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IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21

This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Teamwork in Inclusive Classrooms
This teamwork training package has the following parts:
1. Why is teamwork important in an inclusive classroom
!. What is teamwork Theoretical foundations
". #ow does it work #ow can $ develop teamwork in my class
%. &ome e'amples of teamwork in inclusive schools (in Europe)
*. Teamwork among professionals
+. What have $ learnt about teamwork
,. Collation of references
1. Why is teamwork important in an inclusive classroom?
$n the different sections of the -ide .emoir different elements of
teamwork are included as basic conditions for the development
of the inclusive classroom. $t/s a good idea to point out the
advantages and problems of using teamwork:
Teamwork advantages
provide a valuable opportunity to achieve high 0uality
learning outcomes
foster collaboration1 as well as stimulation
develop pupils2 confidence and active participation in learning
prepare pupils for the workplace
develop a supportive working environment
bring together people with differing e'pertise and different
perspectives
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
lead to creative and innovative solutions to comple'
problems
encourage pupils to challenge assumptions
give pupils a chance to perform a number of different roles
develop other skills such as project management1 time
management1 problem solving1 communication1 conflict
resolution and negotiation skills3 and
Can result in group outcomes of a very high standard.
Teamwork problems:
not all pupils learn everything about the topic1 especially if
the task and workloads are divided into separate
components
some pupils prefer to work and be assessed independently
there is a higher level of risk1 as the uncertainty factor is
higher than in the normal classroom situation
pupils can feel as if they have been 4thrown in at the deep
end56 if they don2t have ade0uate support
some pupils don2t pull their weight
individual grades may be affected if an overall group mark is
awarded
some pupils tend to dominate others in the team and can
hijack agendas
internal team dynamics can collapse
2. What is teamwork? Theoretical foundations
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
- team is a group of people who work together to accomplish a
common goal. The concept of teamwork is defined as 4the work done
by a group of pupils which has a shared awareness of identity and
rules1 the same aims and commitment to help the others6 (-rnai71
1899)
&ome of the interesting elements to study teamwork are:
a. :ualities of a team
b. ;ole and responsibilities of members
c. <asic skills in a team
d. Team development (phases of development)
a. Qualities of a team
&ome of the 0ualities and attribute of teamwork are the following:
Team members share an understanding of their goals and
direction
Team members understand their roles and scopes for
contribution
Team members work together and independently to complete
tasks
Team members avoid frustrations or confusions that may
jeopardise team effectiveness
The most important thing is to be aware and attentive to all pupils
and give them e0ual opportunities for success.
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
b. Roles and responsibilities of members
Team roles and responsibilities are the main parts or functions placed
on each member of the group. These parts must be complementary
and promote the achievement of group objectives. They must also
guarantee the participation of all members so that the class is
genuinely inclusive. There follow descriptions of some important roles
within the team:
Team leader
;esponsible for ensuring that the team achieves its goals on
time
=rovide structure and guidance to allow ma'imum
participation
>acilitator
;esponsible for ensuring that every member participates in
the team and manages conflicts
Team ;ecorder
;esponsible for documenting group activities
Team ;eflector
;esponsible for the development of the team/s process skills
Team E'plorer
;esponsible for e'panding the team/s focus and providing
energy to motivate the team
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
The responsibilities are the tasks which members must carry out in
order for the team to work. These responsibilities need to be
e'plained when the group is being formed. They must be understood
us rules. -n e'ample is dealing with conflict within the team:
Try to deal with conflicts as they arise1 rather than ignoring
them
?iscuss any problems as a group with everyone present
?o not accuse each other of past failing1 but focus on what
needs to change
Try and reach an understanding that everyone agrees with
needs to change1 and make necessary changes to the work plan
accordingly
c. Basic skills in a team
The basic teamwork skills should be:
@nderstand and work within the group
?evelop a strong sense of commitment and responsibilities to
your work
&tay focused on your assigned task and the team goals
=lan and make decisions with others and support the outcomes
;espect the thoughts and options of others in the group
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
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This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
&eek a suitable team approach
Clarify uncertainties by 0uestioning
Aead when appropriate1 mobilising the team for high
performance
-cknowledge problems and deal with them
=articipate enthusiastically
#andle differences or conflicts openly and positively
$t is also important to highlight the beneficial team behaviour as a
working model of a team:
E'press your ideas openly and confront mistakes1 confusions or
frustrations
&hare your knowledge1 e'perience1 time and talents with others
Work interactively and promote each other/s success
&upport and trust others
@nderstand the perception and difficulties of others
;elate to people when working with them
Beep an open mind to new ideas3 be willing to change and
appreciate other points of view
<e willing to listen carefully to what others/ have to offer
Cive direct feedback that focuses on the task1 not on the
individual
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Criticise only ideas1 not people
=ractice selfDrespect and build selfDesteem
.aintain a positive attitude towards the group and task
d. Team development
$t is a good idea to know the phases of development of a team in
order to successfully get it to work in the school. The stages of team
development and the team activities could be:
>orming stage
Establish structure1 rules1 communication networks
Clarify relations and interdependencies among members
$dentify leader roles1 clarify responsibility and authority
?evelop plans for goals accomplishment.
&torming stage
$dentify and resolve interpersonal conflict.
>urther clarify rules1 goals1 and structural relationships
?evelop a climate of participation among group members
Eorming stage
?irect group activity toward goal accomplishment.
?evelop dataDflow F feedback systems for task
performance.
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
=romote more cohesion among group members
=erforming stage
Aeader role emphasis on facilitation1 feedback1 and
evaluation.
;enewal1 revision1 and strengthening of roles and group
interdependencies.
&how of strong motivation toward goal accomplishment
3. ow does it work? ow can I develop teamwork in my
class?
Teachers must learn some basic competences to develop teamwork in
their classes:
Planning for each stage of group work. Thinking about how they
will introduce and organise pupils in teamwork.
To introduce pupils to teamwork is useful:
The teacher can ask pupils to reflect about their previous
ideasGschemes and e'perience in teamwork
The teacher might want to e'periment first with informal
learning teams. -fterwards1 you might propose formal
learning teams and longDterm teams progressively.
To organise learning teamwork the teacher must decide how the
groups will be formed:
&ome teachers prefer randomly assigning pupils to groups
to ma'imi7e their heterogeneity: a mi' of males and
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
females1 verbal and 0uiet pupils1 the cynical and the
optimistic.
&ome teachers let pupils choose with whom they want to
work1 although this runs the risk that groups will socialise
too much and that pupils will selfDsegregate.
&till other teachers prefer to form the groups
themselves1 taking into account pupils2 prior achievement1
levels of preparation1 work habits1 ethnicity1 and gender.
They try to sprinkle the more able pupils evenly among
the groups
- middle ground1 is to ask pupils to e'press a
preference.
Aearning teams work best when they are balanced in terms of
their abilities and have members with varied characteristics.
$deally1 group members have:
various levels of prior achievement
various levels of prior e'perience
a gender mi'
an ethnic and linguistic mi'
various learning styles
To help in allocating pupils to a team it can be useful to use a
coloured card method (all yellows together and so on) or an
2icebreaker2 activity to let pupils identify others with similar
interests or outline different team roles and let pupils choose
their preferred role or let them selfDselect.
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Explaining to their classes how the groups will operate and
how pupils will be graded. E'plaining the objectives of the
group task and defining any relevant concepts and tasks.
Giving pupils the skills the need to succeed in groups. (&kills
like active and tolerant listening1 helping one another in
mastering content1 giving and receiving constructive criticism1
managing disagreements and so on).
