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And what is grasping?

There are four: grasping for sense pleasures, for speculative


views, for rites and customs, and for delusions of selfhood.
Find a place where you are alone. Train yourself in the following way: When you
breathe in, experience breathing in. When you breathe out, be fully conscious that
you are breathing out. f you cherish and practice this, it will bear great fruit.
Whatever you are doing and wherever you are, you will !nd steadiness, calm, and
concentration if you become conscious of your breathing.
f you want to "now the past, to "now what has caused you, loo" at yourself in the
#$%&%'T, for that is the past(s e)ect. f you want to "now your future, then loo" at
yourself in the #$%&%'T, for that is the cause of the future.
The past should not be followed after,and the future not desired* what is past is
dead and gone, and the future is yet to come.
The purpose of the +oly ,ife does not consist in ac-uiring alms .or/ honor... nor in
gaining morality .or/ concentration... That unsha"able deliverance of the heart: that
indeed, is the ob0ect of the +oly ,ife, that is its essence, that is its goal.
When you contemplate the body by being within the body, you should not engage in
all sorts of ideas about it* the same when you contemplate feelings by being within
feelings, you should enter in without ideas* the same applies to contemplating the
mind by being within the mind and contemplating thoughts by being within
thoughts. The thoughts should be 0ust the ob0ects of mind and you should not apply
yourself to any train of ideas connected with them. n this way, by putting ideas
aside, your mind will become tran-uil and !xed on one point. t will then enter into a
meditation that is without discursive thought and is rapturous and 0oyful.
Where, for instance, is the identity of myself? There(s a special -uality that ma"es
me di)erent from everything else and also from all other selves. And want that
identity, my own self, to continue. &o where does that identity dwell?1 1Where
indeed?1 as"ed the 2uddha. 1That self to which you cling is in constant change.
3ears ago you were a baby, then a youth, and now a man. Which is your true self4
that of yesterday, that of today, or that of tomorrow which you so long to preserve?1
1 see have misunderstood things,1 replied 5utadanta slowly, 1and although !nd it
hard to endure the light, the truth now dawns on me that there is no separate and
enduring self. will ta"e my refuge in your teaching and !nd that which is continuing
and everlasting in the truth.
3ou tell me to stand still, but am not wal"ing,1 he shouted, 1whereas you who are
wal"ing say you are still. +ow is it that you are standing still but am not?1 The
2uddha turned round. 16y legs move but my mind is still,1 he said.13our legs are
still but your mind moves all the time in a !re of anger, hatred, and feverish desire.
Therefore, am still but you are not.
Laughing at Existence: A Quest for Meaning
and Purpose
I agree with James Van Praagh who said, We have all been placed on this earth to discover our
own path, and we will never be happy if we live someone elses idea of life.
Why not, we spend our lives attaching names or labels to things, and not seeing them for what
they really are. Is a label or a name reality? or e!ample, when you call someone "learning
disabled,# is that real or $ust a label? %oo many people are labeled in our schools. &aybe the
person $ust learns differently. It doesn#t describe why a person is different or having trouble. In
fact, there is no such thing as "learning disabled.# It#s $ust a label that points to the result of a
challenge or problem. %he label gives comfort to some people because they can point at what
they don#t 'now and give it a name. (abels can be helpful if they e!plain how to deal with
ob$ects or situations. %he problem is labels don#t necessarily point to the causes of the problems
and often hold bad stigmas.)
(inguistic meaning and the meaning of our lives are intimately connected. %he words we use
capture the significance of our acts and reflect what ma'es our lives meaningful for us.
*o how I thin' and what I thin' about all day determine the +uality of my life?)
rom biology we 'now life is not a passive state of indifference and inertia. %he essence of life
is intense care and concern. It#s difficult for most people to step outside of the bounds of what is
commonly accepted by the ma$ority. %he problem is when everyone thin's ali'e, no one thin's
very much at all. ,ver history, we find new ideas are usually challenged, and the people who
offered these new ideas are usually castigated which is tragic. &en fear what they don#t 'now.
%he only reason for life- is life. %here is no why. We simply are. (ife may be beyond reason.
,ne might thin' of life as part of a larger whole, and as such, we are only a very small part of it.
&y guess is we share a collective spirit or life force or consciousness that encompasses and goes
beyond individual life forms. %here is a part of us that connects to other humans, animals and
plants. .ltimately all life forms are trying to reach a harmony or resonance with the other parts
of the life force. /nd our efforts to understand what life is all about often revolve around
e!pressions of compassion and love. We accomplish this by caring about others without any
conditions or e!pectations. When we give without e!pecting to get anything in return, our
motives are pure. 0an you picture it? 0an this force be with you?) Just then a big bubble floated
by with the words
,ur uni+ue perspectives help us ma'e sense of our lives which creates a personal security.)
(u'e said I always thought security was an illusion. I#m not being pessimistic, but security is
simply not real.)
Plato added 1veryone creates their own uni+ue brand of meaning. *ecurity is something
perceived. We all want to feel safe. &aybe nothing has any meaning because unless we provide
meaning, none can be discerned. &aybe this is why we are all so important. 1verything merely
e!ists as it was created and e!ists in a constant state of change. *ome say everything is complete
and perfect as it is, and everything fulfills its purpose by fundamentally being what it is. %he only
"re+uirement# for anything is $ust to "be#. %herefore, everything is the potential fulfillment of its
own uni+ue essence.)
&an answers for his own life by ta'ing responsibility for who he is, what he does, and even for
what he thin's. (ife ultimately means ta'ing responsibility for your e!istence. .ltimately man#s
purpose in life is assuming responsibility for his thoughts and actions. When a person discovers
the "why# for his life#s circumstances, he can bear almost any "how#. ,nly the unfulfillment of
potential is meaningless, not life itself.)
(u'e, I thin' the unfulfillment of potential isn#t meaningless, it#s tragic.)
Plato couldn#t help himself. %he lively discussion had him s'ipping up the trail. 2ever be afraid
to sit awhile and thin'. 3ou#re the authority on your own life. / "beginner#s mind# is a blan' slate
fully open to seeing things as they truly are in the moment without putting illusory layers of
meaning on. We assume we are thin'ing. &uch of the time, it#s more li'ely we are being
thought.)
With new 'nowledge come new perspectives. 3ou#re familiar with the thought "a mind stretched
to a new idea never goes bac' to its original dimensions.#
When you come to 'now a person, you have a better grip on their vested interest in different
ideas.)
Intellectual, emotional and spiritual growth all re+uires us to broaden our perspectives. We need
to continually e!plore the wisdom of the past. We re+uire a continual critical assessment of our
current beliefs with openness to new information, different ways of life, and an eye towards
e!panding our capacity to feel, to care, and to value alternative beliefs.)
,ne test of intelligence is the ability to hold opposing ideas in your mind at the same time while
still retaining the ability to function. /fter all, the parado! is a stimulating source of a true
thin'er#s passion.
While it#s the forum of 'nowledge to spea', it#s the duty and privilege of wisdom to listen.
(istening demonstrates respect and shows you value the other person#s ideas.
People do many things to persuade others to thin' as they do. *ome even go to great e!tremes
to put down opposing opinions. 4ut you haven#t converted people because you#ve silenced them.
(ouis, the greatest deception men suffer is belief in their own opinions. People believe they are
thin'ing when they#re really only rearranging their pre$udices.)
,ur true individuality can only be fulfilled when we challenge our habitual ways of thin'ing. If
we continue encouraging and educating only the intellect in our schools, we will inevitably
create a purely instrumental conceptions of life where all human activity will be valued as a
means to an end, never for itself.)
When we maintain a steady attention to our thoughts and feelings, we see they are not a
permanent part of us. 4y e!amining our feelings and emotions without $udgment, we can better
control them rather than being driven by them. 5eal growth occurs when you reali6e you are not
the voice of the mind 7 you are the one who hears it. &uch of what the voice says is
meaningless. 5eality shows most things that happen in our lives are out of our control. %he real
cause of problems is not life itself. It#s the commotion in our minds that really causes our
problems.)
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Beliefs and Consciousness
#osted on August :;, :<=< by Alan &molowe
*medley8s parents panic'ed when the school counselor told them he was 8highly interactive8
,ur beliefs help us organi6e the world in ways that give us meaning. %hey provide us with a
basic sense of who we are. %hey can also better connect us with e!periences that transcend our
normal ways of 'nowing which can provide hope and inspiration in tough times. It is hard to
'now which perspective is best. /t any given moment in time, life can appear to ma'e sense or
appear without meaning. 4ut when we view life over a stretch of time, it seems to reveal itself as
an entity e!isting in time and space having a purpose and tending in a certain direction.
%ransformation is a fundamental shift in perspective, something most are not willing to
underta'e.
3our mind is your predicament. 3ou are in a prison of your own ma'ing. 9o not thin' your
thoughts are not important. 3our thoughts are ma'ing you what you are every second of every
day. *ometimes disillusionment is the best thing that can happen because it reveals what does not
have real meaning.
9on#t let pride get in the way of learning. &y father fre+uently says "life is $ust a day in the
classroom.# If human life represents a potential learning process, our world certainly provides a
wide range of opportunities for numerous levels of consciousness to develop. ,ur thoughts ma'e
us who we are by virtue of the thoughts we encourage. I#ve observed if you ma'e people think
they are thin'ing, they#ll appreciate your efforts. 4ut if you really force them to thin', they#ll
probably become disgruntled. People seem to li'e it when people appear to thin' $ust li'e they
do. %he mind is a master weaver that creates both the inner fabric of our character and the outer
garment of circumstance. It is our choice whether we weave these thoughts and circumstances
into ignorance and pain or turn them into enlightenment and happiness. /ll that we achieve is the
direct result of our thoughts.
9ifferences challenge assumptions. We inhabit consciousness but don#t own it. 0onsciousness is
our source of self:cognition and is separate and independent of reason. %hrough reason man
observes himself, but only through consciousness does he 'now himself. &an is significant
because he#s a part of the universe that can as' the +uestion, "What is my significance?# &aybe
our significance is humbled because we appear insignificant in the grand scheme of things. We
e!ist generally ignoring the fact we#re aware of our true insignificance. &an'ind is unavoidably
self:aggrandi6ing.
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Ideas, Thoughts and Choice
#osted on August :<, :<=< by Alan &molowe
Introducing the fully interactive super delu!e multi:media &icrosoft (ounger.
I believe the way you define yourself greatly determines how you will delineate your purpose in
life. ;reat minds have purpose, most only have wishes. 0learly defining your purpose energi6es
your life evo'ing passion and motivation. / purpose is not a goal. It can never be reached or
finished< it#s a direction. It#s something you discover for yourself, inside of yourself. 3our
purpose =or many purposes> is continuously addressed throughout your life. When you ponder,
"Why do you e!ist?# you open your mind to the great un'nown. /nd in doing this, you bring
meaning to your e!istence and find a unity that#s pervasive.
,ne great idea can change the world. %hin' of the impact *teve Jobs and 4ill ;ates have had by
envisioning personal computing. Wondering and +uestioning are the first steps towards
discovery. %hree principles connect ideas. %he first is "resemblance# where something resembles
something else from our past. %he second is a "continuous connection# where they are actually
lin'ed together and the third is "cause and effect.# 0reativity or inspiration may transcend these
principles, but perception, thin'ing, doubting, believing, reasoning, 'nowing, and willing are all
grounded in these three simple principles. Imagination is built on 'nowledge.
What we call "thought# is predominately the response of our memory. ,ur thought process is an
iterative repetition of some sensory input involving a combination or reorgani6ation of data in
some new way. Within this framewor', mind and matter are ultimately inseparable. %he strange
thing is there is no 'nown way of confining thought. It#s impossible to 'now where a thought
begins or ends. It may be we are tapping into an energy field or thought field that isn#t restricted
to any particular place, person, time or dimension. &aybe that#s why +uantum physics deals in
probabilities.
Whatever we allow to occupy our mind tends to be magnified in our lives. While we can#t
control every thought that pops into our heads, we can control what we focus on. If we believe
life is a good thing and has value, then life has meaning for us individually. We attach value
because it is appreciated either by our feelings, thoughts or overall consciousness. 4ut the
interesting thing is it#s possible to live a full and meaningful life without ever pondering life#s
meaning. *ometimes there are big differences between what we really believe, what we thin'
we ought to believe and what we want to believe. ,ur actions demonstrate what we really
believe or value. re+uent thoughts of 'indness, optimism and good will are food for your good
health, $oy and success. ,ngoing thoughts that are fearful, critical or selfish are fuel for
unhappiness, sic'ness and failure. %his is where we test the winds of humanity#s compassion. I
