Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 71

TAIZU CANNON BOXING SET

Posted on November 23, 2013


-

FROM THE BOXING METHODS OF THE ZHAO SCHOOL:


ILLUSTRATED CANNON BOXING SET

by Wu Zhiqing
[published by Great East Bookstore, July, 1931]
[translation by Paul Brennan, Nov, 2013]
-

From the Boxing Methods of the Zhao School: Illustrated Cannon Boxing Set
by Wu Zhiqing

- calligraphy by Ma Gongyu
-
Brennan Translation

Portrait of the author, Wu Zhiqing


-

PREFACE BY CHU MINYI

Chinese martial arts can be roughly classified into two branches: Wudang and Shaolin, commonly known as
internal training and external training. Although they are different in origin and development, their aim of
bringing strength and health to the body is the same. Therefore we should not be biased toward one or the other,
but should instead advocate both. Sectarianism is the biggest hindrance to learning and development, and it is
unfortunate that colleagues within the martial arts world will often use it to try and one-up each other, which
rarely leads to progress. But worst of all are the naive and stubborn who keep their treasure for themselves and
are not willing to reveal what they have learned nor freely teach it to others. Although they may have an amazing
skill, every bit of it will be lost forever unless they can be generous enough to share what they have.
Looking through the long history of Chinese martial arts, they have not only had the pattern of being
continually unable to flourish, but have actually been in a situation of continually increasing decline. What is the
reason for this? During the isolationism of former days, literary pursuits were ennobled and martial pursuits were
trivialized. There was reverence for the intelligentsia whereas martial arts were considered to be of a lesser path. It
was not just that scholars viewed them with disdain, the common people did as well. With no esteem for
martiality, warriors were looked down upon and instead there was a fondness for frail scholars. Because of this,
our people have become more feeble with each passing day.
Because it has taken such a long time for martial arts to take shape, they have not been able to flourish as much
as they should have. Not only this, but martial arts organizations were simply not considered of value, and thus
there was no spread of their particular characteristics and people were unable to learn. This is simply because
without public practice facilities, then even if there was a will to learn, there was no place to go for guidance. As a
result, when those rustic people possessed of skill went to the mountains to live in seclusion, those who wished to
learn had to go there to seek it from them in a secret teacher-student relationship.
Not only did such teachers not seek to popularize it, they even fear it being popularized. Why should this be?
Because once a student had completed his study, he was then able to do with it whatever he wanted. The best of
them became righteous heroes, but the worst of them became bullying bandits, resulting in martial arts becoming
even more reviled by the public. This is the view in those apocryphal histories within published novels, and is not
entirely without foundation. Who would behave like this? And can it not be said that society was to blame? Well,
no, because although it was the case that during the isolationism of former days in which literary pursuits were
ennobled and martial pursuits were trivialized, people were still able to find ease in life. Nowadays the factions of
the world have opened their doors to each other with the result that competition among the common crowd is
fierce.
The way of survival is that the superior succeed and the inferior perish, the stronger animals devouring the
weaker. It is entirely a matter of national determination as to whether we will ascend to become one of the strong
and prosperous nations. Our rise or fall as a nation is simply a matter of whether or not we strengthen the people
as a whole. To achieve this, we must first of all pay particular attention to physical education. Martial arts are the
special treasure of our nation, truly the highest form of physical education, and they are a far more economical use
of our time and money than exercises such as Western calisthenics. If we encourage capacity to engage in martial
arts, then it will not be that they cannot be popularized.
In recent years, the Central Martial Arts Institute has been established [Mar, 1928] and the wind in the trees is
being heard [i.e. the news of it is spreading]. Also in recent times, there has been a shift in power [from empire to
republic 1911] and the general mood is one of change. The value of martial arts is gradually being taken seriously
by people, and local martial arts organizations are being established one after another. There is an enthusiasm for
exercise, a public advocation for it of any time, any place, anybody. It can no longer be said there is no
restoration underway, no sign of national empowerment and prosperity.
Since the history of martial arts is long and the number of styles is many, they inevitably have their strengths
and weakness, good points and bad points. Choosing which is suitable is a matter of taking the strengths of a
system to fix the weaknesses of oneself, and so to select the best entirely depends on the practitioner. If you wish
to learn each of these arts, you will never be able to put in enough effort or time. If you wish to learn from books,
chances are that a book about the particular style you have chosen is very hard to come by. These things have led
to some frustration and disillusionment for new generations of students, not to mention that Chinese martial arts
have been so easily lost anyway. The main reason for this is because long ago nothing of them was written down to
leave clear records for future generations. This leaves us with no organized systems, making our work to carry
them thrivingly forward extraordinarily difficult. Furthermore, learning these skills in those days usually
depended on oral instruction and reference to drawings, and so there is insufficient written material to consult for
those who are making books on the subject. For those who are learning on their own, this is yet another factor
holding back the spread of these arts.
In view of this, Shen Junsheng of the Great East Bookstore has expressed grand aspirations, soliciting help
from the martial arts institutes and the nations martial arts experts regarding our nations many native martial
skills so that each schools traditions and each experts learning gets recorded one after another for posterity, a
magnificent collection to behold. He requested a preface of me as I am a habitual advocate of martial arts. Since I
am constantly upholding the same views on the subject, how could I have nothing to say about it? Hence this
sketch of my opinion, here presented in brief.
Chu Minyi
-

AUTHORS PREFACE

A world without new things has reached its material limit in its ability for invention and manufacture. A world
without new ideas has reached its cultural limit in its endeavor to discover and understand. The skills of an era are
of use to that era. The skills of a nation have the characteristics of that nation. Ancient skills are not suitable for
use in the modern world. Western skills are not compatible for use in China. Different environments, different
idealogies. Since the Revolution, rebuilding has sent the nation into a dispirited state, in one way after another,
and our martial arts are still deficient, which is truly a matter for regret.
I have somehow become the head of the Central Martial Arts Institutes editing department, and I myself have
published books such as Cha Boxing, Big Dipper Sword, Two-Person Tantui, Six-Line Short Boxing, A Scientific
Approach to Martial Arts, and others, in the hopes of strengthening the people and saving the nation. If we wish
to popularize such exercises, we will have no effect unless we increasingly publish them. In the context of our
national identity, history, and environment, if we wish to get on the path toward strengthening the people and
saving the nation, should we enlist the help of Western calisthenics or should we restore our native martial arts?
With some careful scrutiny, we can know the answer without asking the question.
Since we are now in the gloriously scientific twentieth century, a thing cannot survive if it does not address
practical function, and this is the reason for the declining of our martial arts. The fault lies in the lack of endeavor
to discover and understand, in conservatively following established methods rather than being aware of
improvements. Fortunately there are enlightened gentlemen in the nation who for this reason have done their
utmost to encourage the various schools and styles to surge forth, each expressing its strengths without any
declaring it is best, so that the old styles could be organized into a martial competition known as the Martial Arts
Examinations [which took place in Oct, 1928]. It encouraged only display of ones prowess within the randomness
of fighting rather than the debating of ones martial theory to score points over another.
It served to show that between updated martial arts and the old systems, we do not know the extent of the
differences, much less how they have evolved. But what a pity it is when a style relies on obscure theory and makes
appeals to the past. This is a flaw, for it can do nothing to promote martial arts as a whole. And on the other hand,
when a style simply uses real life as its premise, this does not prevent ones character from degenerating, for
although one trains to toughen sinews and bones, one can only make jokes about the style in answer to criticism,
burying its heroic quality, which is even worse. Such lamentable situations.
If I have made any error in what I have said above, I hope that my martial arts comrades will be roused to make
corrections so that martial arts may keep advancing. This would give a great brightening to the prospects of these
arts. How admirable that would be.
My goals in making this book are: 1. to neither turn away from ancient teachings, 2. nor to violate modern
teaching principles, 3. to be able to encourage a more scientific approach in educational organizations, 4. to
explain specific application in order for this to be of practical use. In this book, included with each posture is the
name of the technique, its function, a description of the movement, and an explanation of the technique. With a
postures name, function, movement, and significance explained, you can proceed step by step until you have
become an example fit for others to learn by.
The current trend is to engage in such a study of the experience of others in order to build up our bodies and
strengthen our national spirit. I am not talented, but I do have great hopes.
written by Wu Zhiqing of Guxi [in Anhui] at the Shanghai Esteeming the Martial School, April 1930
-

GENERAL COMMENTS

- For this book, I have selected the Cannon Boxing set from the Long Boxing system taught to me by my teacher
Yu Zhensheng. It is divided into two chapters: Chapter One is an introduction to martial arts which analyzes
various aspects, while Chapter Two is a photographic guide to the solo practice.

- This book complies with the teaching procedure of a chapter being divided into five parts,
each part divided into four sections, each section divided into four postures. [The book emulates the principle, but
its actual structure is Chapter One being divided into six parts, then Chapter Two being divided into five parts:
part 1 positioning chart and attention stance, part 2 four sections of the set (1-4), part 3 four sections (5-8),
part 4 five sections (9-13), part 5 five sections (14-18), each section comprising four postures.] Included with
each posture is the name of the technique, its function, a description of the movement, and an explanation of the
technique. With a postures name, function, movement, and significance explained, this enables you to
understand at a glance and practice easily.

- Since this book is for teaching whole groups at a time, you may refer to military methods of drilling.

- In this book, there is a command for each posture so that beginners may feel easily motivated from the start.
After they are familiar with the movements, the simple counting may be done away with and it can flow without
pauses. So as to not violate the principles of our forefathers and yet teach with a modern procedure, there is this
way of doing it.

- This book assumes practice facing certain directions so that beginners can easily memorize and establish
themselves in it. After drilling it until it is familiar, you can face any direction.

- This book has a list of lyrics for the set which has been passed down from long ago. Its phrases are to be recited
over and over in order to get at its meaning. Although we should comply with the writings of the original author in
order to avoid losing touch with the authentic version, another author has nevertheless come up with a new set of
verse to further represent the practical applications, and this is included following the old lyrics.

- This book settles upon posture names which are convenient for study, correspond to the essentials of the
applications, and suit the shapings of the postures. In studying our nations martial arts, we find differences in
terminology between schools and styles, or that the movements of their sets may be the same but the names are
different [or vice versa]. This is one of the harms of keeping things secret and is truly one of the greater
shortcomings in the martial arts world.

- This book is based upon some of my teaching experience over the years. I have put it together for publication in
order to supply my fellow martial arts enthusiasts with reference material.

- Some degree of incompleteness in this book is inevitable, and so I hope my martial arts comrades will correct
me.
-

CONTENTS

Portrait of the author

Authors Preface

General Comments

Chapter One: Introduction

Part 1: Examining the Origin of the Schools

Part 2: Examining the Differences Between the Schools

Part 3: Examining the Categories of Long Boxing and Short Boxing

Part 4: Examining Differences Brought on by Nature

Part 5: Original Song

Part 6: New Song

Chapter Two: Illustrated Set

Part 1: Positioning Chart for the Boxing Set

Part 2: Song [for Sections 1-4]

Section 1 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 1: STEP FORWARD WITH THRUSTING PUNCHES / This is for beginning the movements. / This
posture is the opening technique in this boxing set, and it also readies your body for exercise. The movement
therefore is neither fierce nor slow, but natural. By never forcing the movements, you will deeply obtain the
essentials of health.

Posture 2: WRAPPING ELBOWS / This is preparation for performing the set of boxing techniques. / This is for
preparing you to go through the set, so that while you advance and retreat, attack and defend, you will be able to
avoid anxiety over making mistakes.

Posture 3: LEFT RAISING PALM / This is for catching by raising up. / This is a method of drawing in the
opponents hand to parry it away.

Posture 4: LEFT STEP FORWARD, THRUST PUNCH / This is for attacking with a strike. / Use a palm to parry
while using a fist to strike the opponents chest. When punching, both your shoulder and arm must be relaxed.
When aimed at the target, exerting yourself will only bring you off target and leave with nothing to shoot at. This
is why it is called inch force [i.e. just the right measure of strength].

Section 2 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 5: RETREAT, RAISING PALM / This is for defending with one side and attacking with the other. / Use
your left palm in a raising action to the opponents lower body. Thus it is called raising palm to the groin. The
movements of this technique coordinate the actions of hand, eye, body, and step in order to achieve the effects of
both defending yourself and subduing the opponent.

