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APROPOS KRKIN'S DAUGHTERS
.
.
RATNA HANDURUKAN
Our honorand, the late Professor G. P. Malalasekera lisb
the Pali sources that refer to King Krkin's daughters.1 Inforr
ation from Sanskrit avadana texts relating to two of the past bir f
of these maidens is given in this article written in his honour.
The Saptakumirikivadina, which forms the eleventh chap
of the Asokivadanamala,2 describes how the seven daughters
King Krkin of VaraIasi 3 obtained ordination from the Bud
Kasyapa.4 Sakyamuni, who related the story of these prince
at an assembly of monks is said to have addres. sed them at the
of his sermon and said:
manyadhval bhikavo yas a naginya7 sambuka api
caityavavipakent babhuvur nrpate7 suta7
"Think, 0 monks, those seven snake-maidens, even thou
(they were) shells, became the daughters of a king, as a result
paying homage to a caitya." Here we fnd a reference to t\
past births of Krkin's daughters; () as shells and (I) {
naga-maidens.
( I )
The
S
ambukavadana-nidanakathi, which narrates briefy
birth of Krkin's daughters as shell-maidens was printed earli
A metrical version of this avadana occurring in the Ahoratrivra
caityasevanusalJsavadana,6 the tenth chapter of the Asokavadi
mala gives
more details of the story. The context in which
episode is included in this chapter is as follows.
In response
the wish of an elder called Subhuti to know the Ahoratravra
Sakyamuni described that rite as taught by Vasubandhu to a ki
called Indrapra. Indrapra is said to have performed the r
. :::
"''0'
.
" ';
",
; ' "
!z. '!
.,
-"
118
tatra si jananl drlvi sapta til sundaril siSfl.
However the same folio of the Calcutta manuscript has the rea
di
tatal sa janakal srut vi jitil sapta suti iti
which is identical with the reading of the Tokyo manuscripts. T
three manuscripts agree once again at the conclusion of the sto
but this time in the assumption that the fsherman had
ei t
daughters who were born as the eight daughters of King Krkin,',
eldest of whom married King Dharmadaka. We quote the rele
v' l
section based on all three manuscripts which have the iden
ti> i
reading except for a few scribal variants.
( i) tatra tis caityam abhyarcya sthiti} saptadine mrti}
VirilJasyir Krke(l) rijial suti isan saminiki}
(ii) tisir yi bhaginl jyeli si Vrat iti pratiSruti
dviliyi Dharmavatt khyiti trliyi Subhamaijari
(iii) caturthi Dhimati nimni paicami Netramaijari
ati ca Srimali khyiti saptami ca Madarjahi
(iv) a'!amf Ratnamilikhyi ily eti a!akanyakil
. sujiti nrpate} putryal samiciril samisayi}
(v) tisif jye!hi pradhini yi si kanyi ratisannibhi
Dharmadakasya bhupasya bhiryibhid dharmaciri1i
The names of the eight daughters of Krkin according to
-tk.
above extract from B are Vrati, Dharmavati, Subhamafjbr;.
Dhimati, Netramanjari, Srimati, MadalTjaha and Ratnama \ (" .
The names of the seven daughters of Krkin as recorded in A lc
Padmavati, Sutamanjari,l Dhimati, Nayanamanjari, Yasom II
Mada
rpjaha and Ratnamala. On comparing the two lists it IS
p
ossible to conjecture that the additional name in B added perha\.
to an earlier list of seven is that of Vrati, the eldest daughter.
The eldest of the fsherman's daughters plays a prOmil1l lit
part in the story as given in B, whereas no single daugIHt,
is portrayed as an outstanding fgure in A. According to A the
maidens sit on the bank of a stream on their way to sell fsh, attribu-tf:
their birth in a fsherman's family to sinful deeds done in the PI "t
realise the folly of committing more sin, throw the fsh that were al. ve
into the water and sell only the dead fsh. In B it is the elq e t
]17
h U
t he
abode of the Buddhas ( jimilaya). Being asked
d re8e
e
d f d h ' I'
ks
about others who ha per orme t e rIte ear ler
Y the mo
n
.
d
.
f D
.
11 d
.
d
dha
cited the cases of lndra an a kmg \ altyas ca e
h
u
.
da
m
ana
. Next he spoke of some sages who observed the