don#t thin' suffering#s the point of living. It#s merely the bac'ground or conte!t where we can
e!plore love#s power over illness and death. (ife#s meaning may simply be our angle of vision.
%he +uality of our habitual thin'ing ma'es or damages our lives. 4eliefs which leave no room
for doubt are simply superstitions. It is not so much a particular thought< good or bad, but the
general +uality or tone of thin'ing that determines our fate.
%he most significant decision we can ma'e on a day:to:day basis is our choice of attitude on how
we want to face the world. We don#t see things as they are. We see them as we are. %herefore
we need to guide our focus of consciousness if we want to evolve and discover meaning.
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Think and Relate
#osted on August =>, :<=< by Alan &molowe
0urious about the meaning of life, *medley dials ?:@AA:&1/2I2; and ponders its value.
When I was a child, my father was fond of the e!pression, "thin' and relate.# It was how he
approached every challenge and every new piece of information he garnered. Be taught me to
ponder my circumstances carefully and relate what I 'new to solve the problems I faced. &y
9ad always maintained an ongoing relativistic perspective. 3ears of applying this approach has
helped me countless times.
When I was in college, I had a brilliant friend who maintained a straight "/# average in his
difficult civil and electrical engineeringCastrophysics curriculum. Be came bac' smiling from a
final e!am and told me a story that added something +uite valuable to my father#s sage advice.
4ob told me about his one +uestion final e!am where one of the assumptions given negated the
feasibility of the building the engineering pro$ect described in the e!am. %he /D answer was
simply that the pro$ect could not be built. /s e!pected, most students wrote feverishly for the
entire three hours to show everything they 'new about the sub$ect, but my confident friend
submitted a one line answer. %his story taught me to always +uestion my assumptions. 3our
solutions are only as good as the assumptions and observations you ma'e. 2ot too surprisingly,
what we assume, believe or e!pect to happen tinges and creates our e!perience. If we change
our e!pectations, we can change our e!perience for most aspects of life. What we e!pect over
time at our deepest or subconscious levels tends to shape our e!ternal reality. *o- "thin'ing and
relating# coupled with challenging my assumptions are two great tools that can help you discover
meaning and your purpose.
What is "thought?# /s advanced as our science has become, we really don#t 'now. We 'now
some:things go on in our brains. 4ut where and how does thin'ing really happen? %oday it
remains a mystery. We 'now a great deal about the electrical, chemical and biochemical
reactions furiously going on in our brains. We traditionally label the combination of these
cerebral activities "thin'ing.# 4ut what if "thought# e!ists outside of our brains? 9r. 0andace
Pert described brain:related functions throughout the body in her seminal wor', Molecules of
EmotionE The cience !ehind Mind"!ody Medicine. *ome very bright people postulated thought
could be the fundamental fabric of the universe. %hey have also theori6ed that thought travels
instantaneously, that is faster than the speed of light. &aybe "reality# is a tapping into a very big
thought or thoughts. %hese ideas intrigue me.
(ife has been described as an angle of vision of how we view e!istence. We $udge and are
$udged by how we view life. James /llen said, /ll that a man achieves and all that he fails to
achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts.) 1ven though we don#t always reali6e it, we can
have immense control over our own thoughts and perceptions. We alone determine our own
attitudes. 1very moment of every day we are in the process of deciding what we want to see,
thin', and feel. /nd when we reflect on it, do we usually find our e!pectations are generally
fulfilled?)
&y friend 5alph at the *chool of Wisdom wrote that destiny was not strictly a matter of chance
because also a matter of choice. I believe our destiny is not something to be waited for< it#s
something to be pursued with gusto. 1veryone should ta'e responsibility for being the architects
of their own futures, and this begins with the thoughts we entertain. %here is no belief:free
e!istence. %he most powerful thing you can do to change the world is to change your own
beliefs. %he necessity to believe something doesn#t $ustify any belief in particular.
While the meaning of life might ultimately be perceived differently by every person, the
meanings we develop can be viewed as fingerprints of our minds built from our individual
outloo's and perceptions. *o we must thin' and relate and constantly challenge our assumptions
as we pursue our +uest for meaning and purpose.
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Introduction to the Blog
#osted on August ?, :<=< by Alan &molowe
%he +uest for &eaning and Purpose.
#What is the meaning of life$ %his is perhaps the oldest and most significant +uestion ever
posed by man'ind. /s man e!plores ontological mysteries, he becomes more personal and as's
#What is my purpose in life$ Is our tas' to impose meaning on being? Is the meaning to be
found in the $oy of the $ourney itself? %hese fundamental posers are a natural preamble and
constant stimulus for our $ourney.
&an'ind#s best minds have been grappling with these eternal +uestions and have never found
definitive answers. %here is a long standing philosophical tradition of answering +uestions with
+uestions. %he purpose of this blog =and the boo' I#ve written by the same title> may raise more
+uestions than it attempts to answer, and that is e!citing. %he focus of this e!ploration is not to
dispute nihilism. %he primary assumption is there is meaning to life. Personally, I agree with
/lbert 1instein who said, %he man who regards life as meaningless is not merely unfortunate
but almost un+ualified for life.)
I fre+uently find myself laughing at the notion of writing anything truly illuminating about these
intriguing topics. &y own day to day e!plorations usually lead me to laugh long and hard at
myself. 4ut somehow, the effort always seems worthwhile. In fact, the title of this blog and my
boo' were the result of a conversation my brother and sister had with a fellow college
schoolmate on a blustery autumn afternoon over twenty five years ago. ,ne of the true geniuses
passing through the hallowed halls of Princeton .niversity at that time was a young man named
5ussell. Be was sitting under the proverbial %ree of Wisdom) and was +uietly laughing to
himself. When as'ed what he was laughing at, he casually replied, I#m laughing at e!istence.)
/nd to this day, I am +uite sure he was. Who 'nows, maybe the purpose of life is to find the
humor in itF
I have found the ma$ority of thoughts written on the meaning of life seem to replay through a
do6en or so themes. 2one of these themes are mutually e!clusive. In fact, most are interrelated
and interdependent. %his blog =and my upcoming boo'> will touch on thoughts from some of the
greatest minds throughout anti+uity who +ueried the 4ig Guestions. %heir words are
inspirational and thought:provo'ing.
%han' you for $oining me on your $ourney down the twisting roads of life. I hope the thoughts
shared will stimulate, challenge and e!pand your awareness. %he paths for see'ing truth,
wisdom and meaning are for a lifetime of e!ploration. I hope this so$ourn is a meaningful and
en$oyable one for you. I loo' forward to sharing your thoughts and insights.
Jesus and Buddha:
The Parallel Sayings
Are there universal truths? If we compare the sayings of
Jesus and Buddha the answer is a heartfelt yes
?<< =; ? :
2uddhism and @hristianity would appear to have little in common. Ane is nonB
theistic for instance, the other, theistic. 2ut the sayings of Cesus and the 2uddha,
whose teachings gave rise to the two religions are another matter. They have much
in common in the realms of ethical behavior, discipleship, compassion, materialism
and the inner life. The following are some examples.
%eprinted from &'esus and !uddha( The )arallel ayings& edited by Marcus !org, published by
*lysses )ress
JesusE H9o to others as you would have them do to you.H (u'e IEJ?
BuddhaE H0onsider others as yourself.H 9hammapada ?AE?
JesusE HIf anyone stri'es you on the chee', offer the other also.H (u'e IEK@
BuddhaE HIf anyone should give you a blow with his hand, with a stic', or with a 'nife, you
should abandon any desires and utter no evil words.H &a$$hima 2i'aya K?EI
JesusE H%ruly I tell you, $ust as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to
me.H &atthew KLEML
BuddhaE HIf you do not tend to one another, then who is there to tend you? Whoever would tend
me, he should tend the sic'.H Vinaya, &ahavagga NEKI.J
JesusE HPut your sword bac' into its place< for all those who ta'e the sword will perish by the
sword.H &atthew KIELK
BuddhaE H/bandoning the ta'ing of life, the ascetic ;autama dwells refraining from ta'ing life,
without stic' or sword.H 9igha 2i'aya ?E?.N
JesusE H%hose who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sa'e
will save it.H &ar' NEJL
BuddhaE HWith the relin+uishing of all thought and egotism, the enlightened one is liberated
through not clinging.H &a$$hima 2i'aya OKE?L
JesusE H;o therefore and ma'e disciples of all nations, bapti6ing them in the name of the ather
and of the *on and of the Boly *pirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have
commanded you.H &atthew KNE?@:KA
BuddhaE H%each the dharma which is lovely at the beginning, lovely in the middle, lovely at the
end. 1!plain with the spirit and the letter in the fashion of 4rahma. In this way you will be
completely fulfilled and wholly pure.H Vinaya &ahavagga ?E??.?
*uppose a man who was not blind beheld the many bubbles on the ;anges as they drive along,
and he watched them and carefully e!amined them, then after he had carefully e!amined them
they would appear to him empty, unreal and unsubstantial. In e!actly the same way does the
mon' behold all physical phenomena, feelings, perceptions, mental formations, and states of
consciousness:whether they be of the past, or the present, or the future, far or near. /nd he
watches them, and e!amines them carefully< and, after carefully e!amining them, they appear to
him empty, void and without a *elf.
:from the &a$$hima 2i'aya translated by 2yanatilo'a
!here does the Tath"gata reappear after death?
BU!A QU"TES ## Aggi$acchagotta Sutta %&' Ma((hi)a *i+,ya
-accha :
When a %athPgata#s mind is fully liberated, &aster ;otama, where does it reappear after death?
-
Buddha :
%he term "reappear# does not apply.
%he term "does not reappear# does not apply.
%here term "both reappears and does not reappear# does not apply.
%he term "neither reappears nor does not reappear# does not apply.
-accha :
Bere I have fallen into bewilderment, here I have fallen into confusion, the measure of
confidence I had gained through previous conversation with &aster ;otama has now
disappeared.
Buddha :
It is enough to cause you bewilderment, Vaccha, enough to cause you confusion. or this
9hamma is profound, hard to see and hard to understand, peaceful and sublime, unattainable by
mere reasoning, subtle, to be e!perienced by the wise.
It is hard for you to understand it when you hold another view, accept another teaching, approve
of another teaching, pursue a different training, and follow a different teacher. *o I shall +uestion
you in return. /nswer as you choose.
What do you thin'? *uppose a fire were burning before you. Would you 'now this fire is
burning before me?)
-accha :
3es I would.
Buddha :
What does this fire before you burn in dependence on?
-accha :
%his fire burns in dependence on fuel of grass and stic's.
Buddha :
If that fire before you were e!tinguished, would you 'now this fire before me has been
e!tinguished?)
-accha :
3es I would.
Buddha :
When that fire before you was e!tinguished, to which direction did it go? %o the east, the west,
the north or the south?
-accha :
%hat does not apply, &aster ;otama. %he fire burned in dependence on it#s fuel of grass and
stic's. When that is used up, if it does not get more fuel, being without fuel, it is seen to be
e!tinguished.
Buddha :
*o too Vaccha, the %athPgata has abandoned the material form by which the %athPgata might be
described< this form has been cut it off at the root, made as a palm stump, done away with, so
that the %athPgata is no longer sub$ect to future arising. %he %athPgata is liberated from
rec'oning in terms of material form< having become profound, immeasurable, hard to fathom
li'e the ocean. %hus, the term "reappear# does not apply< "does not reappear# does not apply-
#uota$le #uote
./f you 0ant to +no0 the past' to +no0 0hat
has caused you' loo+ at yourself in the
P1ESE*T' for that is the past2s effect3 /f
you 0ant to +no0 your future' then loo+ at
yourself in the P1ESE*T' for that is the
cause of the future3
4
D BB 6a00hima 'i"aya
Ma((hi)a *i+aya
A #uote $y %a&&hima 'ikaya on past and future
in
future
past
%he past should not be followed after,
and the future not desired<
what is past is dead and gone,
and the future is yet to come.
&a$$hima 2i'Pya J.KOK
&a$$hima 2i'aya
0ontributed byE mimi
#ermalin"
A #uote $y %a&&hima 'ikaya on $reathing, conscious, and
moment
in
breathing
conscious
moment
ind a place where you are alone. %rain yourself in the following wayE When you breathe in,
e!perience breathing in. When you breathe out, be fully conscious that you are breathing out. If
you cherish and practice this, it will bear great fruit. Whatever you are doing and wherever you
are, you will find steadiness, calm, and concentration if you become conscious of your breathing.
&a$$hima 2i'aya
0ontributed byE 5isto
#ermalin"
A #uote $y %a&&hima 'ikaya
What is past is dead and future is not yet here.
&a$$hima 2i'aya
Majjhima Nikaya quote on walking zen
3ou tell me to stand still, but am not wal"ing,1 he shouted, 1whereas you who are
wal"ing say you are still. +ow is it that you are standing still but am not?1 The
2uddha turned round. 16y legs move but my mind is still,1 he said.13our legs are
still but your mind moves all the time in a !re of anger, hatred, and feverish desire.
Therefore, am still but you are not.
6a00hima 'i"aya
EAvercoming anger alone is e-ual to van-uishing all foes.F
/cceptance : /ction : Independence
,ne of the most radical things women can do is to love their body. %he truth of the matter is,
every moment we spend worrying about our bodies, and not necessarily ta'ing care of them,
somebody is figuring out how to ta'e money away from the poor, destroy the environment, drill,
frac', burn, rape and violate women, and we#re not paying attention. 4e radicalE (ove your
bodyF
/uthorE 1ve 1nsler
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People who say they don8t care what people thin' are usually desperate to have people thin' they
don8t care what people thin'.
/uthorE ;eorge 0arlin
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4alance : ;ratitude : Independence : &indfulness : 5espect : 5everence


