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TROY OHIO

ceetl>b wlirm
..
3:00pm
3:00pm- 5:00pm
5:15 - 6:00 pm
6:00-7:30 pm
7:30p.m.
AGENDA, JULY 8, 2014
RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP
TROY CITY COUNCIL
BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS
TROY RECREATION BOARD
Meet at Hobart Arena
Hobart Arena Consultant-led Presentation and Tour
City Council and Board Member Questions
Leave Arena, meet at Tin Roof
(light dinner will be provided)
Marina Building Consultant-led Presentation and Tour
Staff Presentation re Treasure Island Parkland Development
Recreation Board and Park Board Consecutive Meetings (not concurrently)
BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS:
Consider providing a recommendation to Council regarding proceeding with the
Riverfront Development Project, to be funded by a bond issue.
TROY RECREATION BOARD:
Consider providing a recommendation to Council regarding proceeding with the
Riverfront Development Project, to be funded by a bond issue.

TROY OHIO
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Pages
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35-50
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SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION
Table of Contents
Document Title
Hobart Arena Facility Assessment
Hobart Arena Structural Condition Assessment
Hobart Arena Foodservice Review
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Marina Building Renovation Blueprints
Treasure Island Park Concept Drawings
Presenters
Susan Sieger, Crossroads Consulting
David Greuset Convergence Design
N/A
N/A
N/A
Rick Willis, App Architecture
N/A
Presentation -July 8, 2014
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Category
2014 Population
Median Age
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Median Household Income
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Miami County
103,400
41
$47,100
Dayton CSA
1,070,400
40
$45,000
Miami County has a diverse economy led by manufacturing, retail trade, healthcare,
and hospitality
The unemployment rate for Miami County was 6.5% in December 2013 which was
consistent with that for the State of Ohio (6.6%} and the U.S. (6.5%)
There are nearly 7,800 jobs located in Miami County
- The Upper Valley Medical Center is Miami County's largest employer
Troy has excellent highway accessibility
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Facility
University of Dayton Arena
Wright State University's Nutter Center
Hara Arena
Proposed New Music Center at the Heights
James S. Trent Arena
Fraze Pavilion
Hobart Arena
Ice Rink
Kettering Recreation Complex
NTPRD Chiller
RiverSca pe MetroPa rk
South Metro Sports Center
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1
Location
Dayton
Dayton
Dayton
Huber Heights
Kettering
Kettering
Troy
Location
Kettering
Springfield
Dayton
Centerville
Year Opened Capacity
1969 14,000
1990 11,000
1964 7,000
Scheduled for
4,500
2014
2005 4,400
1991 4,300
1950 3,8lXJ
Hobart Arena Historical Events and Total Attendance (2011- 2013)
so
40 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~
50,000
30
20
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
2011 2012 2013 Average
Event activity at Hobart Arena is understated
- Uses such as public skating, hockey, ice skating, soccer, etc. are not reflected in the
above usage
Over the last three years, concert activity has averaged 39% of total tracked attendance
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A sample of event producers who have hosted concerts, sporting events, and expos at the facility were
interviewed
Advantages of Hobart Arena include:
- Quality of staff- professional, flexible, responsive to needs
- Amount of floor space/seating capacity
- Quality of ice
- Proximity and cost of parking
- Cost/value of space
- Location/accessibility to audience
Challenges of Hobart Arena include:
- Narrow concourse
Limited back-of-house space including circulation, storage, dressing rooms and offices
- Lack of catering space
- Need for expanded and upgraded dressing and locker rooms
Date availability particularly for ice-related events
- Cost to cover ice
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Management at Hobart Arena conducted electronic customer surveys in 2013
80% of respondents purchased their tickets online and 12% purchased tickets at
Hobart Arena prior to the event
More than 60% of respondents rated Hobart Arena as 'excellent' in quality of
performance attended, ticket purchasing, and overall experience
Only 39% of respondents rated Hobart Arena as 'Excellent' in Traffic I Parking
Summary of Customer Surveys- 2013
Quality of
Interaction Performance Overall
Response Ticket Purchasing Traffic/ Parking with Staff Attended Experience
Excellent 64% 3go/o 51% 71% 62%
Above Average 25% 37% 31% 21% 34%
Average 10% 20% 13% 6% 3%
Below Average 1% 3% 1% 1% 0%
Poor 0% 1% 1% 0% 1%
No Interaction 0% 0% 4% n/a 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
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Strengths/Opportunities
Hobart Arena is a recognized icon in the
market
Professional, experienced management team
Long history of successful operations
Relatively stable base of event activity
Location proximate to the interstate
Geographic location relative to routing
acts/shows
Positive input from event promoters
Positive input from customer surveys
Parking supply and proximity to facility
Total attendance and financial performance is
generally comparable to profiled peer facilities
Arena industry has generally rebounded from
recent macro economic conditions
Economic generator to the community
Quality of life contribution to the community
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Arrival/Ticketing
Concourse/Food
Seating/Event
Staging/Back of House
Challenges/Threats
Age of the facility
Competition from multiple facilities in the
region several of which are newer and larger
Construction of any arena/amphitheater/ice
rink in the immediate market area will further
increase competition
Radius clauses- some acts, particularly those
playing outdoor festivals, may be contractually
prohibited from playing competitive venues
within a certain mileage radius
Consolidation of the live music industry
Concert activity is cyclic and dependent on
type and number of acts that tour in any given
year
Relatively limited corporate base
Impact of changes in general macro economic
conditions
Chris Young - 24 November 2013
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Event did not overtax lobby/ticket windows
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Overall impression is positive but a general upgrade/refresh of
concourse is recommended
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Merchandise table creates congestion; only one credit card reader
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Concessions concentrated at south
end of arena
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Congestion at event breaks
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Concessions area cluttered
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Some stands unused
Some stands converted to merchandise sales
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Kitchen not equipped for cooking; used for storage
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Beer sold at three segregated locations; intermission lines
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No premium seating
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Columns in seating bowl are a distraction and also impact
ticketing strategy for all events
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Disabled seating at floor level only which impacts sightlines
to the stage
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Limited rigging capacity
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Ad hoc catering area off public concourse
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Dressing rooms below par, odd locations
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Extreme lack of staging area back of house
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Staging/Back ... ..
,. . . ; . . . . . . ' .
HOBART ARE A
Single loading door/no dock
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Comparable Arenas- Facility Program and Market Size Overview
Facility
Aiken Convocation Center
Bowling Green State Stroh Center
EnCa na Events Centre
Enid Event Center
Hobart Arena
Kits a p SUN Pavi I ion
Sanford Center
Town Toyota Center
Average (Excluding Hobart Arena)
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Location Year Opened
Aiken, SC
Bowling Green, OH
Dawson Creek, BC
Enid, OK
Troy, OH
Bremerton, WA
Bemidji, MN
Wenatchee, WA

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2007
2011
2008
2013
1950
1989
2010
2008
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Capacity
3,500
4,400
4,500
3,200
3,800
4,300
4,800
3,800
4,100
County
Population
164,200
129,300
n/a
62,300
103,400
254,000
45,700
74,000
121,600

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Profiled ... < ..
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Comparable Arenas- Summary of Utilization
- Total Attendance -+-Number of Events
100,000
80,000
400
z
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300 3
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60,000
200
40,000
20,000
100
0 0
Facility 1 Facility 2 Facility 3 Facility 4 Average Hobart Arena Facility 5 Facility 6
Event activity at Hobart Arena is understated as a large percentage of usage and corresponding attendance
from uses such as public skating, hockey, ice skating, soccer are not tracked and included in events and
attendance totals
Some of the profiled comparable arenas focus more on ticketed revenue generating events rather than more
community based events
ID

Total events and attendance at a facility do not directly correlate to financial profitability
CON
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Comparable Arenas - Operating Loss
$1,200,000
1$9,8001
$0 +-------.--
Facility 5 Facility 2 Hobart Arena Facility 1 Average Facility 6 Facility 4
Note: Financial data excludes taxes, transfers, capital outlay and debt service.
Despite hosting less events and attendance, Hobart Arena's operating loss was the
third lowest among profiled comparable arenas

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Facility upgrades to address some of the most pressing needs at Hobart Arena
Targeted toward improving the building's marketability, increasing revenues,
improving patron appeal or achieving operating efficiencies
Balance of recommended upgrades
Considered part of an overall master plan for continued upgrades/improvements
Recommend these projects be added to the City's long-range capital budget to be
completed based on available funding capacity
Items such as repairing roof leaks not considered 'upgrades' per se
Considered investments in the long term viability of Hobart Arena as a City
building and community asset
Recommended these projects be included in a routine annual cycle of capital
maintenance for City facilities and addressed as quickly as is reasonably possible
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Item Location
Concourse
Concourse
Concourse
4 Concourse East
Concourse East
Concourse South
Concourse South
Concourse South
Concourse West
10 Restrooms
11 Seating Bowl
12 Heating System
13 Concourse West
Item Location
14 Seating Bowl
15 Back of House

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Proposed Short-Term Projects at Hobart Arena
Order of Magnitude
Proposed Modification Primary Benefit(s) Construction Cost Project Cost Total Cost
$3,849,000 $-771,000 $4,620,000
General upgrade/refresh of concourse finishes Patron amenity
New/remodeled concessions with 30 points of sale (including Patron amenity/revenue
beer) generator
Equipment, signage and point-of-sale system for concession Patron amenity/revenue
stands generator
Develop new crew lounge/multipurpose space for event support Marketability/revenue
and/or rental generator
New main kitchen with direct access to multipurpose room (see
Revenue generator
item above).
Create fixed merchandise stand in high-traffic area (Includes Patron amenity/revenue
fixtures) generator
Kitchen equipment for cooking capability in new kitchen Revenue generator
Build new condiment shelves to ADA-compliant height Patron amenity
Add two portable merchandise carts Revenue generator
Add restroom capacity to meet current code, distributed around
Patron amenity
concourse
Add steel and reinforce bow trusses over stage area to facilitate
Marketability
easier rigging of shows and increase total rigging load capacity
Convert the heating system from steam to hot water as originally
Cost savings
planned.
Add minimum 1 pair exit doors at northwest comer of concourse. Patron amenity
Other Short-Term Projects to Consider for Inclusion Should Additional Funds Become Available
Alternate Projects
Replace existing arena lighting system with new high-efficiency
fixtures, with new lighting control system to maximize the
flexibility of lighting operation.
Develop adequate back of house space for dressing rooms,
loading, staging, marshalling of events, electrical panels,
Zamboni storage, etc.
CON NC E

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Order of Magnitude
Primary Benefit(s) Construction Cost Project Cost Total Cost
$1,025,000 $205,000 $1,230,000
Patron amenity/cost savings
Marketability/cost savings

Proposed Long-Term Improvements at Hobart Arena
Order of Magnitude
Item Location Proposed Modification Construction Cost Project Cost Total Cost
$6,959,000 $1,392,000 $8,351,000
16 Admin Space Relocate administration space to ground floor near box office.
17 Admin Space Add six small suites at second level
18 Admin Space
Repurpose existing admin suite to premium seating and/or
accessible seating with 2 exits and elevator
19 Admin Space
Consider developing an accessible route (ramp) from main
lobby/box office to concourse.
20 Back of House
Create sunken loading dock for over-the-road trailers near
loading door
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21 Back of House Consolidate Shop areas into one space.
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22 Concourse
Provide minimum of 26 3'-0" exit doors from public areas of
concourse
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23 Concourse East
Relocate smoking area farther from entry door. Remediate
negative pressure that pulls smoke into building from outside.
24 Concourse South Add south vestibule secondary entrance facing south parking.
---
Replace existing receptacle circuits with new grounded
receptacles and circuits. Provide new conduit where required.
25 Electrical Provide GFCI receptacle at all wet locations. Provide additional
general service receptacles in the seating bowl for maintenance
and service flexibility.
26 Emergency Lighting
Provide a new outdoor diesel generator for emergency lighting,
located outside the building near the electrical service entrance.
27 Exterior Repaint steel lintels at openings
28 Exterior Wall Investigate and repair stepped cracking in walls

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Item location
29 Exterior Wall
30 HVAC Controls
31 Ice Sheet
32 Main Lobby
33 Office HVAC
34 Seating Bowl
35 Seati ng Bowl
36 Seating Bowl
37 Seating Bowl
38 Seating Bowl
39 Seati ng Bowl
40 Seating Bowl Catwalk
41 Steam Room
Proposed Long-Term Improvements at Hobart Arena (cont'd)
Proposed Modification
Repair spalled concrete at window sill
Provide a new based Building Automation System to control and
monitor the building HVAC and refrigeration systems.
Consider second ice sheet attached or at a remote location to
allow public skating/hockey practice to take place and free up
arena for arena events.
Study relocation of box office relative to administrative space
Provide new controls tied into the new Building Automation
System for central control of the split system and electric
baseboard heaters
New LED scoreboard/video boards at end walls
If second level access is provided for disabled, include accessible
seating and cross aisle on two-story side of building.
Provide additional supply ductwork at the four corner rtu's to
distribute airflow above the seating area. These units can serve
as the primary cooling units for events.
Modify aisle steps to current building code and ADA standards
Add aisle handrails to meet current codes and ADA requirements.
Add motorized shades to existing windows to allow daytime
blackout
Provide new power distribution at catwalk.
Investigate and repair spa lied concrete
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Cat ego
Projects Assumed to Be Funded Through Traditional capital Mai ntenance
Item location Proposed Modification
42 Back of House
Replace the existing refrigerant condenser and receiver with new
equipment. Consider heat reclaim and tie into proposed BAS.
43 Exterior Investigate and repair canopies including roof material
44 Exterior Repair leaks at building exterior
45 Ice Equipment Room Investigate and repair crack in wall
46 Kitchen
Locate and repair the suspected leak. Sawcut the floor and
replace as required to make the repair.
Replace the existing steel domestic water piping with new
47 Restrooms
copper pipe. Extend to new toilet/locker rooms/concessions.
Replace flush valves with sensor operated flush valves. Provide
48 Restrooms additional heat in the restrooms, and ventilate plumbing chases,
to minimize frozen plumbing piping.
Replace the existing water heaters with new high efficiency
49 Restrooms condensing water heaters. Size heaters to include any new
plumbing f i xture groups.
so Restrooms Eliminate extraneous toilet room specialties
51 Roof Repair roof leaks
52 Roof Replace rotted or degraded roof decking in place

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Order of Magnitude
Construction Cost Project Cost Total Cost
$648,000 $129,000 $777,000
-
Category
Renovation/Construction
Other Costs & Contingency
Total Cost Per Category
Total Aggregate Cost
Short-Term
Projects
$3,849,000
S7711ooo
$4,620,000
.
Costs for Short-Term Projects above include:
Additional
Short-Term
Projects
$1,025,000
S2o51ooo
$1,230,000
$5,850,000
Long-Term
Improvements
$6,959,000

$8,351,000
$14,201,000
Capital
Maintenance
Projects
$648,000
S1291ooo
$777,000
$14,978,000
Recommended facility upgrades that generally fit within the $4.5 million cost framework the City deems
achievable in the short-term
Two additional projects that our team feels should fall into the short-term needs category but are above the
$4.5 million threshold
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event
seating
concourse
restrooms
dressing
concession
retail
kitchen
support
concession
retail
kitchen
support
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multipurpose

