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FASHIONING A BRIGHTER FUTURE

RESPONSIBILITY
REPORT
2013
THIS YEAR THE DOROTHY
PERKINS NINE YEAR
CHARITY PARTNERSHIP
WITH BREAST CANCER CARE
EXCEEDED 3 MILLION
IN DONATIONS
WE RECYCLED
33 MILLION
HANGERS
164,000
donated through
Workplace Giving
O V E R
750
EMPLOYEES
RECEIVED
ETHICAL
TRADING
WE COMPLETED THE RESPONSIBLE AND ACCOUNTABLE GARMENT SECTOR (RAGS)
PROJECT BENEFITTING OVER 106,000 INDIAN AND BANGLADESHI WORKERS
WE INCREASED RECYCLING
BY 3% TAKING OUR
OVERALL RECYCLING
RATE TO 85%
1.5m
The total amount we
raised for charity
WE SAVED
AROUND
500 TONNES
OF EXCESS
PACKAGING
FROM SUPPLIERS
WE SIGNED UP TO
THE SUSTAINABLE
CLOTHING ACTION
PLAN (SCAP) 2020
COMMITMENT
SINCE 2008 WE HAVE SAVED
OVER 24,000 TONNES OF CO
2

EMISSIONS THROUGH
REDUCTIONS IN ENERGY USE
2,938
FACTORY
ETHICAL AUDITS
FACTS
AND
FIGURES
2013
WORKING HOURS
WERE DONATED
THROUGH THE
EMPLOYEE
VOLUNTEERING
PILOT PROGRAMME
4,000
tills were replaced with more
energy efcient models
94%
of the energy used in stores
in the UK and Ireland is
from renewable sources
735 TONNES
of food waste from
BHS were recycled
We reduced our transport
CO
2
emissions by 5%
THE PERCENTAGE
REDUCTION IN OUR
CARRIER BAG
USAGE
11%
WE
REVIEWED
T R A I N I N G
04
WELCOME
05
ABOUT ARCADI A
07
ABOUT FASHI ON FOOTPRI NT
08
FASHI ON FOOTPRI NT GOVERNANCE
11
OUR PRODUCTS
12 ETHI CAL TRADI NG
19 ENVI RONMENTAL I MPACTS OF PRODUCTS
21 ANI MAL WEL FARE
23
OUR ENVI RONMENT
25 ENERGY EFFI CI ENCY
25 RECYCL I NG AND WASTE
26 TRANSPORT AND LOGI STI CS
30
OUR EMPLOYEES
31 RETAI L ENGAGEMENT
31 EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERI NG
32 TRAI NI NG AND DEVELOPMENT
32 FASHI ON FOOTPRI NT ADVI SORY PANEL
32 WORKPL ACE DI VERSI TY
33 HEALTH AND SAFETY
34 ACCESSI BI L I TY
36
OUR COMMUNI TI ES
37 FASHI ON RETAI L ACADEMY
37 YOUNG FASHI ON TAL ENT
38 CHARI TI ES
41- 43
TARGETS AND PROGRESS
CONTENTS
Our Fashion Footprint programme is now in its seventh year
and continues to lead our focus on responsible retailing. The
last twelve months have seen many achievements in our
Fashion Footprint programme, which this report will cover.
We hope you nd this progress update informative and interesting. It is available for
download via our website at www.arcadiagroup.co.uk/fashionfootprint
As in previous years, this report highlights the progress we have made and outlines the
challenges and next steps. We have published a summary version again this year,
which we intend to circulate to our employees and we hope will also prove useful for
those stakeholders looking for the highlights of our achievements.
As ever, we are keen to hear what you have to say about this work and any activities of
our Fashion Footprint programme. You can share your views by emailing them to
hellofashionfootprint@arcadiagroup.co.uk
We continue to expect all our suppliers factories to
meet the working conditions outlined in our Code of
Conduct. Every factory must demonstrate this through an
independent, ethical audit which we grade internally.
This year we graded almost 3,000 of these audits.
Where factories need improvements, our Code of
Conduct Guidebook provides guidance.
This year saw the conclusion of the Responsible and
Accountable Garment Sector (RAGS) Benets for
Business and Workers project, the two-year programme
funded by the Department for International Development
(DFID) and retailers. The programme made good
inroads into improving the day-to-day lives of garment
factory workers. We are proud to have been part of it
and keen to maintain momentum, more details of which
can be found on page 14 of this report.
Sadly, the year has also involved solemn reminders of
the need to keep our responsibilities at the forefront of
the businesss priorities. We were shocked and
saddened by events in Bangladesh rst by the factory
re in November 2012 and then by the building
collapse in April 2013 that brought with them such
terrible consequences.
We signed the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in
Bangladesh, which will work towards improving worker
safety, and we take this commitment very seriously.
Another project got underway this year, with Arcadia
signing up to SCAP, the Sustainable Clothing Action
Plan. This involves committing to help reduce carbon,
waste and water impacts. More on this new programme
can be read on page 19.
We are pleased to report that this year we have
managed to reduce our absolute CO
2
emissions through
energy usage by over 5,000 tonnes, bringing our total
CO
2
emissions saved since 2008 to over 24,000
tonnes. This is equivalent to taking approximately
120,000 cars off the road for a year!
Our Fashion Footprint charity has also changed this
year. We successfully completed our three-year
partnership with Tender Heart and forged a new
association with Harmony House. This charity provides
care and education to disadvantaged women and
children in an area of Delhi that is home to many
garment workers.
The refurbishment of our London head ofce, Colegrave
House, is now underway. This is a once-in-a-generation
opportunity to bring our headquarters up to best practice
benchmarks in terms of energy consumption and
environmental credentials. We are condent that we will
all be proud of our new building.
Fashion Footprint Steering Group
WELCOME
04
Ian Grabiner
Group Chief Executive
ABOUT ARCADIA
Arcadia Group is the UKs
largest privately owned
clothing retailer with just
over 2,500 outlets. We
own eight of the high streets
best known fashion brands
BHS, Burton, Dorothy
Perkins, Evans, Miss
Selfridge, TOPMAN,
TOPSHOP and Wallis
as well as the shopping
concept Outfit.

BHS and the Arcadia Group brands were integrated in
2009, although in some instances we report data
separately. Our brands are to be found on the UKs high
streets and in major shopping centres as well as online.
Our eCommerce operation is significant and growing fast.
TOPSHOP and TOPMAN have added to the brands
worldwide network of flagship stores this year, opening
in Los Angeles in February 2013 and Hong Kong in June
2013. These new stores complement their existing
counterparts in New York, Chicago and Las Vegas.
We also have over 570 international franchise
operations trading our brands in 38 countries and our
goods are sold online to 111 countries.
Please refer to our website www.arcadiagroup.co.uk for
more information on this years financial results.
We have more than 40,000 employees, who benefit
from the opportunity to develop their career by moving
between our brands, stores or head offices without
having to switch employers.
Our customers, meanwhile, look to us to ensure that the
products they purchase have been made lawfully, fairly,
without exploiting the people who made them, while
reducing their impact on the environment. We receive
communications from customers who are keen to learn
more about the products they buy from us. Those letters
and emails help us understand, anticipate and address
their concerns.
05
06
OUR BRANDS
BHS offers fashion for the whole family and home, for the
price conscious shopper.
BURTON is one of the most successful mid-market
menswear brands on the high street and has a proud
heritage spanning more than a century.
DOROTHY PERKINS is one of the biggest fashion
retailers in the UK, with over 700 stores within the UK
and internationally. The brand provides customers with
affordable, feminine fashion.
EVANS offers stylish, on trend clothing that has been
especially designed and cut to fit, flatter and make you
look fabulous. Evans is the UKs leading plus size fashion
retailer and has over 200 stores across the UK and
Ireland, with an ever-growing international presence.
MISS SELFRIDGE is for young women who seek of the
moment fashion with a gorgeous and glamorous edge.
The brand offers versatile, affordable and accessible
style with a day to night range for everything our
customer needs for a full and fabulous wardrobe.
TOPMAN is the contemporary menswear brand from
London - fashion forward, on trend, affordable and all-
round amazing.
When we design we draw from everything around us -
the heritage of Savile Row to the punk of the Sex Pistols,
the street style of East London, the runway at London
Collections: Men (of which we are a part) and our
network of creatives and stores all around the world.
TOPSHOP is the fashion destination on the UK high
street. With over 500 stores globally, the brand has
become a fashion phenomenon and is synonymous with
cutting edge fashion at affordable prices.
WALLIS has a long-established position as an aspirational
premium brand on the high street, offering distinctive
fashion handwriting for modern women in their 30s and
40s. It operates just under 550 stores in the UK and
overseas.
OUTFIT is the ultimate out-of-town fashion destination.
Located at easily accessible retail parks across the UK,
Outfit carries a mix of all the Arcadia brands as well as
other selected additional ranges. Outfit has 63 stores
across the UK.
SHARED SERVICES At the heart of our business there are
more than 1,000 dedicated employees working in
Shared Services. They work across all brands and are
responsible for giving a range of centralised services to
the business including Logistics, Finance, Human
Resources, IT, PR, Property and Purchasing. Shared
Services teams are responsible for essential activities
from delivering product to 111 countries worldwide, to
achieving award winning store designs and handling
thousands of customer calls and emails each year.
Shared Services offer efficiencies to the brands by
providing centralised resources and competitive
synergies to the group.
Fashion Footprint is Arcadia Groups programme to
monitor and manage the social and environmental
impacts of our business. It provides our ethical activities
with a focus and framework, underpinning our objective
to be a responsible retailer.
Now in its seventh year, Fashion Footprint reinforces our
commitment to sustainability; a commitment that we
believe makes just as much sense from a business
perspective as it does from an ethical one.
Our Fashion Footprint vision provides us with a mission
statement that we can all get behind: to produce
fashionable products in an ethical way and demonstrate
a responsible attitude towards people and the
environment.
The activities and reporting of our Fashion Footprint
programme are divided into four key pillars
Our Products, Our Environment, Our Employees and
Our Communities.
This report continues to provide tangible and anecdotal
testimony of the progress we have made in the year
ending August 31 2013 along with insights into the
challenges we have faced and our plans for the coming
12 months. These outputs are summarised at the end of
the report.
We have published a
summary version of this report
again this year. This shorter
document was conceived last
year and recognises that
stakeholder communication is
evolving. It will focus on this
years key developments.
Created with our employees
in mind, it is also aimed at
those stakeholders who would welcome a shorter
version of this full report.