We are what we are because of the hard wor', insights and achievements of countless others.
/uthorE Qaren /rmstrong
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9iligence : 0reativity : Independence


(earn the rules li'e a pro, so you can brea' them li'e an artist.
/uthorE Pablo Picasso
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2ever e!plain : your friends do not need it and your enemies will not believe you anyway.
/uthorE 1lbert Bubbard
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Wonder : 0ommon *ense : Bumility : Independence : %ruth:see'ing


Bumans are addicted to the hope for a final rec'oning, but intellectual humility re+uires that we
resist the temptation to assume that tools of the 'ind we now have are in principle sufficient to
understand the universe as a whole...*cientists are well aware of what they don#t 'now, but this
is a different 'ind of problem 7 not $ust of ac'nowledging the limits of what is actually
understood but of trying to recogni6e what can and cannot in principle be understood by certain
e!isting methods...%he world is an astonishing place, and the idea that we have in our possession
the basic tools needed to understand it is no more credible now than it was in /ristotle#s day.
%hat it has produced you, and me, and the rest of us is the most astonishing thing about it.
/uthorE %homas 2agel
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9iscernment : Independence : Judgment : 5ationality


Why see' a doctrine? /s soon as you have a doctrine, you fall into dualistic thought.
/uthorE Buang Po
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2ature never said to meE 9o not be poor. *till less did she sayE 4e rich. Ber cry to me was
alwaysE 4e independent.
/uthorE 2icolas de 0hamfort, writer =?OM?:?O@M>
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0ompassion : Independence
%here is no general doctrine which is not capable of eating out our morality if unchec'ed by the
deep:seated habit of direct fellow:feeling with individual fellow:men.
/uthorE ;eorge 1liot
0ontributorE Josh &itteldorf
Bumanism
1urope
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the revolution will not be televised.
/uthorE ;il *cott Beron
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Without the freedom to critici6e, there is no true praise.
/uthorE Pierre 4eaumarchais, playwright =?OJK:?O@@>
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/ hungry man is not a free man.
/uthorE /dlai *tevenson, statesman =?@AA:?@IL>
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0ompassion : ;rowth : Independence : Qindness : *ervice : %ruth:see'ing


4elieve nothing merely because you have been told it. 9o not believe what your teacher tells you
merely out of respect for the teacher. 4ut whatsoever, after due e!amination and analysis, you
find to be 'ind, conducive to the good, the benefit, the welfare of all beings :: that doctrine
believe and cling to, and ta'e it as your guide.
/uthorE 4uddha
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;rowth : Independence : Qnowledge : *elf:9iscipline


1!perience is a tough teacher because she gives the test first and the lesson after.
/uthorE Vernon *anders (aw
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/ll good things are wild, and free.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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0ourage : 0reativity : Independence


When they give you lined paper, write the other way.
/uthorE 5ay 4radbury
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0ommitment : /ction : Independence : Persistence : *elf:9iscipline : %ruth:see'ing


/ll I want to live in real for once, not $ust to e!ist.
/uthorE .n'nown
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0reativity : Independence
Bere8s to the cra6y ones. %he misfits. %he rebels. %he troublema'ers. %he round pegs in the
s+uare holes. %he ones who see things differently. %hey8re not fond of rules. /nd they have no
respect for the status +uo. 3ou can +uote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. /bout
the only thing you can8t do is ignore them. 4ecause they change things. %hey push the human
race forward. /nd while some may see them as the cra6y ones, we see genius. 4ecause the
people who are cra6y enough to thin' they can change the world, are the ones who do.
/uthorE /pple, Inc.
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I am more afraid that this people have so much confidence in their leaders that they will not
in+uire for themselves of ;od whether they are led by him. I am fearful they settle down in a
state of blind self security. (et every man and woman 'now, by the whispering of the *pirit of
;od to themselves, whether their leaders are wal'ing in the path the (ord dictates, or not.
/uthorE 4righam 3oung
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0hristianity
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Whenever you find yourself on the side of the ma$ority, it is time to pause and reflect.
/uthorE &ar' %wain
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%o be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best day and night to ma'e you li'e
everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight and never stop
fighting.
/uthorE 1. 1. 0ummings
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0onventionality is not morality. *elf:righteousness is not religion. %o attac' the first is not to
assail the last.
/uthorE 0harlotte 4ronte
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1urope
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Independence
3ou wouldn8t worry so much about what others thin' of you if you reali6ed how seldom they do.
/uthorE 1leanor 5oosevelt
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/cceptance : 0ontentment : Independence : Qnowledge : Wisdom : Barmony


3ours is only what you always have on you.
/uthorE Peter 9unov
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0onfidence : 0ontentment : Independence : (ove : *erenity : *trength


I8d rather have high self:esteem and be called a H9ivaH than have low:self esteem and become a
H9oormatH.
/uthorE (ea &ishell
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Independence
;ive me the liberty to 'now, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all
liberties.
/uthorE John &ilton
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Bumility : Independence
It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creed into law if it ac+uires
the political power to do so.
/uthorE 5obert /. Beinlein, science:fiction author =?@AO:?@NN>
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reethought
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Independence : 5esponsibility
/nd the fo! said to the little princeE men have forgotten this truth, but you must not forget it. 3ou
become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.
/uthorE :/ntoine de *aint:1!upery, author and aviator =?@AA:?@ML>
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Independence : (ove
Just because two people argue, 9oesn8t mean they don8t love each other. /nd $ust because they
don8t argue, doesn8t mean they do love each other.
/uthorE .n'nown
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/spiration : 0onfidence : Independence : Insight : Intention : ocus


/n integral being 'nows without 'nowing, sees without loo'ing, and accomplishes without
doingH.
/uthorE (ao %6u
0ontributorE 0arlos J. 9ia6, *r.
4uddhism
/sia
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
/ll great truths begin as blasphemies.
/uthorE ;eorge 4ernard *haw, 2obel laureate =?NLI:?@LA>
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0ourage : Idealism : Independence : *'epticism : 0iti6enship


It is my belief that the writer, the free:lance author, should be and must be a critic of the society
in which he lives. It is easy enough, and always profitable, to rail away at national enemies
beyond the sea, at foreign powers beyond our borders who +uestion the prevailing order. 4ut the
moral duty of the free writer is to begin his wor' at home< to be a critic of his own community,
his own country, his own culture. If the writer is unwilling to fill this part, then the writer should
abandon pretense and find another line of wor'E become a shoe repairman, a brain surgeon, a
$anitor, a cowboy, a nuclear physicist, a bus driver.
/uthorE 1dward /bbey, naturalist and author =?@KO:?@N@>
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0reativity : Independence
If they give you ruled paper, write the other way.
/uthorE Juan 5amon Jimene6, poet, 2obel Pri6e in literature =?NN?:?@LN>
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1urope
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0ourage : 9etermination : Independence : .nity : 0iti6enship


%here is a power that can be created out of pent:up indignation, courage, and the inspiration of a
common cause, and that if enough people put their minds and bodies into that cause, they can
win-. 2ote how often...we have been surprised. 4y the sudden emergence of a people8s
movement, the sudden overthrow of a tyranny, the sudden coming to life of a flame we thought
e!tinguished. We are surprised because we have not ta'en notice of the +uiet simmerings of
indignation, of the first faint sounds of protest, of the scattered signs of resistance that, in the
midst of our despair, portend the e!citement of change. %he isolated acts begin to $oin, the
individual thrusts blend into organi6ed actions, and one day, often when the situation seems most
hopeless, there bursts onto the scene a movement.
/uthorE Boward Sinn
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Bumor : Independence : 0ommon *ense : 0uriosity : ,penness


I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.
/uthorE &ar' %wain
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Independence : Integrity
Bow far should one accept the rules of the society in which one lives? %o put it another wayE at
what point does conformity become corruption? ,nly by answering such +uestions does the
conscience truly define itself.
/uthorE Qenneth %ynan, critic and writer =?@KO:?@NA>
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
5eligious freedom should wor' two waysE we should be free to practice the religion of our
choice, but we must also be free from having someone else8s religion practiced on us.
/uthorE John Irving, novelist =b. ?@MK>
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9iscernment : ;rowth : Independence : Integrity : Intention : %ruth:see'ing


rom this hour I ordain myself loos8d of limits and imaginary lines. ;oing where I list, my own
master, total and absolute. (istening to others, and considering well what they say. Pausing,
searching, receiving, contemplating. ;ently but with undeniable will, divesting myself of the
holds that would hold me.
/uthorE Walt Whitman
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Independence : Intention : Vision