Jr
g
.
o
a
t
h C
aity
agarbha pond at M agadha. These sages fainted
ll0
I
e
f
-
'd h
. h
l'ng
the
poisonous breath \ some nagamal ens, w
'n I
al

0U
them.
The sages cursed them to be born as shells
gl8
h d h
' +
0
UILted
that they would be born as t e aug ters ot a kmg
D
pre
.
f H ' h d .
'f
th
ey
rebo!CU to the woshlp
.
o
.
a caltya. . ow It so appene IS
1
0Uin
the section with whIch we are concerned here.
exp
8D
The
follow
ing
observations could be made based on a compara-
!V0
S!uUy
of the
printed Sambukavadina-nidanakathi and the

l00VdD!
section of the Ahoritravratacaityasevanu.alsavadana
extant i
n
m
anuscript versions only. The two versions are referred
!D
here
as A
and B respectively for convenience.
(i)
In A a fsherman fnds the shells circumambulating a
Cl
5l8
caitya in the pond. In B, the shells circumambulated
g800y-
S!8K in a feld nearby. Presumably they had returned to
the
QDDU
afer doing so when the fsherman cast his net and caught
them.
ii)
A gives the name of the fsherman as Rupaka but does
DD! _IV0 t he name of his wife. We have the opposite position
in,, where the wife is called Sundarika.7
(iIi) According to A, the fsherman's wife gave birth to seven
dau
g
hters on eating the shells. There is confusion regarding t he
number of the daughters in the manuscripts of B.8 Folio
12 of
the Calcut t a manuscript reads:
tatal sa samaye 'suta kanyaka hy atasundarr(l),
8h0 SD indicates that eight daughters were born. However the two
Tekyo manuscripts have the variant reading kanyaka(h)
SQl8SUBU0II! here, t hus agreeing with A regarding the number of
daughters. Again the same folio of the Calcutta manuscript
reads:
. tatra sa janani dr!va a!a tal sundaril sisul,
While both manuscripts in Tokyo read:
119
.
h
a
mon
g them was the foremost and wisell who speaks
ste
h
r
W
u

nger
ones of the evil they had done in the past which had
t
e y
o
.

d't' ned
their
present bIrth, the possIble consequences of
n

_
. .'
further
evil
and the Importance of resortmg to a vIrtuous
,IDg
It
is
she who suggests throwing the live fsh to the water and
ing
the
dead fsh, a suggestion readily accepted by the younger
Qte
s

