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TI 34P02K25-01E
STARDOM
Network Configuration Guide
TI 34P02K25-01E
3rd Edition Apr. 2006



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All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2002, Yokogawa Electric Corporation TI 34P02K25-01E Apr.20, 2006-00

Introduction
About This Document
STARDOM system consists of autonomous controller FCNs/FCJs, field devices, VDS,
HMI clients, and network devices, from which a user can select the optimum
configuration.
Components of STARDOM (FCN/FCJ, VDS, and HMI clients), with highly independent
functions, are acquired through open technologies, allowing flexible configurations of
devices.
This document explains basic information needed for constructing networks of
STARDOM system and detailed setting procedures along with specific cases.
Organization of This Document
Devices Overview
This chapter explains the devices that configure STARDOM system.
STARDOM Network Functions
This chapter explains basic network functions of STARDOM system.
Examples of Network Configurations
This chapter explains setting procedures of the system through specific cases of
network configurations.




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CONTENTS
Introduction................................................................................................i
1. Devices Overview.............................................................................1
1.1 STARDOM Network Overview................................................................... 1
1.2 Autonomous Controller FCN/FCJ............................................................. 4
1.3 VDS.............................................................................................................. 8
1.4 Network Devices....................................................................................... 10
1.5 Communication Protocols....................................................................... 17
2. Network Features of STARDOM....................................................19
2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations........................................................... 19
2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings) ................................. 24
2.3 Communication Performances............................................................... 33
2.4 Security ..................................................................................................... 43
2.5 Network Functions of FCN/FCJ.............................................................. 44
2.6 Duplexing Control Network..................................................................... 49
2.7 Cautions for Network Configuration...................................................... 62
3. Examples of Network Configurations...........................................63
3.1 Small Two-layered System (Standard) ................................................... 63
3.2 Small One-layered System...................................................................... 65
3.3 Medium Scale Two-layered System........................................................ 66
3.4 Installing Controllers in a Field as Standalone ..................................... 68
3.5 Connecting Simple HMI to Standalone Controller in a Field ............... 70
3.6 Connecting Routers to Control Networks ............................................. 73
3.7 Connecting Several Control Networks to VDS...................................... 75
3.8 Duplexing Networks................................................................................. 76
3.9 Connecting Devices (e.g.PLCs) Other than FCN/FCJ to VDS ............ 79
3.10 Connecting PLC to FCN/FCJ................................................................... 81
3.11 Operation with Remote HMI .................................................................... 85
3.12 Send Mails to/Receive Mails from VDS and FCN/FCJ ......................... 87
3.13 Monitoring and Maintaining FCN/FCJ Remotely................................... 89
3.14 Setting FCN/FCJ and VDS Remotely...................................................... 92
3.15 Connecting FCN/FCJ and VDS via WAN................................................ 93
3.16 Connecting Remote Devices to Duplexed Control Network............... 95
3.17 Synchronizing Times among Nodes ...................................................... 97

STARDOM
Network Configuration Guide
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3.18 Using Hand-held Devices in a Field ..................................................... 103
3.19 Connecting Remote Sites Using Wireless Devices............................ 105
3.20 Connecting to Existing ASTMAC.......................................................... 107
Revision Information.................................................................................i

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1. Devices Overview
This chapter explains the devices you need to take into consideration when
constructing STARDOM system networks.

1.1 STARDOM Network Overview
This section explains an example of basic network configuration of STARDOM
system.

STARDOM system consists of the following hardware:
Table Devices of STARDOM
Devices Contents
Controller FCN/FCJ, PLC, etc.
Data server VDS
HMI Devices with Web browser
Network device Hub, router, etc.
Field device Sensor, valve, contact I/O device, etc.