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existing concourse plan
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roposed main level plan
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event
seating
coocourse
restrooms
dressing
concession
retail
kitchen
support
admin
multipurpose
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event
seating
concourse
restrooms
concession
retail
kitchen
support
admin
multipurpose
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seating
concourse
restrooms
club
concesston
suite
kitchen
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proposed upper level plan
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New multipurpose space and kitchen
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showing addition of back of house space & loading
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showing new concession and restrooms
showing new south entry vestibule
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showing addition of suites at upper level
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showing addition of second ice sheet to north
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Bring the concessions operations in-house and hire a full time concessions manager
Increase the number of points of sale (POS) per customer at every event
Add credit card capabilities to all permanent and portable sales locations
Add cooking capabilities to one or two of the concession stands (this could also be a service
window from a new cooking commissary/kitchen)
Implement menu engineering- increase sizes and prices for major events, add popular items,
delete slow sellers to streamline service
Incorporate beer into the food stands and snacks into the beer stands to increase customer
convenience and profitability
Increase the number of events where beer is sold in controlled environments
Renegotiate not-for-profit service agreements (food and merchandise) to current market rates
Marketing and concessions personnel should work together to expand sponsorships
Collaborate with sponsors to add professional graphics to the stands and upgrade menu boards
Utilize three-dimensional vibrant signage on the concourse
Reduce counter heights of stands and condiment counters to the ADA level of 34"
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Assuming that the recommended short-term projects are completed and the food
service operating strategies are implemented, the economic analysis estimates the
impact to:
- Utilization
- Financial performance
- Economic impacts in terms of spending, jobs and earnings
- Fiscal impacts to local and State governments
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Estimated Impact to Hobart Arena Annual Utilization
- Total Attendance
60
50,000 so
40,000 40
30,000 30
20,000 20
10,000 10
0 0
Three-Year Avg Range (Low End) Range (High End)
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Estimated Impact to Hobart Arena Annual Operating Loss
- Annual Hobart Arena Operating Loss Cost Per City Resident
1$286,0001
$100,000 $5.00
$0 +---_.... ___ .._____-+--
--+ $0.00
Three-Year Avg Range (Low End) Range (High End)
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Estimated Impact to Annual Spending General From Hobart Arena Operations
$5.0
$4.0
] $3.0
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$2.0
$1.0
$0.0
Direct Indirect/Induced
Three-Year Avg Range (Low End) Range (High End)
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Estimated Impact to Annual Total Jobs Supported From Hobart Arena Operations
60
so
40
30
20
10
0
Three-Year Avg Range (Low End) Range (High End)
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Estimated Impact to Annual Tax Revenues From Hobart Arena Operations
$200,000
$150,000
$100,000
$50,000
$0
Loca I State
$45,000
Three-Year Avg Range {Low End)
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Range {High End)
Securing funding to conduct more detailed site and architectural planning
studies
Developing a more detailed spatial program
Further refining renovation/construction cost estimates
Addressing other renovation/enhancement related issues such as minimizing
disruption to the existing Hobart Arena and assessing the impact to existing
users and future bookings
Identifying potential financing strategy and related timeline
Developing a strategic plan for future land needs in surrounding lots to
accommodate Hobart Arena needs that may include long-term addition of
an ice sheet and/or development of supporting amenities
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Structural Condition Assessment
Hobart Arena
Troy, Ohio
Prepared for
Convergence Design, LLC
Prepared by
Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc.
920 Main, Tenth Floor
Kansas City, Missouri 641 05
SOB-14001-00
April 23, 2014
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WALTER P MOORE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 SOB-1400 1-00
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................... 1
Objective .......................................... ............................................... 1
Definitions ........................................................................................ 1
Facility Description ........................................................................... 2
Foundations and Ice Slab .......................................................... 3
Concourse ................................................................................ 3
Seating Bowl ............................................................................. 3
Low Roof Levels ....................................................................... 3
Catwalk and High Roof Level .................................................... 3
Building Exterior ........................................................................ 4
OBSERVATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................ 5
Foundations and Ice Slab ............... ................................................. 5
Concourse ....................................................................................... 5
Seating Bowl ................................................................................... 6
Low Roof Levels .............................................................................. 7
Catwalk and High Roof Level. .......................................................... 7
Building Exterior ............................................................. .................. 7
CONCLUSIONS AND REPAIR PRIORITY .............................................. 1 0
Immediate Priority .............................. ............................................ 10
High Priority ................................................................................... 11
Medium Priority ....... ....................................................................... 11
Low Priority .......................................... .......................................... 11
CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURAL MODIFICATIONS ................................... 12
Eliminate Four Columns in Seating Bowl ........................................ 12
Modifications to Rigging Grid ......................................................... 12
LIMITATIONS ....................................................................................... 14
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WALTER P MOORE
INTRODUCTION
Hobart Arena
April23, 2014
Objective
SOB-1400 1-00
A condition assessment to evaluate the overall condition of the primary
structural elements of the Hobart Arena in Troy, Ohio was conducted by
Walter P Moore during a site visit on May 10, 2011.
The objective of the assessment was to:
Determine the general condition of the arena's primary structural
elements
Engage arena staff to determine areas of structural distress or
concern
Identify problem conditions that require immediate attention
Provide prioritized conceptual repair recommendations
necessary to address the observed conditions
Provide an opinion of probable construction costs for structural
repairs identified.
The condition assessment was limited to visual observation and did not
include any material testing or detailed inspections. The Walter P Moore
representative relied on information provided by the Arena Manager and
Operations Manager. We reviewed original construction drawing sheets
1-R, 4-R through 11-R and one unnumbered sheet, prepared by
Freeman A. Pretzinger, dated June, 1948 for general understanding of
the building layout and structural systems. Observations and evaluation
of the building envelope, such as roofing materials, cladding joints and
expansion joint materials, was beyond the scope of this assessment.
Definitions
The definitions of terms used in this report are given below. Note that
when terms are applied to an overall system, certain portions of the
system may be in a different condition.
Excellent: Component is in a "like new" condition requiring no
rehabilitation and is performing its function as intended.
Good: Item is in sound condition and performing its function.
The component is exhibiting some signs of normal wear
and tear. Some incidental rehabilitation work may be
recommended.
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WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
Fair: Component is performing adequately at this time but the
component's rate of deterioration has begun to
accelerate.
Poor: Component has either failed or cannot be relied upon to
continue performing its original function. Repair or
replacement is required. Item exhibits deferred
maintenance; repair, replacement, or maintenance is
required to prevent further deterioration.
Facility Description
Hobart Arena is a 3, 782 seat multi-purpose arena with an ice sheet
located at 255 Adams St. in Troy, Ohio. Opened in September 1950 this
64 year old facility has been home to numerous hockey teams as well as
an indoor football team in recent years. The arena is open daily to the
general public with the ice sheet available for use nine months of the
year. The arena continues to host numerous events including ice shows,
circuses, and concerts. A typical building section illustrating the arena's
primary structure is shown below in Figure 1.
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long Span Barrel
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Joists with X-Bracing
in Alternate Baya
Figure 1 -Typical Framing Section
-38-
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WALTER P MOORE
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Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014
Foundations and Ice Slab
SOB-1400 1-00
The original contract documents indicate the primary building columns
are founded on isolated shallow spread footings approximately five feet
below the ice sheet concrete slab. Perimeter walls are shown to be
bearing on continuous strip footings interconnecting the column's spread
footings. The original drawings do not indicate the footing bearing
material. (Refer Figure 2)
The ice sheet consists of a seven inch thick cast-in-place concrete slab
placed two inches lower than the surrounding event level slab-on-grade.
Concourse
The event level concourse wraps around the entire perimeter of the ice
sheet with concessions and restrooms located throughout. The walking
surface is the original cast-in-place concrete slab-on-grade. Restrooms,
concessions, and other support spaces are typically constructed with
non-load bearing masonry walls and drop-in ceilings. The underside of
the concrete seating bowl and supporting raker beams are left exposed
but are difficult to see as they have been painted black and are often
hidden behind mechanical ducts and other equipment.
Seating Bowl
The seating bowl is original and is comprised of cast-in-place treads and
risers supported by cast-in-place concrete raker beams and columns at a
maximum 20-foot spacing. Eight large vomitories provide access to the
ice sheet while an additional nine vomitories provide access to an
intermediate cross aisle above row three. Cast-in-place concrete steps
are located at all aisles.
Low Roof Levels
The lower roofs flanking either side of the barrel vaulted high roof
consists of wood decking supported by open web steel joists spanning
between load bearing masonry walls along the building's exterior and
deep steel trusses at the interior support. These trusses provide the
vertical offset between the high and low roofs. (Refer Photo 1)
Catwalk and High Roof Level
The barrel vault high roof level is comprised of wood decking supported
by long span bowstring joists supported at each end by structural steel
trusses spanning between columns located in the seating bowl. Four
rows of bridging provide lateral bracing for the deep joists with X-bridging
located in alternate bays.
-39-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
The arena roof offers minimal rigging capacity and rigging points. The
rigging grid is currently assumed to be four bowstring joist bottom chords
and the W1 0 bottom chord bracing members that align with the joist
bridging lines. This results in a rigging grid of steel approximately 20-feet
square which is sometimes problematic for show rigging. The Arena
Manager expressed a desire to infill the grid with new steel beams to
reduce the rigging grid to 1 0-feet in both directions.
An existing catwalk does extend the length of the ice sheet along the
center of the building. We did not walk on the catwalk so our
observations were limited to what was visible from the event floor and
bowl. (Refer Photo 2)
Building Exterior
The arena's exterior walls consist primarily of conventional clay brick
veneer backed up by non-load bearing concrete masonry. This wall is
supported on a six foot concrete wall for gravity support. (See Photo 3)
Building entrances are typically partially protected by cast in place
concrete walls with cast-in-place concrete canopies cantilevering out
over the entryway.
-40-
WALTER P MOORE
OBSERVATIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Hobart Arena
April23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
Photos represent typical examples of distress conditions observed during
the site visit and do not include every instance of structural distress
present in the facility.
Foundations and Ice Slab
Since all foundations were buried and not visible during the site visit no
direct observations were made of these structural elements. However,
after consultation with the building staff and general observations of the
building finishes it does not appear there are settlement or abnormal
building movements that would normally be associated with foundation
problems.
The ice sheet slab was covered by ice and was being used by skaters
during our site visit. As such, we did not make any direct observations of
the ice slab. However the Arena Manager stated that they don't know of
any issues related to the ice slab and to their knowledge the slab is not
showing any signs of distress. It appears that the slab has performed as
initially designed and will continue to do so with proper maintenance.
Recommendation: The ice sheet slab should be inspected on
a quarterly basis by building staff to observe signs of distress.
Given the high value and function of this slab any cracks or
spalls should be investigated immediately, details prepared
which accommodate the slabs special needs and functions and
repaired immediately to avoid accelerated deterioration of the
slab reinforcing and coolant piping.
Concourse
Concourse Wall Cracking
Observed several hairline cracks in concrete masonry walls, both load
bearing and non-load bearing. In general these cracks were of minimal
width and still tight. (Refer Photo 4)
Recommendation: Building staff should inspect the walls on a
quarterly basis to verify the cracks are not growing in either width
or length. Crack monitors can be installed that will provide
objective monitoring of cracks. Any crack larger than 1/16-inch
in width should be routed and sealed.
-41-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014
Mechanical Room
S08-1400 1-00
Observed a significant crack over a man door in the ice floor equipment
room. This wall is load bearing and supports the roof framing spanning
over the mechanical room. (Refer Photo 5)
Recommendation: At the time of the site visit the cause of this
cracking was not apparent. It is likely a shrinkage crack that has
been exacerbated by numerous temperature swings over the
building's life. Further investigation is required to determine the
cause for this cracking and to develop an appropriate repair.
Steam Room
Observed several instances of spalled concrete on both the concrete
walls and concrete ceiling above. Exposed reinforcing steel at these
spalled locations was visibly corroded. (Refer Photo 6)
Recommendation: The cause of the corrosion may be due to
high humidity. A more detailed investigation should be
performed to discover the cause of the corrosion. The extent of
the corrosion should be discovered by half-cell potential or other
non-destructive evaluation technique. After the cause of the
corrosion is discovered and mitigated, proper repair
recommendations can be determined and implemented.
Seating Bowl
Masonry Wall Cracks
Observed several locations where stair-stepped cracks are visible along
the masonry wall mortar joints. These are commonly visible extending
down from a wall opening. (Refer Photo 7)
Recommendation: The cracks are small in width and stairstep in
similar patterns near several windows. These are likely
shrinkage cracks due to expansion and contraction of the wall.
Further investigation is required to determine the cause for this
cracking and to develop an appropriate repair.
Concrete Curb at Window Sill
Observed a spalled concrete curb supporting a window frame over one
of the cantilevered concrete canopies. (Refer Photo 8)
Recommendation: Spalled area should be repaired by
removing any loose concrete, chipping to sound concrete and
casting a repair mortar with bonding agent.
-42-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014
Low Roof Levels
Roof Decking
808-1400 1-00
Observed several locations where the wood decking was damaged
and/or rotted. It appeared the likely cause was due to water infiltration
from the roof level. (Refer Photo 9)
Recommendation: This deterioration may be due to a failure in
the roofing system. A more detailed investigation should be
performed to determine the cause of the deck deterioration After
the cause of the deterioration is discovered, proper repair
recommendations can be determined and implemented. In
general this repair will require removal and replacement any
rotted or degraded wood decking with members of similar grade
and species, matching depth, matching tongue and groove
pattern, deck lap and nailing pattern.
Catwalk and High Roof Level
We did not walk the catwalk nor were we able to observe the high roof
steel framing up close. Our only observations of the catwalk and high
roof framing were from the event level and seating bowl. From these
distances a direct observation of the steel framing was not possible.
However, from these lower levels there were no obvious signs of distress
or movement.
Building Exterior
In General the building fagade appeared to be in good condition with no
obvious signs of distress. There were very few visible cracks in the
exterior brick veneer, including at the corners of steel lintels over door
and window openings. There were no apparent patterns of cracks,
spalls or open control joints that support an indication of differential
building settlement.
Concrete Entry Canopies
At each of the main entry points into the building a cast-in-place
cantilevered canopy typically extends out over the entryway. In most
locations cracking is visible on both the underside and vertical faces of
the canopy. We understand that these canopies have been patched in
the past and continue to be a maintenance concern. (Refer Photo 1 0)
Recommendation: The cause of the distress may be due to
water intrusion due to failed roofing, inadequate reinforcement
detailing, alkali-silica reaction or some combination of these or
other causes. A more detailed investigation should be
- 43-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 808-14001-00
performed to discover the cause of the distress. The roofing
system should be investigated by a qualified roofing consultant.
The extent of potential corrosion should be discovered by half-
cell potential or other non-destructive evaluation technique.
Concrete testing may be indicated by further investigation to
determine if alkali-silica reaction is taking place. After the cause
of the distress is discovered and mitigated, proper repair
recommendations can be determined and implemented.
Steel Lintels Over Openings
Steel lintels supporting the brick veneer over door and window openings
were observed. In many instances the protective coating has been
chipped or fallen off the steel allowing corrosion to occur potentially
reduce their structural capacity. (Refer Photo 11)
Recommendation: These lintels should be repaired before the
deterioration accelerates causing damage to the brick veneer
while reducing their load-carrying capacity. A more detailed
investigation should be conducted to determine the source of the
moisture causing the corrosion. Retrofitting the lintels with
properly detailed flashing may be indicated. In general, repair
could consist of removing the existing brick veneer, cleaning,
repair/replacement and coating of the corroded lintel, installation
of the flashing system and replacement of the brick veneer.
Concrete Wall Cracking
Observed several locations around the perimeter of the building where
vertical cracks were visible in the lower concrete wall. (Refer Photo 12)
Recommendation: The original construction drawings indicate
limited amounts of horizontal reinforcing to control shrinkage
cracks. The cause of this cracking could be from poor
design/detailing of the reinforcing exacerbated by freeze-thaw or
alkali-silica reaction inherent in the original concrete mix used in
the construction. Further investigation to determine the source
of the observed distress is recommended before proper repairs
can be designed and implemented.
Brick Veneer Distress
Observed distress in the brick veneer located in the vertical pilasters
along the south elevation. Cracking of the brick was evident as well as
some movement. One possible cause for this condition would be water
penetration through failed mortar joints which is then susceptible to
freeze-thaw conditions. It may be due to differential movement due to
-44-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
expansion of the brick veneer and creep shrinkage of the interior
concrete column. (Refer Photo 13)
Recommendation: The cause of this distress could not be
determined during our site visit. Additional investigation would
be required to determine the source of distress prior to
implementing any repairs. We recommend a more detailed
investigation which would likely include the creation of openings
in the brick veneer at select locations to allow observation of the
supporting framing. This investigation should be done as part of
the recommended investigation described below.
Water Penetration
Observed areas inside the building where it appears water vapor is
transmitting through the exterior wall. Blistering paint on the interior
surface of concrete masonry walls was visible. The lack of a vapor
barrier inside the multi-wythe wall may also be contributing to the
problem. (Refer Photo 14)
Recommendation: We recommend a more detailed
investigation which would likely include document review,
creating small openings in the brick veneer and interior concrete
masonry at select locations to allow observation of the interior of
the wall system, and modeling of the exterior wall system to help
determine the likely causes and prepare recommendations for
remediation.
-45-
WALTER P MOORE
CONCLUSIONS AND
REPAIR PRIORITY
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
Walter P Moore has completed the structural condition assessment of
the Hobart Arena in Troy, Ohio. The evaluation consisted of a visual
review of the exposed structural elements both interior and exterior.
Our condition assessment indicates that the building structure is in good
condition and well maintained by the building owner and maintenance
staff. Only a few elements observed were in fair condition and are
recommended for repair in the near term. Specific details of noted
distress can be found in the Observations and Recommendations
section.
To address the observed distress, we have provided a prioritized list of
recommendations. Our recommendations are divided into the following
four categories: Immediate, High, Medium, and Low.
Immediate priority items should be repaired as soon as
possible.
High priority items should be repaired within the next 12 months
to maintain serviceability of the associated item.
Medium priority repairs should be repaired within 3 years to
prevent further deterioration.
Low priority repairs should be addressed within the next 5
years and are considered general maintenance items.
Repair priorities are based on the level of observed damage, concerns