Evaluating the effectiveness of teamwork. Evaluating goals and
objectives1 trust and conflict1 e'pression of differences1
leadership1 control and procedures1 utilisation of resources1
interpersonal communication1 problem solving Gdecision
making)
The construction of these competences implies that the teachers
must be wellDgrounded in some aspects like:
Be conscious of group si!e. $n general1 teams of four or five
pupils work best. Aarger groups decrease each pupil2s
opportunity to participate actively.
"eep teams together. When a team is not working well1 avoid
breaking it up1 even if the group re0uests it. $t is important to
learn solving problems together.
#elp groups plan how to proceed. -sk each group to devise a
plan of action: who will be doing what and when. ;eview the
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IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
groups2 written plans or meet with each group to discuss its
plan.
Teachers can design tasks that have clearly defined outcomes
and variety of roles and responsibilities that facilitate the team
planning.
Regularl check in with the teams. Teachers can establish
checkpoints with the team.
=upil/s roles are one important element to check in with the
teams. <ehaviour in the group can be of " types:
that which helps the group accomplish its task
that which helps group members get along better
(relationships)
self oriented behaviour which contributes to neither group
task nor group relationships
Teachers must help to improve roles like:
#armonising
o -ttempting to reconcile disagreements
o ;educing tension
o Cetting people to e'plore differences
Cate keeping
o #elping to keep communication channels open
o >acilitating the participation of others
o &uggesting procedures that permit sharing remarks
Encouraging
o <eing friendly1 warm1 and responsive to others
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
o $ndicating by facial e'pression or remarks the acceptance
of others2 contributions.
Teachers must balance the roles of a team and compensate for
the missing basic roles to facilitate the inclusion in it.
Teachers also must check pupils/ selfDoriented roles (to'ic roles)
in a team like:
?ominator: interrupts others3 launches into long
monologues3 is overDpositive and overDdogmatic3 tries to
lead group and assert authority3 is generally autocratic.
Eegativist: rejects ideas suggested by others3 takes a
negative attitude on issues3 argues fre0uently and
unnecessarily3 pessimistic.
-ggressor: criticises or blames others3 tries to get attention3
shows anger or irritation against group or individuals3
deflates importance or position of others in group.
&toryteller: likes to tell long 5fishing stories5 which are not
relevant to the group3 goes off on long tangents.
$nterrupter: talks over others3 engages in side
conversations3 whispers to neighbour.
=oor me: tries to get the group2s attention to deal with own
personal concerns1 discomfort1 bad luck and so on.
Teachers can help to change these to'ic roles in a team and
generate other positive roles.
Provide mechanisms for groups to deal with problems
(uncooperative members1 conflicts among members and so on)
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Teachers can provide some norms to deal with problems in a
team:
&tandard or group rules always develop in a group in order
to control the behaviour of members.
Eorms usually e'press the beliefs or desires of the majority
of the group members as to what behaviours should or
should not take place in the group.
These norms may be clear to all members (e'plicit)1 known
or sensed by only a few (implicit)1 or operating completely
below the level of awareness of any group members.
&ome of the usual norms of teams are the following:
o Commit to the goals of team
o =erform assigned tasks completely1 accurately1 on time.
o ;espect the contributions of others
o -ssist other team members when needed
o -sk for help before we get into trouble
o >ollow guidelines for effective meetings
o -ctively participate in team deliberations
o >ocus on problems not people or personalities
o Constructively resolve conflicts or differences of opinion
o Comment clearly and constructively
o (H)
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IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Teachers can encourage pupils to provide feedback when they see
destructive group behaviour. In the other hand negative roles can be
improved by teachers following these protocols:
The dominating member. Teachers should try to understand
why the person needs to be in control and encourage
everyone/s view and thought on an issue.
The silent member. Teachers should consider reasons behind
the silent and encourage himGher to speak.
The critical member. Teachers can help to change this role
talking with the person privately about how criticism are
affecting the group
There are many types of teams composed through comple'ity
criteria that teachers and educators should differentiate in order to
promote inclusively in their classroom:
$ormal learning teams are teams established to complete a
specific task1 such as perform an e'periment1 write a report1
carry out a project and so on. These groups may complete their
work in a single class session or over several sessions. Typically1
pupils work together until the task is finished1 and their project
is graded.