A state5
that the mother came to know of their course of
ion
one
day
and so killed the fsh she gave them for sale the
bllo
wing
day.
It is not clear as to how the mother came to know
,f it
acco
rding
to A but B provides the explanation. One day,
ing
t ht
all
the fsh were alive, the maidens were surprised
nd
conf
u
sed
as to what they should do. The foremost
m
ong
the
m, pure in intention and intelligent,12 consoled
e young
er sisters and dictated the course of action to be
llo
wed
which
was to throw all the fsh into the river, not to go
o
m
e
em
p
ty
-handed for fear of reprisal, but to stay in the vicinity
fthe stream,
taking refuge in the Three Jewels. The others follow
r advice,
The mother heard of this from someone or other,
m
e
there, beat them and took them home. She killed all the
ish before she gave them for sale the next day .
. On this day the maidens delayed to return home, for they rested
the bank of the river on their way back from selling fsh, and
en decided to build caityas with sand 'and worship them.
The
gry fat her who came in search of them abused them, beat them
ad lef them wailing, Hearing their laments a pratyekabuddha
ived on t
he scene. The maidens pay their respects to him quite
ntaneously according to the account given in A. But in B their
'tial reaction is that of amazement mingled with joy and a feeling
uncertainty.
as to who the sage was. Once again the eldest
.
ter; the discerning one,13 gives an enlightening discourse, on
ring which the younger sisters pay obeisance to him and seek
g in him.
It is in keeping with this prominent position given to the eldest
ter that she should be the wife of King Dharmadaka14 who
b the last person in a list of people said to have performed the
oratra rite according to B, which it should be remembered is a
t devoted to extolling its special benefits. It should be recalled
t t he story of the shells that became a fisherman's daughters
120
came to be narrated out of an incident arising in connection WJ
some sages who practised the rite. The connecting link betwe
this story and the main theme of B is the identifcation of the mt
,
prominent among the sisters as the wife of King Dharmara g
noted for his having performed the Ahonitravrata. The se
ve'n
daughters of K'kin remained celibate and obtained ordinat
iQl1
from the Buddha Kasyapa according to the SaptakumirikivadQQf
version. I
t may then be suggested that the eighth daughter in_ B
had to be invented and, in giving a name for her, that of Vra
ti,' (
very suitable name incidentally for an important participant
of, M
vrata, was chosen. The inconsistency of referring to eight maidgr _
at the end of a story which dealt with seven of them only may
have
been noted by some scribes, who possibly tried to reconcile tb. >
inconsistency by changing the reading of the manuscripts.
(iv) According to A, the fsherman's daughters return h
On V
after meeting the pratyekabuddha, worship the parents and SI
to them on the evil of destroying life. This admonitory discoue
o 1 verse
.
The fsherman is said to have given up killing on th
advice. This incident is not recorded in B.
(v) The following emendations could be made 1 A,
printed text of the Sambukdvaddna-niddnakathd.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
change all occurreflces of sambuka to {ambuka
p. 47 line 25 read Subhamafjari for Sutamafjari
"
" 27 read Madarpjaha for Maharljaha
" "
35 read pravitah daivayogena (MS. devajoge
for praviddhah
(e) p. 48 " 20 read sisirarasmivarisecanena (cf. B
reads here: sarvas tas tat sudharasm;
parispJtah)
(
0 " "
25 read bhaginyab
.
kim bahuna
(I, 1)
The past birth of the seven daughters of KJkin as
is mentioned in the Saptakumirikavadana.15 That this birth
naginis was the one that immediately preceded their birth as she I_
was already indicated earlier in this article in describing the con
in which the episode of the 'shell-maidens' appears in the Ahorat
vratacaityasevdnusafsdvaddna chapter
.
of the Asokdvaddnamo .
j
121
Th
s
tory
as it
occurs in this chapter may be outlined as
11

In
Magadha there was a pond called Caityagarbha.
fo
ows.
h ' d hO d
Th
so
me
sag
es
observed the a oratra nte an wors lppe a
ere
e

