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COAXIAL ANTENNA

SIMULATION
A coaxial antenna is a vertically polarized omni-di-
rectional antenna. It was frst registered as US patent
by Arnold B. Bailey in 1939 as a vertical antenna pro-
viding coaxial element sleeve structures. A new type
using radiation by the outside of the coaxial elements
was also registered in 2006 by Bonnie Crystal as a
coaxial antenna with smaller size and more efcient
broadband, wideband and controlled bandwidths.
Te following example models a basic prototype of
coaxial antennas: a quarter-wavelength section of a
coaxial cable such that the inner and outer conduc-
tors are separate but still attached to the remaining
cable. Tis antenna operates between 2 GHz and 4
GHz. In this report, we fnd further description and
plots of the antennas performances.
FIGURE 1: GEOMETRY OF THE COAXIAL
ANTENNA
Through this simulation, we
should be able to visualize ra-
diation patterns of the antenna,
calculate the reflection at its
port and view its near and far
field distribution in 2D and 3D
plots between 2 and 4 GHz.
SIMULATION
BOUNDARY CONDITIONS
This coaxial antenna has a PEC
volume laying along the conduc-
tors stem. The input port is placed
on the Teflon surface between the
ground and signal conductors. We
assign -as it is usual for antenna
studies-, radiation boundaries to
the lateral surfaces of the mod-
el. In this example, were only in-
terested in the radiations made in
front of the wider circular face.
HFWORKS
APPLICATIONS
RESULTS
This chart shows the return loss at
the antennas port for the frequency
band from 2 to 4 GHz. We can get
the curve smoother by applying a
small frequency step; However the
values will have almost the same
magnitude as we can see the dis-
tances separating the points from
the origin.
FIGURE 2: WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE ANTENNA AT 2
GHZ
This animation shows a capture of the wave propagation inside the co-
axial antenna using ths section clipping feature of HFWorks.
FIGURE 3: RADIATION PATTERN OF THE ANTENNA
We might have a rough 3D electric field plot due to
a bad choice of chart scale and angles steps. so we
define the minimum and maximum values and things
will get clearer. We can animate the 3D plot by vary-
ing its phase to see how changing the omega T phase
affects the distribution of the field.
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