ABOUT FASHION
FOOTPRINT
07
Harness employees
potential and
commitment
OUR EMPLOYEES
Develop our environmental
performance and use
resources responsibly
OUR ENVIRONMENT
Support charities
and communities
OUR COMMUNITIES
Improve the social and
environmental impacts of
the products that we sell
OUR PRODUCTS
Heather Pinder
Group HR Director
Stephen Boyce
Head of Property
08
FASHION FOOTPRINT
GOVERNANCE
Colin Campbell
Group Head of
Risk Management
Alda Andreotti
Group Supply Chain
Director
Wesley Taylor
Brand Director Burton
Carole Simpson
Wallis Retail
Operations Director
Tania Foster-Brown
Group PR and
Communications Director
Martin Worsley
Evans Head of Finance
Paul Forrest
Group Senior Employee
Relations Manager
Siobhan Forey
Chief Operating Ofcer
HR and Operations
Paul Goddard
Spectrum for Arcadia
Operations Director
David Shepherd
Chief Operating Ofcer
Trading
Ian Poulton
Group Head
of Purchasing
Derek Mackay
Group Head of
Supplier Management
Jamie Beck
Group Supplier
Management Controller
Andrew Clarke
Group IT Director
A
ll successful initiatives that
bring together a diverse range
of stakeholders require strong
leadership, and Fashion Footprint is
no exception. This is the role fullled
by the Fashion Footprint Steering
Group (FFSG), which comprises senior
members of our business.
The Steering Group continues to meet quarterly to
provide governance, guidance and risk assessment
across all our social and environmental responsibilities
and to ensure that these activities remain integral to
Arcadias strategy.
Endorsed by Group Chief Executive Ian Grabiner, the
Steering Group is chaired by Alda Andreotti, Group
Supply Chain Director. Activity is divided across a
series of working groups, each of which is aligned
with one of the four key pillars and has a Steering
Group member as their sponsor to oversee progress
towards monthly key performance indicators (KPIs).
The day-to-day running of the Fashion Footprint
programme is the responsibility of the Ethical
Trading Team.
FASHION FOOTPRINT
ADVISORY PANEL
(FFAP)
It is four years since we launched our Fashion Footprint
Advisory Panel that acts as the voice of our employees.
FFAP members represent brands and functions across
our business.
This year the panel continued to provide feedback on
the Fashion Footprint initiatives proposed by the Steering
Group and submit proposals and suggestions of their
own. For more details, see Our Employees.
STAKEHOLDER
ENGAGEMENT
Stakeholder engagement is a vital element of all four of
our key pillars. It plays a strategic role in the success of
our workstreams and how they feed into the pillars as
well as how we communicate progress.
The following six groups represent our principal
stakeholders and the dialogue and interaction we
have with them is a continuous theme of this report.
1. OUR EMPLOYEES
Our people are vital stakeholders and we have
dedicated a specic pillar to them; we recognise that
they play an important role in helping us achieve our
Fashion Footprint vision. Our retail colleagues relished
the opportunity to join Fashion Footprint and have
already launched successful initiatives. Meanwhile,
Wallis is piloting an employee-volunteering scheme in
response to feedback from employee surveys. The
success of our charity fundraising each year also rests
on their enthusiasm and commitment.
2. SUPPLIERS, THEIR FACTORIES AND
FACTORY WORKERS
This group of stakeholders is particularly vital to our
activities within the Our Products pillar. Many of our
ethical trading projects rely on their transparency and
willingness to work together to achieve tangible
progress and improvements for workers in our
supply chain.
3. CUSTOMERS
Knowing that the topics we cover in Fashion Footprint
are important to our customers is one of the key drivers
for this work. We want our customers to be condent
we trade ethically and with consideration for our
environmental impacts. Contact from customers
usually via email ensures we can reect their interests
and concerns when we are carrying out Fashion
Footprint initiatives.
4. TRADE UNIONS, GOVERNMENTS,
NGOs, CAMPAIGNING GROUPS
AND STUDENTS
This is the most diverse group of stakeholders we work
with and can be broadly seen as civil society and
government. All input and feedback from this group
has a signicant impact on our work. This year, again,
we have been busy working with various members of
this group. For example, the TOPSHOP and TOPMAN
Joint Turkey Project has beneted from collaboration
with global workers union IndustriALL, and a
local non-governmental organisation (NGO), Social
Development and Gender Equality Center (SOGEP).
In addition, senior Arcadia representatives met with
09
representatives of the Department for International
Development (DFID) during the year in London and
Dhaka, Bangladesh.
5. OTHER RETAILERS AND BRANDS
We regularly collaborate with other high street retailers
on a wide variety of projects and initiatives. Examples
of this are RAGS (see page 14), our involvement in the
Joint Turkey Project (see page 15) and the Sustainable
Clothing Action Plan (see page 19, a new project to
drive increased sustainability for the lifecycle of
clothing.
6. THIRD PARTY SERVICE PROVIDERS
We work with many third party service providers,
whether it is to test our products or audit our suppliers
factories. These companies work in partnership with
our own teams, providing valuable specic expertise
to support our programmes.
POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES
Policies and procedures are also an important part of
how we work and we have a comprehensive list of
business policies in place that are appropriate to an
organisation the size of Arcadia Group.
In terms of Fashion Footprint, there are a number of
policies, for example:
Workplace Diversity;
Health and Safety Policy;
Dignity at Work Policy; and
Anti-Corruption Policy.
These are in addition to our Code of Conduct and its
Guidebook, our Migrant Workers Guidelines, Home
Workers Guidelines, Contract Labour Guiding
Principles and our Animal Welfare Policy.
10
11
This pillar focuses on understanding
and reducing the impacts that
manufacturing our products may
have on people and planet.
OUR
PRODUCTS
W
here and how we make our products
offer us diverse opportunities to
make a difference and demonstrate how seriously we
take our responsibilities.
Just as our products are essential to our business, the Our
Products pillar is pivotal to the success of Fashion
Footprint. Rightly, we are judged on the social and
environmental impacts of creating and commissioning
our products and the work we do to improve these.
We have ongoing initiatives, whether it is supporting our
suppliers to improve working conditions or trialling the
use of waste materials to create new ranges.
Reporting within this pillar falls into three key areas:
Ethical Trading;
Environmental Impacts of Products; and
Animal Welfare.
Fostering a socially and environmentally sound approach
to doing business also makes good business sense, as
our experience is that driving improvements in these
areas enhances performance across the board.
We continue to receive and grade ethical audits of
suppliers factories, an activity that is supported by our
Code of Conduct Guidebook. This year we have
set even stricter targets on audit grading, targeting
out-of-date and orange audits, working towards achieving
all factories operating with a green or yellow rating.
Working with other stakeholders continues to be an
essential component of this pillar. Our joint endeavours
with other retailers pool expertise and resources. Non-
governmental organisations (NGOs) and consultants
also play a role in our efforts.
There are a number of policies and guidelines relevant to
this key pillar, several of which are referred to throughout
this section.
ETHICAL TRADING
Our ethical trading work is wide ranging, multi-layered
and involves many different stakeholders. We have a
number of areas of activity which have seen progress
this year.
1. Ethical Audit Programme
2. Country Risk Assessments
3. RAGS the Responsible and Accountable Garment
Sector Project
4. Joint Turkey Project
5. Strategic Labour Priorities
6. Code of Conduct Guidebook
7. Management Systems
8. Sumangali
9. Prohibited Activities
1. ETHICAL AUDIT PROGRAMME
We do not own or operate factories and Arcadia Group
is rarely dominant in an individual factory. We have
strong working relationships with our network of
international suppliers, 51% of which have been with us
for three years or more. Arcadia goods are manufactured
in approximately 1,040 factories through 700 suppliers.
The top 20 suppliers provide 44% of our goods.
This year Arcadia products were made in 44 countries
worldwide, although our top ten sourcing countries
accounted for 91% and the top five for 73% of the goods
we sold. These top five countries remain as China,
Turkey, Romania, Mauritius and India. Our support of UK
manufacturing continues with 54 factories producing our
goods.
In terms of the BHS supply chain, the departments work
with approximately 520 suppliers, and the top 20 supply
35% of their goods.
This year BHS products were made in a similar number
of countries to Arcadia and the top five accounted for
75% of the goods sold. These countries were China, UK,
Bangladesh, India and Vietnam.
12
Under our ethical audit programme our brands must
submit a third-party factory ethical audit (see audit
process below) no older than a year to receive a grading
for a new factory set-up. In order to help reduce audit
fatigue we accept audit reports from the majority of
recognised audit bodies as long as they are
independent and non-modifiable.
We grade these audits on a scale of red, orange, yellow
and green. If the audit is graded red, we will not allow
the brand to use this factory until the issues have been
resolved, irrespective of whether it is a new or current
factory. Red flags include serious breaches of our Code
of Conduct and local laws, such as non-payment of
minimum wage or locked fire exits.
We anticipate that our Code of Conduct Guidebook
will continue to be useful in accelerating the resolution of
problems identified during audits. Last year we introduced
a new monthly update of audit statistics, which is sent to
Brand and Buying Directors. The report continues to
focus on out-of-date audits and orange audits as well as
the proportion graded green.
This year we increased our targets to work towards
fewer factories with out-of-date audits and 100% of our
factories operating with a green or yellow rating. At the
year-end, 80% of our factories were graded green or
yellow and next year we need to do more to target
orange grades.
Overall this year we reviewed 1,124 ethical audits for all
brands except BHS (see BHS update below), which is a
similar number to last year and affects approximately
286,000 workers.
Since our current audit programme began in 2007, of
the audit reports and evidence reviewed, 1,420, or
approximately 30% were follow-up audits. Of those
40% improved, 41% stayed the same and a further 19%
deteriorated (in which case we expect the supplier to
progress their corrective action plan).
Overall this year for BHS we reviewed 1,814 ethical
audits. Of those, 430 were follow-up audits. 32%
improved, 39% stayed the same and 29% deteriorated
in which case we work with the supplier to progress their
corrective action plan.
Although this work is the foundation of our ethical trading
programme, we acknowledge that this is not enough to
drive long-term change. This is why we work on the
projects outlined below.
We have also begun to introduce a new ethical audit
database called Valid8, developed to give us much
tighter control over out-of-date audits and easier
management of non-compliance closure, evidence
review and feedback for suppliers and factories.