d ` h d
't
tht was
1 It. Some snake-mal ens saw t em an came
cal
a

. e
r
them
.
The
sages
fainted for a moment struck by their pOisonous
nea
h

h h - d
b
rea
th.
On
regaining t elr se

ses t ey saw t e naga-mal ens


and
curse
d
them
in anger, wlshmg that they become shells. The
nagam
a ide1s, being turned into s?ells (for the curse seems to have
tak
en im
media
te efect) became fnghtened, bowed to the sages and
begg
ed
their
pardon. They implored the sages to teach them a
.eans of
releasing themselves from the efect of the curse. The
sag
e, theiL compassion aroused, asked them to resort to a caitya,
tocircu
mambulate it and so pay homage to it. The sages predicted
that as a consequence of doing so the shells would be born as the
daughters of a king, free from sin, pure in mind and blessed with
frtune. In that birth too, they would pay reverence to caityas,
lead religious lives and reach the abode of the Victorious Ones.
.
Thereup
on the shells took recourse to a paddy-feld, saw a
paddy-st
alk lef after the harvesting, assumed that it had the form
oTa caitya and paid homage to it circumambulating it constantly.
(II, 2)
The episode of the naginis quoted above merits companson
with that occurring in the Ahoritravratakathi included in the
Kirtikavratakathi manuscripts belonging to the Tokyo University
Iibrar.18 The context in which the relevant passage occurs is
the same as that in which the story outlined above occurs, i.e. with
reference to some sages who observed the Ahonitra rite. The
instancs of Sakra and the Daitya Nirghoadamana having performed
the rite earlier are cited before referring to the sages, the section of
the text relevant to whom is as foJlaws.
(i) Nayas ca puri sapta jalisraye prati!hitar
pupujul19 jinadhitusthar vidhibhi820 ca viSiradil
. (ii) niginyo viadarpindhil21 pujyaminin22 jinilayar
tipitin23 kirayim isur viingirail2. pradihana
il

(iii) tatas25 tail sipiti26 evar27 niginyal sambuki khalu .
bhavadhvaf sapIa janmani28 punas29 caityasya30 sevaki
l
122
(iv) tatas31 cinte punal pripya minuyar pU1yabhivatal32
ei Si33 niyaki yi tu Dharmadakar pati1' labha34
(Y) tatas ti varcitil35 sarvil sambuki dharmaminasi(i
dhanyim pradaki:im cakrur36 bhivayantyo37 jinilaym]l
(vi) tata38 pU}yinubhivena devyal saptakumirikil
I
bhiti rijasuti39 dhanyil40 prilabhan41 paramar padGiIl
I
(vii) tisim eki Vrati42 nimni Dharmadakapativrati43
tasyil pU;yaprabhivena Dharmadako 'labhad44 vratmli
The following comments may be made on the above ptssage
(II, 2) in comparing it with the story outlined earlier (II, 1). The
name and the location of the pond in which there was a caitya
worshipped by the sages is not given in II, 2. The numher of
sages unspecifed in II, 1 is given as seven ih II, 2. The number
of the snake damsels is unspecifed in one MS. giving the story of
I, 1, but two of the manuscripts imply that there were eight
of
them. The text in II, 2 does not expressly mention the num ber of
snake-maidens, but the fact that they are asked to become seven
shells when they are cursed by the sages and the subsequent birth
of the shells as seven princesses may be taken as an indication of
their having been seven naga-maidens. Some details liKe the
incidence of the sages having fainted and the naga-maidens asking
for pardon and the means of gaining release from the curse do
not occur in II, 2. It is noteworthy however, that the sages wish
that the leading one among the maidens in their human Dlrth
would have Dharmadaka as her husband in II, 2, a prediction
missing in I, 1. A paddy stalk was circumambulated hy the
maidens in I, 1 while grain was circumambulated in the version
given in II, 2. The continuation of II, 1 describes the birth or the
shells as a fsherman's daughters, as noted by us in section J of
this article. This episode is omitted in II, 2 which says tha t the
shells became seven pfincesses, one of whom, presumably the
eldest, became the spouse of Dharmadaka, who through hel
power of merit gained the (Ahoratra) rite.
( II,
3 )
A diferent version of the nagini episode occurs in an indepen
dent Ahoritravratakathi manuscript belonging to the Tokyo Univer
sity Library.45 The text in this manuscript is in prose with verse
I
I
I
123
' nt
ersp
e
rsed
in
so

e
.
places .
.
The
.
conte

t in which the
_
story o
h
n
ag
a-
maid
ens
IS Inserted In this text IS as follows. Sakyamunz
t
e
at
K
api
lav
astu pr

