845
Texas
annexed
1830
Indian
Removal
1803
Louisiana
Purchase
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1819
US gains
Florida
1807
Embargo
Act
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality

Cotton Gin
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1846
US war
w/ Mexico
1845
Texas
annexed
1830
Indian
Removal
1803
Louisiana
Purchase
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1819
US gains
Florida
1807
Embargo
Act
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality

Cotton Gin
1810
Industrial
Revolution
In colonial times, Americans
created everything they
needed--every shirt or gun by
hand.

(Hart 258)
Imagine coming to school with the clothes made by your mother. Only having two sets of clothes....period.
Francis Cabot Lowell
How did the factories of the Industrial Revolution a!ect women?
How did the factories of the Industrial Revolution a!ect women?
Lowell Girls, History Alive pg. 258
How did the factories of the Industrial Revolution a!ect women?
How did the factories of the Industrial Revolution a!ect women?
Social Culture
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1846
US war
w/ Mexico
1845
Texas
annexed
1830
Indian
Removal
1803
Louisiana
Purchase
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1819
US gains
Florida
1807
Embargo
Act
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality

Cotton Gin
1810
Industrial
Revolution
1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1846
US war
w/ Mexico
1845
Texas
annexed
1830
Indian
Removal
1803
Louisiana
Purchase
1812
War w/
Britain
1825
Monroe
Doctrine
1819
US gains
Florida
1807
Embargo
Act
1790
1793
Isolationism
& Neutrality

Cotton Gin
1820 - 1840
Era of Reform
1810
Industrial
Revolution
Era of Reform
(1820s - 1840s)
(Hart 244)
SLAVE LABOR
SLAVE LABOR
Leviticus 25:44-46
Leviticus 25:44-46
However, you may purchase male and female
slaves from among the nations around you.
Leviticus 25:44-46
However, you may purchase male and female
slaves from among the nations around you.
You may also purchase the children of
temporary residents who live among you,
including those who have been born in your
land. You may treat them as property.
Abolitionist Movement
People who favored
abolition, the
ending of slavery.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
Abolitionist Movement
Remind students of the impact of the Guttenberg press. Mention Kony 2012 here or wait for Uncle Toms Cabin.
(Hart 276)
1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
Fort Sumter, South Carolina
April 12th, 1861
When should the
government lead its
people into military
conict?
A nations foreign policy is what often determines whether or not a government will lead its people into military conict. The question you have to
determine as a citizen of this country is when is it justiable or not for the government to make that choice.
Agenda

Materials: Laptop, Military Conict


Hypothesis graphic organizer,

Work Period >Military Conict


Hypothesis Outline

H.W. - Military Conict Hypothesis


Outline due May 23rd
Slavery:
Abolitionists vs. Southerners
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Slavery:
Abolitionists vs. Southerners
DBQ #6
Slavery:
Abolitionists vs. Southerners
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Slavery:
Abolitionists vs. Southerners
DBQ #6
Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 104), laptop

Sectionalism: Missouri and California


statehood

Work period -> Military Conict


Outline

H.W. - Military Conict Outline due May


23rd
U.S. has acquired territories, but now it needs to set about the business of converting those territories into states. Now weve gone through this process
before.
After America gained its independence from Great Britain, it had to solve a similar problem with the new territory that it gained.
After America gained its independence from Great Britain, it had to solve a similar problem with the new territory that it gained.
After America gained its independence from Great Britain, it had to solve a similar problem with the new territory that it gained.
Articles of
Confederation

First plan of
government for
America

Majority of power
stays with the states
Used the powers granted to them under the Articles of Confederation to do so.
Now the Articles of Confederation werent very successful in dealing with a majority of the problems in the nation at that time, but it was successful in one
of them and that was in developing a process upon which western lands could become new states.

Military Weakness

Foreign Trade

Interstate Commerce

Ination Internal Insurrection
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
Now the Articles of Confederation werent very successful in dealing with a majority of the problems in the nation at that time, but it was successful in one
of them and that was in developing a process upon which western lands could become new states.

Military Weakness

Foreign Trade

Interstate Commerce

Ination Internal Insurrection Developing Western Lands
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
F
A
I
L
S
U
C
C
E
S
S
Now the Articles of Confederation werent very successful in dealing with a majority of the problems in the nation at that time, but it was successful in one
of them and that was in developing a process upon which western lands could become new states.
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Territory > 5,000 free adult males - Elect its own lawmaking body.