13
People sitting around table having a meeting
Some documents
Factory
Interview
People sitting around table having a meeting
Some documents
Factory
Interview
People sitting around table having a meeting
Some documents
Factory
Interview
People sitting around table having a meeting
Some documents
Factory
Interview
People sitting around table having a meeting
Some documents
Factory
Interview
OPENING MEETING
Introduction with management and worker
representatives to explain the audit aims and process
FACILITY TOUR
All buildings, including
dormitories if relevant,
are visited
DOCUMENT REVIEW
This includes legal requirements,
working hours, conditions
and wages
EMPLOYEE INTERVIEWS
Workers are selected by the auditors and interviews are
carried out in private both in groups and individually
CLOSING MEETING
Findings and requirements are presented and
timescales for improvements are agreed
REMEDIATION
Arcadia grades the audit, ensures the follow up audit
timings are acceptable and provides support to close off
non-compliances
ETHICAL AUDIT PROCESS
Valid8 improves efficiencies via:
online factory set-up;
automatic triggering and grading of audits;
continuous validation of suppliers and factories;
live reporting; and
instant communication with suppliers.
The database is now in use centrally with the ethical
trading team and will be rolled out gradually to each
brand and their suppliers.
2. COUNTRY RISK ASSESSMENTS
There have been some terrible reminders over the last 12
months that some countries continue to present a higher
risk than others in the sphere of ethical trading.
We were deeply saddened by the events suffered by
garment workers in Bangladesh over the last year, first
with the fire in November 2012 and then by the building
collapse in April 2013. We signed the Accord on Fire
and Building Safety in Bangladesh in September 2013
and take this commitment very seriously. We will continue
to work locally to help bring greater protection for textile
workers there.
Two senior members of the Ethical Trading team visited
Bangladesh again in June as part of standard ethical
trading factory visits. However, this provided us with an
opportunity to underline efforts already in progress to
work with factories on building stability and fire safety.
Although there are ongoing challenges around getting
the right expertise there and ensuring the validation of
paperwork, we have visited some factories accompanied
by a civil engineer to review structural safety.
We recognise the benefits of joint efforts and so we are
working with other retailers on joint information and
encouragement of factories to improve.
While Bangladesh is not a dominant sourcing location
for our brands, we have once again reviewed our
Bangladesh supplier and factory set-up process, which
we last revisited in 2010. A new four-point plan involves
even stricter set-up criteria to add the supplier or factory
to our roster. All factories must meet these new criteria.
As terrible as the Bangladesh tragedies have been, we
remain mindful of the need to carefully prioritise, monitor
and respond to issues in all sourcing countries.
3. RAGS
This year saw the completion of both phases of the Benefits
for Business and Workers (BBW) project, part of the
Responsible and Accountable Garment Sector (RAGS)
Challenge Fund, set up by the Department for International
Development (DFID), the UK agency for international aid.
Arcadia was one of six initial retailers (others were Marks
& Spencer, Mothercare, New Look, Sainsburys and
Tesco, subsequently joined by Ralph Lauren and Varner
Group), that part-funded the project, which focused on
improving the management systems of garment
manufacturers and for responsible and ethical production
to become the norm in the garment manufacturing sector
supplying the UK.
Led by industry consultants Impactt, the aim was to
improve the business practices of garment manufacturers
as well as the day-to-day lives of their workers.
Working with factories in Bangladesh and India, the
project aimed to demonstrate the business benefits of
providing better jobs through:
establishing a more stable and satisfied workforce;
enhancing workers pay;
avoiding excessive hours worked; and
improving productivity and quality in the longer term.
73 factories took part in the programme including nine
Arcadia Group factories and the results have been
promising, benefitting over 106,000 workers. While
there was wide variation in the pace at which factories
adopted the new approaches, those where there were
both high levels of buy-in from business owners and
stable industrial engineering saw the greatest benefits.
Bangladesh results:
efficiency improved by 18%;
cut to ship ratio improved, meaning that factories
saved 40,000 during the 6 month course, a return
on their initial investment (ROI) of over 21;
14
worker absenteeism reduced by 34% on average,
indicating that workers were more motivated to come
to work each day;
worker turnover reduced on average across all
factories by 52%. This means that fewer than half the
number of workers were leaving every month than at
the start of the programme;
overall, factories saw an increase in average
take-home pay of 491 taka per month or 8% -
equivalent to an increase in annual pay of 3.4
million across the workers employed by participating
factories;
workers quality of life was also improved by
significant reductions in working hours, with the
percentage of workers working more than 60 hours
per week falling by 43%; and
factories performed strongly on hourly pay,
increasing this by 12% against a target of 5%.
India results:
efficiency improved by 26%;
cut to ship ratio improved enabling Indian factories to
realise 25,000 of savings, a 6-month ROI of 13;
absenteeism reduced by 27%;
worker turnover was down by 26%;
average take-home pay increased by 265 rupees or
5%. This would be equivalent to an increase in
annual pay of 614,000 across all the workers
employed by participating factories; and
factories also performed well on hourly pay,
increasing this by 8%.
Participants told us:
On the first day, I was thinking why do I, a production
planning manager, need to attend an HR module?
After attending I realize this is very important for
production people to understand workers and their
feelings. I learn how to talk to them and what makes
them worried and what helps them to do quality work.
Listening to others and working as a team is very
important. Production Manager.
I feel lots of change in this factory in the last six months
there is less absenteeism, because of the attendance
bonus. I am saving the extra money for my daughters
future and using it for buying new things for the house.
It is helping me through all my life. Pilot line worker.
The tools and learnings from this project are now ours
to share with factories and we intend to put these to
good use.
4. JOINT TURKEY PROJECT
TOPSHOP and TOPMANs Assessment, Remediation, and
Capacity building (ARC) programme is designed to move
beyond the traditional auditing model while achieving
compliance with retailers codes of compliance. It seeks to
empower factory owners, managers and workers to create
a fair working environment while reducing audit fatigue
(repeated auditing of factories by numerous brands and
retailers).
Last year we established a collaborative project called the
Joint Turkey Project (JTP) with two other major high street
retailers. Together we share the common goals of establishing
mature systems of industrial relations and building the
factories productivity to support a wage ladder.
This inaugural phase included training for worker
representatives, enabling them to lead participatory
discussions with all workers.
Scoping work has taken place among the three partners
to shape the programme and define key performance
indicators as well as baseline assessments in these
core areas.
The three partners define the JTP as follows:
To develop and implement a strategic and holistic
programme that will improve factory productivity,
workers conditions, working hours, earnings and
worker management dialogue. This will utilise proven
processes of communication, training and industrial
and other forms of engineering. The programme will
benefit the workers, suppliers, factories, and retailers.
Guiding KPIs have been identified to support effective
worker/management dialogue, enhanced productivity
and effective management systems.
15
A four-strong team seconded from the three partners has
been established on the ground to run the project day-to-
day. They have already completed baseline assessments
on HR management systems in all three factories.
External stakeholders have also been put in place this
year and the programme is working alongside the
Geneva-based global union IndustriALL, its partner
Accademic and Turkish non-Governmental organisation
Social Development and Gender Equality Center
(SOGEP). This group has completed worker/
management dialogue baseline assessments and
the election of worker representatives began during
August 2013.
The third phase of the programme is productivity and
efficiency. An industrial engineering partner, REFA has
been appointed and brings considerable expertise in
this area and will deliver training to employees and
senior management in factories.
Meanwhile, a half way programme review will also be
held in September 2013 to measure success and gather
learnings from the project to date.
5. STRATEGIC LABOUR PRIORITIES
a. Living wage
b. Freedom of association
c. Purchasing practices
d. Vulnerable workers
a) LIVING WAGE
Our major focus in this area over the last year has been
as part of RAGS (see above). Our overall position on the
living wage has not changed. Arcadia supports the
position that all workers in our supply chain, including
piece rate, subcontracted, informal, home and migrant
workers, should always receive sufficient wages to meet
their needs for nutritious food, clean water and other
needs (shelter, transport etc) as well as a discretionary
income, which is now a generally well accepted
definition of a living wage.
The work of campaigning groups such as Labour Behind
the Label (LBL) and the Asia Floor Wage Campaign
influence our activities. Indeed, TOPSHOP and
TOPMANs JTP (see above) has been developed around
LBLs four pillars: collaboration; worker organising and
freedom of association; purchasing practices and
developing a route map to a living wage.
There is no universal definition of a living wage and there
are many practical difficulties to agreeing and
implementing a living wage, which are common to all
retailers. We believe the most effective solution would be
for governments to increase the minimum wage, which
would create a level playing field for all parties. Despite
this, we have been pleased at the impact the RAGS
project made in general to wages. We are keen to work
with other retailers to use these learnings to encourage
other factories to implement the techniques which worked
and which can make a difference to workers wages.
b) FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION
We believe worker representation and dialogue with
management is fundamental to empowering workers to
improve their working conditions and wages.
Ensuring freedom of association is guaranteed continues
to be a significant challenge, with a small percentage of
the factories our suppliers use known to have trade
union presence.
However, we continue to communicate with suppliers
and factories about the benefits of freedom of association
and as a minimum we expect our suppliers to ensure that
factories give workers the right to organise.
We have produced a Right to Organise Guarantee
(RTO) template, drafted with the help of the International
Textiles Garment and Leather Workers Federation
(ITGLWF), now IndustriALL. This is included in our Code
of Conduct Guidebook (Part 4, pages 258-9:
www.arcadiagroup.co.uk/fashionfootprint/code-of-
conduct-and-guidebook/Guidebook-part-4.pdf)
This year we have had the RTO translated into Bangla,
Hindi, Romanian, Turkish and Urdu, to add to our Chinese
version, and have sent these to all relevant suppliers.
These are also made available on our website and the
extranet that we use to communicate with suppliers.
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We have asked suppliers for the RTO to be posted on
notice boards, explained and given to all workers twice
yearly with a pay slip. When visiting factories we request
to see this and when speaking with workers we ask them
if they have had this guarantee communicated to them.
Freedom of Association is an important part of worker/
management communications within the HR
Management Systems Portfolio we have produced (see
our section on Management Systems) and of the Joint
Turkey Project (see above).
c) PURCHASING PRACTICES
We believe that by improving the way we design and
buy goods and by raising awareness amongst our teams
of the potential effects on factory workers, we can have
a positive impact on how suppliers factories manage
their people, their production and their working
environments.
An important element in this area is the development of
training for all appropriate staff (everyone in design,
buying and merchandising). Last year we had started this
training and had hoped to finalise it by the end of 2012.
We did not meet this target and the project has been
delayed further this year by other projects.