siding over a large assembly when a person


:
a

h
e
na
me of
Subh
u
ti re
q
uested him to expou

d t?e ahonHravrata.
e
Bu
ddha
in
respo
nse r

ferred t
?
an occaSIOn In the pas wh

n
Sa
ri
p4
tra
exp
ou
nded the nte to KIn
.
Dharmadaka,
.
who lIved m
the
ci
ty
of D
harmapattana. Descnbmg the benefcial efects of
p
erform
ing
the rite, Sariputra said that the king was entitled to a
o
ne
s
eve
nth
sha
re of these, should he observe the rite46 The
king
had
a great caitya built after which he performed the rite
fol
low
ing
the
instructions of Sariputra. At the conclusion of the
rite,
Sar
ipu
tra responded to the king's reference to his not receiving
his
sha
re
of the outcome of the rite47 by relating the following
story
of the
past48 which is of interest to us.
A
naga
and a nagini lived in a pond in the penance-grove of a
bod
hisa
ttva
called Mahamati. Five sages used to worship at a
cait
ya in that beautiful penance-grove. One day the naga and
. nigini bit one of these sages. The sage cursed the naga and nagini
and wished that they break up into seven pieces. As soon as they
'were cursed the snakes became seven shells. On account of their
:aving seen caityas constantly during their birth as nagas, the shells
recalled their past birth. They realised that they were born as
shells as a result of having bitten a sage who was devoted to caitya
worship. They regarded each grain (of cereal) in the feld (where
t
h
ey were) as a caitya and circumambulated them. On the fourth
day from then they became the daughters of a king called Kirakirtti.
The manuscript containing the text is very faulty.
a teptative text based on this single manuscript, the
available to us at the time of writing.49
We print
only one
Kva50 cim maharaja Mahamatir nama bodhisatvanirmitam
tap(vanar satacaityam ekam asti mahatavi nama. Sarasi puka-
ra1lmekam asti. Tatra naganagini prativasati. Te51 caityas-
rama52 aliramalJiya vividhapuapaparipurlJlJal53 sarchanna
babhuva. Tasmir caitye paica rayo nanasvadhyayajapatapa
bhaktito pujitavan54 pratidinarz. Tatra ekasmin dine naganagini
nagau tatra rim ekar darsitavan. Tato r#l sarpadarsitave
dnivedayan55sapitavan.56 He naganaginp7 kim artharz darzsitarz
ma1, SaptakhalJcrz bhavantu vinasau.58 Tato nagfnagau sap i
tamitreIa59 sapta sambuka60 janmantare61 babhuvul. Eva1!
124
paribhramamine sambuki62 nigajanme nityafl caityadadanaYi6
purvajanmavrttir smrtavin64 babhuva. Kasmils cit65 caity
a.
bhaktar ril dalsitenihaf itthar sambukijanmam66 anubhu
t
a