FCN FCJ
Control Network
PLC
VDS
Data Server
HMI
VDS
HMI Server
HMI
Firewall Router
Control System Information Network
Configuration
PC
Field
Device
Field Network
Information
Network
Wide Area
Network
HMI
HMI
Firewall Router
Field
Device

Figure Basic Network Configuration
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Control Network
A control network is a Local Area Network (LAN) that connects controller devices such
as autonomous controller FCNs/FCJs or PLCs, and VDS data servers. The reliability
and real-time operation are required by this type of network that performs critical
communications continuously over the network.
Field Network
A field network is a small and slow network connecting FCNs/FCJs and intelligent filed
devices or remote I/O devices. Typical examples are FF-H1, PROFIBUS, DEVICENET
and Ethernet.
FCNs/FCJs support FF-H1 and Ethernet in R1.11 and later.
Control System Information Network
A control system information network is a LAN that connects VDS data servers, VDS
HMI servers (commonly exist on the same PC with VDS data server) and HMI clients.
On a small system, the level of control system information network can be submitted by
connecting VDS HMI servers and HMI clients to control networks.
Information Network (Intranet)
An information network is a backbone of intra-company information system LAN.
Wide Area Network (WAN, Internet)
A WAN is a network that spans geographically dispersed area, such as public line or
internet; a variety of network are available through public switched phone networks,
leased lines, satellites, IP networks, etc.
FCN
An FCN is a controller of the module mount type that is connected to control networks,
with highly reliable features, allowing to duplex the control network, CPU, power supply
and internal bus for connecting I/O module.
FCJ
An FCJ is a small controller of the all-in-one type STARDOM that is connected to control
networks, and can be installed in devices at sites. It is possible to duplex control
networks. FCJ cannot be enhanced with I/O modules since it has a built-in I/O interface.
In addition, it cannot duplex the CPU, power supply and internal bus for connecting I/O
module. Other functions are same with FCN.
Field Devices (supporting field networks)
These are intelligent field devices supporting field networks. These devices support FF-
H1 and Ethernet.
PLC
Other suppliers' PLCs supporting Ethernet communication can be connected to control
networks.
VDS Data Server
A VDS data server acquires control data from controllers on control networks, providing
upper computer such as VDS HMI servers with abstracted data.
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VDS HMI Server
A PC equipped with Web-based HMI server functions. Normally, HMI servers and data
servers run on the same PC. On some large scale systems, they can run on separate
PCs.
HMI (HMI Client)
An HMI is a Web-based HMI client device that provides operation and monitoring
windows. A PC equipped with Internet Explorer and Java VM (Virtual Machine) is used.
Configuration PC
A configuration PC is a PC that creates and downloads control logics of FCN/FCJ or
field devices, and configures devices. You use this PC with installing configuration tools,
to connect to control networks when starting up the system. You can install configuration
tools on a PC on which VDS runs, to reduce the number of PCs. The configurations
other than the basic network settings (IP addresses) of FCN/FCJ can be made from
remote PCs connected via routers.
Table Main Configuration Tools
Tools Contents
Resource Configurator Configurations of FCN/FCJ
Logic Designer FCN/FCJ control logic design and download
Web browser Advanced configurations of FCN/FCJ
Graphic Designer Design of HMI operation and monitoring windows
Network Devices (Hub, Router, etc.)
Components are connected to a hub, composing a star topology. When configuring
separate network domains or connecting remote sites, you should construct networks
via routers or firewalls. You need to choose the optimum devices according to the
conditions of infrastructures in your area.

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1.2 Autonomous Controller FCN/FCJ
This chapter explains network interfaces of the autonomous controller FCN/FCJ.

FCN/FCJ has two Ethernet network interfaces. Each interface has the number (1 or 2),
and the label with the corresponding MAC address.
If you do not duplex the control network, use only network interface1. Alternatively, they
can be used as two separated networks.
Each port is 10/100 Mbps, supporting full-duplex and auto negotiation functions.
FCN
The following figure shows an outside drawing of FCN with maximum configuration.
Control Unit
Extension Unit1
Extension Unit2
Power Module
CPU Module
SB Bus Repeat Module
T Splitters
SB Bus Cable
Base Module

Figure Outside Drawing of FCN
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The network interface of FCN is installed on the front of the CPU module.
Display LED from left
RDY : Control program
CTRL : Control Right
Reset Switch
Network Interface 1
Serial Port
Shutdown Switch
System Card Eject Button
System Card
MAC Address
Communication Status LED from top
LINK : Normal HUB connection status
ACT : Send/Receive status
Network Interface 2