However, the training has been updated recently to
include new buying procedures and new policies such
as that relating to Bangladesh. We have also been in
discussion with a key supplier across a number of product
lines and brands who would be willing to trial a joint
project to better understand our buying impacts from a
supplier perspective and, as such, we expect to refresh
this training in the coming year.
d) VULNERABLE WORKERS
Our work in this area comprises:
(i) home workers;
(ii) migrant workers; and
(iii) contract workers.
(i) Home workers
Home working involves carrying out tasks on products at
home. When managed properly this provides a way for
individuals to balance their work and home life and we
support factories that provide this option.
However, the lack of visibility of home workers, combined
with their complicated employment status, has made them
a vulnerable worker group. This is why we have been
working on improving our understanding of the incidence
of, and conditions for, home workers in our supply chain.
This year TOPSHOP and TOPMAN continued work on
engaging with home workers by establishing guidelines
and a toolkit. We have, however, faced challenges with
the implementation and use of the toolkit. It has been
particularly difficult to ensure engagement of middle
management within the factories where the processes
and procedures have been introduced.
In response, we have scaled back the scope of the
project. By limiting our work to two suppliers, we hope to
make it more manageable and focused so that the
benefits can be assessed more effectively.
Regular feedback from contractors in this area has
enabled us to focus on:
encouraging contractors to work with an NGO,
raising awareness of the importance of using the
toolkit and ensuring home workers are paid correctly
and on time;
raising awareness with the contractors and home
workers of membership schemes providing access to
free medicine and advice on general health and
hygiene; and
raising awareness of the value of passbooks and
purchase orders to home workers when dealing with
contractors and factories.
In order to gain transparency on wages for home workers
we have selected limited locations and suppliers. We
hope this will help us gain traction and start to drive
change and improve conditions for home workers.
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(ii) Migrant Workers
In recent years Arcadia Group has been active in the
area of improving the recruitment and working conditions
of migrant workers who travel from one country to
another for employment. This migration is generally
beneficial but the people involved can be in a vulnerable
situation, and can be exploited by unscrupulous agents,
for example.
This is why we developed our Migrant Workers
Guidelines which are available in Part 4 of our
Code of Conduct Guidebook (www.arcadiagroup.co.
uk/fashionfootprint/code-of-conduct-andguidebook/
Guidebook-part-4.pdf).
This year, we will be going back to those suppliers to
verify that the best practice standards remain in place,
what challenges remain and what further work we need
to do to in the recruitment process as this is the first key
step that migrant workers take.
iii) Contract Workers
TOPSHOP and TOPMANs work in the area of contract
workers continues in partnership with two other high
street retailers. We feel the work carried out to date has
provided us with valuable awareness of the priorities
and the challenges faced by contract workers.
We have learnt about the recruiting practices used by
factories and contractors and by working with both
parties we have been able to establish the root cause
behind those practices and the resultant problems. The
output is a set of guiding principles on recruitment
practices.
We have pinpointed a small number of factories with
which to work on implementing the guiding principles
and raising awareness of the business case for factories
to hire employees directly and not on contracts.
6. CODE OF CONDUCT GUIDEBOOK
Our Code of Conduct Guidebook extends practical
guidance to suppliers and factories on how to improve
labour standards based on our Code of Conduct.
Key suppliers producing in the UK and China have been
issued with a copy in either English and/or Chinese. We
had planned to extend the different language versions to
include Hindi, however, while this is still something we
would like to do, it has not been possible this year.
This year we have taken the decision to review Part 3 of
the Guidebook: Health & Safety and the Environment.
We have shared its contents with external experts in
order to conduct a review of our position on fire safety.
Our Code of Conduct Guidebook can be found at:
www.arcadiagroup.co.uk/fashionfootprint/code-of-
conduct-and-guidebook
7. MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
We continue to build on our Code of Conduct
Guidebook by further developing Part Four: Human
Resources Management Systems. Last year we expanded
this to cover all areas of traditional and strategic Human
Resources Management Systems.
This involves:
1. The link between worker engagement and a
successful business;
2. How to reach these benefits;
3. The role of the HR department; and
4. Examples and templates of practical tools and how
to implement them.
Management systems are often in place for production
but can be inadequate for areas such as employment
and worker welfare. A simple example is a proper
contract for employees. Part Four of the Guidebook
includes examples of practical tools such as training
slides and trainer notes, policy statements and template
contracts and handbooks, so that factories can use these
as a guide to creating their own versions.
Underpinning all areas are the following fundamental
drivers of worker engagement, which all organisations
should develop:
1. leadership that clearly transmits vision and values
this means being transparent and including workers
in leaderships goals;
2. engaging managers, i.e. managers who facilitate
and empower rather than control and restrict their
staff, showing appreciation, respect and commitment
to developing and rewarding capabilities;
18
19
3. workers voices: an effective way for workers to
voice their views and concerns; and
4. behaviour throughout the organisation that is consistent
with stated values leading to trust and integrity. The
Portfolio has been written and tested in two factories
(one in Bangladesh and one in India). It is now an
extension of Part Four of the Code of Conduct
Guidebook while the templates within it will be used
as part of ARC/Joint Turkey Project (see above).
The Portfolio will be published for all suppliers once
testing within factories has been completed.
8. SUMANGALI
Sumangali schemes involve young female migrant
workers in poor rural areas of Southern India in particular,
who become at risk of exploitation when they take up
residential contracts to work in a garment factory or
cotton mill.
Under a Sumangali scheme workers are attracted by the
prospect of paid work, safe accommodation and a final
lump sum payment (often used to pay for a dowry,
which remains general practice despite being prohibited
in India). NGOs have reported that some of these
schemes involve excessive working hours for minimal
pay, pressure to stay on to the end of the contract period
and withholding of the lump sum payment at the end.
Arcadia was among the international retailers represented
at a conference hosted by the Ethical Trading Initiative
(ETI) in India in March 2012 to discuss these issues with
local communities.
We remain committed to the elimination of such labour
rights abuses despite incidents of these being very
difficult to identify due to them relating more to mills than
garment factories. We have communicated these
expectations to suppliers and expect any workers in our
suppliers factories in Southern India or anywhere else, to
apply our Code of Conduct.
9. PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES
There are a number of activities which Arcadia prohibits.
This list includes policies to protect animal welfare, the
sandblasting technique, the use of Uzbek cotton and
mulesing of sheep. All these bans remain in place and
our new ethical audit database (Valid8) will improve our
verification process to ensure that factories comply.
Sandblasting a process used to give denim a worn or
faded look was banned in 2011 due to the potential
health hazards faced by workers if they breathe in the
fine silica particles used. Uzbek cotton was banned in
2008 due to concerns about forced and child labour in
Uzbekistan during cotton harvesting. Mulesing refers to a
sheep husbandry practice used in the Australian wool
industry to remove skin from sheep (often without
anaesthetic) to prevent flystrike.
ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACTS OF PRODUCTS
We made a commitment last year to review the
environmental impacts of our key suppliers factories. This
project has involved an assessment of the environmental
processes for several key suppliers and action taken in
response to the findings.
Some of the progressive environmental initiatives in place
at our factories include rainwater harvesting for dyeing
processes, dryers equipped with heat recovery units for
energy efficiency and energy-efficient lighting.
Work will continue to advance our suppliers
environmental credentials as part of a new initiative we
have joined this year. We are one of the early signatories
to the Sustainable Clothing Action Plan (SCAP) 2020
commitment, which aims to improve the UK clothing
industrys environmental footprint.
SUSTAINABLE CLOTHING ACTION PLAN
SCAPs ambition is to improve the sustainability of
clothing across its lifecycle. It will bring together the
clothing industry, government and other stakeholders to
take action to reduce the carbon, water and waste
footprint, along with providing support, tools
and guidance.
SCAPs 2020 commitment will see us measure and
reduce our overall carbon, water and waste footprints
across all our brands. Using SCAPs footprint calculator,
we will measure and report the total impacts of the
clothes we sell in the UK on an annual basis.
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Signatories are committed to playing their part in reducing
their UK carbon, water and waste footprints via a seven-
point action plan:
1. Use a common assessment tool to measure baseline
position and track changes in footprint over time.
2. Reduce the environmental footprint of clothing
through fibre and fabric selection.
3. Over the longer term, work with supply chain
partners to reduce the environmental footprint of
their processes.
4. Extend the useful life of clothes and reduce the
environmental impact of clothing in use through
product design and services.
5. Develop effective messaging to influence consumer
behaviours, which will reduce the environmental
footprint of clothing.
6. Increase re-use and recycling to recover maximum
value from used clothing.
7. Develop actions that help keep clothes out of landfill.
CARE LABELLING
We continue to extend our advice to customers to wash
at lower temperatures. Washing clothing at lower
temperatures can save up to 40% of the energy used to
heat water. All our brands are working to influence our
customers wash care habits. For example, last year,
90% of BHS womenswear garments featured the
wording, save energy, wash at 30 degrees. Only 1%
of BHS womenswear clothes are dry clean only and
include the messaging be green when you dry clean.
For Dorothy Perkins 94% of garments carry wash at 30
degrees labelling and only 3.5% of garments are dry
clean only. Wallis continues to promote the Green Earth
option for all dry clean only garments, rather than the
traditional perc (perchloroethylene) process.
PACKAGING
Our packaging standards for suppliers have been in
place for a number of years and they already save the
business approximately 500 tonnes of excess packaging
a year. This year we have not been able to roll this out
to BHS as much as we would have liked and we will
need to review the best way to achieve some
quick wins.
This year we have extended a cardboard carton re-use
process at three of our distribution centres. This involves
re-using cartons from suppliers to send stock to our
franchise partners overseas, instead of recycling them.
We estimate this will save approximately 300,000
cartons per year.
SUSTAIN
Sustain is TOPSHOPs initiative that aims to deliver
sustainability into the brands ranges via a mix of local
sourcing, reclamation and environmentally friendly
processes.
Now into their third year, these projects continue to grow
and provide valuable insight into the appetite for and
challenges of creating products that reduce environmental
impact and waste, support communities in need and
raise awareness of sustainability.
Reclaim to Wear, our range of up-cycled clothing
(created from fabric that would otherwise be treated as
waste) continues to grow, both in terms of scale and
worldwide availability.
Following on from last years introduction of the range in
partnership with From Somewhere, summer 2013 saw
the launch of a second collection as part of the unveiling
of TOPSHOPs new flagship store in Hong Kong. Similar
launches followed in the brands global flagships,
marking its extension beyond the online-only sales
channel.