2ot all that wander are lost.
/uthorE John ronald ruel tol'ien
0ontributorE /utum worcester
.niversal 1thics
1urope
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.nthin'ing respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.
/uthorE /lbert 1instein
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*cientific In+uiry
1urope
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H*apiens permanently lives in a somnambulistic condition which 'eeps him dormant, ma'ing it
impossible for him to attain real 'nowledge, and seriously damaging his awareness and
intelligence. 1ach day what he 'nows increases at the cost of his human essence, which is
reduced in direct relationship to the e!tent and potency of his cerebral programming. %his
programming converts him into a veritable biological robot with automatic physiological,
instinctive, emotional, and intellectual reactions. %he individual8s ideas, opinions, or sentiments
lose all human validity, and he is converted into a mere circuit activated by e!ternal influences.
%hese e!ternal influences are thus converted into disconnected elements of the individual8s
internal reactions, a mere echo of the cultural concert and the emotional and instinctive tide of
humanity.
/uthorE John 4aines
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Independence
/ considerable percentage of the people we meet on the street are people who are empty inside,
that is, they are actually already dead. It is fortunate for us that we do not see and do not 'now it.
If we 'new what a number of people are actually dead and what a number of these dead people
govern our lives, we should go mad with horror.
/uthorE ;.I. ;urd$ieff
0ontributorE Jon Qary
2ew /ge
1urope
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Independence
*o preserve yourselves, my brothers, from the calamities of this place, for distinguishing it is
e!tremely difficultF *ouls find it sweet, and then within it they are duped, since they become
completely enamored of it.
/uthorE *ufi proverb
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Islam
&iddle 1ast
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%he power of accurate observation is fre+uently called cynicism by those who don8t have it.
/uthorE ;eorge 4ernard *haw
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Independence
%he human heart cries out for help< the human soul implores us for deliverance< but we do not
heed their cries, for we neither hear nor understand. 4ut the man who hears and understands we
call mad, and flee from him.
/uthorE Qhalil ;ibran
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
or the total development of the human being, solitude as a means of cultivating sensitivity
becomes a necessity. ,ne has to 'now what it means to be alone, what it is to meditate, what it is
to die< and the implications of solitude, of meditation, of death, can be 'nown only by see'ing
them out. %hese implications cannot be taught, they must be learned.
/uthorE Qrishnamurti
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Interfaith
/sia
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Independence : Vision
or the great ma$ority of man'ind are satisfied with appearances, as though they were realities,
and are often more influenced by the things that seem than by those that are.
/uthorE 2iccolo &achiavelli
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1nlightenment Philosophy
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Independence : Insight : .nity


%he deeper the self:reali6ation of a person, the more they influence the whole universe by their
subtle spiritual vibrations, and the less they themselves are affected by the phenomenal flu!.
/uthorE *ri 3u'teswar
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Binduism
/sia
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1thics : Independence : Virtue


If everyone would only fight for his own convictions, there would be no war.
/uthorE (eo %olstoy
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence
*tructures of which we are unaware hold us prisoner.
/uthorE Peter *enge
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence : 5ationality
If you follow the ways in which you were trained, which you may have inherited, for no other
reason than this, you are illogical.
/uthorE 5umi
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Islam
&iddle 1ast
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/daptability : Independence
9on#t let the world around you s+uee6e you into its own mold, but let ;od re:mold your minds
from within.
/uthorE .n'nown
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence
&en spend the best parts of their lives earning money in order to en$oy a +uestionable liberty
during the least valuable part of it.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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.nitarian
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%hat government is best which governs not at all: and when men are prepared for it, that will be
the 'ind of government which they will have.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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/ction : Independence : Industry


%he mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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Idealism : Independence : Virtue


/ll men recogni6e the right to revolution< that is, the right to refuse allegiance to, and resist, the
government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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.nitarian
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Idealism : Independence : Virtue


.nder a government which imprisons any un$ustly, the true place for a $ust man is also in prison,
the only house in a slave *tate in which a free man can abide with honor. %hey do not 'now how
much truth is stronger than error, nor how much more elo+uently and effectively he can combat
in$ustice who has e!perienced a little in his own person. If the alternative is to 'eep all $ust men
in prison, or give up war and slavery, the *tate will not hesitate which to choose.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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.nitarian
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Independence : Virtue
%hey who assert the purest right, and conse+uently are most dangerous to a corrupt *tate,
commonly have not spent much time accumulating property. %he rich man is always sold to the
institution which ma'es him rich. /bsolutely spea'ing, the more money, the less virtue< for
money comes between a man and his ob$ects, and obtains them for him< and it was certainly no
great virtue to obtain it.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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.nitarian
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Independence : *elf:9iscipline : %ruth:see'ing


/nd what is grasping? %here are fourE grasping for sense pleasures, for speculative views, for
rites and customs, and for delusions of selfhood.
/uthorE &a$$hima:2i'aya
0ontributorE Jon Qary
4uddhism
/sia
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0ompassion : 9iligence : Independence : &indfulness


4e a lamp unto yourselvesF Wor' out your liberation with diligenceF ill your mind with
compassionF
/uthorE 4uddha
0ontributorE Jon Qary
4uddhism
/sia
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0ourage : orbearance : Independence


irst they ignore us, then they laugh at us, then they attac' us: then we win.
/uthorE ;andhi
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Interfaith
/sia
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Independence
What we call &an#s power over 2ature turns out to be a power e!ercised by some men over
other men with 2ature as its instrument.
/uthorE 0.*. (ewis
0ontributorE Jon Qary
0hristianity
1urope
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Independence
1ven if you are a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.
/uthorE ;andhi
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Interfaith
/sia
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
/ll truth passes through three stagesE irst, it is ridiculed. *econd, it is violently opposed. %hird,
it is accepted as self:evident.
/uthorE /rthur *chopenhauer
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence
&ost people are other people. %heir thoughts are someone else#s opinions, their lives a mimicry,
their passions a +uotation.
/uthorE ,scar Wilde
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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9iscernment : Independence
%he most dangerous man, to any government, is the man who is able to thin' things out for
himself.
/uthorE B.(. &enc'en
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence : ,b$ectivity : .nity


*ynchronistic phenomena prove the simultaneous occurrence of meaningful e+uivalences in
heterogenous, causally unrelated processes< in other words, they prove that a content perceived
by an observer can, at the same time, be represented by an outside event, without any causal
connection. rom this it follows either that the psyche cannot be locali6ed in time, or that space
is relative to the psyche.
/uthorE 0arl Jung
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Bumanism
1urope
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;rowth : Independence : Qnowledge : Barmony


%he unconscious wants to flow into consciousness in order to reach the light, but at the same
time it continually thwarts itself, because it would rather remain unconscious. %hat is to say, ;od
wants to become man, but not +uite.
/uthorE 0arl Jung
0ontributorE Jon Qary
Bumanism
1urope
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;rowth : Independence : Insight : .nity


%he "coming of the *elf# is immanent< and the process of collective "individuation# is living itself
out in human history. ,ne way or another, the world is going to be made a single whole entity.
4ut it will be unified either in mutual mass destruction or by means of mutual human
consciousness. If a sufficient number of individuals can have the e!perience of the coming of the
*elf as an individual, inner e!perience, we may $ust possibly be spared the worst features of its
e!ternal manifestation.
/uthorE 1dward 1dinger
0ontributorE Jon Qary
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Independence : Integrity
.ncleanness is so much the attribute of officials that one could almost regard them as enormous
parasites-In the same way the fathers in Qaf'a#s strange families batten on their sons, lying on
top of them li'e giant parasites. %hey not only prey upon their strength, but gnaw away at the
sons# right to e!ist. %he fathers punish, but they are at the same time the accusers. %he sin of
which they accuse their sons seems to be a 'ind of original sin.
/uthorE Walter 4en$amin
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1!cellence : Independence : &indfulness : ,b$ectivity


It is the self within ourselves that we must sacrifice. It is our own heart that has to be torn out of
the false being and offered to the light.
/uthorE Pyramid of ireE %he (ost /6tec 0ode!
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/boriginal
*outh /merica
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,ur normal human tendencies are distraction and dissipation. We begin one tas', then get
seduced by some other option, and lose our focus. We drift away from what is difficult and we
'now to be true, to what is comfortable and socially condoned.
/uthorE 9aniel Pinchbec'
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2ew /ge
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%he unconscious process moves spiral:wise around a center, gradually getting closer, while the
characteristics of the center grow more and more distinct.
/uthorE 0arl Jung
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ear is never a good counselor and victory over fear is the first spiritual duty of man.
/uthorE 2icolas 4erdyaev
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antastic doctrines re+uire unanimity of belief. ,ne dissenter casts doubt on the creed of
millions. %hus the fear and the hate< thus the torture chamber, the iron sta'e, the gallows, the
labor camp, the psychiatric ward.
/uthorE 1dward /bbey
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%he gigantic catastrophes that threaten us today are not elemental happenings of a physical or
biological order, but psychic events. %o a +uite terrifying degree we are threatened by wars and
revolutions which are nothing other than psychic epidemics. /t any moment several million
human beings may be smitten with a new madness, and then we shall have another world war or
devastating revolution. Instead of being at the mercy of wild beasts, earth+ua'es, landslides, and
inundations, modern man is battered by the elemental forces of his own psyche.
/uthorE 0arl Jung
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It is perfectly possible for a man to be out of prison, and yet not free: to be under no physical
restraint and yet to be a psychological captive, compelled to thin', feel, and act as the
representatives of the national state, or of some private interest within the nation, wants him to
thin', feel, and act-%he nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under
constraint remain under the impression that they are acting of their own initiative. %he victim of
mind manipulation does not 'now that he is a victim. %o him the walls of his prison are invisible,
and he believes himself to be free. %hat he is not free is apparent only to other people. Bis
servitude is strictly ob$ective.
/uthorE /ldous Bu!ley
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-the sic' individual finds himself at home with all other sic' individuals. %he whole culture is
geared to this 'ind of pathology. %he result is that the average individual does not e!perience the
separateness and isolation the fully schi6ophrenic person feels. Be feels at ease among those who
suffer from the same deformation< in fact, it is the fully sane person who feels isolated in an
insane society: and he may suffer so much from the incapacity to communicate that it is he who
may become psychotic.
/uthorE 1rich romm
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Insanity is a perfectly natural ad$ustment to a totally unnatural and negative environment.
/uthorE 5.9. (aing
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%he individual has always had to struggle to 'eep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. It you
try it, you will often be lonely, and sometimes frightened. 4ut no price is too high to pay for the
privelage of owning yourself.
/uthorE 2iet6sche
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/nything that#s popular is a rear:view image.
/uthorE &arshall &c(uhan
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%o such a world of conflict, a world of victims, and e!ecutions, it is the $ob of thin'ing people
not to be on the side of the e!ecutioners.
/uthorE /lbert 0amus
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2ever do anything against conscience, even if the state demands it.
/uthorE /lbert 1instein
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reedom granted only when it is 'nown beforehand that its effects will be beneficial is not
freedom.
/uthorE riedrich Baye'
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4etter to be despised for too an!ious apprehensions than ruined by too confident a security.
/uthorE 1dmund 4ur'e
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It had always been a notion of mine that sanity is li'e a clearing in the $ungle where the humans
agree to meet from time to time and behave in certain fi!ed ways that even a baboon could
master-
/uthorE Wilfrid *heed
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Independence : Vision
,nce you have glimpsed the world as it might be, as it ought to be and as it#s going to be
=however that vision appears to you>, it is impossible to live compliant and complacent anymore
in this world as it is.
/uthorE Victoria *afford
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What is uni+ue about the "I# is that hides itself e!actly in what is unimaginable about a person.
/ll we are able to imagine is what ma'es everyone li'e everyone else, what people have in
common. %he individual "I# is what differs from the common stoc', that is, what cannot be
guessed at or calculated, what must be unveiled, uncovered, con+uered.
/uthorE &ilan Qundera
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9iligence : 1!cellence : Independence : .nity : Wisdom