Figure CPU Module of FCN
Two network interfaces are installed; the above is 2 and the below is 1. Each MAC
address is written on the side of the CPU module. The upper line indicates the MAC
address of network interface1; the lower line is the MAC address of interface2.
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FCJ
****
****
***
Pressure Clamp Terminal
for Analog Input
FOUNDATION
Fieldbus (H1)
Signal Connection
Operating Status Display LED
HRDY : Normal hardware status
RDY : Normal system status
CTL : Normal control operation status
Pressure Clamp Terminal
for Digital Input
Pressure Clamp Terminal
for Digital Output
Pressure Clamp Terminal
for Analog Output

Figure Front Elevation of FCJ
Serial Port 2
COM2
Reset
Switch
System Card
Shutdown Switch
Network Interface
(upper:2, lower:1)
RJ45 Modular Connector
Communication Status LED
LINK : Normal HUB connection status
ACT : Send/Receive status
Pressure Clamp
Terminal
for Power Supply
Serial Port 1
COM1

Figure Side View of FCJ from the Right
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Two network interfaces are installed; the above is 2 and the below is 1. Each MAC
address is written on the side of the CPU module. The upper line indicates the MAC
address of network interface1; the lower line is the MAC address of interface2.
Devices that can be connected to FCN/FCJ
The following devices can be connected. For communications on control applications,
communication application portfolios corresponding to each device are required.
Table Devices that can be connected to FCN/FCJ
Types Devices Interfaces
Yokogawa Electric FA-M3 series Ethernet, RS-232-C
PLC
Mitsubishi Electric MELSEC series Ethernet
Omron SYSMAC series RS-232-C, RS-422/RS-485
Power Monitor Yokogawa Electric power monitor RS-485
Temperature Controller Yokogawa Electric Green series RS-422/RS-485
Programmable Display Digital Co. GP-77 series TypeR, GP2000 series RS-232-C
Others Devices supporting MODBUS Ethernet, RS-232-C

For the detailed information on connecting devices, refer to instruction manuals or
technical information published separately.

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1.3 VDS
This section explains the network interfaces of VDS.

The network interface cards used on a PC on which VDS is implemented, can be
general-purpose ones supporting Fast Ethernet.
STARDOM realizes duplexed control networks by software; therefore, it is not required
that you use the same suppliers' network cards for both of them.
TIP
Some suppliers' network adapters provide duplexed networks by themselves with two identical network
adapters mounted. However, you cannot use the supplier-provided duplex function for STARDOM
control network.

Network Adapter Track Usage Records
The following adapters were used for inspections of our products.
Table Track Usage Records of Network Adapters
Suppliers Adapters Models
3Com Fast EthernetLink XL PCI10-100 3C905B-J-TX
Intel EtherExpress Pro/100 Management PILA8460C3J

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Devices that can be Connected to VDS Data Server
The following devices can be connected to VDS Data server.
Table Devices that can be Connected to Data Server
Types Devices Interfaces Remarks
Yokogawa Electric FA-M3 series Ethernet, RS-232-C Standard
Mitsubishi Electric MELSEC series

Ethernet, Serial, MELSECNET
II/
10/H, CC-Link, etc.
Supporting Mitsubishi
Electric middleware,
"EZSocket"
Omron SYSMAC series
(CPU unit:C/CV/CS1/FinsGateWay unit)
Ethernet, Serial, ControllerLink,
SYSMACLINK, etc.
Supporting Omron
middleware,
"FinsGateWay"
Fuji Electric MICREX-F RS-232-C OPC server connection(*1)
Hitachi HIDEC-S10/2 Ethernet OPC server connection(*1)
Sharp JW series Ethernet, RS-232-C OPC server connection(*1)
Matsushita Electric Works MEWNET-FP Ethernet, RS-232-C OPC server connection(*1)
KEYENCE KZ-A300/KZ-A500 RS-232-C OPC server connection(*1)
AB SLC series Ethernet OPC server connection(*1)
PLC
Siemens SIMATIC series Ethernet OPC server connection(*1)
Programmable
Display
Digital GP-77 series TypeR, GP2000 series Ethernet
Digital middleware, "Pro
Server" is required
Power monitor
Yokogawa Electric power monitor
UZ005,PR201,UPM01/UPM02/UPM03/UPM10
0
RS-485
Thermometer Yokogawa Electric Green series RS-422/RS-485
Connected through FA-FM
driver
Data
acquisition
Yokogawa Electric DARWIN series (DA100) Ethernet
Recorder
Yokogawa Electric DAQSTATION
(DX100/DX200/DX100P/DX200P)
Ethernet
Others Options Options Created using VB

*1: can be connected using an OPC server communication package.