2. Population > 60,000 - territory can apply for statehood
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Territory > 5,000 free adult males - Elect its own lawmaking body.

2. Population > 60,000 - territory can apply for statehood
Northwest
Ordinance
1787

Population > 60,000 - territory can apply for statehood
Territory > 5,000 free adult males - Elect its own lawmaking body.

2. Population > 60,000 - territory can apply for statehood
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
No slavery allowed in the Northwest Territory
(Hart 104)
Territory > 5,000 free adult males - Elect its own lawmaking body.

2. Population > 60,000 - territory can apply for statehood
1791
1791
1792
1791
1792
1796
1816
1818
1803
1812
1817
1819
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.

1819 - Missouri applies for statehood as a slave state.
(Hart 286)
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.
Tallmadge Amendment
James Tallmadge
New York
Introduced in the House. The federal government is allowed to add on a clause to a states application for statehood.

Federal government gets to determine whether or not Missouri is slave or free. Southern refutes this.

Does the Tallmadge Amendment stop slavery where it already exists?
Does the Tallmadge Amendment still allow for slavery within the state of Missouri?
Would Tallmadges Amendment lead to the eventual end of slavery in Missouri and discourage slave owners from taking their slaves to the state?
"That the further [importation] of
slavery...be prohibited...and that all
children born within the said State,
after the admission thereof into
the Union, shall be free at the age
of twenty-ve years (Hart 286).
Tallmadge Amendment
James Tallmadge
New York
Introduced in the House. The federal government is allowed to add on a clause to a states application for statehood.

Federal government gets to determine whether or not Missouri is slave or free. Southern refutes this.

Does the Tallmadge Amendment stop slavery where it already exists?
Does the Tallmadge Amendment still allow for slavery within the state of Missouri?
Would Tallmadges Amendment lead to the eventual end of slavery in Missouri and discourage slave owners from taking their slaves to the state?
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.

Who gets to determine whether or not a state entering the
Union is slave or free? Federal Congress or state governments?
Missouri applied to the Union as a state whose Constitution favored slavery. 1/3 of its 66,000 inhabitants were slaves.
SLAVE STATES FREE STATES
Georgia Pennsylvania
South Carolina New Jersey
North Carolina New York
Virginia Connecticut
Maryland Rhode Island
Delaware Massachusetts
Kentucky New Hampshire
Tennessee Vermont
Louisiana Ohio
Mississippi Indiana
Alabama Illinois
A Deadlocked Congress (Hart 287)
Congress has kept the number of free and slave states equal. Weve seen this goal of keeping political power equal between the slave and free states since
the Three-Fifths Compromise.
If you persist...the Union
will be dissolved. You have
kindled a re which only a
sea of blood can
extinguish.

-- Thomas Cobb
(Georgia)
1820
If disunion must take
place, let it be so! If civil
war must come, I can
only say, let it come.


-- James Tallmadge
(New York)
1820
Henry Clay
Kentucky
Missouri Compromise


Missouri Compromise
1820

Missouri enters the Union


as a slave state.

Maine joins the union as a


free state.

No slavery allowed north


of 36 30 latitude
Henry Clay
What does it mean to be self-su#cient? If you were given this task, what do you think it is you would have to do?
This is in 1820 prior to Manifest Destiny. The U.S. does not yet have the territories of Texas or the Mexican Cession.
This is in 1820 prior to Manifest Destiny. The U.S. does not yet have the territories of Texas or the Mexican Cession.
If the Union must be dissolved,
slavery is precisely the question on
which it ought to break. For the
present however, the contest is laid
asleep.


-- John Quincy Adams
1820
If the Union must be dissolved,
slavery is precisely the question on
which it ought to break. For the
present however, the contest is laid
asleep.