The second range offers an increased selection of styles
and has also been produced in greater volumes,
reflecting demand identified when last years collection
sold out in a matter of days.
The range has been entirely produced in the UK and a
great deal of the fabric used was garnered from previous
TOPSHOP Unique collections.
Customer response has, once again, been hugely
enthusiastic, encouraging us to further develop the range
and tap into the growing profile of upcycling. Plans are
21
already in place for another full-scale collection for
spring/summer 2014.
Our Made in the UK project goes from strength to
strength, reflecting a wider trend of sourcing some
products closer to home.
We are developing significant UK sourcing for outerwear
and jersey and in particular for our TOPSHOP Boutique
range. This brings commercial benefits as it helps us to
react to trends much faster and improve sustainability as
we have greater insights into the products provenance.
We continue to work with Izzy Lane, with a new coat
collection planned for autumn/winter 2013, made from
the wool she produces on her farm in Yorkshire, from
sheep rescued from slaughterhouses.
ANIMAL WELFARE
All our suppliers are required to sign up to our animal
welfare declaration as part of their factory set up. Our
internet-based test report system automatically reminds
suppliers of our animal welfare policy when they are
asked to supply goods made from animal sources. In
addition, further confirmations will be put in place by our
new ethical audit database (Valid8). This will include
reinforcing our ban on wool from producers that use
mulesing as part of their animal husbandry techniques.
Our existing policy also states that Arcadia Group expects
suppliers to adhere to the following sourcing standards:
leathers, skins and feathers must only be obtained as
a by-product and not be the sole purpose of the
slaughter of an animal;
no products in full or part are to be sourced from
endangered species from the CITES (Convention on
International Trade in Endangered Species) or IUCN
(International Union for the Conservation of Nature) lists;
real fur or pelts are not to be used on any products
supplied to Arcadia Group;
leathers should not be obtained while an animal is alive;
feathers should not be plucked from live animals; and
Arcadia Group branded cosmetics, and their
ingredients, must not be tested on animals.
TOPSHOP provided a clear public reminder of our
position on the use of exotic animal skins this year when
it teamed up with animal rights group PETA (People for
the Ethical Treatment of Animals) to launch a campaigning
window in the Oxford Circus flagship store.
Urging customers to Keep Wildlife out of your Wardrobe
by signing a PETA pledge, the window display reinforced
the message that exotic animal skins such as crocodile,
python and lizard are often gathered using painful and
unethical methods.
CHALLENGES
Understandably, the arena of ethical trading has been
dominated this year by the shocking events in Bangladesh
with one of the worst factory fires followed by yet more
loss of life when a factory building collapsed.
While our sourcing from the country sits outside our top
sourcing locations, we have recognised the need to
draw together with our buyers, suppliers and other
retailers to step up our commitment to tackling the issues
on the ground.
Having considered seriously the proposals of the Accord
on Fire and Building Safety, we have signed the
agreement as the best opportunity to work with others to
progress safety for Bangladeshi workers. However, that
will only be achieved with the input of the Bangladeshi
government. Without their commitment and support there
is a risk that all our efforts may fail to achieve traction and
improve the day-to-day lives of garment workers there.

NEXT STEPS
Ethical Trading
Continue to progress our ethical audit programme
for the Group including BHS and increase business
through green graded, in-date factories.
Work to ensure our criteria for Bangladesh is met by
all factories and suppliers.
Review the lessons learnt from the RAGS project and
maintain momentum with the Arcadia factories
involved.
Carry out the third phase of the Joint Turkey Project
with our industrial engineering partner.
Trial a joint project with a key supplier and brand to
understand our buying impacts and refresh our
purchasing practices training.
Progress our work with suppliers on adopting the
home worker guidelines and toolkit.
Roll out the contract labour guidelines after testing
the guiding principles with key suppliers.
Publish the Management Systems Portfolio online
after feedback from the Joint Turkey Project.
Environmental Impacts of Products
Continue to reduce our carbon, water and waste
footprint through participation in the SCAP
programme.
Create a Reclaim to Wear collection for spring/
summer 2014.
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A key part of being a
responsible retailer is to minimise
our environmental impacts in the areas
of energy, waste and transport.
OUR
ENVIRONMENT
A
key part of being a responsible retailer is to
minimise our environmental impacts. In the
process of bringing our goods to market we need to be
mindful of the potential impacts our business can have.
Once made, our products need to be transported, sold in
stores that require lighting and a comfortable environment,
all of which is supported by our teams in our head offices.
In this section we focus specifically on energy, waste
and transport. Our working groups in these areas liaise
internally with Property, Purchasing and Logistics and
with external consultants who assist us with tracking
progress against our targets.
Our long-term commitments continue to be to:
lower our energy consumption (and reduce CO
2
emissions);
identify waste streams and work to reduce these;
reduce our consumption of other valuable resources
such as water; and
transport our products while reducing impact on the
environment.
Since the launch of Fashion Footprint we have been
committed to making improvements in all these areas.
Our initiatives are moving into a more mature phase and
outputs have become incremental rather than substantial.
For the fifth consecutive year we have managed to
reduce our absolute CO
2
emissions, bringing our total
CO
2
saved since 2008 to over 24,000 tonnes.
This is equivalent to taking approximately 120,000 cars
off the road for a year!

Work has now started on a major two-year refurbishment
of our central London head office, Colegrave House. It
will be the first fundamental upgrading of the building in
more than 30 years and will deliver a 21st century,
state-of-the-art workplace.
In every sense of the word, the work will see the building
transformed. We are optimistic that we can achieve a
rating of very good from BREEAM, the worlds leading
design and assessment tool for sustainable buildings. If
achieved, this would be the highest accolade we could
hope to secure for a building of this age.
All aspects of the building are being designed to best
practice standards, including energy efficiency, smart
metering, lighting, heating and air-conditioning. A
modern building management system will allow us
remote access to control some functions such as heating
and air-conditioning.
New external cladding and roof insulation will be
installed and all fixtures and fittings such as carpets,
timber products and bathroom ceramics will be sourced
sustainably. Water consumption will be addressed via
dual flush toilets and we will take full control of the
buildings waste management to ensure recycling is
maximised. Use of cycles by staff will be encouraged
with enhanced storage areas and showers.
Our performance during the refurbishment is also front-of-
mind. So far we have been able to re-use hundreds of
chairs and workstations, our contractors will be part of
the considerate building scheme and we intend to
monitor our energy consumption throughout the project.
CARBON TRUST
Last year we reported that we had
achieved the Carbon Trust Standard. This
means that we have been recognised by
a third party for our efforts in reducing
carbon emissions and for our commitment to further these
reductions. The Carbon Trust Standard is widely
considered as the worlds leading certifier of
organisational carbon footprint reduction.
To achieve the Carbon Trust Standard, Arcadia had to:
1. Provide an accurate footprint measurement including
all required emission sources;
2. Demonstrate an absolute reduction of footprint or
equivalent relative efficiency improvement; and
Tonnes of CO

emissions saved through energy


reductions since 2008
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
10,720 3,091 2,257 3,054 5,018
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3. Demonstrate good carbon management including
governance, accounting, reduction methods and targets.
This year we have continued to focus on these key areas
of environmental impacts and we are keen to improve
this even further.
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
AND CO
2
EMISSIONS
Although our total combined energy usage (electricity
and gas) has slightly increased, we have achieved our
target to further reduce CO
2
emissions by 3% this year.
While we achieved our reduction targets on electricity
with a 4% reduction, our gas consumption has increased
by 29% compared to last year.
Much of this increase in gas consumption can be put
down to the extremes of weather experienced this year.
Another cold and very prolonged winter, followed by an
unseasonably chilly spring and then a summer heatwave
has required us to increase the heating and cooling of
our stores in turn. Clearly customer comfort is of utmost
importance to us so it is a compromise we have felt
compelled to make.
Our reduced electricity consumption continues to be
supported by our plans to replace less efficient lamps in
our store lighting systems with energy efficient LED
replacements.
We achieved our goal this year to replace the lighting
along the escalators at our TOPSHOP Oxford Circus
flagship store and to convert all incandescent lamps to
LEDs in BHS lighting departments.
TOPSHOP Oxford Circus has illuminated graphics next
to the main bank of escalators that were lit by 35-watt
ceramic metal halide (CMH) lamps that lasted on
average less than 12 months each. Their LED
replacements run at 26 watts and have an average
lamp life of five years. This project alone has saved 31
tonnes of CO
2
this year and over the course of five years
will save approximately 155 tonnes of CO
2
.
Before joining the Fashion Footprint programme, BHS
lighting departments had been using a wide range of
energy inefficient lamps. Our project to convert the majority
to LEDs this year has been successful with 71,500 lamps
replaced resulting in a CO
2
saving of 307 tonnes.
We continue to review energy providers and switch to
renewable sources wherever possible. Last year 71% of
our energy across stores, head offices and distribution
centres was provided from renewables. This year we
have increased that position to 94%, working with UK-
based Smartest and Dublin-based Energia in Ireland.
The remaining 6% is made up of stores based in Northern
Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
As outlined in last years report, we identified an
aspiration to convert heaters in some of our stores that
currently use diesel oil to more efficient gas-fuelled
heaters. We have undertaken detailed surveys of these
stores this year but have taken the difficult decision not to
progress further due to the prohibitive costs required in
excavation, pipework and soil removal.
Our plan to replace our existing store IT systems with a
much more energy efficient centrally hosted infrastructure
was completed and has driven further energy savings of
over 306,000 kWh on an annualised basis. As part of
the roll out of the new Electronic Point of Sale (EPOS)
system, we also replaced over 4,000 tills with more
energy efficient models.
We continue to encourage our head office teams to use
video conferencing (VC) facilities and last year invested
in increased facilities to save on both domestic and
international travel. We have ensured that there will be
purpose built VC rooms as part of the head office
refurbishment programme.
RECYCLING AND
WASTE
While we have embarked on the refurbishment of our
London head office at Colegrave House, we are also
exploring improvements that can be implemented ahead
of, or alongside, the project. As part of this programme
we are taking the opportunity to review the use of paper
across the business. All printers that are capable of
printing double-sided have been made to do so by
default and relocated to areas where the most printing is
done. As each floor is refurbished in Colegrave House
we will look to replace desk-side printers and copiers
with networked multi-functional devices.
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Overall we anticipate that we will replace 270 desk-side
and small departmental printers, scanners and copiers
with 45 multi-functional devices.