Posture 6: SWIPING FIST / This is for avoiding the brunt of the opponents attack to await an opportunity. / If
the opponent attacks me, I evade his sharpest point, storing energy as I await an opportunity to counter.

Posture 7: INTERCEPTING ELBOW, THRUST PUNCH / This is a method of fake block, real strike. / If the
opponent attacks me at middle height, I use my left elbow to block it, then use my right fist to take advantage of
the opportunity with a strike to his heart.

Posture 8: BINDING FIST, SNAPPING KICK / This is for dealing with the opponent and returning a strike. / The
opponent takes advantage of the gap that appeared because of my punching, attacking my right ribs, so I turn over
my wrist, binding in downward to defend against him, and take advantage of the opportunity to attack him with a
kick.

Section 3 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 9: RIGHT THRUST PUNCH / This is for changing position. / This is for changing position while fighting,
causing the opponent to be unable to detect your strategy. The intention is that of taking him by surprise,
attacking him where he is unprepared.

Posture 10: LEFT THRUST PUNCH / This is for of turning around and striking. / I observe an opponents feints
versus real tactics and get ready for the moment to respond.

Posture 11: LEFT CAPTURING, RIGHT SEALING / This is for capturing and locking. / If the opponent extends a
hand to strike, I use my left hand to capture it, then switch to locking him up with my right arm to make him
trapped, after which I will send out my left hand to strike a vital area.

Posture 12: LEFT THRUST PUNCH / This is for taking advantage of a moment of the opponents inattentiveness
to attack him. / Continuing from the previous techniques sealing, I take advantage of the opportunity to advance
with a strike to the middle of the opponents body.

Section 4 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 13: RIGHT THRUST PUNCH / This is for continuing from the previous postures advancing strike by
turning it into an attack of continuous strikes. / This technique continues from the previous technique, making a
continuous succession of thrust punches. However, to be able to achieve this effect, it is necessary for the punches
to come out one after the other rapidly and without hesitation.

Posture 14: CROSS-SHAPED PUNCHES / This is for turning around to strike an opponent. / If there are
opponents surrounding me, I leap up, flinging my fists upward in an inward circle to prevent their techniques
from getting to me, then I spot their weak points and attack.

Posture 15: SWIPING FIST / This is for luring the opponent in deep. / The swiping fist is used to prevent the
opponents attack by intercepting his strike, thereby keeping away his sharpest point. I wait until he has come in
too far and his power is spent, then when I see the moment to act, I will take advantage of the situation and smash
him.

Posture 16: INTERCEPTING ELBOW, THRUST PUNCH / This is for executing both defense and attack in the
same action. / I take advantage of the opponents attack by using my elbow to cut away his technique and sending
out my right fist in a direct attack to his heart, giving him no time to assess what is happening, rendering me the
one carrying out the winning strategy.

Part 3: Song [for Sections 5-8]

Section 5 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 17: BINDING FIST, SNAPPING KICK / This is for simultaneous attack and defense. / The binding fist is
for defending against the opponent and the kicking leg is for striking him. However, the use of the kick should
comply with the intention of visible punch, invisible kick, and not just be a mechanical movement. It must be
lively and very springy, catching him off guard, and then the use of it will be appropriate, otherwise you will surely
be under his control. Be very careful of this.

Posture 18: RIGHT THREADING PALM / This is for dealing with the opponent by chasing and striking. / If the
opponent pretends to retreat, I then step rapidly, chasing him with a palm strike to see what he will do. Once I
observe his actions, I then settle upon the strategy that will give me control over him.

Posture 19: LEFT THREADING PALM / This is for continuing to press the attack. / If the opponent again tries to
take me by surprise by feigning retreat, I again extend a hand, but I must be walking in to follow him back. Rather
than wait for how he will adjust, I crowd his body to give him nowhere to escape to.

Posture 20: STOMPING STEP, THREADING PALM / This is for dealing with an opponent by changing strategy. /
Having captured the opponent, I suddenly turn around, taking advantage of the situation by locking up his hand
and fiercely dropping down, lifting my leg and stomping the top of his foot.

Section 6 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 21: LIFTING KICK, DOUBLE SPREADING / This is for defending above while attacking below. / If an
opponent covers himself downward, I then send my hands upward and spread them apart, taking advantage of
the opportunity to send a kick to his lower body. This is the correct way to use this technique, but if you try to
apply it before you have the knack of it, you will end up under the opponents control. Take note of this point.

Posture 22: DOUBLE CANNON KICK / This is for offensive pursuit. / If the opponent jumps away, I chase him
and attack, my hands capturing in front while I suddenly attack his belly with snapping kicks. The substance of
this technique of pursuit comes down to the craftiness and surprise of the kicking attack.

Posture 23: RIGHT PALM STRIKE / This is for tripping below and striking above. / When my right foot comes
down, it hooks around and trips up the opponents leg. By adding my right palm pushing forward, he is made to
lose his balance, and thus I am victorious.

Posture 24: LEFT PALM STRIKE / This is for continuous palm striking. / This technique connects with the
previous technique: if one strike misses, the next strike will succeed. As the palms extend and recoil, they must be
rapid and unhindered, no hesitation at all. Its success or failure depends upon its quality of instantaneousness:
How did you do that so fast?

Section 7 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 25: RIGHT PALM STRIKE / This continues the palm strikes with a third strike. / This technique of a
single attack continues into a third strike, causing the opponent to not understand what I am doing, which is why
it is called skill.

Posture 26: TURN AROUND, PROP & HIT / This is for changing direction. / If an opponent suddenly attacks my
upper body from behind, I turn around and use my [left] arm to prop it up, my left [right] fist taking advantage of
the opportunity in that moment to strike to his heart. Hand, eye, body, and step must be coordinated, arriving in
unison, in order for this to be at all successful.

Posture 27: PRESSING PALM, PLANTING PUNCH / This is for simultaneous attack and defense. / The opponent
takes advantage of an opportunity to strike to my ribs, so I quickly use my [left] palm to press it down, then send
my right fist downward with a planting punch to his belly, stepping in to crowd him and render him less
maneuverable, making opportunity mine.

Posture 28: DOUBLE SPREADING, SHEATHING STEP / This is for preventing your lower body from being
attacked. / If the opponent attacks my head, I use double spreading hands to defend against it, then do a
sheathing step to reinforce my lower body, storing power with which to prepare my counterattack [in the
following technique].

Section 8 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 29: CROSS-SHAPED KICK / This is for taking advantage of an opportunity to attack the opponent from
the side. / Closing on the opponent, I use both arms to brace open and parry away his incoming hands, taking
advantage of the opportunity to do a side kick to his waist or ribs.

Posture 30: WRAPPING ELBOWS, SNAPPING KICK / This is for continuing the kicking attack. / If my last kick
misses, I quickly capture the opponents hand and draw it in toward my chest while kicking with my right leg to
his lower body, overcoming him by raising my foot to catch his groin.

Posture 31: RIGHT PALM STRIKE / This is for taking advantage of an opportunity to destroy the opponent if he
loses his balance because of the previous technique. / Continuing from the previous technique, if I feel the
opponent is not toppling dramatically enough, I use a palm strike to help send him away quicker. Although there
is a palm strike, it must be coordinated with the step for it to be effective.

Posture 32: LEFT PALM STRIKE / This is for turning the attack into continuous palm strikes, right then left. /
The purpose of the left palm strike following upon the right palm strike is that if the opponent has not yet toppled
and is still capable of struggling, I now add another and more decisive strike to make him finally fall.

Part 4: Song [for Sections 9-13]

Section 9 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 33: RIGHT CAPTURING, LEFT CHOPPING / This is for dealing with an opponent by capturing and
chopping. / If an opponent attacks me from behind, I turn around, capture his hand, then strike him with a chop,
too suddenly for him to deal with, and thereby gain control over his fate. However, when turning around, the hips
must be nimble and springy for the turn to be done smoothly and for the technique to be at all effective.

Posture 34: LEAP, SHEATHING STEP / This is for overcoming an opponent by capturing with both hands. / If
the opponent withdraws his body to then counterattack, I leap into a sheathing step to destroy his technique, my
hands capturing his arm, making it too difficult for him to get away from the force of my technique.

Posture 35: LIFTING KICK / This is for restraining the opponent and kicking him while he tries to escape. / The
opponent wishes to escape, so I go along with his energy by kicking to the middle of his body.

Posture 36: DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE RIGHT / This [with the following two techniques] is for pushing in
all directions to create a way out from a group of surrounding opponents. / This technique gets rid of a whole
group. Or to continue from the previous technique, it helps topple the opponent if he has not yet fallen.

Section 10 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 37: DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE LEFT / This is for continuing from the previous technique by
echoing the double-hand push. / This technique is for dealing with a crowd of surrounding opponents. However,
when pushing with your palms, your arms must have a capacity to extend and contract in order to give you a
degree of leeway. If you are not on target, do not issue. When you issue, you must be on target to keep from being
controlled by your opponents.

Posture 38: DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE RIGHT / This is for building upon the previous two techniques to
make a continuous attack against opponents. / This technique is for when you are surrounded by opponents on all
sides, continuing as push followed by push for a total of three pushing attacks, opening up three pathways along
which you can fight.

Posture 39: WITHDRAWING STEP, HANGING PUNCH / This is for when an opponent takes advantage of an
opportunity to attack, at which point I retreat and put out a hanging punch to prevent it. / I defend against an
opponent by evading my body to prevent his attack, hanging up my elbow to resist it and thereby get a better
observation of what is coming, then await the opportunity to counter.

Posture 40: STEP FORWARD, RIGHT CARRYING PUNCH / This is for sharply thrusting through to destroy the
opponent. / This is for charging in, my right arm carrying away the opponents incoming fist, then advancing with
my body and step like a bears arm pressing forward. My body pressing in close toward his, he is made to lose his
will for attack or defense, leaving me with the successful tactic.

Section 11 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 41: STEP FORWARD, LEFT CARRYING PUNCH / This is for continuing the previous techniques bold
advance upon the opponent. / This continues my fierce advance pressing in toward the opponent. I absorb the
power of rivers and mountains [smashing him aside with an avalanche, washing him away with a flash flood],
making him not dare to even look me in the eye and contend against my aggressive spirit.

Posture 42: RIGHT PALM STRIKE / This is for continuing to press in against the opponent, this time with a palm
strike. / This continues from the previous techniques forward pressure, taking the opponent by surprise with a
palm strike to the middle of his body while tripping up his footing with my step, causing him to lose his balance.

Posture 43: RETREAT, THREADING PALM / This is for switching things up. / In this technique, I use a palm to
respond to the opponent while turning my body and retreating a step, engaging the enemy with a change of
strategy. Transforming from one technique to another is the most important skill. Pay attention to the nimbleness
of your hips. If your hips are nimble, your body will be lively and your step stable. No matter what direction
attacks comes from above, below, front, rear, left, right you will thus give yourself time to deal with them
rather than be in the predicament of having too much to do at once.

Posture 44: THREADING PALM, KICK TO THE FACE / This is for turning around with hooking and hanging,
taking advantage of the opportunity to perform a kicking maneuver. / This technique hooks and pulls in while
hanging up a palm, then kicks to the opponents face. In the practice of boxing arts, there is shape striking shape,
not shape striking shadow. Within your mind, there has to be an imagined opponent. Skillful victory is not really
about success through sinew, but is actually a matter of winning through wisdom.

Section 12 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 45: FLYING HAND, RAISING PALM / This is a method of spreading the clouds to see the sun
defending against the opponent by taking advantage of a gap through which to attack. / As I use my right hand to
deflect and left hand to raise up, my body turns sideways to leave room in front, inducing the opponent to
approach me so I can then seize the opportunity to capture him [in the following technique].

Posture 46: LEFT CAPTURING, RIGHT CHOPPING / This is for capturing with the front hand and chopping with
the rear hand. / Continuing from the previous technique, your left raising palm now captures the opponents hand
and your right deflecting palm now comes downward as a backfist, a fake technique switching to a real technique.

Posture 47: SNAPPING KICK / This is for continuing from the previous technique by attacking the opponent with
a snapping kick. / Continuing from the previous technique of capture and chop, if the opponent dodges or blocks,
I then take advantage of the opportunity to kick to his lower body.