-- John Quincy Adams
1820
Gag Rule (1836)
Congress sets aside all anti-slavery proposals.
(Hart 290)
Annexation of Texas of course is going to upset Mexico and the following year the U.S. and Mexico are going to go to war. We know its going to be an easy
victory for the U.S. and that there is a good chance that we will be able to secure Mexicos lands in the west for ourselves.
(Hart 290)
Annexation of Texas of course is going to upset Mexico and the following year the U.S. and Mexico are going to go to war. We know its going to be an easy
victory for the U.S. and that there is a good chance that we will be able to secure Mexicos lands in the west for ourselves.
(Hart 290)

(Hart 290)

1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
(Hart 290 - 292)
(Hart 290 - 292)
1849
California applies
for statehood as a
free state.
(Hart 290 - 292)
36 30
(Hart 290 - 292)
36 30
(Hart 290 - 292)
36 30
(Hart 290 - 292)
36 30
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

Henry Clay
Kentucky
Compromise of 1850
Henry Clay
Kentucky
Compromise of 1850
Henry Clay
Kentucky
Compromise of 1850
Compromise of 1850
Does the provision favor the North or the South?
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.


Does the provision favor the North or the South?
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)
Does the provision favor the North or the South?
Compromise of 1850
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)

The slave trade--but not slavery--would end in


the nations capital.
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)

The slave trade--but not slavery--would end in


the nations capital.
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)

The slave trade--but not slavery--would end in


the nations capital.

A more effective fugitive slave law would be


passed.
(Hart 291)
let this question of Slavery alone,
take it out and keep it out of
Congress; and respect and enforce
the Fugitive Slave Law as it stands. If
not, we leave you!

- North Carolina Newspaper
1850
(Hart 291)
let this question of Slavery alone,
take it out and keep it out of
Congress; and respect and enforce
the Fugitive Slave Law as it stands. If
not, we leave you!

- North Carolina Newspaper
1850
(Hart 291)
Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 112)

Sectionalism: Fugitive Slave Law, Uncle


Toms Cabin, Bleeding Kansas

H.W. - Military Conict Outline due May


23rd
1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
History Alive pg. 291
(Hart 291)
let this question of Slavery alone,
take it out and keep it out of
Congress; and respect and enforce
the Fugitive Slave Law as it stands. If
not, we leave you!

- North Carolina Newspaper
1850
(Hart 291)
Compromise of 1850

California enters the Union as a free state.

New Mexico and Utah are open to slavery


(Popular sovereignty)

The slave trade--but not slavery--would end in


the nations capital.

A more effective fugitive slave law would be


passed.
History of Fugitive Slave Laws
1787 (Hart 112) - 1831 (Hart 290) - 1850 (Hart 292)
Fugitive Slave Law of 1850
The Fugitive Slave Law brings the issue of slavery directly to the North. Northerners can no longer turn a blind eye to it as the condition of slavery now
directly impacts them.
Fugitive Slave Law of 1850
It is a crime to help
runaway slaves and allowed
ofcials to arrest those
slaves in free areas.
The Fugitive Slave Law brings the issue of slavery directly to the North. Northerners can no longer turn a blind eye to it as the condition of slavery now
directly impacts them.
Fugitive Slave Law of 1850
It is a crime to help
runaway slaves and allowed
ofcials to arrest those
slaves in free areas.
Any person that helped a
slave escape , or even refused
to aid slave catchers, could
be jailed.
The Fugitive Slave Law brings the issue of slavery directly to the North. Northerners can no longer turn a blind eye to it as the condition of slavery now
directly impacts them.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCFrObXq3xw
Source: "Hippocampus United States History: The Compromise of 1850."
Alleged runaways were not permitted a jury
trial or allowed to testify at their hearing....

[Judges] who decided the cases were paid
ten dollars if they returned accused fugitives
to slavery but only ve dollars if they released
them.
Source: "Hippocampus United States History: The Compromise of 1850."
Northern
Perspective
Fugitive Slave
Law
Southern
Perspective
Dont want to
enforce the law.

Made all
Northerners slave
catchers

Slave hunters in the
North are harassed.

(Hart 292)
Law wasnt strong
enough.

Infuriated by the
Norths resistance
to the law.

(Hart 292)
Harriet Beecher Stowe
How well are you going to enforce the Fugitive Slave Law after this?
Harriet Beecher
Stowe

A preachers daughter who lived in Cincinnati, Ohio
for a short period of her life.

Saw a lot of escaped slaves and heard their stories.

Visited a plantation in Kentucky once and really
never experienced life in a slave state.
1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
Bleeding Kansas
(Bleeding Kansas Pt. 2)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
Kansas - Free or Slave?

Proslavery men simply had to cross the Missouri state line to come to Kansas, whereas free staters came from Illinois, Indiana, and some all the way from New England. Therefore, it took longer for free state men to reach Bourbon County than it did for proslavery men. out of 2905
possible votes, 6307 ballots were cast.
Kansas - Free or Slave?