#9uty toward self# is almost an e!act translation of the *ans'rit word "dharma#, sometimes
described as the ",ne# of the Bindus. 0an the "dharma# of the Bindus and the "virtue# of the
ancient ;ree's be identical? (ightning hitsF GualityF VirtueF 9harmaF %his is what the *ophists
were teachingF 2ot ethical relativism. 2ot pristine "virtue#. 4ut arTte. 1!cellence. 9harmaF
4efore the church of 5eason. 4efore substance. 4efore form. 4efore mind and matter. 4efore
dialectic itself. Guality had been absolute. %hose first teachers of the Western world were
teaching Guality, and the medium they had chosen was that of rhetoric. /rete implies a respect
for the wholeness or oneness of life, and a conse+uent disli'e of speciali6ation. It implies a
contempt for efficiency-or rather, a much higher idea of efficiency, an efficiency that e!ists not
in one department of life but in life itself.
/uthorE 5obert &. Pirsig
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Guality is better seen up at the timberline than here obscured by smo'y windows and oceans of
words, and he sees that what he is tal'ing about can never really be accepted here because to see
it one has to be free of social authority and this is an institution of social authority. Guality for
sheep is what the shepherd says. /nd if you ta'e a sheep and put it up at the timberline at night
when the wind is roaring, that sheep will be panic'ed half to death and will call and call until the
shepherd comes, or comes the wolf.
/uthorE 5obert &. Pirsig
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Independence : Virtue
/ culture:bearing boo', li'e a mule, bears the culture on its bac'. 2o one should sit down to
write one deliberately. 0ulture:bearing boo's appear almost accidentally, li'e a sudden surge in
the stoc' mar'et. %here are boo's of high +uality that are a part of the culture, but that is not the
same. %hey are a part of it. %hey aren#t carrying it anywhere. %hey may tal' about insanity
sympathetically, for e!ample, because that#s the standard cultural attitude. 4ut they don#t carry
any suggestion that insanity might be something other than sic'ness or degeneracy.
/uthorE 5obert &. Pirsig
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*anity is not truth. *anity is conformity to what is socially e!pected. %ruth is sometimes in
conformity, sometimes not.
/uthorE 5obert &. Pirsig
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If there is anything in the world that can really be called a man#s property, it is surely that which
is the result of his mental activity.
/uthorE /rthur *chopenhauer
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We forfeit three:fourths of ourselves in order to be li'e other people.
/uthorE /rthur *chopenhauer
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Independence : 0iti6enship : Justice


Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. ind out $ust what a
people will submit to, and you have found out the e!act amount of in$ustice and wrong which
will be imposed on them< and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or
blows, or with both. %he limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they
oppress. &en may not get all they pay for in this world< but they must pay for all they get.
/uthorE rederic' 9ouglas
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Independence
/t this point in history, the most radical, pervasive, and earth:sha'ing transformation would
occur simply if every body truly evolved to a mature, rational, and responsible ego, capable of
freely participating in the open e!change of mutual self:esteem. %here is the "edge of history#.
%here would be a real 2ew /ge.
/uthorE Qen Wilber
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Independence : 5esponsibility
%he fear of freedom is strong in us. We call it chaos or anarchy, and the words are threatening.
We live in a true chaos of contradicting authorities, an age of conformism without community, of
pro!imity without communication. We could only fear chaos if we imagined that it was un'nown
to us, but in fact we 'now it very well.
/uthorE ;ermaine ;reer
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Independence : Insight : &indfulness


Babit is necessary< it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut that must be
incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.
/uthorE 1dith Wharton
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/daptability : /ction : Independence


9on#t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be li'e water. 1mpty
your mind, be formless, shapeless: li'e water.
/uthorE 4ruce (ee
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/sia
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%he paramount +uestion of the day is not political, is not religious, but is economic. %he crying:
out demand of today is for a circle of principles that shall forever ma'e it impossible for one man
to control any other by controlling the means of his e!istence.
/uthorE Volairine de 0levre
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Independence : 5ationality
%hin' for yourself and +uestion authority.
/uthorE %imothy (eary
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%he real sin of idolatry is always committed on behalf of something similar to the *tate.
/uthorE *imone Weil
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I have always supported measures and principles and not men. I have acted fearless and
independent and I never will regret my course. I would rather be politically buried than to be
hypocritically immortali6ed.
/uthorE 9avy 0roc'ett
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1thics : Independence
%here will never be a free and enlightened *tate until the *tate comes to recogni6e the individual
as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and
treats him accordingly.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
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.nitarian
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%herefore, be islands unto yourselves. 4e your own refuge. Bave recourse to none else for
refuge. Bold fast to the 9harma as a refuge. 5esort to no other refuge. Whosoever, either now or
after I am gone, shall be islands unto themselves, shall see' no eternal refuge, it is they, among
my disciples who shall reach the very topmost heightF 4ut they must be 'een to progress.
/uthorE 4uddha
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Independence : 5ationality
%he difficulty lies, not in the new ideas, but in escaping from the old ones, which ramify, for
those brought up as most of us have been, into every corner of our minds.
/uthorE John &aynard Qeynes
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
In religion and politics, people#s beliefs and convictions are in almost every case gotten at
second:hand, and without e!amination, from authorities who have not themselves e!amined the
+uestions at issue, but have ta'en them at second:hand from other non:e!aminers, whose
opinions about them are not worth a brass farthing.
/uthorE &ar' %wain
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Bappiness belongs to those who are sufficient unto themselves. or all e!ternal forms of
happiness are, by their own nature, highly uncertain, precarious, ephemeral, and sub$ect to
chance.
/uthorE /rthur *chopenhauer
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/ction : 1!cellence : Independence : Barmony


%he roc's are where they are: and this is their will. %he rivers flow: and this is their will. %he
birds fly: this is their will. Buman beings tal': this is their will. %he seasons change, heaven
sends down rain or snow, the earth occasionally sha'es, the waves roll, the stars shine: each of
them follows its own will. %o be is to will and so is to become.
/uthorE 9.%. *u6u'i
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Independence : Judgment : 0iti6enship


It is comfortable to see the standard of reason at length erected, after so many ages, during which
the human mind has been held in vassalage by 'ings, priests, and nobles< and it is honorable for
us to have produced the first legislature who had the courage to declare that the reason of man
may be trusted with the formation of his own opinions.
/uthorE %homas Jefferson
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&an#s main tas' in life is to give birth to himself.
/uthorE 1rich romm
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/daptability : 0ommitment : 0ourage : 9etermination : Independence : 5esilience


,nly to the e!tent that we e!pose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is
indestructible in us be found.H Pema 0hodron
/uthorE Pema 0hodron
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/cceptance : Independence : Intention


2o one who is being himself is going to be approved of all the time. %he whole world could love
you, but if you do not love yourself, you would not even notice. %he opposite is also true 7 the
whole world could disapprove of you, but if you love yourself, you would not even notice.
/ccept yourself within you and the entire world becomes totally acceptable.
/uthorE 4artholomew
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/ction : Independence : Insight : Intention : ocus


3our time is limited, so don#t waste it living someone else#s life. 9on#t be trapped by dogma 7
which is living with the results of other people#s thin'ing. 9on#t let the noise of other#s opinions
drown out your own inner voice. /nd most important, have the courage to follow your heart and
intuition. %hey somehow already 'now what you truly want to become. 1verything else is
secondary.
/uthorE *teve Jobs
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4oldness : 0ourage : Independence


I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over. ,ut on the edge you see all the
'inds of things you can#t see from the center.
/uthorE Qurt Vonnegut
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/ction : Independence : Intention


*o human beings come to this world to do particular wor'. %hat wor' is the purpose, and each is
specific to the person. If you don#t do it, it#s as though a priceless Indian sword were used to slice
rotten meat. It#s a golden bowl being used to coo' turnips, when one filing from the bowl could
buy a hundred suitable pots. It#s a 'nife of the finest tempering nailed into a wall to hang things
on.
/uthorE 5umi
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0ourage : 0reativity : Independence : Vision


When you have chosen your part, abide by it and do not wea'ly try to reconcile yourself to the
world. %he heroic cannot be the common, nor the common heroic. 0ongratulate yourself if you
have done something strange and e!travagant, and bro'en the monotony of a decorous age.
/uthorE 5alph Waldo 1merson
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Independence : Integrity
%his above allE to thine own self be true, /nd it must follow, as the night the day, %hou canst not
then be false to any man.
/uthorE William *ha'espeare, poet and dramatist =?LIM:?I?I>
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Independence : 5esponsibility
%he man who does not do his own thin'ing is a slave, and is a traitor to himself and to his
fellow:men.
/uthorE 5obert ;reen Ingersoll
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9ecisiveness : airness : Independence : Wisdom


In the natural world, wea'ness is li'e a crime that#s punishable by death.
/uthorE /nthony Innerbichler
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Independence : Insight
%he characteristic human trait is not awareness but conformity, and the characteristic result is
religious warfare. ,ther animals fight for territory or food< but, uni+uely in the animal 'ingdom,
human beings fight for their 8beliefs.8 %he reason is that beliefs guide behavior, which has
evolutionary importance among human beings. 4ut at a time when our behavior may well lead us
to e!tinction, I see no reason to assume we have any awareness at all. We are stubborn, self:
destructive conformists. /ny other view of our species is $ust a self:congratulatory delusion.
/uthorE &ichael 0richton
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0reativity : Independence : Insight


9iscovery consists in seeing what everyone else has seen and thin'ing what no one else has
thought.
/uthorE /lbert *6ent:;yorgi
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Bumility : Independence
While fame impedes and constricts, obscurity wraps about a man li'e a mist< obscurity is dar',
ample, and free< obscurity lets the mind ta'e its way unimpeded. ,ver the obscure man is poured
the merciful suffusion of dar'ness. 2one 'nows where he goes or comes. Be may see' the truth
and spea' it< he alone is free< he alone is truthful, he alone is at peace.
/uthorE Virginia Woolf, writer =?NNK:?@M?>
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Independence : Insight : %olerance : ,penness


%here is so much more hue and variety in real life than any model can encompass. %he labels
straight), gay), bi), are only a lens we use for convenience so we can have a feeling that we
are able to manage and contain an infinitely comple! reality. People don#t reali6e that, and
implicitly believe that humans should conform to the language labels they happen to have
inherited from the way their society arbitrarily parses reality.
/uthorE H%ri!H
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Bumility : Independence : Insight


We are all of us more or less echoes, repeating involuntarily the virtues, the defects, the
movements, and the characters of those among whom we live.
/uthorE Joseph Joubert, essayist =?OLM:?NKM>
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0ompassion : Independence : .nity


%he propagandist8s purpose is to ma'e one set of people forget that certain other sets of people
are human.
/uthorE /ldous Bu!ley, novelist =?N@M:?@IJ>
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Independence : .nity : %olerance


&any paths lead from the foot of the mountain, but at the pea' we all ga6e at the single bright
moon.
/uthorE I''yu : Sen:mon' poet, ?J@M:?MN?
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/cceptance : Independence
1verybody is uni+ue. 9o not compare yourself with anybody else lest you spoil ;od8s
curriculum.
/uthorE 4aal *hem %ov
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0reativity : Independence
ollow your own weird.
/uthorE 4ig Joy Pro$ect
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Independence : Judgment : Peacema'ing


/ll mass movements ran' obedience with the highest of virtues and put it on a level with faithE
8union of minds re+uires not only a perfect accord in the one aith, but complete submission and
obedience of will to the 0hurch and the 5oman Pontiff as to ;od Bimself8. U(eo VIII, *epientiae
0hristianae. /ccording to (uther, H9isobedience is a greater sin than murder, unchastity, theft
and dishonest..H Guoted by Jerome ran', ate and reedom =2ew 3or'E *imon and *chuster,
Inc., ?@ML>, p. KN?W ,bedience is not only the first law of ;od, but also the first tenet of a
revolutionary party and of fervent nationalism.
/uthorE 1ric Boffer
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Independence : &indfulness
Imitation is often a shortcut to a solution. We copy when we lac' the inclination, the ability or
the time to wor' out an independent solution. People in a hurry will imitate more readily than
people at leisure. Bustling thus tends to produce uniformity. /nd in the deliberate fusing of
individuals into a compact group, incessant action will play a considerable role.
/uthorE 1ric Boffer
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9ecisiveness : Independence : Qnowledge