Posture 48: THRUST PUNCH, RAISING PALM / This is for striking the opponent with a thrust punch / This
technique is a feint [Shout to the east, but strike to the west.]. However, when turning around, your body must
go along with your eyes as they observe for opponents wherever they may be moving. You must never ignore
opponents for an instant, and thereby your boxing art will already be halfway realized.

Section 13 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 49: CATCHING, INSERTION PUNCH / This is for catching an opponent and sealing him off. / This
continues from the previous technique. Once I have raised my left palm, I quickly turn my wrist to catch the
opponents hand, then my right arm comes out with a downward punch to embrace his arm, which seals off his
body, though the major effect is achieved by stomping on his foot.

Posture 50: TURN AROUND, CAPTURE / This is for turning around and capturing. / This technique stores up
power for the next, and they are really one continuous energy rather than two techniques. Understand that they
are divided into two simply to make it easier to teach when guiding a group.

Posture 51: RIGHT THRUST PUNCH / This is for continuing from the previous capturing technique by attacking
with a punch. / This technique is a matter of a real technique [the following finger jab] coming from a feint [this
punch], a preparation for the next posture. This enables you in your training to constantly grasp the changes of
opportunity, and train for the using of fake and real techniques, straightforward and surprise techniques. When
an opponent attacks in an unorthodox way, I respond in a straightforward way [in order to take him by surprise].
This renders the opponent unable to figure out whether my responses are going to be feints or real, putting me
successfully in charge of the situation. If you get stuck in fixed methods, the applicability of the art will be limited.

Posture 52: TURN AROUND, INSERTING PALM / This is for turning around and jabbing. / The strike to the west
was a feint, the real technique being the response to the east. The punch is straightforward while the palm strike is
a surprise. This is the way of change in boxing arts.

Part 5: Song [for Sections 14-18]

Section 14 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 53: SHEATHING STEP, FLATTENED LEG / This is for turning around and chopping. / With every step, I
am steadily advancing. With my sheathing step, I am stealing ground to get behind the opponent, then when I
spin to do a chop, I turn around like a snake slithering through the grass, spinning like the wind, dancing with a
display of so much transformation that he is too overwhelmed to do anything to me.

Posture 54: RIGHT THRUST PUNCH / This is for continuing from the previous technique by taking advantage of
an opening for attack. / Continuing from the previous action, switch from a feinting maneuver to a real technique,
taking him by surprise with straightforwardness as you strike with your right fist, a very straightforward
technique.

Posture 55: SHEATHING STEP, WITHDRAWING FIST / This is for gathering yourself in to await developments.
/ This technique is one of sitting down to observe developments, of awaiting the opportunity to act, of overcoming
movement with stillness.

Posture 56: FLATTENED LEG, CHOPPING PALM / This is for turning around to spread and hit. / Having
propped up, I turn around underneath, then spread and hit. This is the skill of using a surprise technique [the
spin] to generate a straightforward one [the chop]. Long Boxing practitioners win by way of four terms: leap to
avoid, turn to evade. Repeatedly give them attention.

Section 15 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 57: DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS / This is for attacking an opponents upper body by way of
kicking to the middle of his body when he evades below and then capitalizing on the adjustment he makes to it. /
First I kick to the middle of the opponents body, then punch to his upper body. Surprising him with a jumping
kick, there is nothing he can do, and then the straightforward technique follows upon it, victory brought about
through the surprise. [i.e. This punch to the head works because of the distracting kick.]

Posture 58: ELBOW TO THE HEART / This is an evasive elbow maneuver for when an opponents body is getting
too close, which also stores up power to attack him. / If the opponent resists against the previous technique and I
am unable to escape from him sticking to me, I bend in my forearm to inhibit him and store up power for what
happens next.

Posture 59: PUSH DOWN, BACK-HANDED SLAP / This is for continuing from the previous technique of
escaping from the opponent to now take advantage of the opportunity to strike him with a back-handed slap. /
Continuing from the previous technique, if the opponent uses a palm to resist against my elbow, I overcome him
by pushing down and seizing the opportunity to give him a back-handed slap to the face. The skillfulness of your
bodys sucking back and shooting out is no trifling thing, for by withdrawing you will be able to dodge without
having to leave your ground, no matter how severe his attack and regardless of your position, and you then need
only shoot your body forward and you will have more than enough for an assortment of punches and kicks. By
knocking away the opponents attack so he leans in slightly, you will hit the target, but otherwise it will be in vain.

Posture 60: RESPONDING WITH BOTH PALM & LEG / This is for continuing from the previous two techniques
by continuing the attack upon his upper body to now attack his middle and lower body. / If I miss with the
previous technique, I continue by executing both a kick and a palm strike, simultaneously attacking him above
[below] and in the middle, causing him to have too much to deal with at once, ensuring that I will get a way
through.

Section 16 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 61: RIGHT PALM STRIKE / This is for continuing from the previous kicking technique by using a bracing
and tripping method to defeat the opponent. / If the opponent has yet not been fallen after being struck by me, I
trip him up with my step while bracing against him with a palm, causing him to quickly fall away.

Posture 62: THREADING PALM / This is for changing in accordance with the previous technique. / I continue
from threading with my right palm by changing to my left palm.

Posture 63: RAISING PALM / This is for changing direction and preparing a pursuing strike. / This change of
direction is a preparation to chase an opponent, and is also for me to observe his mind, thus I adopt this defensive
stance and wait for the moment to advance.

Posture 64: RESPONDING WITH A PALM / This is for pursuing an opponent while drawing in to strike. / If the
opponent steadily steps away, I steadily follow. If he retreats urgently, I chase him urgently, and if he retreats
leisurely, I chase him leisurely. The strategy of drawing in my palm is to see if he will counterattack and also to
prepare to strike.

Section 17 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 65: DRAWING OUT THE LEFT PALM / This is for continuing to pursue the opponent. / This technique
is linked to the movement of the previous technique. As your feet alternate advancing and following in order to
crowd the opponent, your body and step should strive for naturalness and must not manifest any sluggishness,
thereby conforming to the principle of whole-bodied coordination.

Posture 66: TURN AROUND, SEND UP CLOUDS / This is for turning around and spreading. / I turn my body to
escape a threat, taking advantage of the opportunity to also split through with my right palm.

Posture 67: THREADING PALM / This is for blocking down with the left hand and hanging up with the right. /
Continuing from the previous technique, I then intercept while coiling around to hang a palm up, guarding against
his attack to be prepared against all harm.

Posture 68: CROSS-SHAPED PALM STRIKES / This is for opening the door to face an opponent. / This technique
is firstly to open the door to face the opponent, secondly to prepare for the end of the exercise.

Section 18 (name of the technique / function / remarks on the technique):

Posture 69: CROSSED HANDS / This is for capturing with both hands. / This posture draws the set to a close,
reining in the work you have put into all the previous postures, causing the blood circulation throughout your
body to gradually resume its original condition by bringing the set to a halt before it turns into strenuous exercise.
The influence of this upon your health is not small. Boxing sets usually go from beginning to end by going from
simplicity to complexity as a way to build you up in mind and body. Concluding the set then takes your
strenuousness to mildness so that your mind and body will easily recover from the fatigue.

Posture 70: WIPING PALM / This is for continuing from the previous technique of capturing with both hands. /
This posture brings the set to an end, harmonizing the movements, and is a final display of bravado.

Posture 71: RETREAT WITH DOUBLE PUNCHES / This is for bringing the set to a conclusion. / This posture
concludes the exercise for your limbs and muscles, causing your heartbeat and blood circulation to relax and
resume their normal working condition.

Posture 72: WRAPPING ELBOWS / This is for returning to your original state. Upon completing this posture,
your hands hang down, returning you to standing at attention.
-

From the Boxing Methods of the Zhao School: Illustrated Cannon Boxing Set
-

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

Part 1: Examining the Origin of the Schools

When we examine the written record of martial arts history, there are no martial systems to speak of prior to the
Six Dynasties [222-589]. They begin in the Liang Dynasty [502-577] with the Buddhist monk Damos Shaolin
Boxing. Then in the Song Dynasty [960-1279], there appeared Taizus Zhao school of boxing. [Taizu means great
ancestor, i.e. the founder or first emperor of a dynasty. The first emperor of the Song Dynasty was Zhao
Kuangyin. The founder of any dynasty can be called Taizu, but he in particular is honored as the founder of a
famous martial arts system, and so Taizu in relation to martial arts refers specifically to him. Nowadays the Zhao
school of boxing, or Zhaojia Quan / Zhaomen Quan, is more commonly known as Taizu Quan.] Also in the Song
Dynasty appeared the Yue school of boxing from Yue Fei, as well as Taiji Boxing from the Wudang Daoist Zhang
Sanfeng.
Such is the account that can be read in chronicles or heard through oral traditions, but subsequent generations
further divided the schools into the styles we have today. The fashion of striving to be the most unique increased
and the force of sincerely encouraging each other faded, with the result that our mighty and valuable martial arts
systems have slipped into complacency and fragility. In our modern era of scientific advancement, to not move
ahead means to fall behind until it is too hard to survive, which induced Sun Yat-sen to publicly declare: The
statistics show that our nations population is decreasing in birthrate with each passing day. Examine how listless
and dispirited our national character is, and it goes without saying how important martial arts are to the future of
our national identity.
In 1927, the government established Nanjing as the national capital, and then founded the Central Martial Arts
Institute there the following year as a scheme for widespread martial arts instruction. Zhang Zhijiang was
appointed director of the project. Martial arts experts from all over the country heard about it and flocked in to
conduct mutual research, doing away with factional attitudes of style and returning to the essential source.
If we wish to know how the various styles came to be and how they should be summed up, it will not really
work without the principles of Chinese martial arts as a whole. Though I am not very bright, I have at least learned
this from my studies: Chinese martial arts as a whole diverged into distinct schools, which further diverged into a
variety of styles, each of which then settled into their own boxes of reasoning, and by returning them to their
essence, they again become mixed into the whole of Chinese martial arts. This is expressed in drawings 1 and 2:

as a whole:

Chinese martial arts


-

levels of divergence:

From Shaolin

came the Zhao school,

from which came the Yue school,

from which came Wudang.

()

Systems of Chinese martial arts began with Shaolins Five Animals. Since the Taizu system of the Song Dynasty,
development produced Cha Boxing, Hua Boxing, Hong Boxing, Cannon Boxing, Tantui, Mind-Intent Six Unions,
and various schools of Long Boxing. From Yue Fei was created the double pushing hands exercises and the
interconnected exercises of Xingyi. This was passed down and refined until the early Ming Dynasty and Zhang
Sanfengs Taiji Boxing. Notice its place in drawing 2.
We know the sequence of divergence for the various schools from Shaolin to Zhao, from Zhao to Yue, from
Yue to Wudang but as for the reason for it, it all comes down to a single process, a simple matter of time and
space: the more the arts were practiced, the more they were refined, day after countless day, and the more widely
they were spread, the more they branched off. Due to differences of climate, terrain, physique, and circumstances,
each of these arts selected different contents and methods. (Some of their different qualities are presented further
below.)
Although each school within the whole of Chinese martial arts occupies its own sphere of influence, they are
unable to depart from their source and exist on their own. This is expressed in drawing 3:

other branches < Shaolin > Zhao school

Chinese martial arts



other branches < Wudang > Yue school

Each of the schools are merged together, but are distributed to form Chinese martial arts as a whole. This is
expressed in drawing 4:

Shaolin

Yue school Zhao school

Wudang

Part 2: Examining the Differences Between the Schools

()