"Come on, then, gentlemen of the
slave states. Since there is no
escaping your challenge, we accept
it in the name of freedom.

We will engage in competition for
the virgin soil of Kansas, and God
give the victory to the side which is
stronger in numbers, as it is in
right."

-- Senator William Seward, on the
passage of the Kansas-Nebraska
Act, May 1854
Proslavery men simply had to cross the Missouri state line to come to Kansas, whereas free staters came from Illinois, Indiana, and some all the way from New England. Therefore, it took longer for free state men to reach Bourbon County than it did for proslavery men. out of 2905
possible votes, 6307 ballots were cast.
Border Ru#ans
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
(Hart 294)
Proslavery men simply had to cross the Missouri state line to come to Kansas, whereas free staters came from Illinois, Indiana, and some all the way from New England. Therefore, it took longer for free state men to reach Bourbon County than it did for proslavery men. out of 2905
possible votes, 6307 ballots were cast.

Out of 2,905 possible votes...6,307 ballots were
cast.
Proslavery men simply had to cross the Missouri state line to come to Kansas, whereas free staters came from Illinois, Indiana, and some all the way from New England. Therefore, it took longer for free state men to reach Bourbon County than it did for proslavery men. out of 2905
possible votes, 6307 ballots were cast.

(Hart 296)
I dont think it is of very much use
to stay any longer in high
school....the boys would be better
learning to hold muskets and the
girls to make bullets.

- Female Connecticut Student
1856
(Hart 296)
I dont think it is of very much use
to stay any longer in high
school....the boys would be better
learning to hold muskets and the
girls to make bullets.

- Female Connecticut Student
1856
(Hart 296)
Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 294)

Sectionalism: Dred Scott Decision,


Lincoln-Douglas Debates, John Browns
Raid

Work Period - Military Conict Outline

H.W. - Military Conict Outline due May


23rd
Cotton Gin 1793
A single person can now process 50 lbs. of cotton/day.

0
400,000,000
800,000,000
1,200,000,000
1,600,000,000
2,000,000,000
1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860
Pounds of U.S. Cotton Production (1790 - 1860)
1793
Cotton Gin
invented
U.S. Slave Population
How did the factories of the Industrial Revolution a!ect women?
SLAVE STATES FREE STATES
Georgia Pennsylvania
South Carolina New Jersey
North Carolina New York
Virginia Connecticut
Maryland Rhode Island
Delaware Massachusetts
Kentucky New Hampshire
Tennessee Vermont
Louisiana Ohio
Mississippi Indiana
Alabama Illinois
A Deadlocked Congress (Hart 287)
Congress has kept the number of free and slave states equal. Weve seen this goal of keeping political power equal between the slave and free states since
the Three-Fifths Compromise.
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
1 - When we think of the last few days of our study, its interesting to consider just how di!erent our country of today is from our nation during the 1800s.
When one considers the historical trend of how our nation dealt with the issue of slavery. Interesting to consider that at one point, many in the nation
thought that this country would forever be divided.

2 - The issue of power of the states vs. the powers of the federal government. In which instances should the states have the power? In which instances
should the federal government have the power? Its an argument that continues on today with issues such as gay marriage, legalization of marijuana,
health care, and illegal immigration.

3 -

(Hart 294)
Take a moment to review some of the key factors leading up to the Civil War
Take a moment to review some of the key factors leading up to the Civil War
Take a moment to review some of the key factors leading up to the Civil War
Take a moment to review some of the key factors leading up to the Civil War
Take a moment to review some of the key factors leading up to the Civil War
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Bleeding Kansas
Border Ru#ans
(Hart 296)
I dont think it is of very much use
to stay any longer in high
school....the boys would be better
learning to hold muskets and the
girls to make bullets.

- Female Connecticut Student
1856
(Hart 296)
I dont think it is of very much use
to stay any longer in high
school....the boys would be better
learning to hold muskets and the
girls to make bullets.

- Female Connecticut Student
1856
(Hart 296)
1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
(Hart 296)
Dred Scott
Debate
Supreme Court Justice
Roger B. Taney
(Hart 296)
Was Dred Scott a citizen? Did his time in the free territory make him free? Could slavery be banned in parts of the Louisiana Territory?