Bave the courage of your 'nowledge and e!perience. If you have formed a conclusion from the
facts and if you 'now your $udgment is sound, act on it : even though others may hesitate or
differ. 3ou are neither right nor wrong because the crowd disagrees with you. 3ou are right
because your data and reasoning are right.
/uthorE 4en$amin ;raham
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9iscernment : 1thics : Independence


4lind obedience is itself an abuse of human morality. It is a misuse of the human soul in the
name of religious commitment. It is a sin against individual conscience. It ma'es moral children
of the adults from whom moral agency is re+uired. It ma'es a vow, which is meant to re+uire
religious figures to listen always to the law of ;od, beholden first to the laws of very human
organi6ations in the person of very human authorities. It is a law that isn8t even wor'ing in the
military and can never substitute for personal morality.
/uthorE Joan 0hittister, nun
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Independence : %olerance : ,penness


/ civili6ed society is one which tolerates eccentricity to the point of doubtful sanity.
/uthorE 5obert rost, poet =?NOM:?@IJ>
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9iscernment : Independence : Integrity : Judgment


;ood men must not obey the laws too well.
/uthorE 5alph Waldo 1merson, philosopher =?NAJ:?NNK>
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Bumor : Independence
%here are few things as nausiating as pure obediance
/uthorE .n'nown
0ontributorE &air
2orth /merica
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Independence : Judgment
9epend upon yourself. &a'e your $udgment trustworthy by trusting it. 3ou can develop good
$udgment as you do the muscles of your body : by $udicious, daily e!ercise.
/uthorE ;rantland 5ice
0ontributorE Valerie%
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Independence : *'epticism
If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it8s still a foolish thing.
/uthorE 4ertrand 5ussell
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reethought
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Independence : *'epticism
%he fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence that it is not utterly absurd< indeed,
in view of the silliness of the ma$ority of man'ind, a widespread belief is more li'ely to be
foolish than sensible.
/uthorE 4ertrand 5ussell
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reethought
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0reativity : Bumor : Independence


ollow your own weird.
/uthorE James 4roughton
0ontributorE %urtle
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1thics : Independence : *'epticism


&orality is doing right, no matter what you are told. 5eligion is doing what you are told, no
matter what is right.
/uthorE .n'nown
0ontributorE *ue4
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Independence : ,penness
5estriction of free thought and free speech is the most dangerous of all subversions. It is the one
un:/merican act that could most easily defeat us.
/uthorE William ,. 9ouglas, ..*. *upreme 0ourt Justice
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Independence : ,penness : %ruth:see'ing


Preserving the right to uncensored e!pression is important not only because it is indispensable
for an ob$ective e!amination of truth claimsXit is no accident that dictatorships uniformly
suppress speechXbut also because it has intrinsic value. Buman dignity re+uires the freedom to
e!press oneself as an individual.
/uthorE 5onald /. (indsay, President, 0enter for In+uiry
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2orth /merica
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Independence
9o not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.
/uthorE 4ertrand 5ussell, philosopher, mathematician, 2obel laureate =?NOK:?@OA>
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4oldness : Independence : Integrity : %ruth:see'ing : Bonesty


What is freedom of e!pression? Without the freedom to offend, it ceases to e!ist.
/uthorE *alman 5ushdie, writer =b. ?@MO>
0ontributorE Valerie%
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4oldness : Independence : Bonesty


/dversity is the first path to truth
/uthorE (ord 4yron
0ontributorE 'yoMAJd
reethought
1urope
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Independence
We cannot live in a world that is not our own, in a world that is interpreted for us by others. /n
interpreted world is not a home. Part of the terror is to ta'e bac' our own listening, to use our
own voice, to see our own light.
/uthorE Bildegard Von 4ingen, mystic =?A@N:??O@>
0ontributorE Valerie%
0hristianity
1urope
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0reativity : ;rowth : Independence


Without deviation from the norm, "progress# is not possible.
/uthorE ran' Sappa
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airness : Independence
,nce social change begins, it cannot be reversed. 3ou cannot uneducate the person who has
learned to read. 3ou cannot humiliate the person who feels pride. 3ou cannot oppress the people
who are not afraid anymore. We have seen the future, and the future is ours.
/uthorE 0esar 0have6
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2orth /merica
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Independence
%hat so few now dare to be eccentric mar's the chief danger of the time.
/uthorE John *tuart &ill,
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1nlightenment Philosophy
1urope
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Independence : *implicity
%he price we pay for money is paid in liberty.
/uthorE 5obert (ouis *tevenson, author =?NLA:?N@M>
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1urope
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
ew people are capable of e!pressing with e+uanimity opinions which differ from the pre$udices
of their social environment. &ost people are even incapable of forming such opinions.
/uthorE /lbert 1instein
0ontributorE Valerie%
*cientific In+uiry
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0ourage : Independence : Integrity : Peacema'ing


/t the bottom of a good deal of the bravery that appears in the world there lur's a miserable
cowardice. &en will face powder and steel because they cannot face public opinion.
/uthorE 1dwin Bubbel 0hapin, minister and orator =?N?M:?NNA>
0ontributorE %urtle
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/ction : Independence
%he %hings to do areE the things that need doing, that you see need to be done, and that no one
else seems to see need to be done. %hen you will conceive your own way of doing that which
needs to be done X that no one else has told you to do or how to do it. %his will bring out the
real you that often gets buried inside a character that has ac+uired a superficial array of behaviors
induced or imposed by others on the individual.
/uthorE 4uc'minster uller
0ontributorE Jonah 9empcy
*cientific In+uiry
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Independence
It is no measure of health to be well ad$usted to a profoundly sic' society.
/uthorE J. Qrishnamurti, author, spea'er, and philosopher
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Prudence : ;rowth : Independence : &indfulness : %olerance


,f heaven and hell I have no opinion, for I have friends in both you see.
/uthorE &ar' %wain
0ontributorE Qatherine
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0ourage : Independence : %ruth:see'ing


I do not say thin' as I thin', but thin' in my way. ear no shadows, least of all in that great
spectre of personal unhappiness which binds half the world to orthodo!y.
/uthorE %homas Bu!ley
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Independence : *'epticism : %ruth:see'ing


1very great advance in natural 'nowledge has involved the absolute re$ection of authority.
/uthorE %homas Bu!ley
0ontributorE %urtle
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;rowth : Independence : ,penness


2o his mind is not for rent, to any god or government. /lways hopeful yet discontent, he 'nows
changes aren8t permanent. 4ut change is.
/uthorE 2eil Peart
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Independence
/lways stay in your own movie.
/uthorE Qen Qesey
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Independence : (ove : &indfulness


It is in deep solitude that I find the gentleness with which I can truly love my brothers. %he more
solitary I am the more affection I have for them-. *olitude and silence teach me to love my
brothers for what they are, not for what they say.
/uthorE %homas &erton, mon' and poet
0ontributorE %urtle
0hristianity
1urope
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Independence
I love people. I love my family, my children . . . but inside myself is a place where I live all alone
and that8s where you renew your springs that never dry up.
/uthorE Pearl *. 4uc'
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Independence : (ove
or there is one thing I can safely sayE that those bound by love must obey each other if they are
to 'eep company long. (ove will not be constrained by mastery< when mastery comes, the ;od
of love at once beats his wings, and farewell :: he is gone. (ove is a thing as free as any spirit<
women naturally desire liberty, and not to be constrained li'e slaves< and so do men, if I shall tell
the truth.
/uthorE ;eoffrey 0haucer
0ontributorE *ue4
1urope
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Independence : (ove
Bim that I love, I wish to be free :: even from me.
/uthorE /nne &orrow (indburgh
0ontributorE 0onnie4
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0ourage : Independence
/t the bottom of not a little of the bravery that appears in the world, there lur's a miserable
cowardice. &en will face powder and steel because they have not the courage to face public
opinion.
/uthorE 1dwin Bubbel 0hapin
0ontributorE Josh &itteldorf
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Independence : Integrity
In the world to come, I shall not be as'ed, HWhy were you not &oses?H I shall be as'ed, HWhy
were you not Susya?
/uthorE 5abbi Susya
0ontributorE Valerie%
Judaism
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;enerosity : Independence : 5esponsibility


;od will not call you to account for what is futile in your oaths, but Be will call you to account
for your deliberate oathsE for e!piation, feed then indigent persons, on a scale of the average for
the food of your families< or clothe them< or give a slave his freedom.
*acred te!tE Qoran, %he %able *pread LE@K
0ontributorE Valerie%
Islam
&iddle 1ast
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Independence : Qnowledge : Justice


2e!t in importance to freedom and $ustice is popular education, without which neither freedom
nor $ustice can be permanently maintained.
/uthorE James /. ;arfield =?NJ?:?NN?>
0ontributorE Valerie%
2orth /merica
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1thics : Independence
0ivili6ation can only revive when there shall come into being in a number of individuals a new
tone of mind, independent of the prevalent one among the crowds, and in opposition to it :: a
tone of mind which will gradually win influence over the collective one, and in the end
determine its character. ,nly an ethical movement can rescue us from barbarism, and the ethical
comes into e!istence only in individuals.
/uthorE /lbert *chweit6er
0ontributorE Valerie%
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Independence
We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who wal'ed through the huts
comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. %hey may have been few in number, but
they offer sufficient proof that everything can be ta'en from a man but one thingE the last of the
human freedoms :: to choose one8s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one8s
own way.
/uthorE Victor ran'l
0ontributorE Valerie%
Judaism
1urope
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Independence
(iberty, ta'ing the word in its concrete sense, consists in the ability to choose.
/uthorE *imone Weil
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1thics : Independence : Integrity


%oday we are engaged in a deadly global struggle for those who would intimidate, torture, and
murder people for e!ercising the most basic freedoms. If we are to win this struggle and spread
those freedoms, we must 'eep our own moral compass pointed in a true direction.
/uthorE 4arac' ,bama
0ontributorE Valerie%
2orth /merica
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/ssertiveness : Independence : 0iti6enship : Justice


When one comes to thin' of it, there are no such things as divine, immutable, or inalienable
rights. 5ights are things we get when we are strong enough to ma'e good our claim on them.
/uthorE Belen Qeller
0ontributorE Qatherine
2orth /merica
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Independence
/ person needs at intervals to separate from family and companions and go to new places. ,ne
must go without familiars in order to be open to influences, to change.
/uthorE Qatharine 4utler Bathaway
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Independence : Justice
%hose who would deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves< and, under a $ust ;od,
cannot long retain it.
/uthorE /braham (incoln
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Independence
2o man is good enough to govern another man without that other8s consent.
/uthorE /braham (incoln
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0ivic (aw
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Independence
%he greatest enemy of individual freedom is the individual himself.
/uthorE *aul /lins'y
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4alance : 0ooperation : Independence


%here are two 'inds of people who never amount to muchE those who cannot do what they are
told, and those who can do nothing else.
/uthorE 0yrus 0urtis
0ontributorE Valerie%
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0onfidence : 0ourage : Independence : Integrity : 5esponsibility : 0iti6enship


5emember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to
be one.
/uthorE 1leanor 5oosevelt
0ontributorE 4rian
2orth /merica
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Independence : Integrity : ,b$ectivity : %ruth:see'ing : 0uriosity