Students say that Fuxi created the eight trigrams and that it was the basis of all Chinese culture. Therefore
everyone knows that the Grand Polarity gave rise to the two polarities, and the two polarities gave rise to the four
manifestations. Eventually the teachings of Daoism prospered, and priests claimed to be nourishing their natures
and cultivating truth. But they were unable to grasp the essence of the eight trigrams, and so by way of clever
misappropriations and superficial wordings, strained interpretations of philosophy turned into mythology and
absurd explanations about Nature.
In my opinion, from about middle antiquity until recent times, our national character had been completely
wrapped up in conventional Daoist thought (although I am unable to prove this in detail), so much so that when
we talk in martial arts of things such as seated meditation or the elixir field, these are examples of terminology
from the Daoist arts and elixirist traditions. Those who practice such arts study intensively to be able to bring
about longevity and the deathless death of ascending to the land of the immortals nonsensical gibberish.
Although there is no verification for why there is division into schools, there are two that rise above the rest: the
two traditions of Shaolin and Wudang.
Shaolin says of itself: externally it trains the sinews and bones and internally it cultivates the elixir field this is
what it all comes down to. Generating stillness from movement, it has hardness and it has softness.
Wudang says of itself: internally it refines the energy of the elixir field and externally it performs the boxing
postures this is what it all comes down to. Generating movement from stillness, it has softness and it has
hardness.
As for their principles, although we may analyze the prioritizing of movement or stillness, or the differences
between hardness and softness, internal and external, ultimately the result is the same! And so too for the elixirist
traditions. If we force a distinction between the two schools, then either movement or stillness will come before or
after. But think about it. If there was no movement, how could there be stillness? And if there was no stillness,
how could there be movement? There is naturally no absolute of movement or stillness, nor of hardness or
softness, internalness or externalness.
Thus the Shaolin tradition is outwardly hard and inwardly soft, whereas the Wudang tradition is outwardly soft
and inwardly hard. But once skill is achieved in either, one can be either hard or soft, for hardness and softness
have merged into one, meaning there is neither hardness nor softness. In short, hardness and softness, movement
and stillness, all have the principle of being interconnected with each other. Since there is essentially no difference
in their goals, how then can we describe them as distinct schools? Hard and soft are the inside and outside of each
other, and cannot be separated, as demonstrated here by the Taiji symbol see drawing 5:

hard

soft

Furthermore, there are those who say that the Shaolin tradition is hard and active while the Wudang tradition is
soft and passive, that they have a different emphasis. Relevant to this point is this common saying [derived from
the writings of Cheng Yunsheng]: Alone, the passive cannot be born. Alone, the active cannot grow. [Therefore
the sky and ground have paired them into passive/active.] Passive and active are an integrated whole, and this is
an irremovable truth of the universe, and this can be held up as evidence that Wudang and Shaolin are not
mutually exclusive. When the active aspect reaches its peak, the passive aspect is generated, in the same way as
the sun going down followed by the moon coming out. For all things, there is a single principle of cycling
unchangeably, again as demonstrated by the Taiji symbol see drawing 6:

active

passive
()()

Martial arts experts used to bluntly describe the distinction between internal and external schools by drawing the
division as Daoist priests (internal) and Buddhist monks (external) rather than any meaningful distinction
between the arts themselves. When martial artists talk from the standpoint of these arts, they say internal training
is a matter of the breath, and consider that to be the internal skill, while external training is a matter of sinew,
bone, and skin, and consider that to be the external skill. To push for such a distinction is silly. Whatever school
you may have in mind, they all discuss the internal training of the elixir field and the external training of sinews
and bones. The principle remains that of responding to physiological requirements and studying martial skills. It
is only those who are obsessed with a traditional Daoist mentality, those who parade themselves as being ever so
mysterious simply so they can show off how weird they are, that are the ones who therefore talk of spirituality and
push for a division between internal and external.

Part 3: Examining the Categories of Long Boxing and Short Boxing

Charting the boxing arts is like outlining an essay. An essay must have its four sections of introduction,
development, transition, and conclusion, and then one can begin the process of writing it, in which there is then
the gathering up of words to make sentences and the collecting of sentences to form paragraphs. We could look at
Chinese martial arts in the same kind of way.
For example, Large Hong Boxing, Small Hong Boxing, Cha Boxing, Six Unions, or Taiji, each a kind of boxing
that has complete practice routines, can be thought of as the outlining of the essay. Arts such as Tantui or Xingyi
[both of which emphasize the practice of individual techniques rather than full practice sets], can be thought of as
the accumulating of words and sentences. In this way, the Long Boxing arts train general structure, while Short
Boxing arts train specific function.
Furthermore, those Long Boxing arts each move around according to the situation, addressing each of the
compass points as though spotting opponents about to make surprise attacks, the movement of the performance
routine developing according to certain circumstances in order to respond to opponents all around, as in the intro,
development, transition, and conclusion of essay composition. [Tantui and Xingyi exercises on the other hand
tend to move more along straight lines rather than addressing every surrounding angle.] This is expressed in
drawing 7:
F C E

B A

H D G

This diagram of the compass points is represented by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H. One of the Long Boxing sets could
begin and return to any of these points, but only as long as none of the directions is left ignored is it then to be
deemed a full demonstration of martial arts. Practicing only one direction would make an incompletely structured
boxing set and would not be favored.
The significance of the Short Boxing arts is then in the specific training of the various methods for hand, eye,
body, and step, the training of both left and right, and the linking up of all the parts to make applicable technique.
[This indicates that to add them to our view of drawing 7, we could perhaps think of the Short Boxing arts as
representing the dots of the dotted lines.]

Part 4: Examining Differences Brought on by Nature

The climate is colder in the north and warmer in the south, and there is variation of physique as a consequence, as
well as a difference in which methods are selected for developing physique. Different climates produce different
chemical activity in bodies. Southerners are wise and tactful, and their bodies are shorter and weaker.
Northerners on the other hand are blunt, and their bodies are strong. This is because of the terrain and the
weather.
Their training methods are thus different, and yet the material they select from is the same. North and south
both draw from Shaolin and Wudang. When these traditions were being passed down, teachers did not stick to
one or the other, and it is still not known why they have developed into their present form. As to combat using the
northern or southern boxing arts, each has it specialty and they are well-matched, and they are slightly distinct in
terms of physiology.
The southern arts emphasize defense, usually employing a posture of shrinking the body in. Their defense is
solid and meticulous, but they are slightly lacking in offense. Their muscles are tensed up as though seized in
spasms, meaning that the most skilled tend to look worn out and emaciated.
The northern arts emphasize attack. They are spread open and lively, the muscles loose and extended, thereby
easily nurturing the body, meaning that the most skilled tend to be tall and imposing. Some of the differences
between north and south are presented in the table below:
/
examples of differences between south / north:

climate warm / cold

terrain mountains & rivers / plains

temperament tactful / frank

mentality progressive / conservative

physique delicate / robust

diet rice / wheat

transportation boat / cart & horse

In the table of differences above, there is variation in physique, mentality, etc. Their methods of health and
self-defense also became different in response to physiological demands and the pressures to defend themselves.
This is the theory of distinctiveness between northern and southern schools.

In conclusion:

From the above can be seen that they have different needs, adapting to different environments and different
circumstances, and yet their goals are the same: health and self-defense. Therefore the branches stem from a
single source, the various styles deriving from a single family, all in an interconnected relationship, and none can
be said to be inferior or superior. Based on this, finding suitable martial arts to fit into our modern scientific era
should not be difficult.

Part 5: Original Song






The shock of the heros cannon makes the bells ring.
Smooth stepping gains him a way in.
He seems to fire his cannon then dodge out of the way with a leap through the dragons gate.
The onslaught of his hands seems like a hurling of cannonballs at his opponent.
Opposing the mountain to split it into mountains new, he overpowers and captures the opponent.
He is like a sparrow hawk entering the pine forest with a few flaps of its wings.
The continuous cannon fire is hard to survive.
The Three-Line Cannon Boxing keeps advancing.
His cross-shape punches are a match for Mt. Hua.
With twin birds steal away food, he reverses sky and ground.
Some people will ask you if the boxing is really like a cannon.
Immediately give a shout and let them feel the sound of the Three-Line Cannon Boxing.

Note:

The original version above is an ancient form of oral instruction. Its phrases are rather difficult to explain, yet it
expresses truth. For the sake of the methods of application, I have made this new version below:

Part 6: New Song

THREE-LINE CANNON BOXING IN VERSE


[There is no actual explanation in the book for the three lines. There is not even a meaningful mention of the
term other than in Posture 38, which gives a hint that it could be used to express three pathways for fighting
surrounding opponents. Is the theme of the set supposed to be a sense of cannons firing in three directions? This
would also spotlight Postures 36-38 to be the central movements of the set not only as numberings but also as the
major techniques. More likely the three lines are simply intended to mean a breakdown of the set into three
segments, in which case it would seem to most reasonably divide into the first as Postures 1-25, the second as
Postures 26-48, and the third as Postures 49-72.]

[Postures 1-16:]
Step forward, sending out both fists to attack the opponent.
Wrap your elbows in toward your body and observe all around.
Raise to the left, step forward sending out a thrust punch.
Retreat, raising to his groin in a heroic tiger stance.
A fist swipes, another thrusts out and then binds in.
Punch right and left, then capture and seal.
After a left thrust punch, the right fist shoots out.
Perform cross-shaped punches, swiping fist, then intercepting elbow and thrust punch.
[Postures 17-32:]
Binding fist and snapping kick, then right threading palm.
Left threading palm, then turn around and stomp down full.
Lifting kick with double spreading, then double cannon kick.
Execute triple palm strikes, starting with the right.
Turn around to prop and hit, attacking his heart.
Press down for a planting punch, then hands spread apart to return in front.
Kick into a cross shape, then do a snapping kick.
Palm strikes go out with left and right steps to adapt to the situation.
[Postures 33-52:]
Capture and chop with right hand and left.
Leap into a sheathing step, then a kick lifts up.
Perform double-hand follow-step pushes, starting with the right.
Pushing left and right, the effect is extraordinary.
Retreat with a hanging punch to defend against his technique.
Perform carrying punches, stepping the same on both sides.
Send out a palm, then thread through with the other.
Facing him, follow with a kick.
Flying hand and raising palm, then capture and chop.
Do a kick, a thrust punch, then a raising palm in a golden rooster stance.
First catch then insert, then turn around to capture.
To do a jabbing palm, a thrusting punch creates the best opportunity.
[Postures 53-72:]
A leg flattens, a punch thrusts out and draws back in.
Turning around, a leg flattens and a palm spreads forcefully.
Double wind through the ears starts by delivering a kick.
Attack his heart with an elbow, then give a back-handed slap to his face.
When the left leg kicks, a palm also shoots out.
Palms then thread to the opponents throat, right then left.
Palms then extend with steps, right then left, to press another opponent.
Hands fly, turn around, and a threading palm is sent out.
The crossed hands continue into the wiping palm.
With double punches and wrapping elbows, the set comes to a rest.
-

CHAPTER TWO: ILLUSTRATED CANNON BOXING SET

Part 1: Positioning Chart for the Boxing Set

Explanation:

When starting to learn a boxing set, you should first of all make note of your orientation,
then begin to practice. Thus when you are going through it on your own, you will not be at a loss as to where to put
your hands and feet. If you by chance forget, just consider what direction you are facing and you will easily recall.
Therefore in the beginning, you must be clear about north, south, east, and west, although after you have
practiced the set to familiarity, you will no longer need such directions. For this particular set, you start in the
east, facing north with south behind you. See the compass:
N

W E

STANDING AT ATTENTION

Explanation of the posture:

Your heels should be standing next to each other on the same line, toes swung out so your feet are at about a sixty
degree angle to each other. Your legs should be naturally straight. Your upper body should be balanced on top of
your waist, your spine straightened, and slightly leaning forward. Your shoulders should be level and slightly
spread away to the rear. Your arms should hang naturally, hands touching your thighs, fingers together and
slightly bent. Your head should be upright, neck straight. Your mouth should be closed, breathing done through
your nose. Your gaze is level to the south.

Part 2: Song [for Sections 1-4]




Step forward, sending out both fists to attack the opponent.
Wrap your elbows in toward your body and observe all around.
Raise to the left, step forward sending out a thrust punch.
Retreat, raising to his groin in a heroic tiger stance.
A fist swipes, another thrusts out and then binds in.
Punch right and left, then capture and seal.
After a left thrust punch, the right fist shoots out.
Perform cross-shaped punches, swiping fist, then intercepting elbow and thrust punch.

SECTION 1 (The command counts 1 2 3 4):

Posture 1

Name of the technique:

STEP FORWARD WITH THRUSTING PUNCHES

Function:

This is for beginning the movements.