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1.4 Network Devices
Use hubs or routers to connect controllers and VDSs. Generally, there are two
types of hubs: repeater hub and switching hub. Choose the optimum according to
the feature of network, with consideration especially given to the performance
and the wiring distance.
Hubs and Routers
Repeater Hub
The hub has the repeater function to connect two or more cables such as 10BASE-T or
100BASE-TX. The repeater function is to relay transmission signals; it performs
waveform shaping to the signal received from one segment, amplifying it to the given
level to send to all other segments. This type of hub is used for connecting different
media segments each other, lengthening the distance of the same segments or
supporting the increase of the connecting nodes. On STARDOM, use a hub supporting
Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) or a Dual Speed hub (supporting both 10 Mbps and 100
Mbps) or a hub supporting 10 Mbps only. There is another type of repeater hub, so-
called intelligent hub that includes network management functions, although it is more
expensive than usual repeater hubs. By using this feature, the user can monitor the
status of the network or pin down the source of failures of the network remotely.
Switching Hub
A switching hub has bridging features, enabling to store a received packet in the buffer,
analyzing the destination address, and then forwarding it to the necessary port. Unlike
repeater hubs, switching hubs do not relay frames to all segments, which enables to
distribute loads of the network. In addition, some switching hubs have other varieties of
features including the auto-negotiation, optical interface, 1 Gbps Ethernet interface,
VALN, SNMP, STP, port mirroring, and Layer 3 switch.
Router
A router is a network device to transmit packets over networks based on the information
of network layers. Routers have a function to route communication frames. Routers are
used for connections between network domains or connections to WAN or other media.
Recently, the routers with multi-functions such as security functions, firewall, and
redundant network functions are generally used.
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Main Functions of Network Devices
This subsection explains the main functions and features of network devices for
reference purposes to choose the optimum network device.
Full-Duplex
Full-duplex enables the transmission of data in two directions simultaneously (send and
receive), avoiding the collision of the two. With Fast Ethernet, 200 Mbps bandwidth is
enabled.
Auto Negotiation
The auto negotiation is a function to confirm the communication method to be employed
between two ports connected to cables, through FLB Bursts signals. The selection
between interfaces with different speeds (10 Mbps or 100 Mbps) or between different
communication modes (half-duplex or full-duplex) is automatically performed. The
communications between two devices should be one of the following combinations of
communication speeds and communication modes.
Table Combinations of Communication Speeds and Communication Modes
10M Half 10M Full 100M Half 100M Full Auto
10M Half X - - - X
10M Full - X - - -
100M Half - - X - X
100M Full - - - X -
Auto X - X - X

X: Possible
-: Impossible

FCN/FCJ supports the auto negotiation features. Therefore, specify auto negotiation
(recommended), 100 Mbps Half Duplex or 10 Mbps Half Duplex for a target connecting
device of FCN/FCJ.
Supporting 1 Gbps
A switching hub with a port which supports data transfer rates of 1 gigabit per second. It
is effective to use this hub for high-speed link between switches or between a switch
and a server or to a backbone. 1000BASE-X, standardized in IEEE802.3z and
1000BASE-T, standardized in IEEE802.3ab are provided. For detailed specification,
refer to the corresponding standards.
VLAN
VLAN is a function to divide a LAN logically within a switch. It imposes restrictions on
the scope of forwarding broadcast packets, and divides logical groups, in which
communications are established, enabling to construct a network so that each group
may be connected to the separate switches. VLAN also realizes highly efficient network
through the function to forward broadcast packets only within the same VLAN.
SNMP
SNTP is a switching hub with SNMP features to mange a network. SNMP is effective for
monitoring networks or tracking down the source of failures remotely.
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Layer3 Switch
Layer3 switch is a switching hub with routing functions implemented in the hardware.
Faster routing operations and relatively reasonable prices than usual routers are
attained in this switching hub.