%he third:rate mind is only happy when it is thin'ing with the ma$ority. %he second:rate mind is
only happy when it is thin'ing with the minority. %he first:rate mind is only happy when it is
thin'ing.
/uthorE /./.&ilne
0ontributorE 4rian
1urope
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Independence : ,penness
%he combined wisdom and genius of all man'ind cannot possibly conceive of an argument
against liberty of thought.
/uthorE 5obert Ingersoll, ?NOO
0ontributorE Valerie%
Bumanism
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
Intellectual liberty UisW the right to thin' right and the right to thin' wrong. %hought is the means
by which we endeavor to arrive at truth.
/uthorE 5obert ;. Ingersoll, ?NOO
0ontributorE Valerie%
Binduism
2orth /merica
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Independence
%here may or may not be a *upreme 5uler of the universe::but we are certain that man e!ists,
and we believe that freedom is the condition of progress< that it is the sunshine of the mental and
moral world, and that without it man will go bac' to the den of savagery, and wll become the fit
associate of wild and ferocious beasts.
/uthorE 5obert Ingersoll, ?N@A
0ontributorE Valerie%
Bumanism
2orth /merica
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/ction : Independence
reedom fighters don8t always win, but they8re always right.
/uthorE &olly Ivins
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0ourage : Independence
We need people who will dare to ris' anything and everything to see things different.
/uthorE *hushobha 4arve
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0ompassion : Independence
9emocratic societies- leave much to be desired, but are certainly the most satisfactory to date.
%hey are based on freedom, talent, chance, and merit, while including a safety net for those who
have fallen off the high wire of health and success.
/uthorE (aurent ;renier
0ontributorE %urtle
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orbearance : Independence : Wisdom


/nyone who has the power to ma'e you believe absurdities has the power to ma'e you commit
in$ustices.
/uthorE Voltaire, parisE phylosopher, writer
0ontributorE Qatherine
1urope
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Independence
It is not difficult to be unconventional in the eyes of the world when your unconventionality is
but the convention of your set.
/uthorE W. *omerset &augham
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Independence
Who so would be a man must be a nonconformist.
/uthorE 5alph Waldo 1merson
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Independence : Justice
If the law is of such a nature that it re+uires you to be an agent of in$ustice to another, then I say,
brea' the law.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
0ontributorE Valerie%
1nlightenment Philosophy
2orth /merica
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Independence : %olerance
If a man does not 'eep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different
drummer. (et him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
/uthorE Benry 9avid %horeau
0ontributorE Valerie%
1nlightenment Philosophy
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Independence : %ruth:see'ing
reedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.
/uthorE ;eorge ,rwell
0ontributorE Valerie%
1urope
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Independence
Beresy is what the minority believe< it is the name given by the powerful to the doctrines of the
wea'.
/uthorE 5obert Ingersoll
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Bumanism
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Independence
It is easy to live after the world8s opinion< it is easy in solitude to live after our own< but the great
man is he who in the midst of the crowd 'eeps with perfect sweetness the independence of
solitude.
/uthorE 5alph Waldo 1merson
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Independence
/ dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.
/uthorE ;. Q. 0hesterston
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;rowth : Independence : Qnowledge : &indfulness : *'epticism


&en fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth : more than ruin : more even than death...
%hought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to
privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. %hought loo's into the pit of hell and is
not afraid. %hought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.
/uthorE 4ertrand 5ussell
0ontributorE Valerie%
Bumanism
1urope
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0reativity : Independence : Qnowledge : *'epticism


%houghts are free and sub$ect to no rule. ,n them rests the freedom of man, and they tower
above the light of nature...create a new heaven, a new firmament, a new source of energy from
which new arts flow.
/uthorE Paracelsus
0ontributorE Valerie%
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/spiration : Independence
%he point of life is not to meet society8s standards, but to e!ceed your own goals.
/uthorE &ouse/
0ontributorE &arley/
2orth /merica
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Independence : &oderation : .nity


/nd what is this liberty which must lie in the hearts of men and women? It is not the ruthless,
the unbridled will< it is not freedom to do as one li'es. %hat is the denial of liberty, and leads
straight to its overthrow. / society in which men recogni6e no chec' upon their freedom soon
becomes a society where freedom is the possession of only a savage few< as we have learned to
our sorrow. . . . %he spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right< the spirit of
liberty is the spirit which seeds to understand the minds of other men and women< the spirit of
liberty is the spirit which weights their interests alongside its own without bias< the spirit of
liberty remembers that not even a sparrow falls to earth unheeded.
/uthorE Judge (earned Band
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airness : Independence
We hold these truths to be self:evident, that all men are created e+ual, that they are endowed by
their 0reator with certain unalienable 5ights, that among these are (ife, (iberty and the pursuit
of Bappiness.:::%hat to secure these rights, ;overnments are instituted among &en, deriving
their $ust powers from the consent of the governed, :::%hat whatever any orm of ;overnment
becomes destructive of these ends, it is the 5ight of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to
institute new ;overnment, laying its foundation on such principles and organi6ing its powers in
such form, as to them shall seem most li'ely to effect their *afety and Bappiness.
/uthorE ..*. 9eclaration of Independence
0ontributorE Valerie%
0ivic (aw
2orth /merica
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Independence
%he privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.
/uthorE .n'nown
0ontributorE Valerie%
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/ssertiveness : Independence : Integrity : 0iti6enship


%he voice of protest, of warning, of appeal is never more needed than when the clamor of fife
and drum, echoed by the press and too often by the pulpit, is bidding all men fall in step and
obey in silence the tyrannous word of command. %hen, more than ever, it is the duty of the good
citi6en not to be silent.
/uthorE 0harles 1liot 2orton
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Independence : Virtue
1ven if everyone elseIs not doing good,I alone will.1ven if everyone elseis doing wrong,I alone
will not.
/uthorE 4uddha
0ontributorE &arley/
4uddhism
/sia
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0ourage : Independence
%he whole secret of e!istence is to have no fear. 2ever fear what will become of you, depend on
no one. ,nly the moment you re$ect all help are you freed.
/uthorE 4uddha
0ontributorE Su6'a
4uddhism
/sia
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9etermination : /ction : Independence : 0iti6enship


2ever doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citi6ens can change the world. Indeed,
it8s the only thing that ever has.
/uthorE &argaret &ead
0ontributorE 9arcy 5
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Independence : 5esponsibility : Prudence


%a'e the whole responsibility on your own shoulders and 'now that you are the creator of your
destiny.
/uthorE *wami Vive'ananda
0ontributorE Vedanta
Binduism
/sia
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Independence : 5esponsibility : /cceptance


/s long as we re+uire someone else to ma'e us happy, we are slaves.
/uthorE *wami Vive'ananda
0ontributorE Vedanta
Binduism
/sia
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Independence : Initiative : 5esponsibility


%he best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. 2o apologies or
e!cuses. 2o one to lean on, rely on, or blame. %he gift is yours : it is an ama6ing $ourney : and
you alone are responsible for the +uality of it. %his is the day your life really begins.
/uthorE 4ob &oawad
0ontributorE Su6'a
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4oldness : Independence : 0uriosity


9o not go where the path may lead. ;o instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
/uthorE 1merson
0ontributorE wal'inbeauty
2orth /merica
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4alance : Independence : Vision


We need to imagine a world in which every woman is the presiding genius of her own body. In
such a world women will truly create new life, bringing forth not only children =if and as we
choose> but the visions, and the thin'ing, necessary to sustain, console and alter human e!istence
Xa new relationship to the universe. *e!uality, politics, intelligence, power, motherhood, wor',
community, intimacy will develop new meanings< thin'ing itself will be transformed. %his is
where we have to begin.
/uthorE /drienne 5ich
0ontributorE /nnV
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Independence
Pin your faith to no ones sleeves, haven8t you two eyes of your own.
/uthorE %homas 0arlyle
0ontributorE 0onnie4
.n'nown
.n'nown
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Independence : *trength
%he true character of liberty is independence, maintained by force.
/uthorE Voltaire
0ontributorE Su6'a
.n'nown
1urope
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,b$ectivity : /cceptance : Independence


1ven though I had let them choose their own soc's since babyhood, I was only beginning to
learn to trust their adult $udgment.. . . I had a sensation very much li'e the moment in an airplane
when you reali6e that even if you stop holding the plane up by gripping the arms of your seat
until your 'nuc'les show white, the plane will stay up by itself. . . . %o detach myself from my
children . . . I had to achieve a condition which might be called loving ob$ectivity.
/uthorE /nonymous Parent of /dult 0hildren
0ontributorE Su6'a
2orth /merica
Permalin'

o 0urrently M.ACL *tars.