Explanation of the movement:

Hear the command of One! From standing at attention, take three steps forward [left, right, left] to stand with
your feet together again as in standing at attention. At the same time, your hands lift up, palms upward, fingertips
touching your waist, and they each go outward, making complete circles until in front of your chest, grasped into
fists with the fist eyes facing each other. Your body is again standing as in the attention posture. Your gaze is level.
See photo 1:

Remarks on the technique:

This posture is the opening technique in this boxing set, and it also readies your body for exercise. The movement
therefore is neither fierce nor slow, but natural. By never forcing the movements, you will deeply obtain the
essentials of health.

Posture 2

Name of the technique:

WRAPPING ELBOWS

Function:

This is preparation for performing the set of boxing techniques.

Explanation of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your fists roll over so they have their pulse area facing upward and withdraw to
your waist, making the posture of your elbows wrapping in. Your bodys posture has still not changed. Your gaze is
level. See photo 2:

Remarks on the technique:

This is for preparing you to go through the set, so that while you advance and retreat, attack and defend, you will
be able to avoid anxiety over making mistakes.

Posture 3

Name of the technique:

LEFT RAISING PALM

Function:

This is for catching by raising up.

Explanation of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your stance still does not change. Your left fist becomes a palm, goes
downward, to the west, and raises upward, the fingertips pointing up, arm slightly bent. Your gaze is to the
fingertips. Your right arm keeps its elbow wrapped in. See photo 3:

Remarks on the technique:

This is a method of drawing in the opponents hand to parry it away.

Posture 4

Name of the technique:

LEFT STEP FORWARD, THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for attacking with a strike.

Explanation of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a step forward to the west and your right foot follows to
stand next to it. At the same time, your right fist thrusts out to the west, tigers mouth diagonally upward, your left
hand guarding beside your right arms pulse area, your body going along with the punch by slightly turning to the
left. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 4:

Remarks on the technique:

Use a palm to parry while using a fist to strike the opponents chest. When punching, both your shoulder and arm
must be relaxed. When aimed at the target, exerting yourself will only bring you off target and leave with nothing
to shoot at. This is why it is called inch force [i.e. just the right measure of strength].

SECTION 2 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 5

Name of the technique:

RETREAT, RAISING PALM

Function:

This is for defending with one side and attacking with the other.

Explanation of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right foot retreats a step to the east, the knee slightly bends, your left foot
withdraws a half step, toes touching down, making a T-shape sitting tiger stance. At the same time, your right fist
becomes a palm, raises upward, and extends to the rear until it is level, fingertips pointing upward, palm facing to
the north, while your left palm goes downward, forward, and raises up, fingertips pointing upward, arm slightly
bent. Your left elbow hangs down pointing to your left knee, which is turned outward to the left. Your gaze is to
the fingertips of your left palm. Your chest is opened and your hips are sinking down. Your feet are right full, left
empty. See photo 5:

Remarks on the technique:

Use your left palm in a raising action to the opponents lower body. Thus it is called raising palm to the groin.
The movements of this technique coordinate the actions of hand, eye, body, and step in order to achieve the
effects of both defending yourself and subduing the opponent.

Posture 6

Name of the technique:

SWIPING FIST

Function:

This is for avoiding the brunt of the opponents attack to await an opportunity.

Explanation of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your body and feet do not move, but your left palm becomes a fist, the forearm
evasively bending in until level with the upper arm. At the same time, your hips slightly sink. Your gaze is still to
the west. See photo 6:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent attacks me, I evade his sharpest point, storing energy as I await an opportunity to counter.

Posture 7

Name of the technique:

INTERCEPTING ELBOW, THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is a method of fake block, real strike.

Explanation of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a half step forward, the knee bends, and your right leg
straightens, making a left bow stance. At the same time, your left hand cuts downward in front of your left knee,
then goes to the rear until the fist is at ear level, while your right hand grasps into a fist, gathering in beside your
waist, then goes to the west with a thrust punch at chest level. Your body stands in a left crossed stance [i.e. left
foot and right hand forward]. Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the west. See
photo 7:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent attacks me at middle height, I use my left elbow to block it, then use my right fist to take
advantage of the opportunity with a strike to his heart.

Posture 8

Name of the technique:

BINDING FIST, SNAPPING KICK

Function:

This is for dealing with the opponent and returning a strike.

Explanation of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right fist turns over so the wrist is downward and the hand is facing up,
the upper arm touching your right ribs. At the same time, your right foot lifts and kicks to the west, the sole of
your left foot twisting to the right [left]. Going along with the kick, your body faces to the southwest. Your gaze is
to the west. See photo 8:

Remarks on the technique:

The opponent takes advantage of the gap that appeared because of my punching, attacking my right ribs, so I turn
over my wrist, binding in downward to defend against him, and take advantage of the opportunity to attack him
with a kick.

SECTION 3 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 9

Name of the technique:

RIGHT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for changing position.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right leg lowers and stands straight, and your left foot follows by closing
in upward, the lower leg bending back to be parallel with the ground, upper leg hanging straight down, toes
hanging down. At the same time, your right fist goes from your waist with a level thrust punch to the west, while
your left fist gathers in to your waist, elbow wrapped in. Your body is squared to the south. Your gaze is to the
west. Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. See photo 9:

Remarks on the technique:

This is for changing position while fighting, causing the opponent to be unable to detect your strategy. The
intention is that of taking him by surprise, attacking him where he is unprepared.

Posture 10

Name of the technique:

LEFT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for turning around and striking.

Explanation of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a step out to the east, your right foot follows to stand next
to it, toes pointing to the south. At the same time, your left fist goes from beside your waist with a level thrust
punch to the east, your right arm raising high, the tigers mouth facing to the east. Your body is squared to the
south, and your gaze is to the east. Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. See photo 10:

Remarks on the technique:

I observe an opponents feints versus real tactics and get ready for the moment to respond.

Posture 11

Name of the technique:

LEFT CAPTURING, RIGHT SEALING

Function:

This is for capturing and locking.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your body turns to the left rear, your right foot takes a step out to the east,
both knees bending to make a horse-riding posture. At the same time, your left fist becomes a palm, goes to the
east, and makes a complete circle to the east that ends in a capturing technique, bending in the fingers to form a
tigers claw, to capture the opponents hand, while your right arm comes downward to the east to lock in the
opponents arm with your elbow, the fist eye diagonally upward, the forearm cutting diagonally to the outside of
your right leg, your left palm guarding in front of your right shoulder. Your torso is upright and your chest is
sticking out. Your gaze is to the east, your body squared to the north. See photo 11:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent extends a hand to strike, I use my left hand to capture it, then switch to locking him up with my
right arm to make him trapped, after which I will send out my left hand to strike a vital area.

Posture 12

Name of the technique:

LEFT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for taking advantage of a moment of the opponents inattentiveness to attack him.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your horse-riding stance changes to a right bow stance. At the same time, your
left palm grasps into a fist and does a level thrust punch to the east, while your right fist withdraws to your waist,
elbow wrapped in, your body slightly turning to the right. Your chest is squared to the east, your gaze is still to the
east, and you are in a left [right] crossed stance [right foot and left hand forward]. See photo 12:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous techniques sealing, I take advantage of the opportunity to advance with a strike to
the middle of the opponents body.

SECTION 4 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 13

Name of the technique:

RIGHT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous postures advancing strike by turning it into an attack of continuous
strikes.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your body does not change, but your left hand withdraws to your waist, elbow
wrapped in, while your right fist thrusts out to the east, making a straight-stance right bow stance [right foot and
right hand forward]. Your gaze is still to the east. See photo 13:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique continues from the previous technique, making a continuous succession of thrust punches.
However, to be able to achieve this effect, it is necessary for the punches to come out one after the other rapidly
and without hesitation.

Posture 14

Name of the technique:

CROSS-SHAPED PUNCHES

Function:

This is for turning around to strike an opponent.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right foot lifts and your left foot goes up as your body leaps up and turns
around to the right rear, your right foot coming down with a stomp, and your left foot takes a step out to the west,
making a left bow stance. At the same time, your arms fly up, hands still as fists, then come together in front of
your chest, draw in to your waist, and spread apart as thrust punches to the east and west. Your left fist is slightly
lower at chest level, right fist slightly higher at ear level. Your body goes along with the action by slightly leaning to
the left. Your gaze is to the west, your body squared to the north. See photo 14:

Remarks on the technique:

If there are opponents surrounding me, I leap up, flinging my fists upward in an inward circle to prevent their
techniques from getting to me, then I spot their weak points and attack.

Posture 15

Name of the technique:

SWIPING FIST

Function:

This is for luring the opponent in deep.

Explanation of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your body and step do not move, but your left forearm bends in to be level
with your upper arm. At the same time, your hips slightly sink to the left [right] to drive the swipe. Your torso is
upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 15:

Remarks on the technique:

The swiping fist is used to prevent the opponents attack by intercepting his strike, thereby keeping away his
sharpest point. I wait until he has come in too far and his power is spent, then when I see the moment to act, I will
take advantage of the situation and smash him.

Posture 16

Name of the technique:

INTERCEPTING ELBOW, THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for executing both defense and attack in the same action.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, you remain in a left bow stance as your left hand cuts downward in front of
your left knee and goes upward to the rear until the fist is at ear level, while your right fist gathers in beside your
waist and goes to the west with a thrust punch at chest level, your body slightly turning to the left. You are in a left
crossed stance [left foot and right hand forward]. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 16:

Remarks on the technique:

I take advantage of the opponents attack by using my elbow to cut away his technique and sending out my right
fist in a direct attack to his heart, giving him no time to assess what is happening, rendering me the one carrying
out the winning strategy.

Part 3: Song [for Sections 5-8]




Binding fist and snapping kick, then right threading palm.
Left threading palm, then turn around and stomp down full.
Lifting kick with double spreading, then double cannon kick.
Execute triple palm strikes, starting with the right.
Turn around to prop and hit, attacking his heart.
Press down for a planting punch, then hands spread apart to return in front.
Kick into a cross shape, then do a snapping kick.
Palm strikes go out with left and right steps to adapt to the situation.

SECTION 5 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 17

Name of the technique:

BINDING FIST, SNAPPING KICK

Function:

This is for simultaneous attack and defense.

Explanation of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right fist turns over so the wrist is downward and the center of the hand is
facing up, the upper arm touching your left [right] ribs. At the same time, your right leg lifts and does a level kick
to the west. Going along with the kick, your body slightly turns to the left. Your whole body is standing upright,
your left arm still raised. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 17:

Remarks on the technique:

The binding fist is for defending against the opponent and the kicking leg is for striking him. However, the use of
the kick should comply with the intention of visible punch, invisible kick, and not just be a mechanical
movement. It must be lively and very springy, catching him off guard, and then the use of it will be appropriate,
otherwise you will surely be under his control. Be very careful of this.

Posture 18

Name of the technique:

RIGHT THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for dealing with the opponent by chasing and striking.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right leg comes down, your left foot crowds toward it with a half step
forward, then your right foot takes a further step out to the southwest. At the same time, your right fist changes to
a palm, the wrist turning over in a small inward-coiling circle, and threads out to the southwest. Your whole body
goes along with the posture, making an open-step upright stance. Your body is squared to the southeast. Your
right [left] arm has not moved. Your gaze is to the southwest. See photo 19 [18]:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent pretends to retreat, I then step rapidly, chasing him with a palm strike to see what he will do.
Once I observe his actions, I then settle upon the strategy that will give me control over him.

Posture 19

Name of the technique:

LEFT THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for continuing to press the attack.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left foot steps out to the southwest, your right foot goes forward a half
step, and your left foot again steps out to the southwest. At the same time, your left fist gathers in toward your
chest, changing to a palm, goes along the top of your left [right] arm, and threads diagonally upward to the
southwest, your whole body going along with the technique by putting you in an open-step upright stance. Your
body is squared to the northwest. Your right palm stays close to your chest, fingertips upward. Your gaze is still to
the southwest. See photo 19:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent again tries to take me by surprise by feigning retreat, I again extend a hand, but I must be walking
in to follow him back. Rather than wait for how he will adjust, I crowd his body to give him nowhere to escape to.