vyikulibhutaf. Tata ketre dhinyasya67 ekaikal67 caitya
m
it;
smrtvi68 pradakilJafl paribhramanti. Tata caturthakena dinencf
sambukijanmamukti70 Kirakirttir nima maharije saptakany
akd
janma prati/abdhd71 babhuJlul. Kanyaki nitiHi strajf vratac
ar;
bhutal.72
(II, 4)
The above extract (II, 3) deserves to be compared with a
metrical version occurring in the ffteenth chapter of a manuscri pt
of the VicitrakarlJikaJladana belonging to the library of the To
kai
University.73 Here too Sariputra narrates the episode
to
Dharmadak$a.
The notable details in II, 3 and II, 4 are the number of sage
being mentioned as fve, the replacement of the naga-maidens by a
male and female snake who break into seven pieces and become
shells on being cursed and the occurrence of Kirakirtti instead 0
Krkin as the name of the king as whose seven daughters the shell
were born. The course of action that the seven princesses followe
as described in U;' 4 viz resorting to a penance grove and attendin
upon Buddhas is similar to that given in the Saprakumarikavadina.
But the version of II, 4 difers completely from i t when it states i
the words of Sariputra that Dharmadaka and his wife DharraSila
presumably the naga and nagin] of the legend were born in Dharma-:
pattana and received (knowledge of) the Ahoratra rite on accoun'l
of that merit. The merit referred to, judging from the context, i
that accumulated during the birth as seven princesses. It i s cleal'
that this latter statement is merely the resu It of an attempt to link
the story of Krkin's daughters with the celebrated Ahoratravrat.
with a view perhaps to enhance its importance.
NOTES
1.
Dictionary of Pali Proper Names, Vol I, London, 1937, Vol II London
1938. See S.v. Kiki where he gives the names of eight daughters:
Uracchada, Samal;i, Samala, Gutta, Bhikkhudasika., Dhamma, SudhamJ11ii
and Sallghadasi. See also the entries under the above names. The
numbe r of the daughters appears to vary in the Pali tradition. For instance
Uracchada is said to be one of the nine daughters of King Kiki (s.,<.
Uracchada) while seven daughters are referred to elsewhere (e.g. s.v. Gutta,
Dhamma).
125
Available
in
manuscript. form only .
.
See (i) No. 3 in the Asia
.
tic Socie
.
ty
of Bengal
noted by Ra1endralala MItra on p. 12 !Q the Sanskrit Buddhist
Lit
erature 0/
Nepal,
Calcutta ] 82. See also ibid p. 221 f. The MS.
No. B 24 he refers to
.
there ont
,
alOs wo hapters
.
of the Asokavadinamiia
viz.,
the
Ahor
itracGl tyasevanusaf!sa vadana (fohos 1. -18 and th