In 1846 in Missouri, a slave named Dred Scott sued his owner for his freedom in both state and federal court. Scott claimed that he had been living on free
soil in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory for more than ve years and that in consequence, he was free. The Supreme Court ultimately decided that to
make Scott free would be to deprive his owner of property. If the Supreme Court had granted Dred Scott his freedom, what would it have meant for slaves
throughout the South?
Dred Scott
Debate
Was Dred Scott a citizen?

Did his time in a free
state make him a free
man?

Does Congress have the
power to make any laws
concerning slavery in the
territories?
Supreme Court Justice
Roger B. Taney
(Hart 296)
Was Dred Scott a citizen? Did his time in the free territory make him free? Could slavery be banned in parts of the Louisiana Territory?

In 1846 in Missouri, a slave named Dred Scott sued his owner for his freedom in both state and federal court. Scott claimed that he had been living on free
soil in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory for more than ve years and that in consequence, he was free. The Supreme Court ultimately decided that to
make Scott free would be to deprive his owner of property. If the Supreme Court had granted Dred Scott his freedom, what would it have meant for slaves
throughout the South?
No African
American, whether
slave or free, was
an American citizen
or could ever
become one.
The Missouri
Compromise is
unconstitutional.
Dred Scott Decision
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Dred Scott Decision
DBQ #6
No African American was an American citizen-or could ever become one.
No African American was an American
citizen-or could ever become one.
No African American was an American citizen-or could ever become one.
[Negro] had no rights which the white man was
bound to respect; He was bought and sold and
treated as an ordinary article of merchandise and
trafc whenever a prot could be made by it.

- Roger B. Taney
1857
5th Amendment

No person shallbe deprived of


life, liberty, or property, without
due process of law; nor shall
private property be taken for
public use, without just
compensation.
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
Compromise of 1850

California enters as a free state.

New Mexico & Utah territory open to
popular sovereignty
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Missouri
Compromise
1820
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
P
o
p
u
l
a
r
S
o
v
e
r
e
i
g
n
t
y
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
Northwest
Ordinance
1787
Mason
Dixon
Line
1767
Congress has the constitutional responsibility
to protect the property rights of slaveholders...

(Hart 297)
Banning slavery in a territory...is the
same as taking property away from
slaveholders...And that is
unconstitutional.

(Hart 297)
U
n
i
t
e
d

S
l
a
v
e

S
t
a
t
e
s

o
f

A
m
e
r
i
c
a
The Decision of the Supreme
Court
Is the Moral Assassination of a
Race and Cannot Be Obeyed!

- New York Tribune
Birth of a new political part in 1858 - Republican Part
1860 - Republican Party Platform
No man can own another man.

Slavery must be prohibited in
the territories.

All new states must be free
states.

Rights of African-Americans
must be respected.
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
(Hart 298)
(Hart 298)
I have no purpose
to introduce political
and social equality
between the white
and black races.
I am in favor of the
race to which I
belong having the
superior position
But the negro is
entitled to the same
rights to life, liberty,
and the pursuit of
happiness as the
white man
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Go5J_UgF8Ck

33:50

http://www.history.com/topics/john-brown/videos/john-browns-raid
Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 297), laptop (Outline)

Election of 1860, Secession, Attack on Fort


Sumter

Final Project Work Period

H.W. - Complete Military Conict Hypothesis


Outline by May 23rd (Printed Out)
No African American was an American citizen-or could ever become one.
No African American was an American
citizen-or could ever become one.
No African American was an American citizen-or could ever become one.
Congress has a constitutional right to protect the property of slaveholders in a territory.
Banning slavery in a
territory...is the same as
taking property away
from slaveholders...And
that is unconstitutional.

(Hart 297)
Congress has a constitutional right to protect the property of slaveholders in a territory.
U
.
S
.

T
e
r
r
i
t
o
r
y
Congress has a constitutional right to protect the property of slaveholders in a territory.
U
.
S
.

T
e
r
r
i
t
o
r
y
U
n
i
t
e
d

S
l
a
v
e

S
t
a
t
e
s

o
f

A
m
e
r
i
c
a
Congress has a constitutional right to protect the property of slaveholders in a territory.
Free
Free Slave
Birth of a new political part in 1858 - Republican Part
1860 - Republican Party Platform
No man can own another man.

Slavery must be prohibited in
the territories.