regarding life safety, and the structural need for the repairs to be
performed.
Immediate Priority
Due to the relative age of the structure, high quality level of initial
construction and proactive maintenance by the arena ownership there
were only two elements observed that require further study and repairs
immediately.
In the ice floor equipment room further investigate the crack
above the door opening in the exterior load bearing wall. Make
repairs as required. (Refer Photo 5)
Review roofing systems and parapet conditions for potential
water infiltration. Repair roofs to make water tight.
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WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April23, 2014
High Priority
S08-1400 1-00
In the steam room investigate the cause of the distress and
make repairs to the spalled concrete areas on both the concrete
walls and concrete ceiling above.
Investigate and remediate the cause of the wood decking
distress, then remove and replace wood decking where
degraded and/or rotted. The cause of the distress must be
remediated prior to replacing the decking.
Repair any structural steel lintels over doors and windows with
scratched, deteriorated, or missing protective coatings. Modify
the lintels to include flashing and recoat steel elements with
galvanic paint or a high performance paint system.
Further investigate cause for excessive cracking at cantilevered
concrete canopies and determine recommended repairs.
Medium Priority
In the seating bowl further investigate stair stepped cracks in the
exterior load bearing walls and determine recommended repairs.
Repair spalled concrete curb at window sill.
Further investigate cause for cracking and movement of brick on
south elevation and determine recommended repairs ..
Further investigate exterior concrete walls (base below brick
veneer) to determine cause of the cracks and determine
recommended repairs.
Low Priority
Inspect ice sheet slab on a quarterly basis to track or discover
any signs of distress.
Inspect concourse masonry walls on a quarterly basis to track
and discover any cracks or other distress.
-47-
WALTER P MOORE
CONCEPTUAL
STRUCTURAL
MODIFICATIONS
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 808-14001-00
As part of our assessment we were tasked with reviewing two conceptual
structural modifications currently on the Owner's wish list.
Considerations include feasibility, constructability, and cost.
Eliminate Four Columns in Seating Bowl
First on the Owner's wish list is the possibility of eliminating four existing
structural steel columns in the seating bowl. Currently, the long span
bowstring joists over the ice sheet span transversely to structural steel
trusses spanning between columns at 60-foot spacing. There is a desire
to eliminate two columns along each sideline to provide greater flexibility
in the bowl and reducing the number of obstructed view seats.
The existing trusses are 8'-8" deep and comprised of structural steel
angle web and chord members. If the two interior columns were
removed from the sideline the span would triple in length from 60-feet to
180-feet. While the span would triple the design forces internal to the
truss would actually increase by a factor of nine. Modifying the existing
trusses to accommodate this tremendous increase in forces is infeasible.
Modifications to Rigging Grid
The existing arena roof offers minimal rigging capacity and rigging
points. Allowable rigging loads are on the order of 10,000 lbs per long-
span joist and any loads applied to the bottom chord members are to be
vertical at panel points only.
The rigging grid currently consists of four bowstring joist bottom chords
and the W10 bottom chord bracing members that align with the joist
bridging lines. This results in a rigging grid of steel approximately 20-feet
square which can be problematic for show rigging. The Arena Manager
expressed a desire to infill the grid with new steel beams to reduce the
rigging grid to 1 0-feet in both directions.
Adding new steel beams to generate a 1 0-foot grid in each direction is
possible. It will, however, reduce the overall allowable rigging capacity
by the weight of the new steel beams. New beams installed inside an
existing 20-foot grid could potentially weigh 1200-1400 lbs. Rigging load
information provided to us indicates a maximum 1200 lbs may be applied
at each panel point of a main truss. Thus, the allowable rigging load
would be consumed by the dead weight of the new steel.
It is possible to strengthen the existing long span joists to accommodate
the dead load of new beams in addition to a modest rigging capacity,
-48-
WALTER P MOORE
Hobart Arena
April 23, 2014 808-1400 1-00
however, the cost would be significant. We have not developed an
estimated cost but can make a comparison to a recent project on which
we made similar modifications. Construction cost could be on the order
of $200,000 to $250,000 for the roof truss modifications alone. Design
fees and other soft costs would be added on top of this construction cost.
In addition to the long span joists, the capacity of the existing 60-foot
span supporting trusses, columns, and foundations may prohibit any new
rigging load from being applied. It may be possible to strengthen these
members as well to accommodate a modest increase in rigging loads,
but heavy rigging points, say on the order of 2,500 lbs or more, are likely
infeasible. We are unable to estimate a construction cost due to the
complexity of strengthening details and challenging installation. But it is
likely the construction cost for strengthening these elements could
exceed the costs for the roof truss modifications noted above.
-49-
WALTER P MOORE
LIMITATIONS
Hobart Arena
April23, 2014 S08-1400 1-00
This report has been prepared to assist Convergence Design and the
Hobart Arena building management understand the nature and type of
distress investigated in this study and determine a future course of
action. Walter P Moore assessed specific issues relevant to the distress
observed on the primary structural elements of the Hobart Arena in Troy,
Ohio.
Walter P Moore has no direct knowledge of, and offers no warranty
regarding the condition of concealed construction or subsurface
conditions beyond what was revealed in our review. Any comments
regarding concealed construction or subsurface conditions are our
professional opinion, based on engineering experience and judgment,
and derived in accordance with current standard of care and professional
practice.
Various other non-structural, cosmetic and structural damage unrelated
to this assessment may have been observed throughout the structure,
some of which are discussed in general in this report. However, a
detailed inventory of all cosmetic, nonstructural and structural damage
was beyond the scope of our assessment. Comments in this report are
not intended to be comprehensive but are representative of observed
conditions. In this study we did not include review of the design, review
of concealed conditions, or detailed analysis to verify adequacy of the
structure to carry the imposed loads and to check conformance to the
applicable codes. Repair recommendations discussed herein are
conceptual and will require additional engineering design for
implementation.
We have made every effort to reasonably present the various areas of
concern identified during our site visits. If there are perceived omissions
or misstatements in this report regarding the observations made, we ask
that they be brought to our attention as soon as possible so that we have
the opportunity to fully address them in a timely manner.
This report has been prepared on behalf of and for the exclusive use of
Convergence Design, Crossroads Consulting Services, and the City of
Troy, Ohio. This report and the findings contained herein shall not, in
whole or in part, be disseminated or conveyed to any other party or used
or relied upon by any other party, in whole or in part, without prior written
consent.
-50-
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Hobart Arena Foodservice Review
Prepared by Chris Bigelow, President, The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Project Background
The Arena was privately built in 1950 with the City of Troy (City) assuming ownership in
1970. The Arena did not generate sufficient revenues in 2013 to meet operating
expenses and is seeking new ideas for increased revenues and/or decreased costs.
Chris Bigelow, President of The Bigelow Companies, Inc. working under the Crossroads
Consulting Services LLC Agreement, has the responsibility to assess the food and
beverage facilities and services at the Arena and make recommendations for
improvements. Chris Bigelow conducted an on-site review of the foodservice facilities
at the Hobart Arena (Arena) on Sunday, November 24, 2013, during the Chris Young
concert and then participated in a staff walk-through of the foodservice facilities, as well
as meetings with the City's and Arena's management team.
Representatives from the Arena and the operators and contractors involved with the
meetings and walk through included:
- Troy Mayor, Michael Beamish
- Troy Public Service & Safety Director, Patrick Titterington
- Troy Recreation Board President, Marty Hobart
- Troy City Engineer, Debbie Swan
- Troy Director of Recreation & Arena Manager, Ken Siler
- Troy Assistant Director of Recreation, Carrie Slater
- Variety Attractions Talent Buyer, Todd Boltin
- Hobart Arena Operations Manager, Phil Noll
- Business Agent International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees
Local #66, Ken Rice
- Not for Profit Organization (NPO) Concessionaire Manager, Connie Brown
- Coldwater Cafe & Catering, Jenny Swigart
- City of Troy Project Manager, Stanley Jegley II
- City of Troy Planning & Zoning Manager, Timothy Davis
- City of Troy Foreman-City Forester, Jeremy Drake
6/23/2014
-51-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Arena Overview
The Arena has approximately 3,700 fixed seats and space for 1,300 additional seats on
the floor. The Arena hosts amateur and community ice skating events and wide variety
of entertainment and civic events.
Most concerts are set with an end-stage having a practical capacity of 3,000.
Historically the City promotes all of the concerts with the exception of Christian acts for
which there is a regional promoter. The primary concert season is October through
March for the Arena, after which many acts prefer the larger gross ticket sales potential
at the outdoor venues.
The City operates the Arena with multiple operators for services. The City contracts the
food and non-alcoholic concessions to a local not-for-profit organization (NPO), the
American Legion Baseball Team. The City operates the Beer stands. In addition to
these two operators a third entity, a local caterer, serves all of the backstage catering.
And a fourth group, the local chapter of the American Red Cross sells all of the
merchandise at the Arena.
One of the many negatives of splitting food services at the Arena is the beer and food
concessions are segregated so customers have to go to two different concession
stands and wait in two lines for a beer and a hot dog. Likewise, a customer who would
like to buy some popcorn or a pretzel with their beer also have to wait in two separate
lines, often not even close to each other. Another factor with multiple operators is the
economics; each of these vendors has their own overhead and profit motives.
6/23/2014
-52-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
If services were combined under one entity, whether in-house under the City or under
one contract, the terms should be more favorable with the reduced overheads.
In addition, it appears based from responses to questions, that the City exerts very little
control over these outside vendors, which is one reason we observed that revenues
were not being maximized.
The City has been very conservative about beer sales in the past and currently only
sells beer at 12 to 15 of the annual events. One of the reasons the City sells beer
rather than their NPO concessionaire is an agreement to tightly control its sale.
However, all admit those conservative policies are starting to change as the Arena has
demonstrated it can sell beer in a responsible manner with well-trained employees. It
was noted that the concert producer Jam Productions was allowed to sell beer in Beer
Gardens for the Great Ohio Festival, so the City should be able to obtain the same
rights for events inside of the Arena.
Other than Pepsi Cola, to date the City has not made any effort to secure sponsorships
for the Arena. The City receives $5,000 annually for Pepsi's sponsorship of all City
venues for up to eight years. Pepsi must supply all dispensing equipment, a concession
trailer and sell their product at an annually determined price, but that price was not
included in the agreement provided. In addition, Pepsi provides all vending machines
and pays the City 30/o on 20 oz. bottled drinks sold at $1.25, 20/o on Gatorade and
Propel sold at $1.50 and 15%> on all other energy drinks sold at $2.00.
Recommendation:
The City needs to retain the right to set the selling price of all vending
items and receive a higher commission for prices above these base prices
required by Pepsi.
Yuengling and Budweiser beer products also
have signage in the concession stands, but
no Yuengling is sold, which is very unusual.
The hockey dasher boards have an ad for
Little Caesar's Pizza, but again no pizza is
sold in the Arena.
6/23/2014 -53- The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LL( Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Recommendation:
Arenas typically sell sponsorships to several concession product
manufacturers in exchange for having their products sold in the venue, as
well as services such as banks, to generate revenue for the building. It is
important for the City to be aware of sponsorship and /(tied house"
restrictions which may require other brands of beer be offered. Likewise,
State and Federal legislation also restrict the direct tie-in of sponsorship
and the ban on a retail licensee, such as a concessionaire, from receiving
any income from an alcohol manufacturer.
All types of ancillary revenue, such as earning profits or commissions from concessions
and increasing merchandise sales and selling sponsorships, will increase the City's
ability to attract more entertainment acts to the venue.
The City manages the Troy Aquatic Park immediately behind the Arena and manages
the concessions along with a school booster club. The Park operates in the summer
months, which are the slowest months for events at the Arena. This is another reason
that one consolidated concession department may be the most profitable operating
alternative.
Facilities, Equipment and Potential Improvements
The Arena's last renovation was between 1997 and 2001, and while it has a good base
of concession equipment, it will need new equipment and improvements in order to
expand menus and services to the users of the venue, which will in turn increase
revenues to the City.
Condiment counters and beer stand service counters were taller than allowed under the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which calls for a maximum height of 34",
however the food concession service counters were within the 34" limit.
As part of its bid the concessionaire had to certify that they were in compliance with
ADA, which we do not feel the entire concession operation is. Whether or not they can
be held accountable for leasehold improvements in the Arena is questionable, however.
6/23/2014
-54-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Credit cards are accepted for beer but not in the food
stands; however several cashiers share one credit
card reader in the stand. Stand-alone cash registers
are used but they do not have pre-set menu keys
requiring the cashier to look up the price for each
order, thus slowing the transaction.
Recommendation:
Customers no longer carry large amounts
of coins and bills; even teenagers often
carry just credit cards. All points of sale,
both permanent and portable need to
accept credit cards. Studies show that
credit card transactions are typically 15%
to 20% higher on average than cash transactions. Therefore credit cards
increase your sales. With swipe and go policies they speed transaction
time by eliminating counting change back and not requiring a receipt, and
they also speed cashier closeout at the end of the event with less cash to
count and less opportunity for theft. At a minimum, pre-set registers
should be used.
The City owns all fixed equipment. The NPO owns all smallwares and has added some
smaller pieces to bolster their service abilities. These items include:
Smallwares (tongs, pots, pans and cleaning equipment)
2 microwave ovens
2 roller grills
It is not clear at this point whether the NPO's ovens and grills and replaced equipment
were counted by the City in 2012 or is in addition to that City-owned equipment.
There are no concession stands on the entire main concourse on the sideline that has
the main entrance (stage right). Originally there were stands on this concourse but they
were replaced by City display cases and historical exhibits.
While there is bright neon signage above the one open food stand, some customers
may never know it exists because of its location in the end-zone rather than visible from
the main entrance.
6/23/2014
-55-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
The concession stands are all on the inner
perimeter of the concourse, therefore
providing limited head height under the raker
beams, which is both a major hazard of
employees hitting their head and the exposed
ceilings are also now a cleaning issue that
many health departments would not allow.
6/23/2014
-56-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
While the NPO has two fully-equipped concession stands, they choose to only open one
on the majority of the events. In addition, there are other stands that only sell beer or
are equipped for food, but occasionally sell merchandise.
Recommendation:
Concessions should be a major revenue source for the Arena and menu
items are an impulse buy. Customers should see and smell the food as
soon as they enter the Arena. Realizing there will be congestion issues,
there needs to be a master plan for ways to place the concession stands
on the outer wall. Expanding out will allow you to increase points of sale,
widen the concourse, and by having concession stands on the exterior
wall of the Arena, you will be able to vent for cooking, grilling and frying.
Likewise, combining food and beer in all stands will increase the customer
convenience of not having to line up at two separate concession stands
just to buy a beer and a sandwich.
Several participants we spoke with mentioned building a lounge cafe for public skating,
with coffee or vending and featuring tables and chairs for customers to wait comfortably
for their skaters to finish.
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
The concessionaire indicated the storage is too small to purchase the minimum orders
required from commercial foodservice wholesalers, so they must pick up their own
products at Sam's Club or other local retail stores. This is also true for beer kegs where
the City must rely on a local distributor to provide refrigerated storage per event.
There are two ice makers in the Arena to handle the needs of the portable carts that ice
down beer as well as the soft drinks. We understand they are sufficient for the current
level of business.
Beer Equipment: There are three (3) sales
locations that have portable "bottoms up" jockey
boxes, provided by the beer distributor.
Additional equipment will be required if the City
agrees to offer beer in the food stands.
We were told that hot water is supplied to all
foodservice sinks from a central boiler; however
we saw a water heater in the commissary.
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LL( Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
There is no office or cash room for the concessions operation. The concessionaire
often uses locker room #1 during events to act as an office.
Recommendation:
Any renovation of the Arena should provide for a secure office and cash
room for the concessionaire.
The signage at the main entrance does not create any appeal for the customers to find
the concessions or merchandise.
Recommendation:
Three-dimensional vibrant signage should be used on the concourse so it
attracts customers and draws their attention to the concessions as they
look down a concourse. Using three dimensional food icons will also allow
the customers to know instantly which stands sell beer, soft drinks, or
burgers and fries.
There is no on-site cooking in either the concession stands or the commissary. In any
Arena renovation, we would recommend adding cooking capabilities to expand the
menu to include burgers, cheesesteaks, fries and grilled chicken sandwiches. These
are all popular concession items and all higher price points than just hot dogs.
6/23/2014
-59- The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLCJ Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Management has indicated a large multipurpose room is needed and we would agree
with that. That room could be used for media and back-stage catering, rather than the
current storeroom. That room could also host banquets and meetings. Even with the
addition of such a space, we would recommend a cost benefit analysis to determine if a
full kitchen is warranted in the Arena.
We are told there are several quality off-premise caterers, including the current one
Coldwater Cafe, and there are other competing banquet spaces including
Club55/Crystal Room (200 capacity), Fort Piqua Hotel (200 to 350 capacity), Learning
Plaza (500 capacity) and the local country club (150 capacity). A study could ascertain
if there is sufficient banquet demand to warrant that full kitchen. Coldwater would
recommend a room with a capacity of at least 350 for a banquet (4,500 sq. ft.) plus
sufficient kitchen production space.
What the off-premise caterers would like in a renovated commissary is prep space,
sinks, work tables, coffee machines, ice makers and a walk-in cooler and freezer they
could use during their events. Coldwater Cafe brings their product in on a trailer with
refrigeration, but could use the expanded prep space. If the Arena had a dishwasher,
Coldwater Cafe would leave all of the smallwares and placesettings at the Arena, which
would reduce their labor costs and breakage.
Coldwater Cafe also indicated that they could expand their backstage catering menu at
the Arena if there was some basic cooking available in the commissary such as an oven
with a range top. They have used Panini presses to provide some hot sandwiches, but
indicate that sufficient power to work their equipment can be problematic in the Arena.
This may be an asset for backstage catering as the venue looks to attract more acts.
They also requested refrigeration in the dressing rooms which are also locker rooms, to
enhance the back stage service.
Given the location of the Arena on the Miami River, we also see opportunities for
catering outside of the venue in tents and portable kiosks, using the renovated
commissary as a base during festivals and even private parties.
Menu
In general, the current menu pncmg and portions are extremely low. The NPO is
allowed to set their own menu and pricing without any oversight by the City. It is
obvious from the current pricing structure that the NPO is not trying to maximize
revenues and the City has no incentive either as they do not receive a percentage of
sales, as would be typical under traditional commission agreements.
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLCJ Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Likewise looking at the display of
product, the NPO has the least profitable
items, candy and chips, prominently
displayed on the front counter. While a
few of those items may be appropriate for
public skating, they are not what you
want to sell at a concert, where items
such as pretzels and nachos should have
front counter displays.
Recommendation:
The City must approve the menu, portions and pnc1ng whether
foodservice is operated in-house or by a contractor and prices need to be
competitive with other entertainment venues in the State. Every year, the
menu should be reviewed and any items not producing at least 1% of
sales should be eliminated from the menu.
We also recommend a two tiered pricing
strategy, one for major events such as the
concert we observed, and the second a lower
priced menu (similar to current pricing) for the
community skating events.
The NPO has upgraded its cappuccino and
hot chocolate program which is popular during
ice events, but again needs to be served in
larger portions.
Pizza was on the menu board but covered up
with a cardboard sign and as mentioned
earlier, a pizza chain was advertising in the
hockey arena. Equipment to sell pizza was
provided by the City, but the NPO decided it
was not a good seller.
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Recommendation:
City needs to determine if pizza is popular enough to sell and as products
are removed, the menu boards need to be constructed to allow for
changes, edits, deletions and additions. Likewise by coordinating