%nformal learning teams are ad hoc temporary groups of pupils
within a single class session. $nformal learning groups can be
initiated1 for e'ample1 by asking pupils to turn to a neighbour
and spend two minutes discussing a 0uestion you have posed.
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Jou can also form groups of three to five to solve a problem or
other class task.
&ong'term teams (usually e'isting over a long period of the
course) with stable membership whose primary responsibility is
to provide members with support1 encouragement1 and
assistance in completing course re0uirements and assignments.
!. "ome e#amples of teamwork in inclusive school $in %urope&
$n most European countries the aim of compulsory education is that
of providing pupils with 0uality education that enables them to
ac0uire basic cultural skills as well as fostering their own personal
development (social skills1 study and work habits1 creativity and
affectivityH) Compulsory education should help pupils to develop the
abilities which enable them to achieve these important aims (among
others):
To know the values and rules for coe'istence in order to
prepare them to actively e'ercise citi7enship.
To develop individual initiative and teamwork1 fostering selfD
confidence1 pupil initiative and critical awareness.
To know and respect different cultures1 individual differences
and e0ual rights both for men and women.
$n recent years1 some ways of working about teamwork have been
developed in Europe to promote inclusiveness:
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
a. Group dnamics (Esteve =ujol !KK,3 -.?ie7 de @l7urrun and -.
.asegosa1 188+)
&ome schools use group dynamics to increase good relationships
among pupils and the best contribution of every pupil to the work
group. Croup dynamic activities develop some skills referring to
communication1 confidence among group members1 decisionD
making1 problem solving1 conflict resolution and cohesiveness.
-lso group dynamic activities encourage collaboration and
creativity.
Effective group dynamics re0uire respect for one another1 clearly
articulated shared goals1 fre0uent interaction1 e0ually divided
tasks1 and shared responsibility for mistakes and successes and
free e'pression of opinions and perspectives.
- course of group dynamics has many of the following sections:
$ntroduction to group dynamics1 group goals and social
interdependence1 communication within groups1 leadership1
decision making1 creativity1 conflict resolution1 diagnosis and
intervention in a group1 learning group skillsH
b. (ollaborative learning )Pere Pu*ol+s, -../0
Collaborative learning is an educational approach to teaching and
learning that involves groups of pupils working together to solve a
problem1 complete a task1 or create a product. $n the school1
groups provide support1 an academic framework to learn1 a
conduit for encouragement1 and in many ways1 a buffer that can
prevent academic failure. $n a group setting1 the pupil has the
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IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
opportunity to rehearse his understanding with others and to be
e'posed to other conceptual constructs.
&uccessful collaborative learning re0uires effective and appropriate
implementation of pupil groups. ?epending on the purpose and
longevity of the group1 the teacher needs to consider the si7e and
composition of the group and the amount of direction or guidance
given.
<ase groups are a type of work group. They last the entire term
(or even several weeks)1 meet regularly1 re0uire planning as to the
si7e and composition of the group1 and personalise the task at
hand by providing support and encouragement between group
members.
Collaborative group work is not simply having pupils sit together
and talk. $t is not giving the same individual task to several pupils
and telling them to talk about the assignment with each other. To
make collaborative learning a success1 there must be some kind of
essential component that holds the group together such as
positive interdependence1 faceDtoDface interactions1 individual
accountability1 distinct roles1 personal responsibility1 teamwork and
social skills and group processing.
The advantage of collaborative learning is that it is effective in
helping pupils learn and it may reach pupils at different learning
levels. This way of working has been increased in the last few
years in many schools. Aittle by little collaborative learning is
becoming one important resource for inclusive schools. =ere
=ujolLs has been one of the leading advocates in Catalonia.