All new states must be free
states.

Rights of African-Americans
must be respected.
ELECTION OF 1860
Stephen A. Douglas - Douglas asserted that settlers could exclude slavery from a territory by not adopting local legislation to protect it. In other words, he claimed that even if territorial governments followed the Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott and did not prohibit
slavery, municipalities could still do so by failing to support slavery.

John C. Breckinridge - in favor of a resolution supporting extending slavery into territories whose voters did not want it

Constitutional Union Party. Its name comes from its extremely simple platform, a simple resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution...the Union...and the Enforcement of the Laws." wanted to avoid disunion over the
slavery issue. They hoped that by failing to take a rm stand either for or against slavery or its extension, the issue could be pushed aside.
Stephen A. Douglas
--Democrat--
ELECTION OF 1860
Stephen A. Douglas - Douglas asserted that settlers could exclude slavery from a territory by not adopting local legislation to protect it. In other words, he claimed that even if territorial governments followed the Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott and did not prohibit
slavery, municipalities could still do so by failing to support slavery.

John C. Breckinridge - in favor of a resolution supporting extending slavery into territories whose voters did not want it

Constitutional Union Party. Its name comes from its extremely simple platform, a simple resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution...the Union...and the Enforcement of the Laws." wanted to avoid disunion over the
slavery issue. They hoped that by failing to take a rm stand either for or against slavery or its extension, the issue could be pushed aside.
Stephen A. Douglas
--Democrat--
John C. Breckinridge
--Democrat--
ELECTION OF 1860
Stephen A. Douglas - Douglas asserted that settlers could exclude slavery from a territory by not adopting local legislation to protect it. In other words, he claimed that even if territorial governments followed the Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott and did not prohibit
slavery, municipalities could still do so by failing to support slavery.

John C. Breckinridge - in favor of a resolution supporting extending slavery into territories whose voters did not want it

Constitutional Union Party. Its name comes from its extremely simple platform, a simple resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution...the Union...and the Enforcement of the Laws." wanted to avoid disunion over the
slavery issue. They hoped that by failing to take a rm stand either for or against slavery or its extension, the issue could be pushed aside.
Stephen A. Douglas
--Democrat--
John C. Breckinridge
--Democrat--
Abraham Lincoln
--Republican--
ELECTION OF 1860
Stephen A. Douglas - Douglas asserted that settlers could exclude slavery from a territory by not adopting local legislation to protect it. In other words, he claimed that even if territorial governments followed the Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott and did not prohibit
slavery, municipalities could still do so by failing to support slavery.

John C. Breckinridge - in favor of a resolution supporting extending slavery into territories whose voters did not want it

Constitutional Union Party. Its name comes from its extremely simple platform, a simple resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution...the Union...and the Enforcement of the Laws." wanted to avoid disunion over the
slavery issue. They hoped that by failing to take a rm stand either for or against slavery or its extension, the issue could be pushed aside.
Stephen A. Douglas
--Democrat--
John C. Breckinridge
--Democrat--
Abraham Lincoln
--Republican--
John Bell
--Constitutional Union--
Party
ELECTION OF 1860
Stephen A. Douglas - Douglas asserted that settlers could exclude slavery from a territory by not adopting local legislation to protect it. In other words, he claimed that even if territorial governments followed the Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott and did not prohibit
slavery, municipalities could still do so by failing to support slavery.

John C. Breckinridge - in favor of a resolution supporting extending slavery into territories whose voters did not want it

Constitutional Union Party. Its name comes from its extremely simple platform, a simple resolution "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution...the Union...and the Enforcement of the Laws." wanted to avoid disunion over the
slavery issue. They hoped that by failing to take a rm stand either for or against slavery or its extension, the issue could be pushed aside.
(Frey 299)
(Frey 299)
1860 - Republican Party Platform
No man can own another man.

Slavery must be prohibited in
the territories.

All new states must be free
states.

Rights of African-Americans
must be respected.
In the weeks following the
[November] election, talk of
secession lled the air.

(Hart 299)
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
Confederate States of America
South Carolina
Mississippi
Florida
Alabama
Georgia
Louisiana
Texas

Confederate Constitution
Citizens guaranteed the right to
own slaves. --President--
Jefferson Davis of Mississippi
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
D.B.Q.
Document Based Question
Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War
DBQ #6
North
(Union)
South
(Confederacy)
Abraham Lincoln
Leader
Jefferson Davis
No man can own another
man.