Posture 20

Name of the technique:

STOMPING STEP, THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for dealing with an opponent by changing strategy.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right foot steps out to the southwest, your whole body turning around to
the left rear, your left foot lifts and stomps, your hips sinking, and you are squatting down with your feet together.
At the same time, your right palm threads out and coils a full circle from the upper left while your left arm blocks
downward from the upper left, your wrists crossed, fingertips upward at shoulder level, going along with your
bodys sinking by pulling in downward in front of your chest. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out.
Your body is squared to the northeast, your gaze forward and level. See photo 20:

Remarks on the technique:

Having captured the opponent, I suddenly turn around, taking advantage of the situation by locking up his hand
and fiercely dropping down, lifting my leg and stomping the top of his foot.

SECTION 6 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 21

Name of the technique:

LIFTING KICK, DOUBLE SPREADING

Function:

This is for defending above while attacking below.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a half step to the northeast and your right foot lifts and
kicks forward. At the same time, your arms go upward and spread apart to the sides to form a semicircle. Your
body is squared to the northeast, your gaze level to the northeast. See photo 21:

Remarks on the technique:

If an opponent covers himself downward, I then send my hands upward and spread them apart, taking advantage
of the opportunity to send a kick to his lower body. This is the correct way to use this technique, but if you try to
apply it before you have the knack of it, you will end up under the opponents control. Take note of this point.

Posture 22

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE CANNON KICK

Function:

This is for offensive pursuit.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, with your arms not moving, your right foot comes down and you quickly take
three large steps to the northeast [the first being your right foot coming down, then left, right], your left foot lifts,
and your right foot immediately goes upward with a snapping kick to the northeast. At the same time [as the
double kick], your arms go forward from above, raised level, then withdraw in front of your chest, palms facing
each other, fingers diagonally forward. Your chest is sticking out, your gaze to the northeast. See photo 22:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent jumps away, I chase him and attack, my hands capturing in front while I suddenly attack his belly
with snapping kicks. The substance of this technique of pursuit comes down to the craftiness and surprise of the
kicking attack.

Posture 23

Name of the technique:

RIGHT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for tripping below and striking above.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right foot comes down to the northeast, the knee bends, and your left leg
straightens, making a right bow stance. At the same time, your right palm slices diagonally downward to the
northeast, your left palm withdrawing to your waist [as a fist according to the photo], and your upper body going
along with the technique by slightly leaning forward. Your gaze is to your palm. See photo 23:

Remarks on the technique:

When my right foot comes down, it hooks around and trips up the opponents leg. By adding my right palm
pushing forward, he is made to lose his balance, and thus I am victorious.

Posture 24

Name of the technique:

LEFT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for continuous palm striking.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your stance does not change, but your right palm withdraws to your waist
while your left palm goes out to the northeast, fingertips forward, your body going along with the technique by
slightly turning to the left [right]. Your gaze is again to the palm. See photo 24:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique connects with the previous technique: if one strike misses, the next strike will succeed. As the
palms extend and recoil, they must be rapid and unhindered, no hesitation at all. Its success or failure depends
upon its quality of instantaneousness: How did you do that so fast?

SECTION 7 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 25

Name of the technique:

RIGHT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This continues the palm strikes with a third strike.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your stance does not change, but your left palm withdraws to your waist while
your right palm again slices to the northeast, your body going along with the palm by turning slightly to the right
[left]. Your gaze remains forward. See photo 25:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique of a single attack continues into a third strike, causing the opponent to not understand what I am
doing, which is why it is called skill.

Posture 26

Name of the technique:

TURN AROUND, PROP & HIT

Function:

This is for changing direction.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your body turns to the left rear to be squared to the southwest, your feet not
changing their location but the toes turning to point to the northwest, your left knee bending, right leg
straightening, making a bow stance. At the same time, your left arm goes forward from below, propping upward,
as your right palm grasps into a fist and does a level thrust punch to the southwest. You are in a left crossed stance
[left foot and right hand forward]. Your gaze is to the southwest. See photo 26:

Remarks on the technique:

If an opponent suddenly attacks my upper body from behind, I turn around and use my [left] arm to prop it up,
my left [right] fist taking advantage of the opportunity in that moment to strike to his heart. Hand, eye, body, and
step must be coordinated, arriving in unison, in order for this to be at all successful.

Posture 27

Name of the technique:

PRESSING PALM, PLANTING PUNCH

Function:

This is for simultaneous attack and defense.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right foot steps out to the southwest in front of your left foot, making an
overlapping stance. At the same time, your left palm presses down from above to be in front of your belly, your
right fist withdrawing to your waist then going over your left arm to plant downward to the southwest. Your gaze
is to your fist. See photo 27:

Remarks on the technique:

The opponent takes advantage of an opportunity to strike to my ribs, so I quickly use my [left] palm to press it
down, then send my right fist downward with a planting punch to his belly, stepping in to crowd him and render
him less maneuverable, making opportunity mine.

Posture 28

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE SPREADING, SHEATHING STEP

Function:

This is for preventing your lower body from being attacked.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your left foot steps out to the southwest, your right foot follows with a
sheathing step behind your right [left] foot so your legs are overlapping in a sitting stance. At the same time, your
right fist becomes a palm, both arms raise high, spread apart to the sides, and circle fully so that they come
together in front of your belly, palms upward. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to
the southwest. See photo 28:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent attacks my head, I use double spreading hands to defend against it, then do a sheathing step to
reinforce my lower body, storing power with which to prepare my counterattack [in the following technique].

SECTION 8 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 29

Name of the technique:

CROSS-SHAPED KICK

Function:

This is for taking advantage of an opportunity to attack the opponent from the side.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your body slightly leans to the right as your left foot lifts and does a side kick to
the left. At the same time, your arms spread apart to the sides, bracing open like a bird spreading its wings, your
right arm raised to be level with your left foot, left arm slightly higher and with its fingers forward. Your gaze is to
the west, your body squared to the northwest. See photo 29:

Remarks on the technique:

Closing on the opponent, I use both arms to brace open and parry away his incoming hands, taking advantage of
the opportunity to do a side kick to his waist or ribs.

Posture 30

Name of the technique:

WRAPPING ELBOWS, SNAPPING KICK

Function:

This is for continuing the kicking attack.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your left foot comes down, then your right foot lifts, your body turning to the
northwest [southwest], and kicks. At the same time, your palms grasp into fists and quickly withdraw, elbows
wrapping in. Your body is squared to the south [southwest]. Your left leg stands straight. Your chest is opened up
and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the southwest. See photo 30:

Remarks on the technique:

If my last kick misses, I quickly capture the opponents hand and draw it in toward my chest while kicking with
my right leg to his lower body, overcoming him by raising my foot to catch his groin.

Posture 31

Name of the technique:

RIGHT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for taking advantage of an opportunity to destroy the opponent if he loses his balance because of the
previous technique.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right leg comes down to the northwest [southwest] and the knee bends,
making a right bow stance. At the same time, your right fist becomes a palm, braces forward, fingers upward,
striking the opponent with the palm edge, arm slightly bent. Your body slightly leans forward. Your gaze is to your
palm. See photo 31:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous technique, if I feel the opponent is not toppling dramatically enough, I use a palm
strike to help send him away quicker. Although there is a palm strike, it must be coordinated with the step for it to
be effective.

Posture 32

Name of the technique:

LEFT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for turning the attack into continuous palm strikes, right then left.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your left foot steps out to the northwest and the knee bends, making a left bow
stance. At the same time, your right fist [palm according to the photo] withdraws to your waist, elbow wrapped in,
while your left fist becomes a palm and goes out with your left step. Your gaze is to the palm. Your body slightly
leans forward. See photo 32:

Remarks on the technique:

The purpose of the left palm strike following upon the right palm strike is that if the opponent has not yet toppled
and is still capable of struggling, I now add another and more decisive strike to make him finally fall.

Part 4: Song [for Sections 9-13]






Capture and chop with right hand and left.
Leap into a sheathing step, then a kick lifts up.
Perform double-hand follow-step pushes, starting with the right.
Pushing left and right, the effect is extraordinary.
[Retreat with a hanging punch to defend against his technique.
Perform carrying punches, stepping the same on both sides.]
Send out a palm, then thread through with the other.
Facing him, follow with a kick.
Flying hand and raising palm, then capture and chop.
Do a kick, a thrust punch, then a raising palm in a golden rooster stance.
First catch then insert, then turn around to capture.
To do a jabbing palm, a thrusting punch creates the best opportunity.

SECTION 9 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 33

Name of the technique:

LEFT [RIGHT] CAPTURING, LEFT CHOPPING

Function:

This is for dealing with an opponent by capturing and chopping.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your upper body turns around to the right rear, your right hand circling
outward, performing a capturing maneuver, then grasps into a fist at your waist. At the same time, your left foot
lifts and takes a large step to the northeast, the leg extending and flattening downward, your right leg bending and
lowering, while your left palm chops down, parallel with your left leg, almost to the ground, the palm facing to the
southeast. The weight of your body is on your right foot and is squared to the northeast. Your gaze is level. See
photo 33:

Remarks on the technique:

If an opponent attacks me from behind, I turn around, capture his hand, then strike him with a chop, too
suddenly for him to deal with, and thereby gain control over his fate. However, when turning around, the hips
must be nimble and springy for the turn to be done smoothly and for the technique to be at all effective.

Posture 34

Name of the technique:

LEAP, SHEATHING STEP

Function:

This is for overcoming an opponent by capturing with both hands.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right foot stepping out to the northeast, your body leaps, your left foot
stepping through with a sheathing step behind your right foot, and both knees bend to make a sitting twisted
stance. At the same time, your left [right] hand circles outward to be below your navel, palm upward, fingers
slightly bent, as your right [left] hand circles inward to be below your solar plexus, palm downward, fingers
slightly bent, the palms facing each other. Your chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your head is turned
to the right, your gaze to the northeast [although turning to the left to gaze northwest in the photo], body squared
to the northwest. See photo 34:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent withdraws his body to then counterattack, I leap into a sheathing step to destroy his technique,
my hands capturing his arm, making it too difficult for him to get away from the force of my technique.

Posture 35

Name of the technique:

LIFTING KICK

Function:

This is for restraining the opponent and kicking him while he tries to escape.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left leg stands straight as your right foot lifts and snaps out with a toe
kick to the northeast, your palms still as before. Your whole body is standing straight. Your gaze is to the
northeast. See photo 35:

Remarks on the technique:

The opponent wishes to escape, so I go along with his energy by kicking to the middle of his body.

Posture 36

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE RIGHT

Function:

This [with the following two techniques] is for pushing in all directions to create a way out from a group of
surrounding opponents.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right foot comes down and your left foot does a follow step forward to the
northeast, toes touching down, right knee bent, making a left shivering chicken stance. At the same time, your
arms send out your palms pushing together to the north [northeast], the palms facing outward, your right arm
somewhat more forward than your left. Your body is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to the
north [northeast]. See photo 36:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique gets rid of a whole group. Or to continue from the previous technique, it helps topple the opponent
if he has not yet fallen.

SECTION 10 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 37

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE LEFT

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous technique by echoing the double-hand push.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left foot steps out to the south [southwest], your right foot follows, toes
touching down, making a right shivering chicken stance. At the same time, your palms withdraw in front of your
chest then push together to the southeast [southwest], your left arm somewhat more forward than your right, the
palms facing outward. Your chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the south [southwest].
See photo 37:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is for dealing with a crowd of surrounding opponents. However, when pushing with your palms,
your arms must have a capacity to extend and contract in order to give you a degree of leeway. If you are not on
target, do not issue. When you issue, you must be on target to keep from being controlled by your opponents.

Posture 38

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE-HAND PUSH TO THE RIGHT

Function:

This is for building upon the previous two techniques to make a continuous attack against opponents.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right foot steps out to the northwest, your left foot follows, toes touching
down, making a left shivering chicken stance. At the same time, your palms withdraw in front of your chest then
push together to the northwest, your right arm somewhat more forward than your left, the palms facing outward.
Your chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the northwest. See photo 39 [38] [The photo is
unfortunately a repeat of 36 which shows the posture directed to the northeast. There should instead be a
different photo showing the same posture turned ninety degrees to the left.]:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is for when you are surrounded by opponents on all sides, continuing as push followed by push for
a total of three pushing attacks, opening up three pathways along which you can fight.