Sapta-
.
k
uma
riki
vadina
(folios 18-34). The whole manuscnpt however IS called
Aho
ri
travrata
nu.m.nsCi and !he colophon on p. 34 reads: Ahoratravrata
nuS
amsa
yar
Saptakumarikavadanar sarp.pirIarp. This colophon
probably made Mitra
,
give the misleading title Saptakumirii Avadin. a
alias AboritravratanU8G1?tsi to the MS. The summary he gIves there IS
that of the content of the Ahon.tracaityasevanusaf!srvadana, that being
the corr
ect title of the chCpter given on folio 18 of the MS.
(ii) Seirn Matsunami, A Catalogue of the Sanskrit Manuscripts in the.
Tokyo University Lihrary, Tokyo 1965, No. 37 noted on pp. 18 and 213.
(iii) Cecil Bendall, Catalogue 0/ the Buddhist Sanskrit Manuscripts in the
University Library, Cambridge, Cambridge 1883, MS. Add. 1482.
Filliozat describes a Saptakumirikivadana by Gopadatta on p. 85
of the Catalogue du fonds Sanscrit, 1941. From the short quotations
in this description it appears to be diferent from the Asokivadinamili
version. Cf. also E. Burnouf, Introduction a l' histoire du Bouddhisme
Indien, Paris] 844, p. 556.
My observations, on the Saptakum(irikivadana in this article are based
on the Calcutta and Toyko MSS.
MSS. tad yathCibhut pun' raji Vara:.asyif maharddhikaf
Krk in nama munindrasya Kasyapasya susevakaA
tas),a rajiah suti sapta kum6iik6J1 8ubh68aya
MSS. tata sa Kasyapo buddhas tar saptakanyaka api
bhiku'isthaviraya1!l tada caryaya1!1 samarpayat
5.
Ratna Handurukande, "The Story of the Shell-maidens" in Aija/i, O. H. de
A
. Wijesekera Felicitation Volume, ed. by J. Tilakasiri, Colombo 1970,
pp. 46-49.
6. Extant in MS. form in Calcutta, Tokyo and Cambridge. See Mitra,
op.ciL, p. 221 f, Matsunami, op.cit. Nos. 37 ad 55 and Bendall, op.cit.,
MS. Add. 1482. My observations here are based on the Calcutta and
Tokyo MSS.
.'
MSS. patnya} sundariki,yas ta,} sambuki,} purato 'rpayat
For a similar confusion in PaJi sources see n. 1 above.
This form suggests that the name of the king was KrkL But for the
occurrence of the form Krkin cf. n. 3 above.
To be emended to Subhamanjari, cf. Section I, v,b of this article.
11. MSS. tatra tisar pradhana ya jyetha sa bhagini sudhlQ
. }2. MSS. tatra fasar pradhana sa bhagini suddhasaya sudhiQ
J 3. MSS. tatas ta,sarp. pradhina ya bhagini Sa vicak!at)a
]4. Cf vs. V quoted above .
. 15. See vs. from Saptakumarikavadilla quoted in the beginning of this article.
] 6' My comments here are based on the Calcutta MS. and the Tokyo MSS.
Nos. 37 and 55; see n. 6 above.
17.
Eight maidens according to two MSS.
1
126
18. Matsunami, op.cit., Nos. 96, 97, 98 and 102 III, referred to as A, R C, n
respetively in the following notes. :
19' A pupuju, B pupujar
20. B vividhis
21. A 0dappa 0
22.
A ranarp, C, D pujya' manaf
23. A, B, C tepitarp, D tepita
24. A, C, D viEon 0
25. B, D gatas
26. B, C, D srapi ta
27. B, C etarp, D eka
28. A, B, D janmani, jatmAni
29. C punis
30. B caitYaT, tu, C, D caitya tu
31. D tatal)
32. D putya bhavatal)
33. A ra
34. A Iabhal, B labhe
35. D vavarp
36. A, D ru
37. D bhaviyaQ
38. C, D tatol)
39. C rajadharmaparasuta, D rajadharrayanisuta
40. D dhanyol)
41. B prarabhan, D prarabhav
42.
A ti, C pra!!
43. A, B prativrata., D prativatal).
44. C labhed
45. Matsunami, op.cit., No. 54
46. MS. evar maharaja Dharmadaka sarppurttaphaJa(r) bhutarp. Tasya
dharmanar saptabhagaikabhagal1l bhupataye.
47. MS. Tato raja yacanagatha(l1l) krtavan
k/amasva bho rahasatva vratarajaahodayar
mama bhago na sarppraptal1l, tava padaprasadat(al))
48.
tava bhagya(l1l) maharaja madgiram ekakarp srutu
purvanukulasu tral1 ca pravakE(y)ami vidhir tava
49. This quotation is from folio 14 of the MS. Where the reading adopted
in the text has been altered, the reading of the MS. is given in the foil.
notes.
50. ke
51. tare
52. ore
53. ta
54. pujiteyan
1
1
1
1
,
i !
"ve
dayena
;
sropitavana
)
1
.
naganagini
S8.
. vinasau
;9:
sasiipita Q
).
syambukii
,1.
janrmataro
,2.
syambuka
\3.
caityadasainaya
i.
smrrtava
is.
cita
1.
syambuO
7.
dhanyasyakakar
8 smatvi,
9. ditana
o.
syam
O
1. labdho
]27
2. The text continues as follows: ta sapta kanyaka [apova. Folio 14 ends
here. Then there appears to be a lacuna in the MS. for the next folio
begins with da pw pa vara patanti. Possibly the missing portion con
tinued with an account of the story of the seven princesses who resorted
to a penance grove. The MS. ends with the following statement:
Sariputral), svagrhar gatavan. Daklamaharajena ahoratravratarajapra
bhavena mok9am anupriptarp,.
I. Se No. 12 in the Catalogue of the Budhist Sanskrit Manuscripts in the
library of Tokai Unh'ersity by Yutaka Iwamoto, Proceedings of the Faculty
of Letters, Vol. 2, Tokyo, 1960.
\