Slavery must be
prohibited in the
territories and all new
states must be free
states.

Rights of African-
Americans must be
respected.
View of African-
Americans &
Slavery
African-Americans can
never be citizens of the
United States

African-Americans are
property

Slavery is permitted in
the territories
When should a
government lead its
people into military
conict?
A nations foreign policy is what often determines whether or not a government will lead its people into military conict. The question you have to
determine as a citizen of this country is when is it justiable or not for the government to make that choice.
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened

National pride and


honor
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened

National pride and


honor

Politically popular
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened

National pride and


honor

Politically popular

National economy is
threatened
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened

National pride and


honor

Politically popular

National economy is
threatened

Enforce the nations


laws and treaties
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?

Relationship (Alliance)

Militarily prepared

Economically
affordable

National security
threatened

National pride and


honor

Politically popular

National economy is
threatened

Enforce the nations


laws and treaties

Morality
Military Conict Conditions
What are the most important conditions for you?
Agenda

Materials: Textbook (Hart 299), notebook,


writing utentsil

Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War DBQ

H.W. - Complete DBQ #1-8 and begin to work


on completing Military Conict Hypothesis
Outline
1860 - Republican Party Platform
No man can own another man.

Slavery must be prohibited in
the territories.

All new states must be free
states.

Rights of African-Americans
must be respected.
In the weeks following the
[November] election, talk of
secession lled the air.

(Hart 299)
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected as president in 1860. Southerners thought the government was becoming too strong. They did not think the government had the right to tell them how they should live. Southerners felt if they stayed in the United States, the North would control
them.
Confederate States of America
South Carolina
Mississippi
Florida
Alabama
Georgia
Louisiana
Texas


Confederate Constitution
Citizens guaranteed the right to
own slaves. --President--
Jefferson Davis of Mississippi
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-c-C5YHZ0UcU/T6WDKCV8zPI/AAAAAAAAA_I/_osXKuy7x0M/s1600/dollar.bmp
Agenda

Materials: Textbook, notebook, writing utensil,


Sectionalism graphic organizer

Seminar: Lincoln, Secession, and the Civil War

Summative Project Presentation Details & Notebook


submission

H.W. -

Manifest Destiny & Sectionalism Quiz 5/20 - 5/24

Final Sentence Outline due 5/24

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


1810 1820 1830 1840 1850
1819
Missouris
Statehood
1860
1849
Californias
Statehood
1854
Bleeding
Kansas
1857
Dred
Scott
Decision
1860
Election
of
Lincoln
1859
John
Browns
Raid
A Dividing Nation
March 11th 1861 - Confederate States of America
4 weeks after the formation of the Confederate States of America, the Confederate states lead their people into military conict here...Fort Sumter in South
Carolina.
March 11th 1861 - Confederate States of America
4 weeks after the formation of the Confederate States of America, the Confederate states lead their people into military conict here...Fort Sumter in South
Carolina.
Attack on Fort Sumter - April 12th, 1861
Fort Sumter is a fort federal fort (government property) in the middle of Charleston Harbor. Document #7 - Fort Sumter SC
Attack on Fort Sumter - April 12th, 1861
Fort Sumter is a fort federal fort (government property) in the middle of Charleston Harbor. Document #7 - Fort Sumter SC
Attack on Fort Sumter - April 12th, 1861
Fort Sumter is a fort federal fort (government property) in the middle of Charleston Harbor. Document #7 - Fort Sumter SC
Attack on Fort Sumter - April 12th, 1861
Fort Sumter is a fort federal fort (government property) in the middle of Charleston Harbor. Document #7 - Fort Sumter SC
Was the American Civil War
inevitable?
Could the war have been
prevented? If so, how?
Battle Location Casualties Victor
Battle Location Casualties Victor
Seven Days
Battle

6/25 - 7/1 1862
Virginia 36,059 Confederacy
Battle Location Casualties Victor
Seven Days
Battle

6/25 - 7/1 1862
Virginia 36,059 Confederacy
Second Battle of
Bull Run

8/29 - 30/1862
Virginia 18,000 Confederacy
Battle Location Casualties Victor
Seven Days
Battle

