Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 36

Passive Optical Network Design

- Design and Cost Considerations


Patricia Alsina
J anuary 29, 2014
Telecom Commercial Operations 2013 Corning Incorporated 2
Agenda
PON Design Objectives
Review of Architectures
Design and Cost Considerations
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 3
PON Design Objectives
A future-proofed OSP network
Easily configure subscriber driven changes
Ability to adjust split ratios or offer dedicated fibers
Scale network to take rates
Minimize initial capital investment
Understand the cost components of the system for both CAPEX and
OPEX
Ability to defer costs until revenue is generated
Will cookie cutter design approach work
Minimize installation cost and complexity
Understand installation cost drivers
available labor, skill levels, equipment
Understand deployment speed requirements
Telecom Commercial Operations 2013 Corning Incorporated 4
Central Switch Homerun (CSH)
1x32 splitter
Telecom Commercial Operations 2013 Corning Incorporated 5
Local Convergence (LC)
1x32 splitter
Telecom Commercial Operations 2013 Corning Incorporated 6
Distributed Splitting (DS)
1x4 splitter
1x4 splitter
1x4 splitter
1x8 splitter
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 7
Cost Components to Consider
Product costs
Cable install methods
Aerial, buried, duct
Lash, self-support, trench, plow, bore, pull
Existing duct or new
Splicing
Set-up charges
Per splice charges
Product placements
On pad, pole, strand, vault, pedestal
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 8
Additional Cost Components
Time to install / deploy
Product deferment
Labor skill levels and availability
Labor charge structures ($ per foot vs. $ per job)
Product purchasing and inventory
Physical storage space
Part number management
Development of design
Development and documentation of splice plans
Testing requirements
Specialized equipment requirements
Splicing, testing
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 9
Typical FTTH Network
CSC
LCP
NAP
ONT - NID
(LC)
(CSH)
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 10
Overview of Design Process Steps
Work from homes to CSC
1. Determine NAP groupings
2. Bring NAPs together by determining splice points
3. Decide on optimum cable paths to link splice points
4. Bring cables to convergence point(s)
5. Select convergence products(s)
6. Determine feeder cable size and path
7. Provide hardware for CSC
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 11
Design Considerations NAP Placement
Product selection will drive ability to defer drops
Drops spliced at NAP
Splice in 100% and store
Splice in as needed
Drop connectorized at NAP
Easier to defer product until service request
Drops placement decisions will drive NAP placement decisions
Crossing street vs. same side of street
Lot front distances
Street front vs. backlot
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 12
Drop Length Impact (crossing vs. same side of street)
300-ft of drop cable
Length difference
= 50-ft
350-ft of drop cable
2850-ft of drop cable
1800-ft of drop cable
Length difference
= 1050-ft
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 13
Lot Front Distances
Larger lot fronts require longer drops
Cost of longer drops and to install drops might outweigh savings
gained from larger NAP size
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 14
Street front vs. back lot
Street front
Back lot
Aerial
More prevalent
in Greenfield
Easy to defer drops
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 15
Sample Design NAP Placement
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 16
Cable Access Points One Side of Street
4 splices 4 splices 4 splices
12 splices
Considerations:
Balance installation cost and time required to install three splice points
versus additional cost to install multiport tails
More splice points may become advantageous as length of multiport tail
increases
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 17
Pre-terminated Cable
Replaces splice points with factory installed tap
Allows deferment of multiport
4-F tap 4-F tap 4-F tap
12-F tap
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 18
Cable Access Points Both Sides of Street
Three Scenarios
Access cable at each NAP
Cable on both sides of street
Multiple splice points
One street crossing
Access cable and cross street
Cable on single side of street
Reduced splice points
More street crossings
Access cable at one point
Cable on single side of street
Minimum splice points
One street crossing
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 19
Cable Access Points - Side Streets
Place access point at existing NAP
Multiple options for serving side streets
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 20
Side Street NAP Options