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
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This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
c. Peer mentoring )&%( service 1epartment of Education, -../0
=eer mentors are trained to work with other pupils in school to
develop positive relationships and help special needs pupils or
immigrant pupils with their worries1 problems and difficulties.
=eer mentoring will support the school in the following ways:
facilitate the welcome and adaptation for special needs or
immigrant pupils
contribute to strategies related to positive behaviour
management
help to address issues of behaviour and attendance
support the development of social skills
help overcome barriers to learning
The mentor training covers the following areas: What is a mentor1
rights and responsibilities1 active listening1 acknowledging
feelings1 helping the mentee to find solutions1 confidentiality1 peer
mentor safety rulesH
&ome teachers use peer mentoring as a form of team work to
improve the relationships and the pupils learning in the class. This
resource is promoted by &ervice A$C (?epartment of Education) in
some inclusive schools.
d. Peer mediation )2.(. Bo3u4, -../5 %nnovation Pro*ects'1epart of
Education0
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
=eer mediation is a service that the pupils themselves can use to
resolve conflicts that they are having with other pupils. $t gives the
pupils an opportunity to be more independent and solve conflicts
in a mature responsible manner.
=eer mediation is confidential. The mediators will not discuss your
session outside the mediation room.
The steps involved in mediation are the following:
Cetting each side of the story
&haring feelings from both sides
<rainstorming solutions
Compromising to make an agreement
&igning an agreement
-t the conclusion of peer mediation1 an agreement will be
completed and signed by everyone in the room. The mediators
will then follow up on the mediation session within the week. The
peer mediation can be done in informal spaces like the playground1
by any pupils of the class or school accepted by the antagonists.
&ome volunteer pupils or all pupils from inclusive schools are
trained in the peer mediation process. -ll pupils are given e0ual
opportunity to act as peer mediators. This approach is used mostly
in schools to help to encourage pupils/ alternative forms of dispute
resolution.
&ometimes there is a training course for mediators for teachers1
parents and pupils all together. They can learn and practice some
skills related to process mediation. There are many schools with
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IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
innovative projects about mediation in the last five years in
Catalonia promoted by the ?epartment of Education.
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use which may be made of the information contained therein.
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'. Teamwork amon( professionals
Educators are being asked to collaborate with each other1 with
administrators and district officials1 with pupils1 with parents1 and
with community members. What most realise after the first few
e'periences with any of these demands is that 4collaboration6
re0uires a lot of time and meetings. $n fact1 collaboration is hard
work that takes time1 commitment1 skills1 and the kind of continuity
that helps to build a shared understanding.
Teamwork is a form of collective work where educators and school
professionals come together to share ideas1 strategies1 even possible
solutions. Each member has their own individual task, but these
separate tasks can benefit from hearing what colleagues are doing or
have done with similar tasks.
.ost educators were not specifically prepared to work together.
#istorically1 teachers were prepared for 4individual practice6 rather
than 4group practice.6 Teachers were e'pected to take their pupils1
close their doors1 and do their jobs. Therefore teamwork skills must
be learnt by the professionals in the inclusive school.
$n the $nclusive school educators are being re0uired to work together
in more ways:
D &chool professionals must articulate a mission and work
collaboratively to achieve it.
D &chool professionals must collect and interpret a wide variety of
information to ensure that their pupils are succeeding at higher levels
of achievement in alignment with curriculum frameworks and
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This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
standards. Educators must collaborate in using curriculum
frameworks to design curriculum and teaching for each pupil1
including pupils with disabilities.
D Teachers must collaboratively in0uire into their practice in order to
continue to learn and improve as professionals.
D &chool professionals must collaborate with families and community
members to tailor school efforts and curriculum to local standards
and needs.
&ome special skills are re0uired for teamwork:
- &kills of planning work. -uto evaluate what people are good at
and then assign roles accordingly. &et deadlines for each group
member. .anage time to finish team outlines.
- &kills of communication like becoming better listeners1
e'pressing ideas effectively1 asking for help when it is
necessary...