sponsorship and menus, the City may realize additional sponsorship
dollars if they sell that sponsors product at Arena events.
The current vending machines on the concourse have lower selling prices than at the
concession stands. The purpose of the vending machine should be convenience and
customers will pay for that convenience with higher prices or they will wait in line at the
concessions stand.
Recommendation:
Vending prices should also be higher than concession prices if they are
used by the ticket-buying public.
We tasted the hot dog, which was served at the proper temperature but was small and
bland. The sausage had a better smoky flavor, but again too small and did not have
any special toppings like chili, cheese, peppers, onions or sauerkraut.
Recommendation:
6/23/2014
The equipment is there to offer specialty toppings on sausages, which is a
justification for increasing the selling price.
-62- The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
The popcorn popper is right inside the door of the commissary adjacent to the
concourse, but all corn is popped before the event. There are additional smaller
poppers in the concession stands, but they do not appear to be used during the event.
Recommendation:
Reposition the popper so customers can view it preparing the corn fresh
during the event. This will drive sales if customers can smell the popcorn
popping when they enter the Arena. Another alternative would be to use
the smaller poppers in the concession stands and pop and sell from those
two locations.
The City never opens more than three beer stands regardless of the event. Based on
our observations of the long lines at intermission, this is not a customer friendly or
revenue friendly decision.
Recommendation:
6/23/2014
Industry standard is 1 point of sale (POS) cashier line per 100-150
customers, depending on the event. If no beer is sold, that ratio can
increase to 1 per 250 customers. Based on our calculations, even if all of
the concession stands were open, you would not have enough points of
sale to handle a full house.
-63-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Continue to open more POS at every event and monitor the increased per
capita sales as well as the increased labor cost, until you find the ideal mix
by event type, for the Arena.
The staff indicated that depending on the show, they can also sell margaritas as well as
beer, but it was not clear who makes that decision or when they are sold. The event we
observed would have been a perfect market for margaritas.
Recommendation:
The City needs clear guidelines when to sell which products, but revenue
generation should always be a consideration after public safety issues.
Personnel
All foodservice personnel in the Arena are non-union. The beer pullers are City
employees and work on an hourly, part-time basis as needed. In addition some of
these employees also work for the City at the adjacent Aquatic Park, which is open from
Memorial Day to Labor Day annually. This works well considering the Arena's primary
concert season is October through March.
All personnel that serve beer are trained under the TEAM (Techniques in Effective
Alcohol Management) guidelines. In addition, staff checks all customer's ID's and
wristbands those 21 or over to allow them to purchase beer. Both policies are excellent
and should continue.
We were told that the facility engineer often helps out pouring beer during events, and
the Arena personnel have the added responsibility of providing cleaning supplies to all
City departments including Parks & Recreation.
Recommendation:
While it is always good that various departments help each other during
unusually busy periods, it is important that the concessions department is
adequately staffed to maximize sales and minimize customer lines.
The NPO is open for public skating but not Youth Hockey, however it appears the group
rather than the City makes its own decisions when they will open. It was not clear if all
of the NPO volunteers working in the concession stand were at least 16 years of age.
6/23/2014 -64-
The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Recommendation:
The City should require specific stands to be open at specific events and
all volunteers to be at least 16 years of age for insurance purposes. The
NPO must insure its own volunteers in case one is injured while working at
the Arena.
While the City Beer servers all had grey fleece vests and
white shirt uniforms, the concession stand employees had
no uniforms, giving the operation a very amateurish look.
Recommendation:
City must approve the uniforms for all
workers in the Arena, regardless of whom
they work for.
Tip jars were seen around the concession stands.
Recommendation:
Industry standard is that there are no tips in concessions or beer stands
with the exception of full-service bars. Due to cash control, you do not
want employees to have an excuse to be leaving their stand with cash.
Likewise customers don't tip in fast food restaurants, so unless they were
getting something for free from the stand worker why would they tip a
concession employee? In addition, concession menus should be priced
aggressively and if customers are willing to give away money in tips on top
of the concession price, they must not view the pricing as high as we may
think.
Concessions Agreement
Troy Post 43 Baseball, an American Legion Baseball Team (NPO) has a three year
agreement with the City for the non-alcoholic rights at the Arena. T.L. Baseball
Boosters, Inc. has tax exempt status as a Not-for-Profit-Organization 501(c) 3
organization certified by the Internal Revenue Service. Paper work included in the bid
documents indicates that T.L. Baseball handles expenses, profits, & audits annually for
the Team, however it is not clear why the contract is not between the City and TL, rather
than the Team.
In some states 501 (c) 3 corporations do not collect or pay sales taxes for their
businesses. Is this the case with the Team, and if so has that been approved by the
City and the Ohio tax authority?
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Recommendation:
The City should ensure that the legally registered group is who holds the
contract for concessions.
The contract runs from July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2015.
The NPO pays a flat fee ($9,900 per year) to the City regardless of the volume of
business and must be open at all events except graduations and youth hockey. In
addition they pay the City $150 per professional sporting or cheer event. No additional
payments are due for concerts which we assume is due to the Team not selling the
beer.
According to financial statements, the City collected $10,500 from the NPO in 2013 and
the NPO estimates they netted no more than $5,000 annually from the operation after
paying all expenses.
NPO indicated to us that they were the only bidders for this contract and this is a
reduction in their rental fees from the last contract, due to declining events and sales.
The operation is managed by the coach's wife, Connie Brown, and she also provides
concessions at the City's Duke Park. She uses four American Legion teams plus teams
from girls' softball and little league. Each player must commit to a minimum number of
events to raise the equivalent amount of money for their team's expenses.
Brown indicated they have four stands they can use at the Arena but never saw the
need to open more than one.
Cheerleading is their highest grossing food event at the Arena, which explains the
additional fee payable by contract, however in most venues, concerts with beer would
be the most profitable, if one concessionaire was handling all food and beverage sales.
In addition to purchasing all of the products, Brown must pay for the individual Health
Permits; $483 per permanent stand annually or $45 per event for temporary locations.
The menu items most in demand that she cannot serve are grilled items such as
hamburgers and fried items such as French Fries. This reinforces our recommendation
that any master plan of the Arena include the redevelopment of the concession stands
to allow for cooking in order to maximize sales.
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Merchandise
Merchandise sales are managed by the local chapter of the American Red Cross,
another NPO. Typical merchandise splits are 70/o to the promoter/act, 30o/o for venue
on soft goods and 90/o/1 0/o on CO's or other music, which is very favorable in today's
marketplace. We are seeing some venues giving away the merchandise rights in order
to book an act. The Red Cross receives a flat rate for selling, with no incentive to sell
more.
We did not see any line items on the City's Profit and Loss Statement related to
Merchandise sales or expenses.
For the concert that we observed, merchandise was displayed in one area of the
concourse, just to the right of the main entrance. Unfortunately this is a heavy traffic
area, which is good for sales, but bad for circulation. In addition, customers queue
beyond the tables so cannot see the merchandise until they get up to the table, which
slows transaction time. On top of this, there is only one cashier that takes credit cards.
There were several concession stands that were closed during the concert which could
have sold merchandise, but only one was used for just the opening act so did not
produce the volume of business.
6/23/2014 -67- The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Recommendation:
While the merchandise was displayed on the wall with pricing which is
good, we would recommend professionally designed displays in any future
renovation of the Arena. Walk-in kiosks that allow customers to actually
see the product up close normally produce more sales than these flat
displays.
The unfortunate part of dealing with a charity group is they are not as motivated to
maximize sales, particularly if they are earning a fixed fee, as opposed to vendors who
are earning a living from their commissions.
Recommendation:
Even if retaining the Red Cross, switch their compensation to a
percentage of sales to reward them for increasing sales over the current
level. Merchandise is the highest price point of all items sold in the Arena
and therefore all cashiers must accept credit cards to maximize sales.
The City must dictate the number and location of merchandise stands and
the number of sellers in each sales location. The industry standard would
be to have 1 merchandise stand for every 1, 000 expected customers.
Sell all groups' merchandise in all stands. Given the extremely narrow
concourses it is important to offer multiple sales locations to spread out
the crowd. We would recommend moving ticket-taking out, so even the
building's lobby entrance could be a sales point for merchandise as well
as any closed concessions.
Financial Review and Recommended Improvements
We had developed several internal financial reports based on the original food and
beverage reports provided to us (2013 Budget) by making the basic changes
recommended in this report concerning menu and pricing, increased points of sale and
accepting credit cards at all locations. The result was a projected $6,000 increase in
net revenues to the Arena. With major improvements in the concession stands to
increase points of service and add cooking capabilities those net revenues will rise even
further.
We now understand that the Arena's actual beer sales in 2013 were approximately 55o/o
higher than projected in the 2013 budget that we had used as a base model. Therefore
we recommend working with facility management once the scope of improvements is
determined, to develop the most accurate financial projections for the future operation,
utilizing the latest base numbers as well as what physical improvements will be made.
6/23/2014 -68- The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
Crossroads Consulting Services LLC; Hobart Arena Foodservice Operational Review
Those projections will include hiring a full time concession manager, who would manage
all of the food, beverage, beer and merchandise operations. The existing volunteer
groups could still be retained to staff concessions and merchandise stands, but their
compensation would be based on a commission of sales actually generated. We would
recommend still allowing outside caterers to utilize the venue for banquets and
backstage catering. However those caterers would now pay the Arena 15o/o of sales for
any banquets.
In reviewing our report the following items are our key recommended improvements to
the foodservice operation .
./ Hire a full time concessions manager
./ Add credit card capabilities to all permanent and portable sales locations
./ Add cooking capabilities to one or two of the concession stands (this could also be a
service window from a new cooking commissary/kitchen)
./ Menu Engineering; increase sizes and prices for major events, add popular items,
delete slow sellers to streamline service
./ Incorporate beer into the food stands and snacks into the beer stands
./ Increase the number of events where beer is sold in controlled environments
./ Renegotiate not-for-profit service agreements (food and merchandise) to current
market rates
./ Marketing and concessions work together to expand sponsorships
./ Collaborate with sponsors to add professional graphics to the stands and upgrade
menu boards
./ Reduce counter heights of stands and condiment counters to the ADA level of 34"
6/23/2014
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The Bigelow Companies, Inc.
BALLARD* I(ING
& ASSOCIATES LTD
-70-
Ken Ballard
President
Ballard*King & Associates
2743 E Ravenhill Cir.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
(303) 470-8661
ken@ballardking.com
Table of Contents
Section I Introduction ........................................................................ 1
Section II Market Analysis and Trends Assessment ....................... 3
Section III Marina Development Directions ..................................... 18
Section IV Partnership Assessment ................................................... 26
Section v Funding Requirements .................................................... 29
Section VI Action Plan ....................................................................... 34
Section VII Conclusion ........................................................................ 37
Section VIII Appendix ........................................................................... 38
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section I - Introduction
The purpose of this study is to critically analyze the feasibility of redeveloping the Treasure
Island Marina in Troy, Ohio into a viable, regional, destination, recreation amenity that
highlights the Great Miami River corridor.
This report is based on information gathered from site visits to Troy and the Treasure Island
Marina on April 29 and 30, and July 28, 2009. In addition to a tour of the existing marina as
well as other recreation amenities in Troy and the greater Miami Valley, interviews were held
with key city staff and officials as well as other organizations with a possible impact on the
Treasure Island Marina.
Interviews:
Michael Beamish- Mayor, City of Troy
Troy Public Service and Safety Director
Troy Recreation Staff
Troy Parks Commissioners
Troy Recreation Board
Miami County Park District
Miami Conservancy District
Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission
Tin Roof Restaurant
Brewster Rhoads, Regional Director/Ohio Governors Office
Local citizens of Troy
Three Ohio communities with similar outdoor recreation amenities were utilized as case studies
for the project.
Case Study Communities:
Loveland
Xenia
Yell ow Springs
History:
The historic Hobart Marina in Troy was constructed by the Hobart Brothers in 1946. It was
originally built to serve family, friends and Hobart employees and was an active center for water
sports activities on the Great Miami River for many years. The marina building features a
unique and distinctive art deco design and was large enough to house a variety of water craft
including many Chris-Craft boats. The marina became the center for a variety of recreation
activities including boat racing, water skiing, picnics, dances, fishing, musical entertainment, and
a number of special events.
Ballard*King & Associates -72-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
With interest in water activities beginning to wane, in the 1970's the marina was donated to the
City of Troy by the Hobart family. From the beginning the front portion of the building served
as a restaurant while the river side went basically unused. Over the last 30 years the structure
)las gradually fallen into a state of disrepair as its function changed from a river oriented public
facility. However, the original beauty of the marina has not been forgotten and the City of Troy
in the last 5 years has spent nearly $400,000 in an attempt to begin to restore the building to its
original glory. With a new restaurant (Tin Roof) that is more in keeping with the theme of the
building and shared vision with the city to see the marina become a functional amenity on the
river conidor, the Treasure Island Marina is poised to begin a new era as a regional "Northern
Hub" for recreation.
Project Vision:
As stated in the City of Troy's promotional brochure on the Treasure Island Marina, the vision
for the facility is "Our desire is to bring back active recreation along the river, create renewed
interest in the environment and open the doors of educational and economic opportunity. All of
this begins at Treasure Island." More importantly Michael Beamish, Mayor of Troy, stated in
his 2009 speech at the River Summit "In short we want to create the Northern Hub, a place
people will head for recreation, relaxation and a fun dining experience".
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section II - Market Analysis and Trends Assessment
One of the keys to the feasibility of redeveloping the Treasure Island Marina is to understand the
potential market for such a facility and also to review the trends in various sports and water
activities that might be supported by the marina.
Demographic Characteristics: The primary focus of the marina will be to serve the residents
of Troy but it is recognized that facility will need to be a key "Northern Hub" along the Great
Miami River corridor as well.
The following is a summary of the basic demographic characteristics of Troy, Miami County and
the Miami Valley area (as designated by the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission).
This information was gathered through ESRI, a national demographic research firm.
Population Comparison:
City of Troy
Miami County
Miami Valley
Number of Households Comparison:
City of Troy
Miami County
Miami Valley
Number of Families Comparison:
City of Troy
Miami County
Miami Valley
Average Household Size Comparison
2000 Census
21,999
98,868
1,059,845
2000 Census
8,920
38,437
415,364
2000 Census
5,883
27,043
284,242
2000 Census
City of Troy 2.40
Miami County
Miami Valley
United States
Source - U.S. Census Bureau and ESRI
Ba11ard*King & Associates
2.54
2.47
2.59
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2009 Estimate
23,270
101,743
1,108,106
2009 Estimate
9,554
40,055
440,791
2009 Estimate
6,131
28,436
295,984
2009 Estimate
2.37
2.51
2.44
2.59
2014 Projection
23,817
103,240
1,128,528
2014 Projection
9,826
40,859
450,567
2014 Projection
6,203
28,666
299,819
2014 Projection
2.36
2.49
2.43
2.59
Median Age Comparison
2000 Census
City of Troy 35.2
Miami County 37.6
Miami Valley 36.2
Nationally 35.3
Median Household Income Comparison
City of Troy
Miami County
Miami Valley
Nationally
Demographic Summary:
2000 Census
$39,530
$44,130
$43,747
$42,164
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
2009 Estimate
37.5
39.8
38.0
36.9
2009 Estimate
$51,442
$55,636
$56,452
$54,719
2014 Projection
37.6
40.1
38.3
37.2
2014 Projection
$54,379
$58,716
$58,695
$56,938
The population base of Troy itself is reasonably small to support a marina with a wide
variety of activities and events. However with the anticipated regional focus of the
project, Miami County with over 100,000 residents and a total of over 1,000,000 in the
greater Miami Valley provides a very strong market for a marina.
The large regional population base also translates into a significant number of households
but the average household size is smaller than the national average indicating fewer
households with children.
The median age of all of the geographic areas is older than the national numbers also
indicating an aging population.
Median household income, one of the primary determiners of recreation participation, is
slightly higher in Miami County and the Miami Valley than the national numbers and the
general cost of living for the area is much lower than other areas of the US. This shows
the possibility of more discretionary income for recreation purposes.
Recreation Activities Participation: On an annual basis the National Sporting Goods
Association (NSGA) conducts an in-depth study and survey of how Americans spend their
leisure time. This information provides key data on participation in a variety of recreation
activities that could be supported by the Treasure Island Marina.
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Participation Rates
Activity
Bicycle Riding
Canoeing
Exercise Walking
Fishing (fresh water)
Running/Jogging
Kayaking
1
Age (median):
Age Income Region
16.5% 19.2% 21.2%
3.8% 4.5% 4.6%
36.2% 37.5% 35.8%
14.0% 15.5% 17.2%
13.1% 13.1% 12.3%
2.2% 2.2% 1.3%
Participation based on median age of the Miami Valley.
Nation Average
16.7% 18.4%
3.9% 4.2%
36.1% 36.4%
14.1% 15.2%
13.4% 13.0%
2.2% 2.0%
Income: Participation based on the 2009 estimated median household income in the Miami
Valley.
Region:
National:
Average:
Participation based on regional statistics (East North Central).
Participation based on national statistics.
Average of the four columns.
Participation Rates from 2000 to 2014
Activity Average 2000 Part. 2009 Part. 2014 Part.
Bicycle Riding 18.4% 176,575 184,978 188,603
Canoeing 4.2% - 40,384 42,306 43,135
Exercise Walking 36.4% 349,457 366,086 373,262
Fishing (fresh water) 15.2% 145,938 152,883 155,879
Running/Jogging 13.0% 124,630 130,561 133,120
Kayaking
2
2.0% 18,877 19,775 20,163
TOTAL 855,862 896,588 914,161
Difference
12,028
2,751
23,804
9,941
8,490
1,286
58,300
The estimated participation numbers indicated above are for each of the sports listed and do not
necessarily translate into expected use figures at the Treasure Island Marina since many
participants utilize other facilities for these activities and may participate in more than one
activity at a time. However, these figures do indicate the total number of people participating in
various activities within the Miami Valley. These statistics show a particularly strong market for
walking and bike riding as well as fishing and running/jogging.
1
These numbers are from the 2007 NSGA survey.
2
These numbers are from the 2007 NSGA survey.
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Sports Participation Summary
Sport Nat'l Rank Primary Service Area % Age Group
Exercise Walking
Bicycle Riding
Fishing (net)
Running/Jogging
Canoeing
Kayaking
3
Nat'l Rank:
% Participation:
Age Group:
..__ ____ ____,..._ __ Participation ~ - - - - ...___ __
1
6
7
12
27
.....__ __ _
36.4%
18.4%
15.2%
13.0%
4.2%
2.0%
Popularity of sport based on national survey.
.----
45-54
7-11
7-11
25-34
18-24
~ - - - - - - - - 18-24
Percent of population that would participate in this sport in the Miami Valley.
The age group with the highest level of participation based on national survey.
Note: Age group participation is generally on a bell curve, with the age group noted having the
highest rate and then declining from there.
3
These numbers are from the 2007 NSGA survey.
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Comparison of State Statistics with National Statistics: Utilizing information from the
National Sporting Goods Association, the following charts illustrate the participation numbers in
selected sports in the state of Ohio.
Ohio Participation Rates
Sport
Exercise Walking
Bicycle Riding
Fishing (net)
Running/Jogging
c . 4
anoe1ng
Kayaking
5
Ohio Participation:
Age Group:
Largest Number:
Ohio Participation Age Group Largest Number
(in thousands)
3,276 45-54 45-54
1,766 7-11 12-17
1,769 7-11 35-44
1,363 25-34 25-34
0 18-24 25-34
122 18-24 45-54
The number of people (in thousands) in Ohio who participated more than once in the
activity in 2008 and were 7 years of age.
The age group in which the sport is most popular. The age group where the highest
percentage of the age span participates in the activity. (Example: The highest percent of
an age group that participates in exercise walking is 55-64.) This is a national statistic.
The age group with the highest number of participants. Example: The greatest number of
exercise walkers is in the 45-54 age group. (Note: This statistic is driven more by the
sheer number of people in the age group than by the popularity of the sport in the age
span.) This is a national statistic.
4
There were no state statistics collected in 2008 from Ohio.
5
These numbers are from the 2007 NSGA survey.
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Recreation Expenditures Spending Potential Index: In addition to participation in recreation