Posture 39

Name of the technique:

WITHDRAWING STEP, HANGING PUNCH

Function:

This is for when an opponent takes advantage of an opportunity to attack, at which point I retreat and put out a
hanging punch to prevent it.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left foot withdraws a step to the southeast and your right follows your
left foots retreat, toes touching down, making a T-shape sitting tiger stance. At the same time, your palms grasp
into fists, your left hand drawing back to your waist, elbow wrapped in, while your right fist turns over so the wrist
is upward and does a hanging punch [hanging in the sense of hanging something up rather than drooping down]
to nose level, the elbow bent and pointing down to your right knee, in line with the toes. Your body goes along
with the posture by squaring to the southwest, your head turned to the right, your gaze to the northwest. Your
chest is opened up and your torso is upright. See photo 39:

Remarks on the technique:

I defend against an opponent by evading my body to prevent his attack, hanging up my elbow to resist it and
thereby get a better observation of what is coming, then await the opportunity to counter.

Posture 40

Name of the technique:

STEP FORWARD, RIGHT CARRYING PUNCH

Function:

This is for sharply thrusting through to destroy the opponent.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right foot steps forward to the northwest and the knee bends, making a
right bow stance. At the same time, your right fist goes forward and upward with a carrying punch until higher
than your headtop, your left fist still with its elbow wrapped back. Your gaze is to the northwest. See photo 40:

Remarks on the technique:

This is for charging in, my right arm carrying away the opponents incoming fist, then advancing with my body
and step like a bears arm pressing forward. My body pressing in close toward his, he is made to lose his will for
attack or defense, leaving me with the successful tactic.

SECTION 11 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 41

Name of the technique:

STEP FORWARD, LEFT CARRYING PUNCH

Function:

This is for continuing the previous techniques bold advance upon the opponent.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right foot steps out to the northwest and the knee bends, making a left
bow stance. At the same time, your right fist withdraws, elbow wrapped in, and your left fist does a carrying punch
forward and upward until higher than your headtop, your body going along with the technique by turning to the
left [right]. Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the northwest. See photo 41:

Remarks on the technique:

This continues my fierce advance pressing in toward the opponent. I absorb the power of rivers and mountains
[smashing him aside with an avalanche, washing him away with a flash flood], making him not dare to even look
me in the eye and contend against my aggressive spirit.

Posture 42

Name of the technique:

RIGHT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for continuing to press in against the opponent, this time with a palm strike.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right foot again steps out to the northwest, to trip up the opponents leg,
and the knee bends, making a right bow stance. At the same time, your left fist withdraws, elbow wrapped in, and
your right fist becomes a palm, bracing out to the middle of the opponents body, your body going along with the
technique by turning to the right [left]. Your gaze is to the northwest. See photo 43 [42]:

Remarks on the technique:

This continues from the previous techniques forward pressure, taking the opponent by surprise with a palm strike
to the middle of his body while tripping up his footing with my step, causing him to lose his balance.

Posture 43

Name of the technique:

RETREAT, THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for switching things up.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right foot retreats a large step and the leg straightens, making a left bow
stance. At the same time, your left fist becomes a palm and threads out to the northwest over your right palm,
fingers pointing diagonally upward, as your right palm withdraws below your left armpit, palm downward. Your
gaze is to your [left] palm. See photo 43:

Remarks on the technique:

In this technique, I use a palm to respond to the opponent while turning my body and retreating a step, engaging
the enemy with a change of strategy. Transforming from one technique to another is the most important skill. Pay
attention to the nimbleness of your hips. If your hips are nimble, your body will be lively and your step stable. No
matter what direction attacks comes from above, below, front, rear, left, right you will thus give yourself time
to deal with them rather than be in the predicament of having too much to do at once.

Posture 44

Name of the technique:

THREADING PALM, KICK TO THE FACE

Function:

This is for turning around with hooking and hanging, taking advantage of the opportunity to perform a kicking
maneuver.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your body turns to the right rear, your left foot takes a large step out to the
southeast, and your right foot lifts and does a high kick to the southeast. At the same time, your left arm sends its
palm from above in the rear, making a circle that passes in front of your forehead then hooking downward until
beside your waist [grasped into a fist], while your right palm goes from beside your waist to hang upward then
come down to slap the back of your right foot. Your left leg is standing straight but with the knee slightly bent.
Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. Your body is squared to the southeast, your gaze forward and
level. The photo shows the moment when the right palm is hanging up and the right leg is about to kick, palm
about to slap the top of the foot. See photo 44:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique hooks and pulls in while hanging up a palm, then kicks to the opponents face. In the practice of
boxing arts, there is shape striking shape, not shape striking shadow. Within your mind, there has to be an
imagined opponent. Skillful victory is not really about success through sinew, but is actually a matter of winning
through wisdom.

SECTION 12 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 45

Name of the technique:

FLYING HAND, RAISING PALM

Function:

This is a method of spreading the clouds to see the sun defending against the opponent by taking advantage of
a gap through which to attack.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right foot comes down to the southeast and your left foot then takes a half
step forward, toes touching down, both knees bending, making a sitting tiger stance. At the same time, your right
palm flies up from below in front and spreads away to the right rear, fingertips at ear level, while your left palm
goes from your waist, passing along your hip, going forward and upward as a raising palm, fingers at shoulder
level, elbow pointing downward toward your left knee. Your torso is upright and your chest is opened up. Your
gaze is to your palm, body squared to the northeast. See photo 45:

Remarks on the technique:

As I use my right hand to deflect and left hand to raise up, my body turns sideways to leave room in front,
inducing the opponent to approach me so I can then seize the opportunity to capture him [in the following
technique].

Posture 46

Name of the technique:

LEFT CAPTURING, RIGHT CHOPPING

Function:

This is for capturing with the front hand and chopping with the rear hand.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a half step to the southeast and the knee bends, making a
left bow stance. At the same time, your left palm turns over so the wrist is upward, then captures and is grasped
into a fist beside your waist, while your right palm becomes a fist and chops forward, the center of the fist facing
upward, upper arm touching your right ribs. You are in a left crossed stance [left foot and right hand forward].
Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to the southeast. See photo 46:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous technique, your left raising palm now captures the opponents hand and your right
deflecting palm now comes downward as a backfist, a fake technique switching to a real technique.

Posture 47

Name of the technique:

SNAPPING KICK

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous technique by attacking the opponent with a snapping kick.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right foot lifts and does a level kick to the southeast, your left leg
straightening, your body slightly turning to the left. Your upper body and arms have not moved. Your body is
squared to the east, head turned to the right, your gaze to the southeast. See photo 47:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous technique of capture and chop, if the opponent dodges or blocks, I then take
advantage of the opportunity to kick to his lower body.

Posture 48

Name of the technique:

THRUST PUNCH, RAISING PALM

Function:

This is for striking the opponent with a thrust punch

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right leg comes down to the east [southeast] and stands straight, your left
leg lifts so the lower leg is hanging down, while your right fist thrusts out to the southeast. Your gaze is to your fist.
Then turn around [to the left] to face to the northwest, your left fist becoming a palm and hanging down from
beside your waist, moving along the outside of your left leg and raising forward [with your left leg also raising],
while your right fist withdraws to your waist, elbow wrapped in. Your gaze is to the west [northwest]. See photo
48:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is a feint [Shout to the east, but strike to the west.]. However, when turning around, your body
must go along with your eyes as they observe for opponents wherever they may be moving. You must never ignore
opponents for an instant, and thereby your boxing art will already be halfway realized.

SECTION 13 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 49

Name of the technique:

CATCHING, INSERTION PUNCH

Function:

This is for catching an opponent and sealing him off.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left foot comes down to the northwest, toes swung out to point to the
north [south], your body rolling to the left, and your right foot follows, stomping down beside your left foot, hips
sinking down, both knees bent to make a ninety degree angle. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out.
Your body is squared to the north [south], your gaze to the west. At the same time, your right [left] palm goes
along with the initial movement of your left foot by turning inward with a catching action, while your right fist
rushes upward until at shoulder level, then does an insertion punch when your right leg stomps downward, your
left palm guarding in front of your right shoulder, palm downward, lower arm bent in, level in front of your chest.
See photo 49:

Remarks on the technique:

This continues from the previous technique. Once I have raised my left palm, I quickly turn my wrist to catch the
opponents hand, then my right arm comes out with a downward punch to embrace his arm, which seals off his
body, though the major effect is achieved by stomping on his foot.

Posture 50

Name of the technique:

TURN AROUND, CAPTURE

Function:

This is for turning around and capturing.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your whole body spins around to the left rear, your left foot takes a large step
out to the west, and your right knee bends, making a left reverse bow stance. At the same time, your left arm
extends with an inserting palm in a manner of wanting to capture, fingertips pointing to the west, as your right fist
withdraws, elbow wrapped in. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 50:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique stores up power for the next, and they are really one continuous energy rather than two
techniques. Understand that they are divided into two simply to make it easier to teach when guiding a group.

Posture 51

Name of the technique:

RIGHT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous capturing technique by attacking with a punch.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left leg bends and your right leg straightens, making a left bow stance.
At the same time, your left palm becomes a fist and withdraws to your waist, elbow wrapped in, while your right
fist does a level thrust punch to the west. You are in a crossed stance [left foot and right hand forward]. Your chest
is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 51:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is a matter of a real technique [the following finger jab] coming from a feint [this punch], a
preparation for the next posture. This enables you in your training to constantly grasp the changes of opportunity,
and train for the using of fake and real techniques, straightforward and surprise techniques. When an opponent
attacks in an unorthodox way, I respond in a straightforward way [in order to take him by surprise]. This renders
the opponent unable to figure out whether my responses are going to be feints or real, putting me successfully in
charge of the situation. If you get stuck in fixed methods, the applicability of the art will be limited.

Posture 52

Name of the technique:

TURN AROUND, INSERTING PALM

Function:

This is for turning around and jabbing.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your feet stay where they are, but your left leg straightens and your right leg
bends, making a right bow stance. At the same time, your right fist withdraws, becoming a palm which then does a
level jab to the east, palm facing downward, your left fist remaining at your waist, elbow wrapped in. Your body
goes along with the palm technique by turning to the right. Your gaze is to the east. See photo 52:

Remarks on the technique:

The strike to the west was a feint, the real technique being the response to the east. The punch is straightforward
while the palm strike is a surprise. This is the way of change in boxing arts.

Part 5: Song [for Sections 14-18]





A leg flattens, a punch thrusts out and draws back in.
Turning around, a leg flattens and a palm spreads forcefully.
Double wind through the ears starts by delivering a kick.
Attack his heart with an elbow, then give a back-handed slap to his face.
When the left leg kicks, a palm also shoots out.
Palms then thread to the opponents throat, right then left.
Palms then extend with steps, right then left, to press another opponent.
Hands fly, turn around, and a threading palm is sent out.
The crossed hands continue into the wiping palm.
With double punches and wrapping elbows, the set comes to a rest.

SECTION 14 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 53

Name of the technique:

SHEATHING STEP, FLATTENED LEG

Function:

This is for turning around and chopping.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left foot passes in front of your right foot and takes a large step to the east,
then your right foot takes a half step to the east behind your left foot, making an overlapping stance. The toes of
both feet now spin around to the right and your left foot again takes a large step out to the east, the leg extends
and flattens out, and your right knee bends to make a left reverse bow stance. At the same time, your left fist
becomes a palm and threads out straight along your right arm, then goes along with your body as it spins around
to the right, your right palm going along upward, then drawing back in front of your chest and beside your waist,
elbow wrapped in, your left arm now extending with your left leg, chopping down to the east, arm parallel with the
leg. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to the east. See photo 53:

Remarks on the technique:

With every step, I am steadily advancing. With my sheathing step, I am stealing ground to get behind the
opponent, then when I spin to do a chop, I turn around like a snake slithering through the grass, spinning like the
wind, dancing with a display of so much transformation that he is too overwhelmed to do anything to me.

Posture 54

Name of the technique:

RIGHT THRUST PUNCH

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous technique by taking advantage of an opening for attack.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your feet stay where they are, but your left knee bends and your right leg
straightens, making a left bow stance. At the same time, your left palm withdraws, grasped into a fist at your
waist, elbow wrapped in, while your right fist leaves your waist with a level thrust punch to the east. You are in a
[left] crossed stance [left foot and right hand forward]. Your gaze is to the east. See photo 54:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous action, switch from a feinting maneuver to a real technique, taking him by surprise
with straightforwardness as you strike with your right fist, a very straightforward technique.

