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Interrupt transfers &

Isochronous transfers in Isochronous transfers in


USB 2.0 & USB 3.0
Group Members
Mehwish Awan
Mehwish Kiran
Agenda
What is isochronous transfer?
Use of isochronous transfer
Format of isochronous transactions
Comparison of transfer in USB 2.0 & USB 3.0
Data Format Data Format
Transfer Direction
Service Period
Bandwidth Allocation
Transfer Packet Size
Power Management
Summary
Agenda
What is interrupt transfer?
Principal Use
Handshake Phase
Format of Interrupt Transactions Format of Interrupt Transactions
Characteristics of interrupt transfer
Comparison of transfer in USB 2.0 & USB 3.0
Data Format
Transfer Direction
Maximum Latency
Bandwidth Allocation
Packet Size
Transfer Completion
Isochronous Transfers
Synchronous connection with other devices
Timeliness is more important than accurate delivery of
data
Occur at fixed intervals
Special priority during execution of each frame Special priority during execution of each frame
Guaranteed access to USB bandwidth
Guaranteed constant data rate
No Handshake Phase
No retrying attempts in case of delivery failure
Principal Use
Typically contain time sensitive information,
such as an audio or video stream
e.g. microphone, speaker, CD audio etc.
Format of Isochronous IN & OUT
Transaction
Data Format
USB imposes no data content structure on
communication flows for isochronous pipes
Streaming pipe Streaming pipe
Transfer Direction
Isochronous pipes are unidirectional pipes
Endpoint descriptor defines the direction of data
flow flow
Two endpoints are required for data transfer in
both directions
This feature is same for USB 2.0 and USB 3.0
Service Period
Isochronous transfers is scheduled to be
performed regularly during the service period
In USB 2.0, service interval is
1 ms for Full Speed endpoints 1 ms for Full Speed endpoints
125s for High Speed endpoints
Isochronous transfers does not support Low
Speed endpoints
In USB 3.0, service interval for isochronous
transfer is 125 s
Bandwidth Allocation
Isochronous transfers along with interrupt
transfers can be allocated up to 80% of total
bandwidth on SuperSpeed
USB 2.0 requires maximum 90% of total
available bandwidth for Full Speed endpoints
and maximum 80% of total bandwidth for
High Speed endpoints
Packet Size
In USB 2.0, maximum data payload is 1023
bytes during each frame for Full Speed
endpoints and 1024 bytes for High Speed
endpoints endpoints
Maximum data payload size is 1024 bytes
during each frame for SuperSpeed
Power Management
USB 2.0 does not support low power USB bus
state b/w service intervals for isochronous
transfers
SuperSpeed allows isochronous devices to
autonomously enter low power link states b/w
service intervals. It defines a PING &
PING_RESPONSE mechanism to activate the
low power link
Summary
USB 3.0 Protocol preserves key characteristics of USB
2.0 Isochronous Protocol i.e., no Retries, Simple
protocol
PING mechanism to allow Low Power Link States for PING mechanism to allow Low Power Link States for
isochronous devices
Software Backward Compatibility
Maximum data transferred in 1 service interval is
increased to 48K bytes
Interrupt Transfers
Interrupt transfers are small data transfers
used to communicate information from the
USB device to the client software.
Principal Use
HID such as mouse, keyboard, joysticks etc.
All data transfer requests are initiated by host
instead of interrupt requests from input
device
Host polls the input device periodically
Handshake Phase
ACK (acknowledgment)
Sent by the host in IN Transactions and by the
device in OUT Transactions on successful
reception of data reception of data
NAK(negative acknowledgment)
Sent by the device only when it is busy or has
no data to send
Handshake Phase
Only device sends the STALL
STALL can be due to
Unsupported Control Transfer Request Unsupported Control Transfer Request
Control request Failed
Endpoint Failed
Format of an Interrupt IN & OUT
transaction
Characteristics of Interrupt Transfers
High reliability to communicate is required
Guaranteed maximum service interval
Guaranteed retry of transfer attempts in next service
interval interval
Guaranteed bandwidth in each service interval
Host waits for ready notification to service the endpoint
Handshake Phase exists
Data Format
In both USB 2.0 and USB 3.0, no data content
structure is imposed on communication flow
for interrupt pipes
Streaming pipes
Transfer Direction
Interrupt pipes are unidirectional pipes
Endpoint descriptor defines the direction of data
flow flow
Two endpoints are required for data transfer in
both directions
This feature is same for USB 2.0 and USB 3.0
Maximum Latency
Endpoint descriptor specifies the latency or polling
interval.
For Low Speed devices, the maximum latency varies
from 10 ms to 255 ms
For Full Speed interrupt transfers, the maximum
latency varies from 1 ms to 255 ms
For High Speed devices, the maximum latency varies
from 125 s to 4 sec
Bandwidth Allocation
In USB 2.0, interrupt transfers & Isochronous
transfers can use up to 90% of the total
available bandwidth
Isochronous & Interrupt transfers can use up
to 80% of the total available bandwidth on
SuperSpeed
Packet Size
Endpoint specifies the maximum data payload size
In USB 2.0, data payload size is
8 bytes or less for Low Speed Devices
64 bytes or less for Full Speed Devices 64 bytes or less for Full Speed Devices
1024 bytes for High Speed Devices
In USB 3.0, maximum data payload size is 1024 bytes
No data padding in case of less data
Packet Size (contd)
Host ensures that data payload size of any
packet is not greater than endpoints
maximum data packet size! maximum data packet size!
Transfer Completion
Interrupt transfer is completed when
Has transferred the exact amount of data
expected
Transfers a packet with a payload less Transfers a packet with a payload less
than the maximum packet size
Responds with a STALL handshake
Questions ?? Questions ??