Independence
/ny power must be an enemy of man'ind which enslaves the individual by terror and force,
whether it arises under the ascist or the 0ommunist flag. /ll that is valuable in human society
depends upon the opportunity for development accorded to the individual.
;ive me the liberty to 'now, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all
liberties.
John Milton
Be that studieth revenge 'eepeth his own wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do
well.
John Milton
Be who 'ills a man 'ills a reasonable creature, but he who destroys a good boo' 'ills reason
itself.
John Milton
Be who reigns within himself and rules his passions, desires, and fears is more than a 'ing.
John Milton
2o man who 'now aught can be so stupid to deny that all men naturally were born free.
John Milton
2one can love freedom heartily, but good men< the rest love not freedom, but license.
John Milton
%he mind is its own place, and in itself can ma'e a Beaven of Bell, a Bell of Beaven.
John Milton
Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing,
many opinions< for opinions in good men is but 'nowledge in the ma'ing.
John Milton
: &ore +uotations onE U,pinionsW
Who overcomes by force hath overcome but half his foe.
John Milton
JOHN MILTON QUOTES
Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil.
JOHN MILTON, Lycidas
Yet some there be that by due steps aspire
To lay their ust hands on that golden !ey
That opes the pala"e o# $ternity.
JOHN MILTON, Comus
Long is the way
%nd hard, that out o# hell leads up to light.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
&u"h sweet "ompulsion doth in musi" lie.
JOHN MILTON, Arcades
'oo!s are not absolutely dead things, but do "ontain a poten"y o# li#e in them to be as a"ti(e as that soul
was whose progeny they are) nay they do preser(e as in a (ial the purest e##i"a"y and e*tra"tion o# that
li(ing intelle"t that bred them.
JOHN MILTON, Areopagitica
None "an lo(e #reedom heartily, but good men) the rest lo(e not #reedom, but li"en"e.
JOHN MILTON, Tenure of Kings and Magistrates
The mind is its own pla"e, and in itsel#
+an ma!e a hea(en o# Hell, a hell o# Hea(en.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Lo(e,-uarrels o#t in pleasing "on"ord end.
JOHN MILTON, Samson Agonistes
.irtue may be assailed, but ne(er hurt,
&urprised by unust #or"e, but not enthralled.
JOHN MILTON, Comus
O thie(ish Night,
/hy shouldst thou, but #or some #elonious end,
In thy dar! lantern thus "lose up the stars,
That nature hung in hea(en, and #illed their lamps
/ith e(erlasting oil, to gi(e due light
To the misled and lonely tra(eller0
JOHN MILTON, Comus
1ea"e hath her (i"tories
No less renowned than war.
JOHN MILTON, To the Lord General Cromwell, May 1!"
'eauty is Nature2s "oin, must not be hoarded,
'ut must be "urrent, and the good thereo#
+onsists in mutual and parta!en bliss.
JOHN MILTON, Comus
For neither man nor angel "an dis"ern
Hypo"risy, the only e(il that wal!s
In(isible, e*"ept to 3od alone.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
/ho o(er"omes
'y #or"e, hath o(er"ome but hal# his #oe.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
O#ttimes nothing pro#its more
Than sel#,esteem, grounded on ust and right
/ell managed.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Millions o# spiritual "reatures wal! the earth
4nseen, both when we wa!e, and when we sleep.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Hail wedded lo(e, mysterious law, true sour"e
O# human o##spring, sole propriety,
In 1aradise o# all things "ommon else.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
The ora"les are dumb,
No (oi"e or hideous hum
5uns through the ar"hed roo# in words de"ei(ing.
%pollo #rom his shrine
+an no more di(ine,
/ith hollow shrie! the steep o# 6elphos lea(ing.
No nightly tran"e or breath7d spell,
Inspires the pale,eyed priest #rom the propheti" "ell.
JOHN MILTON, #ymn
&weet is the breath o# morn, her rising sweet,
/ith "harm o# earliest birds.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
% good boo! is the pre"ious li#e,blood o# a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a li#e
beyond li#e.
JOHN MILTON, Areopagitica
3ood, the more
+ommuni"ated, more abundant grows.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Though all the winds o# do"trine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the #ield, we do
inuriously by li"ensing and prohibiting to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple) who e(er
!new Truth put to the worse, in a #ree and open en"ounter.
JOHN MILTON, Areopagitica
/hat i# earth
'e but the shadow o# Hea(en, and things therein
$a"h to other li!e, more than on earth is thought0
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
%ll heart they li(e, all head, all eye, all ear,
%ll intelle"t, all sense, and as they please
They limb themsel(es, and "olour, shape, or si8e,
%ssume, as li!es them best, "ondense or rare.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Towered "ities please us then,
%nd the busy hum o# men.
JOHN MILTON, L$Allegro
I will point ye out the right path o# a (irtuous and noble $du"ation) laborious indeed at #irst as"ent, but else
so smooth, so green, so #ull o# goodly prospe"t, and melodious sounds on e(ery side, that the harp o#
Orpheus was not more "harming.
JOHN MILTON, %f &ducation
For what "an war but endless war still breed0
JOHN MILTON, %n the Lord General 'airfa(
5e(enge, at #irst though sweet,
'itter ere long ba"! on itsel# re"oils.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
/here there is mu"h desire to learn, there o# ne"essity will be mu"h arguing, mu"h writing, many opinions)
#or opinion in good men is but !nowledge in the ma!ing.
JOHN MILTON, Areopagitica
Yet beauty, though inurious, hath strange power,
%#ter o##en"e returning, to regain
Lo(e on"e possess2d.
JOHN MILTON, Samson Agonistes
3o in thy nati(e inno"en"e, rely
On what thou hast o# (irtue, summon all,
For 3od towards thee hath done his part, do thine.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
The #irst and wisest o# them all pro#essed
To !now this only, that he nothing !new.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise )egained
4nder his #orming hands a "reature grew,
Man,li!e, but di##erent se*) so lo(ely #air
That what seemed #air in all the world, seemed now
Mean, or in her summed up, in her "ontained,
%nd in her loo!s) whi"h #rom that time in#us2d
&weetness into my heart, un#elt be#ore,
%nd into all things #rom her air inspir2d
The spirit o# lo(e and amorous delight.
&he disappear2d, and le#t me dar!) I wa!2d
To #ind her, or #or her e(er to deplore
Her loss, and other pleasures abure9
/hen out o# hope, behold her, not #ar o##,
&u"h as I saw her in my dream, adorn2d
/ith what all $arth or Hea(en "ould bestow
To ma!e her amiable9 On she "ame,
Led by her Hea(enly Ma!er, though unseen,
%nd guided by his (oi"e) nor unin#orm2d
O# nuptial san"tity, and marriage rites9
3ra"e was in her steps, hea(en in her eye,
In e(ery gesture dignity and lo(e.
Let none admire
That ri"hes grow in Hell) that soil may best
6eser(e the pre"ious bane.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Thou O &pirit, that dost pre#er
'e#ore all Temples th2 upright heart and pure,
Instru"t me, #or Thou !now2st) Thou #rom the #irst
/ast present, and with mighty wings outspread
6o(e,li!e satst brooding on the (ast %byss
%nd mad2st it pregnant9 /hat is in me dar!
Illumine, what is low raise and support)
That to the heighth o# this great %rgument
I may assert $ternal 1ro(iden"e,
%nd usti#y the ways o# 3od to men.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
/ho #irst sedu"ed them to that #oul re(olt0
Th2 in#ernal &erpent) he it was whose guile,
&tirred up with en(y and re(enge, de"ei(ed
The mother o# man!ind, what time his pride
Had "ast him out #rom Hea(en, with all his host
O# rebel %ngels, by whose aid, aspiring
To set himsel# in glory abo(e his peers,
He trusted to ha(e e-ualled the Most High,
I# he opposed, and with ambitious aim
%gainst the throne and monar"hy o# 3od,
5aised impious war in Hea(en and battle proud,
/ith (ain attempt. Him the %lmighty 1ower
Hurled headlong #laming #rom th2 ethereal s!y,
/ith hideous ruin and "ombustion, down
To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
In adamantine "hains and penal #ire,
/ho durst de#y th2 Omnipotent to arms.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
'etter to reign in Hell, then ser(e in Hea(2n.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
This horror will grow mild, this dar!ness light)
'esides what hope the ne(er,ending #light
O# #uture days may bring, what "han"e, what "hange
/orth waiting,,sin"e our present lot appears
For happy though but ill, #or ill not worst,
I# we pro"ure not to oursel(es more woe.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Men only disagree
O# +reatures rational, though under hope
O# hea(enly 3ra"e) and 3od pro"laiming pea"e,
Yet li(e in hatred, enmity, and stri#e
%mong themsel(es, and le(y "ruel wars,
/asting the $arth, ea"h other to destroy9
%s i# :whi"h might indu"e us to a""ord;
Man had not hellish #oes enough besides,
That day and night #or his destru"tion wait.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
% dungeon horrible, on all sides round,
%s one great #urna"e #lamed) yet #rom those #lames
No light) but rather dar!ness (isible
&er(ed only to dis"o(er sights o# woe,
5egions o# sorrow, dole#ul shades, where pea"e
%nd rest "an ne(er dwell, hope ne(er "omes
That "omes to all, but torture without end
&till urges, and a #iery deluge, #ed
/ith e(er,burning sulphur un"onsumed.
&u"h pla"e $ternal Justi"e has prepared
For those rebellious) here their prison ordained
In utter dar!ness, and their portion set,
%s #ar remo(ed #rom 3od and light o# Hea(en
%s #rom the "entre thri"e to th2 utmost pole.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
I will pla"e within them as a guide
My umpire +ons"ien"e, whom i# they will hear,
Light a#ter light well us2d they shall attain,
%nd to the end persisting, sa#e arri(e.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Hea(2nly lo(e shall outdo Hellish hate.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
&o little !nows
%ny, but 3od alone, but per(erts best things
To worst abuse, or to their meanest use.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Man hath his daily wor! o# body or mind
%ppointed, whi"h de"lares his dignity,
%nd the regard o# Hea(2n on all his ways)
/hile other animals una"ti(e range,
%nd o# their doings 3od ta!es no a""ount.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Night bids us rest.
JOHN MILTON, 1aradise Lost
<nowledge #orbidden0
&uspi"ious, reasonless. /hy should their Lord
$n(y them that0 +an it be sin to !now,
+an it be death0 %nd do they only stand
'y ignoran"e0 Is that their happy state,
The proo# o# their obedien"e and their #aith0
O #air #oundation laid whereon to build
Their ruin=
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
That thou art happy, owe to 3od)
That thou "ontinu2st su"h, owe to thy sel#,
That is, to thy obedien"e) therein stand.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
These are thy glorious wor!s 1arent o# 3ood,
%lmighty, thine this uni(ersal Frame,
Thus wondrous #air) thy sel# how wondrous then=
4nspea!able, who sitst abo(e these Hea(ens
To us in(isible or dimly seen
In these thy lowest wor!s, yet these de"lare
Thy goodness beyond thought, and 1ower 6i(ine9
&pea! ye who best "an tell, ye &ons o# light,
%ngels, #or ye behold him, and with songs
%nd "horal symphonies, 6ay without Night,
+ir"le his Throne reoi"ing, ye in Hea(2n,
On $arth oin all ye +reatures to e*toll
Him #irst, him last, him midst, and without end.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
%nd some are #all2n, to disobedien"e #all2n,
%nd so #rom Hea(2n to deepest Hell) O #all
From what high state o# bliss into what woe=
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Hail uni(ersal Lord, be bounteous still
To gi(e us only good) and i# the night
Ha(e gathered aught o# e(il or "on"ealed,
6isperse it, as now light dispels the dar!.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Hypo"risy, the only e(il that wal!s
In(isible, e*"ept to 3od alone.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Time, though in $ternity, applied
To motion, measures all things durable
'y present, past, and #uture.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
%ll who ha(e their reward on $arth, the #ruits
O# pain#ul superstition and blind 8eal,
Naught see!ing but the praise o# men, here #ind
Fit retribution, empty as their deeds.
JOHN MILTON, Paradise Lost
Anda tu camino sin ayuda del vecino
%he mind is its own place and in itself, can ma'e a Beaven of Bell, a Bell of Beaven.
John &ilton
&ind, Bell, Place
;ratitude bestows reverence, allowing us to encounter everyday epiphanies, those transcendent
moments of awe that change forever how we e!perience life and the world.
John &ilton
(ife, 0hange, 1!perience
Be who reigns within himself and rules passions, desires, and fears is more than a 'ing.
John &ilton
Bimself, Within, 5ules
0onfusion heard his voice, and wild uproar *tood ruled, stood vast infinitude confined< %ill at his
second bidding dar'ness fled, (ight shone, and order from disorder sprung.
John &ilton
0onfusion, (ight, 9ar'ness
4etter to reign in hell than serve in heaven.
John &ilton
Bell, Beaven, *erve
Be that has light within his own clear breast &ay sit in the centre, and en$oy bright dayE 4ut he
that hides a dar' soul and foul thoughts 4enighted wal's under the mid:day sun< Bimself his
own dungeon.
John &ilton
&ay, 1n$oy, %houghts
Be that studieth revenge 'eepeth his own wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do
well.
John &ilton
5evenge, ;reen, Wounds
2one can love freedom heartily, but good men< the rest love not freedom, but licence.
John &ilton
(ove, ;ood, &en
;ive me the liberty to 'now, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all
liberties.
John &ilton
;ive, (iberty, 0onscience
9eath is the golden 'ey that opens the palace of eternity.
John &ilton
9eath, Qey, ;olden
%o be blind is not miserable< not to be able to bear blindness, that is miserable.
John &ilton
/ble, &iserable, 4lind
When complaints are freely heard, deeply considered and speedily reformed, then is the utmost
bound of civil liberty attained that wise men loo' for.
John &ilton
&en, Wise, (iberty
or what can war, but endless war, still breed?
John &ilton
War, 1ndless, 4reed
%he stars, that nature hung in heaven, and filled their lamps with everlasting oil, give due light to
the misled and lonely traveller.
John &ilton
2ature, (onely, ;ive
/ good boo' is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit.
John &ilton
;ood, 4oo', *pirit
%he superior man ac+uaints himself with many sayings of anti+uity and many deeds of the past,
in order to strengthen his character thereby.
John &ilton
0haracter, Past, Bimself
2o man who 'nows aught, can be so stupid to deny that all men naturally were born free.
John &ilton
&en, *tupid, ree
2othing profits more than self:esteem, grounded on what is $ust and right.
John &ilton
Profits, ;rounded
%ruth never comes into the world but li'e a bastard, to the ignominy of him that brought her
birth.
John &ilton
%ruth, Bim, Ber
4eauty is nature8s brag, and must be shown in courts, at feasts, and high solemnities, where most
may wonder at the wor'manship.
John &ilton
4eauty, 2ature, &ay
(ove:+uarrels oft in pleasing concord end.
John &ilton
1nd, Pleasing, 0oncord
%hey also serve who only stand and wait.
John &ilton
Wait, *tand, *erve
Who 'ills a man 'ills a reasonable creature, ;od8s image, but thee who destroys a good boo',
'ills reason its self.
John &ilton
;ood, ;od, 4oo'
Who overcomes by force, hath overcome but half his foe.
John &ilton
Balf, orce, ,vercome
9eep:versed in boo's and shallow in himself.
John &ilton