Posture 55

Name of the technique:

SHEATHING STEP, WITHDRAWING FIST

Function:

This is for gathering yourself in to await developments.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left foot withdraws in a sheathing step behind your lower right leg, your
legs overlapping, both knees bent, making a sitting twisted stance. At the same time, your left fist becomes a palm
and goes along under your right arm as your right fist withdraws to your waist, elbow wrapped in, left palm
passing in front of your body and propping upward, palm facing to the east [south], your upper body putting all its
energy into turning to the left [right]. Your chest is squared to the west [south], your gaze level to the west. Your
chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. See photo 55:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is one of sitting down to observe developments, of awaiting the opportunity to act, of overcoming
movement with stillness.

Posture 56

Name of the technique:

FLATTENED LEG, CHOPPING PALM

Function:

This is for turning around to spread and hit.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your toes spin around to the left rear, your left [right] leg straightens, then
takes a large step to the west and flattens out, your left knee bending, making a left reverse bow stance. At the
same time, your left palm goes to the left rear in a capturing manner, then withdraws to guard in front of your
right shoulder, while your right fist changes to a palm, goes upward, and chops downward to the west. Your body
is supported on your left foot. Your chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your head is raised, your gaze to
the west. See photo 56:

Remarks on the technique:

Having propped up, I turn around underneath, then spread and hit. This is the skill of using a surprise technique
[the spin] to generate a straightforward one [the chop]. Long Boxing practitioners win by way of four terms: leap
to avoid, turn to evade. Repeatedly give them attention.

SECTION 15 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 57

Name of the technique:

DOUBLE WINDS THROUGH THE EARS

Function:

This is for attacking an opponents upper body by way of kicking to the middle of his body when he evades below
and then capitalizing on the adjustment he makes to it.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left leg lifts up, and before it comes down, your right foot does a kick to
the west. When your feet come down, your right knee bends and your left leg straightens, making a right bow
stance. At the same time, your right hand withdraws, grasping into a fist, then your arms go forward from the
sides, joining together with a strike, your left palm guarding at and touching the tigers mouth of your right fist,
your arms raised up until at shoulder level. Your chest is sticking out and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the
west. See photo 57:

Remarks on the technique:

First I kick to the middle of the opponents body, then punch to his upper body. Surprising him with a jumping
kick, there is nothing he can do, and then the straightforward technique follows upon it, victory brought about
through the surprise. [i.e. This punch to the head works because of the distracting kick.]

Posture 58

Name of the technique:

ELBOW TO THE HEART

Function:

This is an evasive elbow maneuver for when an opponents body is getting too close, which also stores up power to
attack him.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right leg straightens and your left knee bends, making a left reverse bow
stance, your right arm folds in toward your chest, then the elbow strikes out to the west, your left palm guarding
on top of your elbow, your body withdrawing to the left. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your
gaze is level to the west. See photo 58:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent resists against the previous technique and I am unable to escape from him sticking to me, I bend
in my forearm to inhibit him and store up power for what happens next.

Posture 59

Name of the technique:

PUSH DOWN, BACK-HANDED SLAP

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous technique of escaping from the opponent to now take advantage of the
opportunity to strike him with a back-handed slap.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your right leg bends and your left leg quickly straightens to shoot you
forward, your left palm touching your right elbow as your right arm turns over upward and chops downward to
the opponents face with the back of the hand, your left palm moving along the underside of your right arm. Your
gaze is to the west. See photo 59:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous technique, if the opponent uses a palm to resist against my elbow, I overcome him
by pushing down and seizing the opportunity to give him a back-handed slap to the face. The skillfulness of your
bodys sucking back and shooting out is no trifling thing, for by withdrawing you will be able to dodge without
having to leave your ground, no matter how severe his attack and regardless of your position, and you then need
only shoot your body forward and you will have more than enough for an assortment of punches and kicks. By
knocking away the opponents attack so he leans in slightly, you will hit the target, but otherwise it will be in vain.

Posture 60

Name of the technique:

RESPONDING WITH BOTH PALM & LEG

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous two techniques by continuing the attack upon his upper body to now
attack his middle and lower body.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right leg straightens and your left foot does a level kick to the west, your
body slightly turning to the right. At the same time, your left palm extends to the west parallel with your left leg,
your right palm withdrawing to guard in front of your chest [withdrawing to the waist in the photo]. Your gaze is
to the west. See photo 60:

Remarks on the technique:

If I miss with the previous technique, I continue by executing both a kick and a palm strike, simultaneously
attacking him above [below] and in the middle, causing him to have too much to deal with at once, ensuring that I
will get a way through.

SECTION 16 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 61

Name of the technique:

RIGHT PALM STRIKE

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous kicking technique by using a bracing and tripping method to defeat the
opponent.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your right leg lowers to trip up the opponents left foot, the knee bending to
make a left bow stance. At the same time, your right palm braces to the middle of the opponents body, putting
you in a left crossed stance [left foot and right hand forward], your left palm withdrawing to your waist. Your gaze
is to the west. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. See photo 61:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent has yet not fallen after being struck by me, I trip him up with my step while bracing against him
with a palm, causing him to quickly fall away.

Posture 62

Name of the technique:

THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for changing in accordance with the previous technique.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your stance does not change, but your left palm threads out over your right
palm, fingers upward, while your right palm becomes a fist and withdraws to your waist, elbow wrapped in. You
are in a left bow stance. Your chest is opened up and your torso is upright. Your gaze is to the west. See photo 62:

Remarks on the technique:

I continue from threading with my right palm by changing to my left palm.

Posture 63

Name of the technique:

RAISING PALM

Function:

This is for changing direction and preparing a pursuing strike.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your body turns to the right rear to be squared to the east [north], your right
foot withdraws a half step, toes touching down, making a T-shape sitting tiger stance. At the same time, your right
palm goes downward, raises forward and upward, again goes downward to again raise upward passing along the
outside of your right leg [i.e. your right hand makes a complete circle on your right side], fingers and shoulder
pointing toward each other, elbow and knee pointing toward each other, your left hand remaining raised to the
left rear. Your gaze is to the east. See photo 63:

Remarks on the technique:

This change of direction is a preparation to chase an opponent, and is also for me to observe his mind, thus I
adopt this defensive stance and wait for the moment to advance.

Posture 64

Name of the technique:

RESPONDING WITH A PALM

Function:

This is for pursuing an opponent while drawing in to strike.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your right foot steps out to the east, your left foot follows forward a half step,
and your right foot again takes a step forward. At the same time, your right palm withdraws in front of your chest,
then goes out forward to meet the opponent, your left palm remaining raised and unmoving. Your body is squared
to the south [north] and standing straight. Your gaze is to the east. See photo 64:

Remarks on the technique:

If the opponent steadily steps away, I steadily follow. If he retreats urgently, I chase him urgently, and if he
retreats leisurely, I chase him leisurely. The strategy of drawing in my palm is to see if he will counterattack and
also to prepare to strike.

SECTION 17 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 65

Name of the technique:

DRAWING OUT THE LEFT PALM

Function:

This is for continuing to pursue the opponent.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your left foot steps out to the east, your right follows forward a half step, and
your left foot advances another step. At the same time, your left palm gathers in to be in front of your chest [while
your right hand goes to your waist]. Your body is squared to the north [south] and standing straight. Your gaze is
to the east. See photo 65:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is linked to the movement of the previous technique. As your feet alternate advancing and
following in order to crowd the opponent, your body and step should strive for naturalness and must not manifest
any sluggishness, thereby conforming to the principle of whole-bodied coordination.

Posture 66

Name of the technique:

TURN AROUND, SEND UP CLOUDS

Function:

This is for turning around and spreading.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your feet stay in their location as you turn around to the right rear, your right
foot going a half step to the east, lifting and stomping down. At the same time, your right arm goes along with the
turning of your body by raising upward until level on the right side, fingers pointing to the east, palm facing to the
south [north], your left palm guarding in front of your right shoulder. Your knees are slightly bent. Your torso is
upright and your chest is sticking out. Your body is squared to the north, your gaze to the east. See photo 66:

Remarks on the technique:

I turn my body to escape a threat, taking advantage of the opportunity to also split through with my right palm.

Posture 67

Name of the technique:

THREADING PALM

Function:

This is for blocking down with the left hand and hanging up with the right.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your body stays the same, but your right palm coils a circle, going downward,
in front of your chest, and threading diagonally upward to the east, while your left arm coils a circle, going
outward to the lower left, upward, and ends up in front of your right shoulder, so that one palm threads to the
right while the other pushes down beside your ribs. Your body is standing straight, squared to the north, your gaze
level. See photo 68 [67]:

Remarks on the technique:

Continuing from the previous technique, I then intercept while coiling around to hang a palm up, guarding against
his attack to be prepared against all harm.

Posture 68

Name of the technique:

CROSS-SHAPED PALM STRIKES

Function:

This is for opening the door to face an opponent.

Description of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your left foot takes a large step to the west, the knee bends, and your right leg
straightens, making a left bow stance. At the same time, your right arm goes to the right side until raised level,
fingers upward, while your left palm spreads away to brace straight to the west, fingers upward. Your gaze is to
your left palm. See photo 68:

Remarks on the technique:

This technique is firstly to open the door to face the opponent, secondly to prepare for the end of the exercise.

SECTION 18 (1 2 3 4):

Posture 69

Name of the technique:

CROSSED HANDS

Function:

This is for capturing with both hands.

Description of the movement:

One! From the previous posture, your stance does not change, but your right palm goes downward and coils a
half circle to the west so that it and your left palm are crossing each other at the pulse area, fingers diagonally
upward. Your gaze is to the west. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. See photo 69:

Remarks on the technique:

This posture draws the set to a close, reining in the work you have put into all the previous postures, causing the
blood circulation throughout your body to gradually resume its original condition by bringing the set to a halt
before it turns into strenuous exercise. The influence of this upon your health is not small. Boxing sets usually go
from beginning to end by going from simplicity to complexity as a way to build you up in mind and body.
Concluding the set then takes your strenuousness to mildness so that your mind and body will easily recover from
the fatigue.

Posture 70

Name of the technique:

WIPING PALM

Function:

This is for continuing from the previous technique of capturing with both hands.

Description of the movement:

Two! From the previous posture, your right knee bending, your left foot withdraws and goes out to the
northeast. Your thighs are together, left leg straight, belly sucked back, making an empty stance. At the same time,
your hands turn over their wrists and draw in toward your chest, your left palm then becomes a fist at your waist,
elbow wrapped in, while your right palm goes downward, wiping along your left leg until to the back of the foot,
your upper body going along the palm by leaning over, then goes forward and raises up high. Your gaze is level
and settled. See photo 70:

Remarks on the technique:

This posture brings the set to an end, harmonizing the movements, and is a final display of bravado.

Posture 71

Name of the technique:

RETREAT WITH DOUBLE PUNCHES

Function:

This is for bringing the set to a conclusion.

Description of the movement:

Three! From the previous posture, your left foot retreats a step to the south and your right foot follows by
retreating so that both feet are standing next to each other. At the same time, your left fist becomes a palm and
extends forward while your right palm turns over coming downward so that both palms meet in front of your
chest, palms facing upward. Then they spread apart to the sides, passing by your waist, and again go forward,
making complete circles ending up again in front of your chest, and once your palms meet, they have become fists,
tigers mouths facing each other, pulses facing downward. Your whole body stands straight, your gaze level to the
north. See photo 71:

Remarks on the technique:

This posture concludes the exercise for your limbs and muscles, causing your heartbeat and blood circulation to
relax and resume their normal working condition.

Posture 72

Name of the technique:

WRAPPING ELBOWS

Function:

This is for returning to your original state.

Explanation of the movement:

Four! From the previous posture, your body does not move, but your forearms turn over and withdraw to the
rear, your elbows wrapped in beside your waist. Your torso is upright and your chest is sticking out. Your gaze is to
the north. See photo 72:

Note:

Upon completing this posture, your hands hang down, returning you to standing at attention.
-
-
-
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Brennan Translation
The Twenty Ten Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Centres d'intérêt liés