A further reduction in paper usage will come about
through the roll out of Microsoft Office 365, in which
users are presented with an accurate print preview of
their reports before they commit them to a physical
printer. In pilot, this has shown a marked reduction in the
number of incorrectly formatted prints. The roll out of
Office 365 started in our financial year 2012/13 and
will complete in 2013/14.
We continue to make progress in the amount of waste
we recycle via our stores network. This year we achieved
our goal of increasing our total recycling rate by 3%,
taking our overall recycling rate to 85%.
In total, this year our offices have recycled 11,000
tonnes of waste out of a total of 13,000 tonnes
produced.
For stores in shopping centres, waste management is the
responsibility of the centres landlord. While this year we
had planned to continue to press for improved recycling
in these locations, little progress has been achieved and
we plan to pursue this again next year focusing on key
landlords.
We have engaged a leading oil recycling company to
recycle our used cooking oil across the BHS estate. Last
year alone we recycled 69,000 litres of used oil; this
has saved 123 tonnes of CO
2
, the equivalent of
removing 629 Ford Fiestas from the road for a year.
Last year, 78 of our BHS stores recycled their food
waste; a total of 735 tonnes were diverted from landfill
and used to generate electricity through anaerobic
digestion. This has resulted in a total of 324,000 kWh
generated.
HANGERS
Last year 33 million hangers were recycled across the
group. We have had a system in place to re-use hangers
up to seven times before they are broken down and
recycled.
CARRIER BAGS
We have seen an 11% reduction in the use of plastic
bags and have scaled down next years carrier bag
order accordingly. Paper bags usage has also reduced
this year by 35%.
TRANSPORT AND
LOGISTICS
The movement of our products is an area that has seen
transformative plans put in place this year. Wherever
possible, we seek to minimise the impacts of transporting
products especially as our global reach as a retailer
continues to grow.
We have a long-term aspiration in place to establish
international hubs that will support our global network
of stores.
The scoping work has taken place for new merchandising
software, a warehouse management system and supply
chain solutions that will enable the development of a
global network of hubs to optimise the efficient movement
of goods from their place of production to the point of sale.
We currently have two facilities in the USA - a warehouse
on the east coast to support our TOPSHOP and
TOPMAN stores in New York and Chicago and one on
the west coast supporting stores in Los Angeles and Las
Vegas.
New systems go hand-in-hand with developing the
functionality carried out in our USA warehouses,
including the ability to export goods.
In the longer-term, developing this network of international
hubs will reduce the miles travelled by our products, with
goods going direct to our partners, resulting in much
reduced freighting. Alongside these initiatives we
continue to examine taking trucks off the road from
continental Europe by moving product via more emission-
friendly ferry and rail links.
Meanwhile, back in the UK further improvements have
been achieved through the delivery of plans to update
our vehicle fleet, further consolidation of routes and
adherence to industry best practice.
26
UK Distribution Network
BELLSHILL
OUTBASE
ISLE OF
MAN
NORTHERN
IRELAND
EIRE
DUBLIN
BELFAST
EBBW VALE
OUTBASE
AVONMOUTH
OUTBASE
EXETER
OUTBASE
CHANNEL
ISLANDS
ISLE OF WIGHT
WOODLEY
OUTBASE
THETFORD
OUTBASE
EARLESTOWN
OUTBASE
BILLINGHAM
OUTBASE
BARKING
OUTBASE
TILBURY
OUTBASE
HOLYHEAD
LEEDS
DC
MILTON
KEYNES DC
ATHERSTONE
DC
MONKSPATH
DC
27
28
Last year we pledged to increase the use of double
decked trailers on high volume routes, further consolidate
our network and reduce our CO
2
emissions by 5%. All
of these targets have been achieved and we are on
track to replace our fleet in early 2014 to meet the latest
Euro 5 emissions standard.
This year we reduced our transport CO
2
emissions by
5.4%. This is the sixth year in a row that we have
achieved such reductions.
2007-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13
10% 7% 5% 5% 10% 5%
During the year we received approval to complete the
replacement of our store delivery fleet. A pilot of six new
trucks bought in early 2012 to comply with the new London
Emission Zone indicated that there were benefits to be
gained, which encouraged us to roll out the new fleet.
We anticipate that all our fleet will be replaced by early
January 2014, slightly later than originally planned. By
early in the New Year, we will have 125 vehicles that are
fully Euro 5 emissions compliant.
In our current position with 82 compliant vehicles, we
have still managed to make good headway on miles
travelled and fuel consumed. This year has seen mileage
reduced by 6%, building on the 9% reduction achieved
last year. Our overall fuel consumption is down by 5%
and, in the first 12 weeks of using the new vehicles, our
like-for-like miles per gallon (MPG) improved by 11%.
Whilst the good weather helped, this is an encouraging
start and supports a target improvement of 5% in
emissions in 2013/14.
We continue to tighten delivery schedules, reducing
frequencies wherever possible and have achieved
further benefits from route consolidation this year.
Driver training using the SAFED (Safe and Fuel Efficient
Driving) programme and the Smith System defensive
driving programme is completely up to date, ensuring our
drivers are competent and considerate road users.
Forward facing cameras are being installed on all
vehicles at the start of January 2014. The video footage
will provide valuable evidence to review accidents and
also assist as a training aid for drivers.
Our efforts in the UK are mirrored by the commitments
made by our third party forwarders and carriers. The
long-term partnerships we have forged in this area
continue to reap benefits. By selecting best-in-class
partners we can be sure that they share our commitments
to reducing environmental impacts and CO
2
emissions.
When we consider the relative impacts of the different
methods of moving our products, it is clear that moving
goods by ship has the least impact in terms of emissions
per kilometre travelled.
Transport Method CO
2
emissions (grams) per metric
tonne of freight per km
Air 500-950
Road 60-150
Train 30-150
Ship 10-40



Our ocean freight partners are directing major emission-
reduction schemes in their businesses.
Maersk handles a third of our sea freight and made
significant strides in reducing its impact in recent years,
with its CO
2
emissions now just a quarter of what they
were five years ago.
Another of our ocean freight partners is NYK (Nippon Yusen
Kaisha) Group. They recycle as much steel as possible and
have signed a three-year contract to plant trees in Japan as
part of a carbon offset programme. NOL (Neptune Orient
Lines), our primary carrier, have recently received the Green
Ships certificate for 14 vessels in its fleet from Singapores
Maritime and Port Authority.
Of course, as a fashion business, speed is sometimes
crucial and while we do not plan to use air freight across
our business we need to respond to trends. However,
we assess this need very carefully and air freight
represents just 3% of goods brought into the UK by
weight. Our air freight partner ACS (Allport Cargo
Services) has a number of emission-reduction
programmes and in January of this year won a British
International Freight Association (BIFA) service award for
its international hubs solution.
CHALLENGES
We are disappointed with our position this year on energy
consumption and we will focus on resuming our previously
unbroken track record of year-on-year improvements. That
said, it is impossible to predict short-term weather trends
and we need to keep customer comfort in mind.
We are also mindful that some aspects of this section have
stalled this year. We have made little progress on meeting
with landlords of shopping centres to support our aims to
increase recycling. We hope that increased government
pressure in this area will support our goals and we will
continue to lobby centre management on this issue.
NEXT STEPS
Energy Efficiency
Review upgrading our general store lighting to LEDs
across our Outfit stores and to our BHS stores.
Carry out a full review of energy consumption in our
four distribution centres to explore saving opportunities
in these energy intensive sites.
Trial Voltage Optimisation technology in suitable
locations.
Explore lighting upgrade options in our BHS head
office in Marylebone.
Optimise our Building Management Systems in
suitable BHS stores to ensure our energy demand is
in line with trading hours and improve comfort levels.
Stores will pilot hand held till devices with new
software that enables paperless receipts.
A further 750 PCs will be adapted to be more
energy efficient.
130 of our older laptop computers will be replaced
with newer, energy efficient models.
Recycling and waste
Increase our food recycling.
Carry out a full waste audit at our TOPSHOP Oxford
Circus flagship store.
Review backhauling opportunities (optimising space
on all vehicles) in suitable locations.
Roll out more waterless urinals.
Transport
Establish the ability to piggyback on our existing
logistics network for customers click and collect
online orders, negating the need for couriers.
Complete the introduction of our new fleet of Euro 5
compliant vehicles.
Target a further 5% reduction in CO
2
emissions in
2014.
29
Fashion Footprint is important to
our employees and they can
provide valuable insights to
shape our activities.
OUR
EMPLOYEES
30
N
ot only do we recognise the need to
engage our people in support of our
Fashion Footprint programme, we also acknowledge
their expectations of us as their employer to demonstrate
our commitments.
We have taken a number of steps this year to reinforce
the two-way benefits of employee engagement. We
have adopted some of the ideas and recommendations
that have been driven out of the extension of Fashion
Footprint to our retail community, which now includes our
teams at BHS. We have completed an employee
volunteering pilot and put in place steps to take that
forward. We continue to value the feedback from our
Fashion Footprint Advisory Panel.
RETAIL ENGAGEMENT
Last years widening of the Fashion Footprint programme
to embrace our store-based colleagues has proven to be
a springboard for further activity.
Our initial aims were twofold: to raise awareness of the
role our store community could play in helping us operate
more responsibly and to significantly reduce the
consumption of resources across our retail operations.
A working party hosted a series of meetings with the
retail teams to encourage engagement and identify
some simple goals that would galvanise store efforts. The
outputs were: a mission to reduce stationery consumption
in stores, and to challenge employees to come up with
their own Fashion Footprint pledges.
One year on, and we were pleased to be able to revisit
the teams and update them with our progress.
Stationery orders have reduced significantly and new
order forms have been adopted to focus attention on
business-critical materials. A stationery amnesty was
staged to help run down remaining stocks.
Stores have reduced paper consumption by switching
from printed documents to email briefings for all
operational actions. Any printing that does take place
now defaults to double-sided. This has lead to a
reduction in paper consumption of 18%.
Tickets used to reserve items for customers have been
laminated so they can be re-used and light bulbs that can
be switched to low-energy equivalents have been
identified.
Meanwhile, awareness has been achieved via the
pledge boards our store teams created last year.
Messages have ranged from switching off the lights
wherever possible to supporting local charities.
We recognise that maintaining this momentum requires
commitment, so we are planning a Fashion Footprint
Focus Week at the beginning of 2014. Each store team
will be given a pack of blank recycled stickers that they
can customise with their own messages to be shared
with colleagues.