activities ESRI also measures recreation expenditures in a number of different areas and then
indexes this against a national number of 100. The following comparisons are possible.
Recreation Expenditures Spending Potential Index
City of Troy
SPI Average Spent
Fees for Participant Sports 91 $100.47
Fees for Recreational Lessons 87 $113.85
Social, Recreation, Club Membership 90 $153.42
Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 65 $64.81
Bicycles 83 $15.43
Water Sports 84 $6.14
Other Sports Equipment 89 $9.77
Miami County
SPI Average Spent
Fees for Participant Sports 98 $108.99
Fees for Recreational Lessons 96 $125.08
Social, Recreation, Club Membership 97 $165.97
Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 73 $72.61
Bicycles 87 $16.27
Water Sports 100 $7.29
Other Sports Equipment 99 $10.80
Miami Valley
SPI Average Spent
Fees for Participant Sports 102 $113.43
Fees for Recreational Lessons 100 $130.01
Social, Recreation, Club Membership 102 $174.10
Exercise Equipment/Game Tables 75 $74.78
Bicycles 94 $17.56
Water Sports 100 $7.26
Other Sports Equipment 101 $11.06
Average Amount Spent: The average amount spent for the service or item in a year.
SPI: Spending potential index as compared to the national number of 100.
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Other Statistics:
According to the Outdoor Industry Association, participation in kayaking more than
doubled between 1978 and 2004. Participation in canoeing also remains very strong.
In the book Outdoor Recreation in America, authors Clayne Jensen and Steven Guthrie
report that by the year 2000 about 10% of Americans canoed and 3% kayaked. They also
noted that between 1998 and 2002 the Sporting Goods Manufacturing Association
recorded a 59% growth in participation in kayaking and a 20% loss in canoeing
participation.
The Outdoor Foundation in its 2009 Outdoor Recreation Participation survey noted the
following:
o Canoeing increased in popularity nationally from 9,154,000 in 2006 to 9,935,000
in 2008. The greatest increases in the last year were in the 25-44 age group
(10.5%) and the largest decrease was in the 18-24 (-14.9%).
o Kayaking (recreational) increased in popularity nationally from 4,134,000 in 2006
to 5,025,000 in 2008. The greatest increases in the last year were in the 25-44 age
group (15.2%) and the largest decrease was in the 18-24 (-3.3%).
Other Trends and Considerations: The following are other trends and considerations
regarding the viability of the Treasure Island Marina.
Rory Robinson of the National Park Service noted the following in 2007:
o The active outdoor recreation economy is a $730 billion annual contribution to the
US economy.
o In sales comparisons, active recreation retail sales are second only to the
telecommunications industry.
o Increases in commercial and retail occupancy are higher in communities with
trails and sales tax rates are higher as well.
o Corporate relocation and retention ranks "Quality Place" in the top reasons for
determining where to move.
o Recreational trails and open spaces, collectively termed "greenways", make sense
culturally, socially, recreationally, and economically.
In a 2004 survey by the National Association of Realtors and the National Association of
Home Builders listed trails as the top amenity they would like to see in a new
community.
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The Rails to Trails Conservancy reports:
o Trails promote historical preservation.
o Trails impact cultural awareness and community identity.
o Trails help to promote eco tourism.
John Crompton, the noted parks and recreation scholar from Texas A&M University, has
documented how property values increase with a property that is near a trail or other park
amenity.
Landscape Architecture magazine, in a number of articles that have been published in the
last eighteen months, has featured urban rivers that have been revitalized and the positive
impact that this has had on the communities and actual use of the river itself.
Quality of life is becoming an increasingly more important factor in where people chose
to live and work.
Promoting livable and walkable communities is a critical aspect of most community
planning efforts.
With increasing levels of obesity in Americans, trails and other outdoor recreational
pursuits can help initiate a more active lifestyle.
Trails provide an alternate form of transportation.
As the landscape of the United States becomes more urbanized there are increasingly less
opportunities to have contact with nature.
Case Studies: The following is a brief assessment of three other Ohio communities that have a
strong emphasis on outdoor recreation (biking, hiking, canoeing, kayaking, etc.) facilities and
programs.
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Loveland, Ohio
Loveland is a community that IS located on the Little Miami River that is known for its
downtown historic district.
1. Key amenities
The city is located at the far south end of the Little Miami Scenic Trail and the trail runs
right through the historic district. Nesbit Park is the key public amenity that is in town
and on the trail. It features a large amphitheater that hosts a large variety of events and
activities. However there is no indoor space and there are a very limited number of
restaurants in the immediate area. Several bike, running and other sports related
businesses have shops next to the trail. There is also easy access to the Little Miami
River in close proximity to the trail and there is a private canoe livery immediately next
to the river. This allows for both trail and river activities to occur.
2. History
The city is well known for its position on the trail and in fact many people refer to the
Little Miami Scenic Trail as the "Loveland Bike Trail". When the main railroad line that
went through the center of town was permanently vacated then the city was able to work
with the state of Ohio to convert the old railroad bed into a trail. The city then developed
many of the ancillary amenities directly next to the trail.
3. Local or regional orientation
The trail and the river have a strong regional orientation and people come from around
the northeast Cincinnati metro area to access the Little Miami trail.
4. Estimate of annual users
The city estimates that there are between 175,000 to 200,000 trail users annually.
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5. Funding
The trail's funding came primarily from the state but other support amenity dollars came
from city .funds as well as other regional sources and grants.
While the state is responsible for the actual maintenance of the trail itself, the city
maintains all of the areas immediately adjacent to the trail as well as Nesbit Park.
6. Economic impact
No specific studies have been completed on the impact of the Little Miami Scenic Trail
on the Loveland economy, but the city and the chamber of commerce believes that the
trail and river have a critical economic impact on Loveland.
7. Important things to remember
The trail runs through the historic district of the city which is important.
There are a large number of community events that are conducted throughout the
year.
There is both trail and river access.
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Xenia, Ohio
Xenia is known for its incredible network of bike paths and walking trails.
1. Key amenities
The community boasts 4 main regional trails that meet at the Xenia Station hub building
(museum and classroom) which is part of the former train station and rail yard. A
significant number of special events (Greene Trails Cycling Classic, etc.), festivals and a
farmers market are staged out of the Xenia Station area.
2. History
Xenia was originally known as a railroad town that had many rail lines coming into the
city. As the railroad industry began to disappear the city stmted to acquire right of ways
on the old rail beds to turn these into paved trails. From this a four trail system was
developed with the help of a bikeway master plan that was developed by the city. This
effort was supported by a city manager and parks and recreation director that strongly
supported the concept.
3. Local or regional orientation
The trail system with its connections to other neighboring communities in Greene County
has a very strong regional orientation although the trails are also heavily utilized by locals
as well.
4. Estimate of annual users
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It is generally estimated that the trail system in Xenia attracts 500,000 or more users a
year.
5. Funding
Much of the capital funding for the acquisition of the right of ways and construction of
the trails came from grants and from State of Ohio transportation funds. Greene County
also provided some funding as well .
The trails are maintained by Greene County through a contractual agreement with the
city. The county maintains all of the primary trails in the county with a similar contract
with other cities.
6. Economic impact
The city reports that the trails in general have had a very important economic impact on
the community by bringing a large number of people from other area.s that spend money
on equipment rentals, food and lodging in Xenia. In addition there has been an increase
in the number of restaurants, hotels and bike shops.
It was originally hoped that with the renovation of Xenia Station that this would spur
economic development activity in the immediate area however this has not really
occurred.
7. Important things to remember
A central hub of operations is needed.
The facility must be large enough to accommodate a variety of uses. The Xenia
Station building is too small and does not have enough amenities or uses to attract
more people.
Having strong project partners is essential for funding but also for operations.
There needs to be a series of special events to draw people to the area.
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Yellow Springs, Ohio
Yellow Springs is a small "funky" community that IS known for its recreational and
entertainment attractions.
1. Key amenities
The city is located in the middle of the Little Miami Scenic Trail and the trail goes right
through the town. The refurbished train station serves as the hub and houses the chamber
of commerce and restrooms for trail users. The community also runs a large number of
special events in town and near the trail. There are also a significant number of shops
and restaurants in the immediate area and there is good parking and access.
2. History
For more than 100 years the town was a popular attraction with hotels, spas, boarding
houses and taverns. The Little Miami Railroad made the community the center of trade
and recreation in the area. Today the railroad bed is the trail and visitors come for the
shopping, dining, recreation and events.
3. Local or regional orientation
The trail and the community in general have a strong regional orientation.
4. Estimate of annual users
There are no estimates for the number of trail users.
5. Funding
The trails funding came from a number of regional sources and grants while the train
station was built locally through fundraising and it is the property of the town.
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6. Economic impact
The Yell ow Springs Chamber of Commerce reports that the trail has a huge economic
impact on the community but there has never been any actual study done to measure the
true impact.
7. Important things to remember
Having the trail come directly through the town is important.
The train station is an important hub for the trail and the community.
The restaurants and shops are a major draw to the community.
Having a number of special events throughout the year is essential.
Other Sources of Information
Brewster Rhoads - SW Regional Director/Ohio Governors Office and avid kayaker
Project Input-
Need to have the facility be a true destination point.
There needs to be a park like setting with adequate parking, picnic tables, restrooms,
playgrounds, etc.
Stage or amphitheater for events.
There will need to be a series of on-going events and activities to draw people to the
manna area.
Consider reenergizing the island itself.
The ability to store canoes and kayaks in a covered area (for a fee) would be a major
amenity.
The water quality will have to be good and the water levels controlled.
Reconnecting to the river is important
o Will stimulate economic development
o Helps with work force retention
o Celebrates the river's heritage
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Overall Key Findings:
Based on the other benchmark communities and interviews with other individuals, the following
is a summary of the key information that was gathered.
~
!
,,
A community must develop a reputation and appeal as a location for specific trail and
river recreation activities.
The community's recreation amenities must have a regional draw.
There needs to be a central "hub" facility in a community to coordinate activities .
(.
~
~ Conducting a series of events or activities is absolutely essential to bring interest and
attention to the community and the recreation amenities that are being promoted.
r : ~
Celebrating the historical aspects of a community or a specific amenity is important.
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Having the trail and any river access very close to downtown is important.
Recreation amenities and activities contribute to a strong community identity and stress
the importance of quality of life.
Partnerships with other entities (county and regional planning entities) as well as private
sector providers (bike shops, canoe and kayaking companies and restaurants) are
essential.
Communities have indicated that recreation amenities and activities have had a positive
economic impact.
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Section III - Marina Development Directions
Based on the information gathered from the market analysis and trends assessment plus
information from the project interviews and the site visits to Troy, the following are marina
development directions.
Market Opportunities: The following market opportunities are present in the Miami Valley.
The Treasure Island Marina is located in a position where it can promote both river and
trail activities. This is a uni ue market position that many other facilities do not enjoy in
Ohio.
There is an existing building and marina that are in good structural condition that can
form the basic infrastructure for a new facility.
The marina has a rich history to build upon. This provides some name recognition in the
region.
There is an existing restaurant tenant that Is interested in expanding the overall
recreational opportunities of the marina.
There are a number of other existing city recreation facilities in the immediate area
surrounding the marina. This provides an opportunity to cross market to a much larger
recreation audience.
Connecting the marina back to Troy's downtown will be a challenge due to distance but
will be important. Troy Main Street should recognize that the redevelopment of the
marina creates a unique destination feature for the City of Troy.
Project Keys: The following are keys to project success.
The marina and park will need to be a significant location for public gatherings, civic
events, social activities, festivals, and sports events along the river.
Marina improvements must be considered a quality of life issue for the City of Troy.
The marina will need to have a strong regional appeal.
The Great Miami River Trail will need to be completed north to Piqua as well as south
from Tipp City to Vandalia to develop a true regional dra\v from the bike trail.
There will need to be a strong focus on three main elements, water, trail, and park/event
activities.
It will be important that the marina have as much year round use (beyond the restaurant)
as possible.
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The marina must be inviting and enticing to draw users to the area.
The Tin Roof restaurant will be a key aspect of the project and will need to expand its
presence in the area. They will be counted on to not only operate the food service
operation but also the marina and other events taking place at the park. Their financial
success is essential to the future of the project.
The history of the Hobart Marina and the events and activities that took place there will
need to be honored and celebrated.
The Treasure Island Marina will need to be linked to other recreation amenities just
across the river including Community Park, Hobart Arena, and the levee area where the
Strawberry Festival is held. It will also be critical that connections to downtown Troy be
reinforced. A key element in this effort will be the ability to use the future new Adams
Street Bridge to enhance bike and pedestrian movement between these amenities.
The marina is at a key transition point between the more urban areas of the Great Miami
River to the south and natural areas of the river to the north.
Non-motorized use of the Great Miami River needs to be strongly encouraged with
limited to no motor craft access.
The issues of periodic flooding of the marina area will need to be considered and planned
for with any physical improvements to the facility.
The overall safety and security of the marina and park area will have to be improved.
The development of the marina should be a mechanism to increase economic
development in Troy.
The City of Troy has limited funds that can be utilized for making i1nprovements to
Treasure Island Marina and participation by other partners including Tin Roof restaurant
will be essential.
The City of Troy's Recreation Department staff and resources are already over stretched
and their involvement with any additional operations and programming at the marina will
need to be limited. Additional internal resources will be necessary to expand successful,
quality, operations and programming.
The city should consider the development of city wide trails master plan that emphasizes
connections to the marina as well as downtown.
A redeveloped Treasure Island Marina will need to have a strong overall marketing plan
that integrates both local and regional efforts as well as all project partners. The plan
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should also link efforts with other Troy facilities and activities and especially with the
downtown area.
It is critical that at least the basic elements of the marina (canoe and kayak rentals, etc.)
be operational by the summer of 2010.
Marina Facilities: The following are important elements to include in a redeveloped Treasure
Island Marina.
General
The Treasure Island Marina must develop a uniform theme and image. This should play
off of the art deco look of the existing marina building.
Good water quality is absolutely essential to a positive overall experience of the visitor.
As a result there needs to be a constant flow of water through the marina area itself as
well as aeration of the water through a fountain (this is currently under way).
The marina water area has recently been redged but this will need to be redone
approximately every three years to ensure a consistent depth of at least 4 feet. This will
allow for better use of the boat launch and support the rental of other non-motorized craft.
The water level also needs to be more consistent in the late summer and fall so the marina
can have constant use.
There will need to be the development of a looped trail that will support short biking and
walking tours of the area. This will increase more local use and reduce the dependence
on regional destination use.
The vehicular entrance to the marina itself needs to be more visible and requires a
pronounced gateway entrance with significant signage.
There needs to be improved lighting of the marina area including the building, parking
lots, island and water areas. This could include themed lighting for the holidays.
More color needs to be introduced to the area in general. This could be done through
banners, flags and other fabric associated with the actual amenities noted below.
Steps or a ramp should be built from the parking area to the top of the levee to improve
access to and from the trail.
An attempt should be made to acquire the 5 acres that are immediately to the north of the
marina. This would expand the park area surrounding the marina itself, allow for a small
looped trail and provide for a gateway to a larger looped trail with another foot/bike
bridge across the river itself.
The existing geese problem will need to be controlled.
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Marina Building
The exterior renovation of the building and a return to the original art deco look needs to
be completed.
A larger outdoor deck area with enhanced views of the river, marina and Treasure Island
itself are necessary to support outdoor dining and other events.
Consideration should be given to removing the boat storage ramp leading from the
marina into the building itself. This will open up the deck and views to the marina and
island.
The area under the marina building needs to be cleaned up and rehabbed so that it can
actually be used for canoe, kayak and paddleboat storage (this is currently underway).
Establishing a rental area for personal canoes and kayaks should be a priority.
The areas of the building that are not cunently in use for the restaurant need to be
developed into a marina store that rents canoes, kayaks, paddle boats and possibly even
pontoon boats. The store should also have the ability to rent bikes and sell items such as
fishing supplies, life jackets, biking gear, etc. In addition there should be a quick serve
food service operation.
Restrooms that can be easily accessed by marina users and do not interfere with
restaurant operations or use.
An outdoor area that is immediately next to the restaurant that can support food based
events, parties, and activities.
Island and Park Area
Actual floating docks will need to be added to the water area to support the rental of a
variety of water craft. This would also include a courtesy dock for people using the boat
launch.
Informational kiosks should be located along the trail to promote the Treasure Island
Marina and its services.
The park area that is adjacent to the marina and main parking lot needs to be enhanced
for use by marina patrons as well as being able to support special events. This should
include:
o Improved landscaping that enhances a large lawn area that can be utilized for
festivals and other special events. This area will need good lighting and adequate
power to host such activities.
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o A large covered pavilion area with picnic tables (if this is permissible in the river
area).
o Small amphitheater area to support events. This would include a small raised
stage area and lawn seating.
o Restrooms that can support park activities.
o ishing areas accessible from the park area.
Treasure Island itself must be improved. Dry access and use of the area needs to be
encouraged. This should include:
o New playground equipment (the existing equipment is not in compliance and is in
the wrong location).
o Small picnic or events shelter.
o Replacement of the lighthouse using the original design specifications.
o Removal of the overhead power lines.
o Utilize decorative lighting to enhance and showcase the island from the marina
building.
Programs and Services: In addition to making physical additions and improvements to
Treasure Island Marina, developing a strong, on-going, level of program and service options will
be critical.
The Treasure Island River Adventure Series provides an excellent programming base to
build from for the future. This series should continue and will need. to evolve as the
marina's physical improvements become a reality. This series should continue to be
organized and conducted by Troy Parks and Recreation staff but with limited resources,
it should not be expected that the series will be expanded or other programs added for
the marina in general unless partnerships with other organizations are developed.
However, this series has provided for much needed local and regional awareness of the
marina and has provided opportunities for the city to network with local government
agencies, state agencies and universities. These events have shown the need and interest
in revitalizing the marina.
The Tin Roof restaurant has expressed an interest in developing some activities and
services on its own and this should be encouraged and coordinated with other city
events. These could include such activities as:
o Car shows
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o Small concerts
o Weddings and wedding receptions
o Holiday events (hay rides, etc.)
With the presence of the river and other natural areas, developing some environmental
education programs and events will be possible. Having other non-profit organizations
in the Troy area provide these activities should be encouraged.
There will need to be a mix between river based, trail based, and park based activities and
events. These could include such activities as:
o Bike races
o Triathlons
o Bike tours
o Canoe/kayak races
o Canoe/kayak tours
o Fishing derbies
o Car/boat shows
o Concerts
o Outdoor movies
o Festivals