- &kills of responsibility. Everyone is responsible not only for their
own work but for the work of every other member of the school
community.
- &kills of supportive diversity. Collaborative e'periences allow
professionals to overcome prejudices.
- &kills of feedback and evaluation. The e'perience and opinion of
different professionals help to improve the 0uality of products1
processes and relationships of inclusive school.
To sum up1 working in a team is a 0uestion of skills but it also
presupposes the conviction that cooperation is a positive professional
value. These two aspects (skills and the conviction of the value of
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
teamwork) are more closely related than is thought: what people
haven/t mastered is normally undervalued (=errenoud1 1888)
Training needs detected in the area of the development of teamwork
tend to be related to similar aspects of teamwork among pupils1 its
organisation1 its value or basic skills necessary for carrying it out.
&ome training in group dynamics or team building can help
professionals to improve these elements.
). What have I learnt a*out teamwork?
Teamwork is basic to promoting inclusion in a class. &ome important
elements must be learnt by teachers to introduce and organise
teamwork properly. There are some basic 0uestions in order to help
every teacher to evaluate himGherself here:
Why is teamwork important in an inclusive classroom
Which are the best 0ualities of teamwork to promote inclusion
in the classroom
What is teamwork
#ow can $ introduce teamwork in a classroom
#ow can $ organise teamwork in a classroom
#ow can $ evaluate teamwork in a classroom
Which e'amples of teamwork are carried out in inclusive
schools in Europe
What do $ need to participate in teamwork among
professionals
What resources about teamwork do $ know
#ow can $ transfer these course contents to my professional
situation
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
7. Collation of references
a. Bibliography:
Arnaiz, P (1988) Qui s qui. Les relacions humanes al grup-classe. Bar!"#$na E%&
'ra(
B$na#), *& (1996) El trabajo en equipo del profesorado& Bar!"#$na E%& 'ra(
B$+,-, M& C& (2002)& Guia de mediaci escolar. !rograma comprensiu d"acti#itats.
Educaci prim$ria i secund$ria obligat%ria& Bar!"#$na A))$!ia!i( %" M").r") R$)a
S"n)a.&
/i"z %" U#z,rr,n, A& I Ma)"0$)a, A& (1996) La din$mica de grups en l"acci
tutorial& Bar!"#$na E%& 'ra(&
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This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
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2, 9">r,ar=, 2009 ?r$4
C..2HH<<<&0"$!i.i")&!$4HA.C"n)H?$r,4H1650H+."a4"??"!.i7"n"))&C.4
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Credits:
Coordinator: MMM +e(rillo, Carme
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
Team:
MMMCort1 E3 ?omingo1 .3 MMM=ont1 ..E3 MMM &alvador1 E3 MMM&ebastiL1 N. AA3
MMMOalls1 N. AA3 MMMOalverde1 >3 MMMOargas1 N.?. 1 M?E Oreese1 N.C.3 MM<ernat1 E.3
MMMEvans1 N.3 MMMMMMCandeias1 -.3 MMMMMMM<rodin1 N.3 Ajusberg1 -.A.3
- &ervice CPnPral de A/ $nspectionG $nspection de A/Enseignement &pPcialisP (<E)3
MMCentre for &pecial Eeeds Education (-T)3 MMM.eneralitat de Catalunya.
"erveis Territorials a Tarra(ona $%"&3 MMM?evon County Council (@B)3
MMMMM-grupamento de Escolas EugPnio de -ndradeG=aranhos (=T) 3
MMMMMM@niversidade de Qvora1 (=T), Centro de $nvestigaRSo em EducaRSo e
=sicologia1 =ortugal3 MMMMMMM&tockholm @niversity1 ?epartment of Child and Jouth
&tudies (&E)
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.
IRIS 128735-CP-1-2006-1-BE-COMENIUS-C21
This Comenius project has been funded with support from the European Commission
This document the views only of the authors1 and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any
use which may be made of the information contained therein.