Stores will bid to win a prize for the best ideas, slogans
and top tips highlighted by their stickers. Competition
winners will support the retail working party, using the
successful ideas to form the basis of future savings and
targets for next years programme.
EMPLOYEE
VOLUNTEERING
The pilot to introduce an employee-volunteering scheme,
driven by our team at Wallis, is now complete.
Their initial target was to identify and deliver three
volunteering events at partner charities relating to causes
selected by our employees and located within easy
striking distance of our central London head office.
The first project was completed last year with a further
two realised this year. This years first event saw
employees help out at Providence Row, a drop-in centre
for the homeless in East London, while the second was a
makeover day for cancer patients at Pauls Cancer
Support Centre in Battersea, south London.
The events have garnered enthusiastic support from the
team at Wallis head office with over 270 working hours
31
donated and 25% of the head office workforce getting
involved across the three events.
Employees welcomed the chance to become actively
involved in giving back and the charities have benefited
from a transfer of skills, one of the key learnings of the
pilot is the amount of time and resource that organising
these events has absorbed.
This insight has prompted us to seek a brokering partner
who are experts in the field and who can take control of
the organisational challenges. Outsourcing the
arrangement of our employee volunteering in this way
will also enable us to extend the pilot beyond Wallis and
across the rest of the business.
It will also provide the ability to market activities more
effectively internally and it will bring the additional
benefit of making our peoples investments more
measurable in terms of their impact.
TRAINING AND
DEVELOPMENT
We have continued to ensure all new employees in
Buying, Merchandising, Design and Technical Services
attend our Introduction to Ethical Trading training session
at the beginning of their employment. The workshop is
mandatory and is managed by the brands as part of
their induction process. This year over 750 employees
have attended the workshops.
Our senior team members are reminded of their
responsibilities in the area of purchasing practices via our
Leadership Expectations framework.
FASHION FOOTPRINT
ADVISORY PANEL
(FFAP)
The Fashion Footprint Advisory Panel currently has 13
members. The panel meets every two months and was
established as a sounding board, responding and
providing guidance on projects such as the employee-
volunteering pilot driven by Wallis.
The group is well briefed on the priorities supported by
employees at head office via the employee surveys
carried out in 2010 and again in 2012.
The group has been challenged to provide feedback on
what our three-year targets should involve and has
proposed the following to be considered by the Fashion
Footprint Steering Group (FFSG):
ensuring we use LED lamps in all new site
developments and refurbishments in head office and
stores in order to reduce our energy usage and
carbon footprint;
achieving zero waste to landfill from head office and
store locations;
increasing recycling, for example donating redundant
store fittings to schools and charities;
improving distribution of our product, reducing air,
ship and road mileage; and
rolling out employee volunteering across the whole
group.
The FFSG will provide feedback on these in the
coming months.
Part of the FFAPs brief will be to take on board the work
of the Green Champions. While there was initial
enthusiasm for this initiative, as we acknowledged in the
last report, maintaining commitment had been a
challenge. We believe this work should now sit with the
FFAP to ensure there is structure and process in place to
drive it forward.
WORKPLACE
DIVERSITY
We remain committed to the following policy on diversity:
Arcadia Group values the differences that a diverse
workforce can bring to the Company and is fully
committed to the elimination of unlawful and unfair
discrimination in recruitment and in employment. To
this end the Company will not discriminate on grounds
of race, nationality, gender, sexual orientation,
marital status, disability, religion or belief, age,
political affiliation, family status, membership of the
32
travelling community or any other relevant factor.
Arcadia Group aims to build a culture that is
supportive and inclusive, and one that values
meritocracy, openness, fairness and transparency. By
celebrating and integrating individual strengths,
Arcadia Group will maximise efficiency and creativity,
put customers first and deliver great customer value.
Our age and gender statistics illustrate that Arcadia
Group is a young and predominately female organisation,
which is in keeping with the retail sector as a whole.
In our retail stores, 82% of our employees are female
while at head office 72% of the population is female.
In terms of age, 72% of the retail workforce is under 35
while at head office 63% of the workforce is under 35.
The most recent analysis of employee ethnic diversity in
the Arcadia Group was conducted in July 2013. Overall
the analysis indicated a correlation between ethnic
backgrounds of our employees with the ethnic make up
of Great Britain.
Ethnic representation in the workplace
HEALTH AND SAFETY
The health and safety of our employees, contractors and
customers remains a priority. We constantly investigate
and review risk and respond appropriately.
This year we have achieved our targets in all of the four
key areas highlighted in last years report. The areas
where we have seen progress are:
reduce the number of accidents that take place in our
stores;
review and improve training provided for our
customer care team;
ensure all health and safety and access requirements
are included in plans for our head office refurbishment;
and
review and update our Equality Act 2010 training
materials for employees.
Accidents in our stores are down by 13% year-on-year
and we are confident this trend will continue, due to
ongoing and new initiatives to reduce risks.
Summer 2013 saw the launch of a new Consequences
health and safety film that re-enacts hypothetical but
commonplace accidents in-store as if caught on CCTV,
demonstrating to employees what can happen if they fail
to follow procedures. We plan to use this DVD for all our
refresher training. We are confident that the strong visual
impact will ensure that employees remember the
consequences of failing to follow policies and
procedures.
We created a bespoke health and safety course for our
store design team to help them understand their
responsibilities under the Construction Design and
Management Regulations, the law relating to safe project
management. We are keen to ensure that in creating
exciting new stores, safe design is adopted at the earliest
opportunity.
33
* Based on 2001 figures full data on ethnicity from
2011 Census not available until end of 2013
** July 2013 analysis of the Arcadia Workforce
Ethnic
Group
GB %* Arcadia
Retail %**
Arcadia
HO %**
Arcadia
All %**
White
British
85.3% 82.9% 91.0% 87.0%
Irish
1.2% 2.7% 0.5% 1.6%
Other
White
5.3% 1.4% 1.9% 1.6%
Mixed
race
1.2% 1.7% 1.2% 1.5%
Asian 3.8% 3.0% 2.5% 2.7%
Black 2.0% 3.2% 1.3% 2.3%
Chinese
and
Other
Ethnic
Groups
1.2% 2.2% 1.0% 1.6%
Prefer
not to
say
N/A 2.9% 0.6% 1.7%
Whilst no actions have been taken against the group in
regard to incidents relating to legionella, asbestos or
electricity, as a responsible retailer we take potential
major safety issues very seriously so we have put in
place training in these key areas for our teams this year.
In addition, a new system has been put in place to
assess planned designs for shop fixtures for their
suitability. The TOPMAN visual merchandising team is
piloting this new approach, ahead of a planned rollout
across the group.
The end of this reporting year will see the launch of the
first health and safety master class for retail teams whose
store is about to undergo modernisation works. This
training will brief management teams on what to expect,
the risks to look out for, cooperating and coordinating
with contractors, recording documentation and ensuring
compliance. These sessions will prepare managers and
support them through the process, minimising disruption
and reducing accidents.
The department has also provided input into the head
office refurbishment from inception and continues to do
so throughout the construction works.
STORE AND WEBSITE
ACCESSIBILITY
It is now eight years since the Disability Discrimination
Act was enacted (now the Equality Act) and as we make
continual improvements to our retail estate, customers
concerns about store accessibility have reached an all-
time low with just 35 issues referred to our team this year.
This includes BHS, which brings with it the challenges of
trading from larger footprint sites and the added risks
presented by operating in-store restaurants and cafes.
We take all customer concerns seriously. A good
example of this is a fashion blogger for the disabled who
has become a critical friend of the business, working
with Dorothy Perkins and providing insight as part of their
focus groups.
CHALLENGES
As our approach to our responsibilities matures, we
acknowledge that there should be a similar shift in the
way our teams are encouraged to adopt ethical
purchasing practices. We are in the process
of introducing a new framework for Purchasing
Practices training to add to our Introduction to Ethical
Trading Training.
NEXT STEPS
Employee Engagement
Select an employee-volunteering partner and roll out
a scheme to other brands.
Continue to find new opportunities for our retail
teams to drive the Fashion Footprint vision.
Support the Fashion Footprint Advisory Panel and
ensure that as much as possible of their action plan
is implemented.
Roll out Purchasing Practices more consistently to the
group.
Health and Safety (H&S) and Accessibility
Drive further improvements in H&S compliance via
the rollout of refresher training using the new
Consequences DVD.
Roll out the H&S master class for store management
teams ahead of retail modernisation projects.
Trial the use of a compliance app on iPads in large
TOPSHOP stores so H&S checks can be monitored
remotely.
Continue to drive down accidents in our stores via
in-store assessments by our specialist team.
Make documentation and procedures accessible to
all colleagues, including the fully revised H&S
manual and deliver the new fire safety manual.
34
35
Arcadia has a long-held tradition
of support for a wide range of
communities. We give back at group
level, via our brands and through the
individual efforts of our employees.
OUR
COMMUNITIES
36
37
A
rcadia has a long-held tradition of close
involvement in a wide range of communities
worldwide. Activities range from charity donations made
at group level, work with cause-related partners selected
by each of our brands, through to the individual efforts of
our employees who continue to demonstrate their
appetite to give back to causes that matter to them.
As one of the largest employers within fashion retail, we
want to support causes that benefit those within the
industry. So it is perhaps no surprise that, once again this
year, we have chosen to support young fashion talent.
This is a dual strategy, working in partnership with
education via the Fashion Retail Academy and continuing
to support rising stars via London Fashion Weeks
NEWGEN programme (see below).
Further afield, our new Fashion Footprint charity is making
a difference to the lives of disadvantaged children and
women in India via the educational charity Harmony
House. Read on for more details of our planned work
with this inspiring organisation.
This year we continued to donate returned or surplus
stock to Newlife Trading, a social enterprise which
supports disabled and terminally ill children in the UK.
Newlife Trading ethically recycles or sells de-labelled
goods, returning the profits to their charity foundation.
This year Arcadia Group donated over 20,000 cartons
of stock, which raised 334,000 in total.
Our employees also donate via our Workplace Giving
Scheme; total donations this year were 164,000 with
2,400 employees taking part in the scheme.
This year we reviewed all the sample sales that have
taken place in our Skyline restaurant and we were
delighted to confirm that in total we have raised more
than 1 million from our weekly sales to head office
employees since 2000. The proceeds go to charity and
this year alone we have raised 101,000.
During the year our brands and head office activities
have raised a grand total of 1.5 million. A breakdown
of each brands activities can be found on pages 38-40.