o Weddings/reunions/ graduations
Regionally organized events such as bike races, kayaking/canoe events and other special
activities will need to be linked with the Treasure Island Marina. It is anticipated that
many of these events would be organized and funded by other partners or entities.
While it is recognized that most of the programs and activities will be offered during the
summer season developing activities for spring and fall as well as at least some winter
activities will be important.
Potential Economic Impact: The following is a brief assessment of the possible economic
impact of the redevelopment of the Treasure Island Marina. These calculations do not cover
possible economic impacts outside of Troy itself that may occur from the marina. This is only a
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tudimentary assessment based on very basic project assumptions. A more detailed economic
impact study should be completed when a definite well defined plan for the facility is developed.
As a result these preliminary economic impact numbers are conservative. It should also be noted
that no overall multiplier was applied to the base economic numbers. This estimate includes
only new expenses and revenues beyond what is currently being generated at the site.
Indirect- Expenditures by marina users outside of the marina itself.
Local Expenditures
Estimated Annual Users -100,000-150,000
100,000-150,000 x $47.00/per: day trip*
Total Estimated Indirect Economic Impact
$4,700,000-$7,050,000
$4,700,000-$7,050,000
Direct - Expenditures for employee compensation and the purchase of goods and services
associated with the marina. This number includes Tin Roof employees, City of Troy staff
(assigned to Treasure Island facilities and/or programs) and goods and services sold.
Estimated Direct Economic Impact
Grand Total
$250,000-$400,000
$4,950,000-$7,450,000
This initial estimate of the possible economic impact of the Treasure Island Marina on the local
community indicates a considerable annual monetary benefit is possible.
* Expenditures per day were provided by the Miami County Visitors and Convention Bureau
based on State of Ohio produced information and averages that have been benchmarked with
other local communities and areas of Ohio with similar demographic characteristics. This
number reflects a realistic projection of per trip expenditures for the Troy area in 2009. In the
following pages references are made to other lower per trip expenditure numbers from other
studies but these figures are based on information from at least 11 years ago to as long as 17
years in the past and are not nearly as comprehensive in the types or amounts of expenditures
that are anticipated at the Treasure Island Marina.
Other Economic Impact Information: Noted below are what other studies have reported on
the economic impact of trails and waterways in communities.
The American Planning Association in a 2002 article noted how parks enhanced
economic development using five key points:
o Key Point# 1 -Real property values are positively affected
o Key Point #2- Municipal revenues are increased
o Key Point #3 - Affluent retirees are attracted and retained
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o Key Point #4- Knowledge workers and talent are attracted to live and work
o Key Point #5- Homebuyers are attracted to purchase homes
The National Bicycle and Pedestrian Clearinghouse in a 1995 technical brief indicated
the following economic benefits of trails.
o If you build it they will come - bike and pedestrian trails attract a large number of
users and this expands the number of restaurants, stores and overnight
accommodations in a community.
o Trail related tourist and visitor expenditures are high - studies of a number of
trail communities across the United States in 1992 indicated that daily
expenditures from trail users varied from $3.97 to as much as $25.85 a day.
o Trailside property increases in value - walking and bike paths ranked third
among 39 features identified as crucial factors in a home purchasing decision.
o Increase in business - in communities where trails have been added there has
been a significant increase in restaurants, shops and overnight accommodations
supported in part by the number of trail users.
o Trails save taxpayer dollars - the use of bike trails can be an alternative form of
transportation which saves energy.
Rails to Trails Conservancy in an article titled "Economic Benefits of Trails and
Greenways" touted the following .
. o Community gems- trails and greenways are gems in a community and contribute
to the quality of life and economic vitality of a city.
o An economic boon for col"nmunities - trail and greenway systems have become the
central focus of tourist activities in some communities and the impetus for kick
starting a stagnate economy. In a 1998 study, visitors to the Little Miami Scenic
Trail spent an average of $13.54 per visit on food, beverages and transportation
plus $277 a year on clothing and equipment. This was based on 150,000 trail
users a year.
o Impacts on property values- trails and greenways have increased property values.
In a 2002 survey of recent home buyers trails ranked as the number two most
important community amenity out of 18 choices.
o Combining enviromnental an economic benefits - not only do trails provide
economic benefits they also enhance water quality and provide critical open space
buffers in communities.
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Section IV- Partnership Assessment
An increasing large number of new parks and recreation facilities now involve some form of
partnership with community organizations, regional entities and other recreation service
providers. For partnerships to be effective the following must occur.
Must actively pursue and sell the benefits.
Weigh the benefits vs. the price.
Don't compromise the project's mission statement.
Must have a shared vision.
May have to meet differing needs and expectations.
Development and operations requirements must be clearly defined.
An important step in determining the feasibility of a redeveloped Treasure Island Marina is to
assess the partnering opportunities that exist.
Through the planning study process a number of organizations and entities were identified as
possible partners for the project.
Tin Roof Restaurant
Miami County Park District
Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission
Miami Conservancy District
University of Dayton-Rivers Institute
Troy Foundation
Private recreation providers
Outdoor sports organizations
Community groups
Business and corporate
The following is a general summary of the partnership assessment and recommendations for how
to proceed with partneting on the Treasure Island Marina project.
Specific Project Roles -Partnerships can be categorized into three possible levels.
Primary or Equity Project Partners - These would be the main partners in the project who have
the most interest, the ability to fund, and a willingness to be a part of the development and
operation of the facility.
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Tin Roof Restaurant - Since the restaurant is the tenant of the existing marina building it
is expected that they will be the primary partner on the redevelopment of the marina.
They hope to continue to renovate the restaurant itself and expand operations to the deck
area. The restaurant has also expressed a strong interest in increasing its operation to
include the rental of bicycles, canoes, kayaks, and paddle boats as well as operating a
small marina store. They would be responsible for making most of the improvements to
the building for the store as well as the restaurant. It is envisioned that Tin Roof would
be the primary operator of most of the marina and its on-going services. There is also
interest in organizing and conducting a number of special events. Coordinating the
master plan for the Treasure Island Marina with the restaurant will be critical. With a
strong need to have at least a portion of the marina operational by the summer of 2010,
the City of Troy may need to work with Tin Roof to amend the current lease agreement
to allow subleasing of the marina business itself. It should also be recognized that if Tin
Roof is unable to continue operation of the restaurant and marina for any reason there
will be a sizeable impact on the viability of the revitalization of the Treasure Island
Marina.
Troy Foundation- Although it is not anticipated that the Troy Foundation will have any
direct involvement in the actual redevelopment and operation of the marina itself, they
would be considered as a possible primary partner for their role in funding a portion of
the project.
Secondary Project Partners- These organizations have a direct interest in the project but not to
the same level as a primary pat1ner. Capital funding for the project is limited but there can be
some assistance with program and service delivery.
Miami Conservancy District - The district helps preserve land for recreation as well as
assists with funding the development of recreational trails and riverfront projects. From a
planning perspective their involvement in the process will be important and they may
also be a funding agent for improvements to the river area itself.
Miami County Park District- The county park district is an important partner as they are
responsible for the development of portions of the Great Miami River Trail especially to
the north of Troy. With a strong regional focus, interaction with the county and their
parks system will be essential to fully develop the marina concept. They may also
provide some programs and events at the facility.
Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission - This association of local governments
and other organizations in the greater Dayton area is an important resource for planning
especially for facilities that are trying to develop a regional approach and are reliant on
other governmental agencies along the trails and the Greater Miami River.
Private Recreation Providers - In an effort to offer a wide variety of recreation programs
and services, partnering with select private recreation providers will need . to be
encouraged. This could be event promoters, or equipment providers (bike and canoe
shops, etc.).
Ballard*King & Associates
-98-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Support Partners- These organizations support the redevelopment of Treasure Island Marina but
would see limited to no direct involvement in the development or operation of the marina.
University of Dayton - With their Rivers Institute and annual River Summit the
university is a big supporter of use and activation of the Great Miami River. The
university will be a resource for the marina project.
Outdoor Sports Organizations - Local outdoor sports organizations could be primary
users of the marina if it supports their activities. It should be expected that these groups
would be strong proponents for the project.
Community Organizations - Developing working relationships with community
organizations and service clubs should provide much needed support for the project as
well as possible users of the marina.
Business and Corporate Community - It will be important that the corporate community
be approached with a variety of sponsorship opportunities to enhance the revenue
prospects of the marina.
Support partners have limited direct impact on the development and operation of the Treasure
Island Marina but their involvement in the process should still be a priority to build overall
awareness of the project and help to promote the uses and activities that would take place there.
As possible on going users of the facility they could provide a solid revenue stream for the
facility as well.
As the redevelopment of the Treasure Island Marina becomes closer to reality, the opportunities
for partnering will increase. A well written partnership agreement will have to be drafted
between any organizations involved in the project that clearly outlines the capital funding
requirements, project ownership, priorities of use/pricing, operating structure, facility
maintenance and long-term capital funding sources. These agreements should be in place prior
to committing to begin actual construction of more aspects of the project.
Ballard*King & Associates
-99-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section V - Funding Requirements
One of the major challenges for most recreation projects is determining a method for funding the
capital development of the facility. While the primary source for the project funding is
anticipated to be the city, other funding sources could allow for a more comprehensive marina to
be developed. As a result a number of possible funding sources were investigated.
Capital Funding:
There is a number of possible capital funding sources for the project.
City of Troy - As a part of a long range financial strategy the City should pursue all avenues
available for capital funding of the project. These avenues include targeting grants administrated
by a multitude of agencies and branches within: Federal, State, Regional, and Local entities.
With the diversity of the marina facility funds could be available in a wide range of categories
such as transportation, recreation, health, environment, and others. Several possibilities are
noted below.
State of Ohio - There is the possibility of some state funding through government grants but
considering the current economic c9ndition of the state this may be unlikely.
Miami County- Much like the state, it may be difficult to receive much project funding from this
source.
Federal Government - Grant funding for these types of projects has actually begun to increase
and it may be possible for some dollars through sources like the LWCF.
Troy Foundation- There is a strong possibility of the project gaining a level of funding from this
source.
Private Financing - With an equity partner in the Tin Roof restaurant, it is expected that they
will fund most of the interior improvements to the marina building.
Fundraising - A possible source of capital funding could come from a comprehensive
fundraising campaign in the city and the suiTounding area. Contributions from local businesses,
private individuals and social service organizations should be targeted. To maximize this form
of funding a private fundraising consultant may be necessary. A goal of fundraising could be to
fund between 10% and 25% of the capital cost of the project.
Partnerships- There is the possibility of including other equity (primary) partners in the project
but this will be very difficult. As a result additional partnership dollars received from other
organizations is expected to be very limited. Partnership funding derived from corporate dollars
may be able to increase the level of revenue from this source but a more detailed partnership
assessment will be necessary to determine a realistic level of expectation.
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Grants/endowments- There are a number of grants and/or endowments that are available for
recreation projects. In fact there appears to be a greater focus on funding parks and projects that
improve trails and river access than many other types of recreation amenities. There is a
possibility of receiving a reasonably high level of funding from this source if targeted sources are
pursued.
Naming Rights and Sponsorships- Considering the size and magnitude of the project and the
fact that there is already a private vendor involved (Tin Roof) it is unlikely that naming rights
can or should be sold for the project. However sponsorships of different aspects of the marina
project as well as events and activities that take place there should be encouraged.
Beyond public financing all of the other potential funding sources noted above should be
explored with the goal of funding at least 50% of the total project from non-tax sources.
Operations Funding:
With the scenario that Tin Roof will not only operate the restaurant but also be able to develop a
rental business for bikes, canoes, kayaks and other equipment as well as a marina store, much of
the cost of operating the marina will be covered by the restaurant. However the water portion of
the marina, the boat launch and the park area surrounding the marina itself (as well as most of
the parking lots), will have to be maintained by the City of Troy. In addition, city sponsored
activities and events beyond what is being currently offered through the Treasure Island River
Adventure Series would need to be funded as well. The goal of the marina will be to cover as
much of the operational costs as possible through revenues generated by the facility itself.
However it is anticipated that there will be a substantial operations shortfall that will need to be
funded each year. As a result an annual funding plan for the shortfall will be necessary.
City of Troy - It is anticipated that the responsibility for the operational shortfall will be on the
city. However the city will need to identify how the shortfall will be handled and from what
source the funding will come from. It is anticipated that in addition to tax dollars that the city
will be able to garner funding from grants and other sources as well (see below).
Troy Foundation- In addition to (or instead of) capital financing the Troy Foundation may be
able to help fund some events and activities.
Other Government Agencies - There could be some funding for specific events or activities at
the marina. However, this will probably be at a reasonably low level.
Partnerships- With the possible partners that have been identified for the project it is likely that
the center could receive some operational funding from this source. A carefully worded
partnership agreement will be necessary to confirm and guarantee the level of funding that is
possible and the length of time that it should be expected.
Endowment Fund - This would require additional fundraising to establish an operational
endowment fund that would be designed to fund capital replacement and improvements at the
marina. It is often difficult to raise funds for operational endowments.
Ballard*King & Associates
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Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Sponsorships - The establishment of sponsorships for different programs and services as well as
funding for different aspects of the facility's operation is possible. But in most cases this
provides a relatively low revenue stream for funding day to day operating costs for recreation
facilities.
Grants - There are grants that are available for programs and services that focus on
environmental education, and outdoor recreation. It may be possible to acquire funding for
specific programs from this source.
Specific Capital Expenditure Estimates:
Below are listed capital cost estimates for specific components associated with the
redevelopment of the Treasure Island Marina. It should be noted that these are very general
estimates only that will need to be verified by architects and contractors. The exact cost will also
depend on further definition of the specific improvement.
General
- Water quality improvements
Dredging
Aeration
- Looped trail
-Gateway entrance
- Improved lighting
- Acquire 5 acres & expand into a park
(Does not include land costs, but a
donation is possible)
Marina Building
- Building renovation
Exterior
Decks
Under building
Restrooms
Events area
Island and Park Areas
- Floating docks
Ballard*King & Associates
$50,000 to $75,000
$250,000 to $500,000
$50,000 to $70,000
$40,000 to $60,000
$50,000 to $70,000
$1,600,000 to $1,900,000
$10,000 to $20,000
-102-
- Park area landscaping
Picnic pavilion
Amphitheater
- Parking lot improvements
- Treasure Island
Playground
Picnic pavilion
Lighthouse
Overhead power lines
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
$200,000 to $300,000
$75,000 to $100,000
$150,000 to $250,000
Grand Total of Capital Expenditures $2,475,000 to $3,345,000
On-Going Local-Regional Capital Expenditures:
The following is a listing of recreational trail investments in Troy arid the surrounding area over
the last few years.
Troy Connector (River Levee Trail)
Concord Township Trail (Locks & Towpath)
Dye Mill Trail
River Trail (Peterson Road North)
Tipp City North to Troy-Concord Twp
Twin Arch Trail (under construction now)
Tipp City South ( consttuction start Fall 2009)
Lytle to Eldean (proposed in 2010)
River Crossing Bridge (20 11 Peterson Rd. Area)
$ 139,083
$ 232,011
$ 690,000
$ 603,000
$ 647,476
$ 700,000
$1,500,000
$ 250,000
$ 900,000
$5,661,570
Much of these funds were achieved through grants leveraged by matching funds received
through a levy passed for the Miami County Park District.
Upcoming Water Trails Investments:
Concord Township- has purchased land across from El Sombrero along 25-A to develop a river
connection park. The park will have a canoe/kayak ramp for water access, parking, and a shelter.
The township hopes to begin the development of the park in the fall of 2009 or during 2010
depending on funding sources. The estimated investment is $125,000.
Miami County Park District - is hoping to develop two river connection locations and is now
seeking funds for their development. The Park District is also reviewing the creation of "leave
no trace" camp sites at the river connection points. Estimated cost for both connections is
$125,000
Ballard*King & Associates
-103-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
The City of Piqua -is hoping to enhance the existing river access at Goodrich Giles Park and is
currently seeking an ODNR grant for the project. Rough estimate of cost is $100,000.
There has been interest in developing a mile marker type of designation for river travel.
Currently the Miami Conservancy District, University of Dayton-Rivers Institute, and the Miami
County Engineer are working together considering marker possibilities.
As a note of interest the Ohio Department of Natural Resources does have a State Water Trail
coordinator due to growing interest.
Proposed total investment in water trails regionally is $350,000.
Operational Cost Estimates:
The City's leadership will need to address operational costs of the Marina as the area develops
into a Northern Hub of activities. It will be critical to the success of the project for the City to
establish a higher level of maintenance in order for the site to become a destination location.
Marina Building
The Tin Roof Restaurant operates this facility as a restaurant and intends to develop the marina
rental operations and the supporting store feature, and as a result there will be very little direct
cost to the city beyond cunent obligations.
Island and Park Areas
The City of Troy will have to maintain and manage the water portion of the marina, the park
areas and island. If the Treasure Island Marina is going to attract a large number of users then it
will have to be maintained to a higher standard. These additional costs will include increased
maintenance in order to maintain a quality landscaped and active park setting.
Events and Activities
The growth of activities in the marina area will require greater interaction with recreation staff.
It is noted however that the existing recreation staff is operating at capacity with the number of
programs and activities cunently in place. The City's administration will need to address
staffing issues as programs and participation expand along with increased investment in the
facility.
It should be anticipated that there will be some revenues generated from user fees for activities
and events and some funding through sponsorships. The amount of fees generated will be highly
dependent of the volume and types of programs offered as well as the local and regional interests
developed in sponsoring various programs.
Ballard*King & Associates
-104-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section VI - Action Plan
Utilizing the points noted in the previous sections the following are the recommended priorities
for the Treasure Island Marina Project.
Short Term (next year to 18 months)
These are capital improvement tasks as well as program and service delivery priorities for the
next 18 months and the agency( s) that is responsible for the task.
Task City Tin Roof Others
General
Dredging of marina -v
Aeration of water
-\}
Banners
-\}
Trail completion -'./-Miami Cty
Marina Building
Building renovation -v
Outdoor deck
-\} -\}
Under building
-\} -\}
Restrooms
-\}
Events area
-\} -\}
Island and Park
Floating docks
-\}
Programs and Services
Start marina store -v
Rental-bikes/canoes, etc. -v
Summer events
-\}
-v -v
Holiday activities
-\} -\} -\}
Marketing plan -v
-\}
-v
The primary focus during the next 18 months will be on making general improvements to the
marina area and the marina building itself with the addition of more programs and services. The
marina store would be open and there would be the rental of bikes, canoes, kayaks, etc.
Ballard*King & Associates
-105-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Middle Term (18 months to 3 years)
These are capital improvement tasks as well as program and service delivery priorities for the 18
month to 3 year period and the agency(s) that is responsible for the task.
Task City Tin Roof Others
General
Gateway entrance/sign
\}