6/25 - 7/1 1862
Virginia 36,059 Confederacy
Second Battle of
Bull Run

8/29 - 30/1862
Virginia 18,000 Confederacy
Battle of
Chancellorsville

5/1 - 5/4 1862

Virginia 30,500 Confederacy
Battle Location Casualties Victor
Seven Days
Battle
6/25 - 7/1 1862
Virginia 36,059 Confederacy
Second Battle of
Bull Run
8/29 - 30/1862
Virginia 18,000 Confederacy
Battle of
Chancellorsville
5/1 - 5/4 1863
Virginia 30,500 Confederacy
Battle of
Gettysburg
7/1 - 7/3 1863
Pennsylvania 46,000 Union
What was Lincolns position on
slavery?
Agenda

Materials: Final Presentation Instruction Handout,


Textbook, Notebook, laptop,

Final Outline & Presentation Work Period

H.W. -

Manifest Destiny & Sectionalism Quiz 5/20 - 5/24

Final Sentence Outline due 5/24

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


Pacing Goal
All three conditions of your
Military Conict Hypothesis
Outline completed by class
tomorrow.
Agenda

Materials: Laptop

Final Outline & Presentation Work Period

H.W. -

Final Sentence Outline due 5/23

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


Pacing Goal
All three conditions of your
Military Conict Hypothesis
Outline completed by class
tomorrow.
Agenda

Materials: Final Presentation Instruction Handout,


Textbook, Notebook, laptop,

Final Outline & Presentation Work Period

H.W. -

Manifest Destiny & Sectionalism Quiz 5/20 - 5/24

Final Sentence Outline due 5/24

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


Pacing Goal
Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
Agenda

Materials: Laptop

Key reminders - outline, practicing refutations, and


evaluations

1-on-1 Interviews

Final Outline & Presentation Work Period

H.W. -

Final Sentence Outline due TOMORROW by 3:00

Presentation order given tomorrow

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


Pacing Goal
Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
Agenda

Materials: Laptop

Stand Your Ground Practice

Complete and submit nal Military Conict


Hypothesis outline (paper copy and Edmodo)

Work Period > Finalize Outline & Presentation

H.W. -

Final Project Presentations begin 5/28


Stand Your Ground
Casualty
someone injured or killed or captured or
missing in a military engagement
625,000
Civil War
WWII
WWI
Vietnam
War on Terror
0 175,000 350,000 525,000 700,000
American Deaths by War
Civil War
WWII
WWI
Vietnam
War on Terror
0 175,000 350,000 525,000 700,000
American Deaths by War
6,000
58,000
116,500
405,400
625,000
What caused the high
number of casualties
on the Civl War
battleeld?
Battleeld Strategy

Firing lines using smoothbore muskets


were highly inaccurate at long range and
could not inict much damage beyond
100 yards.

25 second reloading period allowed for


infantry charges to run directly into
their enemies defensive lines.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOxeNTgUbIk (1:05)
Casualties Report
(Dead, Injured, Missing)
Battle Date Casualties
1st Battle of Bull Run

July 21st 1861 4,878
Seven Days Battle June 25 - July 1 1862 35,251
2nd Battle of Bull Run

August 28 - 30 1862
11,300
Antietam

September 17 1862
26,134
Robert E. Lee
Confederate General
History Alive Map pg. 307
Casualties Report
(Dead, Injured, Missing)
Battle Date Casualties
1st Battle of Bull Run

July 21st 1861
4,878
Seven Days Battle June 25 - July 1 1862 35,251
2nd Battle of Bull Run

August 28 - 30 1862
11,300
Antietam

September 17 1862
26,134
Gettysburg

July 1 -3 1863
47,000
History Alive Map pg. 307
Emancipation
Proclamation
That all persons held as slaves within the rebellious
states are and henceforward shall be free.

-- Abraham Lincoln
"We show our sympathy with slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach
them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free."

-- William Seward
Secretary of State 1862
Limitations of the
Emancipation Proclamation
Limitations of the
Emancipation Proclamation
- Applied only to the Confederate states that
had seceded from the Union.
Limitations of the
Emancipation Proclamation
- Applied only to the Confederate states that
had seceded from the Union.
- Freedom depended on a Union victory.
Signicance of the
Emancipation Proclamation
- North ghts to preserve the Union & free
the slaves (moral cause).
- Discouraged foreign nations from helping
the Confederacy.
- Black men can be accepted into the Union
military.
Source: Holt pg. 530