FASHION RETAIL
ACADEMY
Our support of the Fashion Retail Academy (FRA) remains
as strong as ever. Opened in 2006, the FRA prepares
students for a career in fashion retail, training them in
areas such as buying, merchandising, visual
merchandising, styling, store management, marketing
and PR, retail business and graphic design. The FRA
offers a range of courses from entry level, requiring no
formal qualifications, to a Foundation Degree in Fashion
Retail Management.
Its work as the UKs first National Skills Academy has
proved a resounding success, leading the way in
employer engagement. This year the FRA secured 514
student work placements across 110 retail partners, with
83% of these retailers saying they would not hesitate to
employ their work placement student.
The biggest event in the Fashion Retail Academys
calendar is the Awards Ceremony, which celebrates the
success of its graduating students each year and 2013
was no exception.
Sir Philip Green, the Academys founder, together with
Marc Bolland (M&S), Jason Tarry (Tesco) and Christos
Angelides (Next) form the principal patrons of the
Academy. At the ceremony they joined a host of business
leaders to congratulate the 490 students who are now
ready to work in the fashion retail industry or to continue
their studies. Special guest and singer Rita Ora presented
the FRA Commitment Award to Naj Chowdhury for his
exceptional work ethic, drive and dedication.
MENTORING YOUNG
FASHION TALENT VIA
NEWGEN
Following on from last years celebrations to mark
TOPSHOPs decade-long sponsorship of young British
designers, this year has seen the partnership take an
exciting new direction.
Nine NEWGEN designers were selected to receive
support to help them showcase their talents as part of the
British Fashion Councils (BFC) London Fashion Week.
38
In addition, TOPSHOP joined forces with the BFC to develop
and broaden its support for the designers businesses. To
help this emerging talent to establish strong commercial
platforms, TOPSHOP has supported a programme of
mentoring, seminars and one-to-one workshops. The brand
has also provided the designers with access to its teams vast
knowledge on all areas of business.
Previous recipients of TOPSHOPs support have
included Alexander McQueen, Julien Macdonald and
Matthew Williamson.
CHARITIES
FASHION FOOTPRINT CHARITY
HARMONY HOUSE, INDIA
Following on from the success of our three-year
partnership with Indian educational charity Tender Heart,
we have selected the next cause to become our Fashion
Footprint charity.
Harmony House is a non-profit organisation based in
India that provides care and education to disadvantaged
women and children.
Our aim is to help Harmony House double the number
of spaces it can offer from 200 to 400. Attendees
benefit from:
an educational scheme delivered by qualified
teachers;
two in-house libraries;
nutritious meals;
free medical consultancy;
vaccinations;
pre-natal advice for local women;
vocational classes; and
shelter and cold weather supplies.
Further fundraising will be organised across our business,
via Fashion Footprint events and sample sales. We are
optimistic that the partnership will repeat the success of
our work with Tender Heart, which saw us achieve our
three-year goal of 50,000 earlier this year.
Our donations made visible improvements at Tender
Heart, increasing the number of teachers, physiotherapists
and speech therapists it employs. Improvements to the
infrastructure have included a purpose-built drinking
water tank and concrete roofing to replace the existing
corrugated iron on all classrooms.
INDIVIDUAL CHARITY SPONSORSHIP
As a group, we are committed to matching funds raised
by our employees up to the value of 500. This year we
have donated 16,000 in support of our employees
with the most favoured charity being Breast Cancer
Care. Events ranged from marathons, sponsored walks,
cycling and mountain climbing.
CHARITY UPDATE BY BRAND
Our employees are passionate about raising money for
charity. Each brand works in partnership with its selected
charity to raise money through store initiatives, product
sales and activities in head office.
BHS
BHS supports NSPCC and Breast Cancer Care as well
as collecting in stores for the Missing People Charity. The
brands fundraising total for the year came to just over
425,000.
BHS has had a five year relationship with NSPCC, raising
an outstanding 306,000 for the child protection charity
this year alone through fundraising activities such as the
sale of Fathers Day t-shirts, the Clothes Aid initiative, Bag
For Life and staff fundraising.
Support for Breast Cancer Care, which BHS has partnered
with for nine years, has been seen through the continuation
of the BCC Strawberry Tea campaign, along with the
launch of the bra initiative.
BHS also supports Wellbeing of Women dresses. Emma
Forbes endorsed four limited edition Occasion wear
dresses sold in selected stores and online. A donation of
30,000 was made to the charity from the dresses sold.
BURTON
This year saw Burton continue to support Trekstock, a
charity partnership established last year. Founded in
2006, Trekstock supports young people with cancer via
funding research and helping them to make better-
informed lifestyle choices. All profits are passed to
39
Cancer Research UKs work around cancers that affect
young people.
It has been an action-packed year for Burton team
members across stores and head office. The key focus was
a Trekstock weekend in May. A team from Burton head
office walked from London to Brighton while others took
part in a skydiving event. Two employees trekked for six
days in the Alps to attend Trekstocks Great Gig in the Sky.
In just four months, the brand sold 4,000 of its fundraising
badges and overall this year Burton raised 55,000.
DOROTHY PERKINS
Dorothy Perkins has two long-term charity partners:
Breast Cancer Care (BCC) and Woodland Trust.
This year saw another major fundraising milestone
reached with BCC, with the figure hitting the 3 million
mark over the nine-year partnership. BCC celebrity
supporter Denise van Outen visited the teams at head
office to say thank you on behalf of the charity. Three of
our leading store fundraisers joined the celebrations,
helping us cut a cake in the shape of a 3.
Our stores have got behind a programme to host
strawberry tea parties this summer. We ran a Twitter
competition inviting followers to tell us where they would
hold their strawberry tea event, with the best five
suggestions winning a tea set to help their efforts.
Each October the brand encourages employees to take
part in Pink Fridays, where they wear, work or party in
pink to raise further funds. Customers are also encouraged
to take part via messages in cardholder statements and
online orders.
August saw the launch of new Love bracelets before the
return of the traditional pin badges. All of this activity has
helped Dorothy Perkins to raise 69,000 for Breast
Cancer Care this year.
The brand has taken the decision this year to conclude
its work with Woodland Trust after raising a total of
19,000 this year, 1.1m over six years and planting
over 192,000 trees. While the partnership has been
very successful in recent years, the brand has decided to
focus efforts on BCC. The final activity with Woodland
Trust was a campaign this summer called Love It or Lose
It, encouraging customers to share their favourite forest-
related memories.
Our Irish stores support the Marie Keating Foundation
and this May sold pearl bracelets in stores to support
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Total donations
have reached 14,500.
EVANS
Evans has continued to support Breakthrough Breast
Cancer through the sale of pink ribbon pins and pink
products, raising a total of 6,000.
We also continue to support Smart Works, a charity
previously known as Dress for Success, which helps
unemployed women. We donate work wear pieces,
helping women feel confident when interviewing and
going back in to work. Since the partnership began over
two years ago, Evans has donated 26,000 worth of
clothing.
MISS SELFRIDGE
Miss Selfridge supports the Lavender Trust, a charity
offering support and information to younger women
affected by Breast Cancer in the UK. This year the brand
raised 11,500, through selling charity pins and hosting
a variety of store fund-raising events.
OUTFIT
The partnership between Alzheimers Society has been
a great success and the contract was extended to run
until June 2013.
Employees throughout the partnership have been hugely
supportive and have thrown themselves into a mix of
activities, including parachute jumps and marathons,
Halloween events, Go Blue days and continued the
enthusiasm for in-store fundraising events. The stores have
been selling jewel keyrings and button mirrors with a
suggested donation between 1.50 - 2 each.
Outfit over the past year have raised over 124,000
and raised an impressive 424,000 throughout the
successful partnership for the Alzheimers Society.
40
TOPMAN
Limited edition wristbands were launched this summer in
support of Teenage Cancer Trust, which provides
specialist services for young people with cancer. Sold in
the top 60 TOPMAN stores and online, the wristbands
cost 2 with all revenues going directly to the charity.
The wristbands are the latest in a series of fundraising
products for TOPMANs support of Teenage Cancer
Trust and raised just under 50,000.
TOPSHOP
A significant new partnership was formed this year, with
Indian-based Womens Interlink Foundations Key to
Freedom project.
Key to Freedom launched in 2012 following a visit to
India by the Duke of York as part of the Queens
Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Womens Interlink
Foundation (WIF) provides refuge for women and girls in
India whose lives have been blighted by human
trafficking, enforced prostitution and domestic abuse.
At WIF, the young women are encouraged and
supported to develop new life skills such as textile dyeing
and printing. These skills are being put to use creating a
range of four sarong designs that are currently being sold
through three London TOPSHOP flagship stores and
online. Since their launch in July 2013, the sarongs have
raised 4,000 for the charity.
Each sarong is signed by its maker, who receives an
upfront payment for her garment. Then all funds raised
from the sale of the sarongs go back to WIF via the
Prince Andrew Charitable Trust (PACT). The proceeds
are used are rescued more girls and, in the longer term,
build more homes.
Following a visit by the TOPSHOP team to the Key to
Freedom project in Kolkata earlier this year, plans are in
place to work with the women to develop a wider range
of products that will match the projects growing capacity
as more girls are rescued.
This spring saw TOPSHOP stage its annual support for
Fashion Targets Breast Cancer. A range of t-shirts, skirts
and keyrings were sold online and in stores, supported
by a window display at the Oxford Circus flagship store,
in-store graphics and a social media campaign. Sales
from the range raised 50,000.
Throughout the year, TOPSHOP has also been selling
charm bracelets in support of Shelterbox. ShelterBox
provides emergency shelter and lifesaving supplies for
families around the world who are affected by disasters.
In the 11 years since the charity was founded, they have
responded to almost 200 disasters and provided
lifesaving aid for over one million people. In total, sales
of the charm bracelets raised over 26,000.
WALLIS
The main focus at Wallis this year has been the support
for our employee-volunteering pilot (see page 31), which
has involved 25% of our head office team. Other
activities included raising funds for a Red Nose Day
cake sale and 3,500 in a pub quiz and raffle for Great
Ormond Street Hospital.
NEXT STEPS
Work towards our target to double places available
at new Fashion Footprint charity Harmony House.
Continue to develop innovative campaigns with
charity partners at a brand and group level through
fundraising activities and product sales.
Maintain and strengthen relationships with the
Fashion Retail Academy.
Continue to sponsor NEWGEN at London Fashion
Week and invest in and nurture future talent.
Encourage and support staff in their own fundraising
activities.
41
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.




This report is printed on 100% recycled paper
CBP00010510911111542