Lighting
Marina Building
Island and Park
Park area
Playground
\}
Shelter/_Ricnic areas
Overhead power lines
\}
Programs and Services
Summer events
Holiday activities
Year round events
Regional events
This time period would focus on improvements to the island itself as well as the park area
surrounding the marina.
Ballard*King & Associates
-106-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Long Term (3 plus years)
These are capital improvement tasks as well as program and service delivery priorities for the 3
plus year time period and the agency(s) that is responsible for the task.
Task City Tin Roof Others
General
Looped trail -'./
5 acre park development -'./ -'./
Marina Building
Island and Park
Amphitheater -'./
Lighthouse -'./
Programs and Services
Summer events -'./
Holiday activities -'./
Year round events -'./ -'./
Regional events -'./
Concerts and stage events
The long range focus of the improvements to Treasure Island Marina are on the development of
the additional acres of park property and the establishment of a looped trail around the
immediate Troy area.
Ballard*King & Associates
-107-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section VII - Conclusion
Recognizing the outstanding opportunity that the. City of Troy has to redevelop the existing
Treasure Island Marina into a recreational amenity that can prove to one of the community's
crown jewels, it is the recommendation of Ballard*King & Associates that the city proceed with
the project. It is clearly understood that the rejuvenation of the marina will require a significant
monetary commitment from the city for both capital and operations but the benefits that can be
derived from the project are significant. These include:
~ The city has an existing asset already in place in the building, the marina and the park.
The Treasure Island Marina has an historical connection to both the Great Miami River
and the City of Troy.
The marina provides a regional attraction for Troy.
A functional marina revitalizes and brings people back to the river.
~ The project emphasizes the natural environment and supports active recreational pursuits.
Treasure Island Marina will provide a considerable economic impact to the community.
The marina promotes a strong partnership between the private sector (Tin Roof
restaurant) and the City of Troy.
In tough economic times the need and demand for providing recreation opportunities
close to home are more acute than ever.
The redevelopment of the Treasure Island Marina is an investment in the community and
relates directly to the quality of life for residents of Troy and the surrounding region.
Ballard*King & Associates
-108-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
Section VIII - Appendix
The following is a list of sources of information that were utilized for this study.
A special thanks to Stan Kegley, Project Manager, City of Troy and Kellen Mescher, Intern, City
of Troy for their assistance in providing information, research material, and other support in
completing the study.
Interviews
Michael Beamish, Mayor, City of Troy
Patrick Titterington, Director of Public Service and Safety, City of Troy
Stan Kegley, Project Manager, City of Troy
Ken Siler, Director of Recreation, City of Troy
Carrie slater, Assistant Director of Recreation, City of Troy
Tim Mercer, Superintendent of Park, City of Troy
Alan Kappers, President, Board of Park Commissioners, City of Troy
James Stubbs, Vice President, Recreation Board, City of Troy
Jerry Eldred, Executive Director, Miami County Park District
Scott Myers, Deputy Director, Miami County Park District
Diana Thompson, Director, Miami County Convention & Visitors Bureau
Douglas Hall, Manager of Program Development, Miami Conservancy District
Hans Landefeld, Manager of River Corridor Improvement Sub District, Miami Conservancy
District
Matt Lindsay, Manager of Environmental Planning, Miami Valley Regional Planning
Commission
Kjirsten Frank, Regional Planner, Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission
Brewster Rhoads, SW Regional Director of the Office of the Governor, State of Ohio
Craig Hughes, Owner, Tin Roof Restaurant
Kyleen Green, Manager, Tin Roof Restaurant
Jeff Wright, Assistant City Manager, City of Loveland
Nimsfa Simpson, City Planner, City of Xenia
Peg Sheffield, Loveland Chamber of Commerce
Karen Wintrow, Executive Director, Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce
Written Works
"Financing and Acquiring Park and Recreation Resources", John Crompton, Texas A&M
"Outdoor Recreation in America", Clayne Jensen and Steven Guthrie
"Historic Preservation & Community Identity', Rails to Trails Conservancy
"Health and Wellness Benefits", Rails to Trails Conservancy
"Economic Benefits of Trails and Greenways", Rails to Trails Conservancy
"Enhancing the Environment with Trails and Greenways", Trails and Greenways Clearinghouse
"Benefits of Trails and Greenways", Trails and Green ways Clearinghouse
"Trails and Greenways for Livable Communities", Trails and Greenways Clearinghouse
"How Cities Use Parks for Economic Development", American Planning Association
Ballard*King & Associates
-109-
Treasure Island Marina Feasibility Study
"The Economic and Social Benefits of Off-Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities, National
Bicycle and Pedestrian Clearinghouse
"Economic Benefits of Trails, Greenways and Open Space", Rory Robinson, National Park
Service
"Outdoor Recreation Participation 2009 Report", The Outdoor Foundation
"Little Miami Scenic Trail Users Survey", Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of
Governments
"Outdoor Activities Participation", Outdoor Industry Association
"2004 Home Builders Survey", National Association of Home Builders
Other Sources of Information
National Sporting Goods Association
Landscape Architecture Magazine
Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission
Miami Conservancy District
University of Dayton-The River Summit and Rivers Institute
Little Miami Incorporated
Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure-Troy Foundation
Loveland Canoe & Kayak
Whitewater Warehouse
Ballard*King & Associates
-110-
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18. CONTINUOUSSTAINLESSSTEELFLASH1NG(0.01871NCH
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17 DRYVITWATER-RESISTlVESARRIERCOATI NO
18. DRYVITADHESIVEINVERTICALNOTCHEDTROWEL
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1G. 2" MINIMUM THICKNESS EPS INSULAliON BOARD. NOTCH
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21. REINFORCINGMESHEMBEDDEOINTOBASECOAT
22. WRAP RE-ENFORCING MESH r MINIMUM AT BACKSIDE
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23 SEALANTWlTHCLOSEDCELLBACKERROOANOWEEP
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24. PLASTIClAMINATE APRONPL-1
25 1fTFURRINGCHANNELS@16"0C
26. VENTEDALUMINUMSOFFIT
27. ALUMINUM ROOF EDGE FLASHING AND FASCIA
28 EXISTINGCONCRETESLAB
29 3/A'"'T&GCOXROOFSHEATHING
30 TPOSINGLE-PLY. FULLYADHEREOROOF
34. PRE.fORMEO 050 ALUMINUM COPING CAP WITH
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EXISTING
35. SHERWINWILUA.MSULTRACRETETEXTUREOMASONRY
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36 4"ALUMINUMWINDOWIOOOR.III14SOHBYGRAHAM
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38. 5/B"GYPSUMWALLBOARD
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40 ORYVITORAINAGESTRIP
47. PLASTICLAMINATEREMOVABLEPANELPL-1
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GENERAL NOTES
A. EXTERIORINSULATIONANDFINISHSYSTEMDETAILS
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2 EXISTINGCONCRETESTRUCTURETOREMAIN
3 EXISTINGMASONRYBRICKPARAPETWALL
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y_,._ Island Parle renova'fiora; ccnsirl af active ....aea(oA,. includ>lg be
trails, an auld ocr amphilheoteF and sicJ9e. kuyaq/can.,.,;ng, and
.....table,.,.,., hoiiSes. A fgt.ihouoe wil be bult otMie to commemcnrle
the l'isfo(y of the site and mimic the rghihoue !hoi once in the paiL
In the de<'gn,the ligtlthDU<e ._positioned in a pomineni location neorltte
river/1a900" and is occampcrnie<l by an easily accessible J*>za and an
overiook pbza at lhe ,;,.,.,. edge. The ampnilhecter and stage ml seve a.1 o
place to hold concerts. ckmeol and ofher auidocr ,....,..m and lri be bu
inia the ellisline leraW!. There are many bike poilu wiltin the pari< for
rec:rea(on enlhw'crts incudO!g, a smoalhly IJIOded bl:e palh lrvm l he leYee
Ira I dawn into the pa.t. These lrak wil o.,.,. people of at oges access for
wallirog. M1!1ing, biting, and ex!*Jring lhe part.
The pc.t desgn tow odvani<J9e of
views inckHfl'lg, a vie..-IPDm the auldocr
amphlhealer lo the downtown and n.....t(
renovated Adarru $treell!<idge. the..;.,... 11om lt!e
restaurant lo the i:land and lglllhoiiSe, vie>on lrvm l he
sheller howe to rghihouse. and lt!e re.launml The
sheller 1-.se IOiJ be located near the neo.oiy n.toted res1n>om
fodity. The main objective of tm project is to restore lhe
locallregonol con,...,ction to the river tt.ough the! part upgrades
and to aeole wme vilual connec1Mty lo downtown l""f.
....