Cable - Multiple Splice Points Cable Single Splice Point
24
6
6
6
6
24
24
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 21
Side Street NAP Options
Standard Multiports
24
Multiports in Series
24
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 22
Side Street Pre-Terminated Cable NAP Options
Multiports in Series
Two 12-F taps
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 23
Sample Design Multiport Tails and Splice Points
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 24
Cable Placement
Connect the dots cable access points
When possible, identify accessible ducts or strand prior to design
Identify main cable paths and use multiports when possible to
serve side streets
May need several design iterations to find optimum cable paths
Balance or optimize fiber counts
Adjust access points as necessary
Utilize street crossings for both cables and multiport tails
Upsize cable counts with spare fiber
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 25
Cable Placement Branch Splicing from Main Cable
LCP
72-F cable
48-F cable
96-F cable
Need 288 fibers
288-F cable
72
48
96
Need 72 fibers
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 26
Cable Placement Using Multiple Cables
LCP
72-F cable
48-F cable
96-F cable
48
Need 72 fibers
144-F cable (120 fibers needed)
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 27
Changing Cable Counts
In long length of cable(s), when to splice in smaller fiber count
versus keeping larger count running
When extra cost of higher count cable is less than splice point
cost, it is better to keep higher count cable going
LCP
288-F cable
144-F cable
2000-ft
132 fibers
to be utilized
In cable
Splice point
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 28
Cable Fiber Count Selection Downsizing Fiber Counts
Keep higher count cable going when
(Chigh Clow) x L < (N x Csplice) + S
Where Chigh = per foot cost of high count cable
Clow = per foot cost of lower count cable
L = length of low count cable path in feet
N = number of splices required for low count cable
Csplice =cost per splice
S = any applicable splice set-up charge
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 29
Cable Fiber Count Selection Downsizing Fiber Counts
Model costs:
288-F cable - $2.60 / ft
144-F cable - $1.50 / ft
Per splice - $35
Splice setup - $150
Example
Cable cost Splice cost
($2.60-$1.50) x 2000 ($35 x 132) +$150
= $2200 = $4770
Splice cost is greater than additional cable cost
=> keep large cable count running
288-F cable
144-F cable
2000-ft
132 fibers
to be utilized
In cable
Splice point
Telecom Commercial Operations 2013 Corning Incorporated 30
Cable Fiber Count Selection Downsizing Fiber Counts
Model costs:
288-F cable - $2.60 / ft
144-F cable - $1.50 / ft
72-F cable - $0.80 / ft
24-F cable - $0.60 / ft
Per splice - $35
Splice setup - $150
288-F cable
72-F cable
1700-ft
24-F cable
1500-ft
66 splices
22 splices
B
C
LCP
Example - Splice point B
Cable cost Splice cost
($2.60-$0.80) x 1700 < ($35 x 66) +$150
= $3060 = $2460
Additional cable cost is greater
=> splice in smaller count cable
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 31
Sample Design - Cable Paths
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 32
Convergence Point
Local Convergence, Distributed Split architectures
Splitter management in field
Typical sizes range from 72 to 432 subscriber groupings
May be up to 864 for very dense neighborhoods
Feeder fiber count and access of importance for future growth
Fibers that bypass splitter for businesses, future cabinets
Included in cabinet or managed in splice closure
1x32 split now may need to be 1x16 split later
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 33
Sample Design LCP Placement
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 34
Design Considerations Feeder (F1) Cable
Central Switch Homerun architecture
High fiber counts needed
Low number of access points required
Local Convergence, Distributed Split architectures
Low to medium fiber counts typically needed
Spare fiber important
Revenue generation
Future cabinets, businesses, etc.
Feeder should be highly protected cable
Installation considerations
Fast repair if damaged
Telecom Commercial Operations 2014 Corning Incorporated 35
Design Considerations - Central Switching Center
Central Switch Homerun architecture
All homes directly connected, with or without splitters
Adds, drops, changes regularly required
Typically high density hardware requirements
Local Convergence, Distributed Split, Segmented Split
Only splitter inputs connected
Medium to low density hardware requirements
Mix of architectures
Some nearby homes may be served directly from CSC
Homes farther away served by local splitter cabinets
Thank you!
Patricia Alsina
Systems Engineer II
Corning Cable Systems
828-901-5595
patricia.alsina@corning.com