Treasure Island
Marina & P a r k
Tree.....,. Island Part: rer'IOYOtions consist of includilg biz
Ita iS, an outdOOI' omphilt>eoierond doge. kuyoq/canoeing, ond
tenlable hoU<es. A wil be bull D<Hk to
the nslory of the site and mimic the thoi in I he polL
In the lhe was in a pumineni bcofion near !he
tivet/lo;oon and is occamponied by an easily occessiblle F*na and an
cweflook plaza at the riwetl' edge. The and stage wll"'"""' as a
place Ia hold concerts. climes and o!her ouldocweYents and bu
inlo lhe lelrail. are many bibe paths wilt-in !he pall< far
recreafan enlhuiasts inct.uf11g. a smoolhly ;raded bR poll!
lnl l dawn into the poll:. The:se lru1s ...a albw pe.opie al al lor
walfng. running, biting, and the pan.
The pool takes ochonia9e of manr weot
one- inclucf11g, a view!-.. !he outdocw
amptilhMer lo !he dawnfawft ond
Ad oms Bridge. the.,;...., from
reriouranllo lhe island and vie.on
shelter howe Ia and reda.-nl The
shelter house wil located near !he """iy nstoled
fodity. 1he main alltis pre jed is to restore the
loccll,gonal C<lflneclion to rivet itwovgh these part
and Ia vilual lo doo.mlown r....,..

ite Concep
Treasure Island
Marina & P a r k