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Track Usage Record of Network Devices
Track Usage Record of Hubs
The following products were used for labo test of STARDOM.
Table Track Usage Record of Hubs
Manufacturers Product names/type names Remarks
Cisco Catalyst2912/24 XL-EN Switching hub with management features
Cisco Catalyst2950-24 Switching hub with management features
3Com SuperStack 3 Switch 3300SM 3C16985 Switching hub with management features
3Com Office connect Dual Speed Hub 8 Dual speed hub
Allied Telesis CentreCOM FS708XL Switching hub
Allied Telesis CentreCOM FS708EXL Switching hub
HP ProCurve Switch 2512/2524 Switching hub,0-55 C
TIP
It takes several tens of seconds for switching hubs with management features to start a packet relay
operation, because the initialization processing is generally carried out after they are turned on.
Therefore, if an FCN with duplexed CPUs is connected to such a switching hub and if the FCN and
the switching hub are turned on simultaneously, the APC (All Program Copy) processing may fail
when the FCN is turned on. In this case, turn on the switching hub first. After the initialization
processing of the switching hub is finished, turn on the FCN.
By default, the spanning tree protocol (a function to automatically set usual routes or routes when
making detours in networks with multiple routes) is configured to Ciscos switching hubs. In this
case, hubs do not forward data to relevant ports for about 30 seconds after devices connected to
the hubs were turned on. In order to avoid this problem, cancel the configuration for using the
spanning tree protocol.

Track Usage Record of Routers
The following products were used for labo test of STARDOM.
Table Track Usage Record of Routers
Manufacturers Product names/type names Remarks
YAMAHA RT140f VPN, firewall features
Allied Telesis CentreCOM AR320 Firewall features
Hubs for Industrial Environments
For reference purposes, hubs used for industrial environments on the market are listed
below; however, they are not used for labo test of STARDOM.
Table Hubs used for Industrial Environments
Manufacturers Product names/type names Remarks
Hirchmann RS2-TX 8 Port, 10/100Base-Tx, 24 VDC, 0-60 C
Phoenix Contact FL HUB 10BASE-T 10BaseT, 24 VDC, 0-55 C
CONTEC SH-8008L 8 Port, 10/100Base-Tx, 100Vac, 0-55 C

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Cables
Please avoid unplugging cables attached to a device by fixing it to a rack or other
furniture, or taking other measures. Generally used LAN cables are listed as follows.
UTP Cables
A UTP cable is the most commonly used unshielded twisted pair cable. Use category 5
or higher UTP cables. There are 4-conductor cables and 8-conductor cables; the both
type can be used. Make a choice between a cross cable and straight cable according to
the intended purpose. Generally, a straight cable is used when the connection is made
between a node and a hub; a cross cable is used when the connections are made
between only hubs or only nodes. Refer to the manual of each network device because
the specification may differ by the device. Select generally used RJ-45 type plugs for the
connectors of both ends.
STP Cables
In environments with much noise, use shielded twisted pair (STP) to reduce the effects
of noise. However, conditions of usage may differ by the network device; use the cable
on your own authority referring to the manual of the network device in use.
Optical Fiber Cables
It is recommended to use this type of cable when you lengthen distances, wire between
separate buildings or use the device in the environment with much noise. The following
LAN standards are provided for the use of optical fiber cables: 10BASE-FL, 100BASE-
FX, 1000BASE-SX and 1000BASE-LX. Each standard defines the type of optical fiber
and maximum distances. For the detailed specification, refer to manuals of the network
device in use or manuals of IEEE802 or the standard itself. Media converters having
optical interfaces or switching hubs supporting optical interfaces are needed because
optical interfaces have not been mounted on FCNs/FCJs.
Specifications of Major Cables
Specifications of major network cables are shown below.
Table Specifications of Major Network Cables
Standard Bandwidth Cable Maximum Distance Remarks
10BASE-T 10 Mbps UTP (Category 3) 100 m
Copper cable of
10 Mbps
100BASE-TX 100 Mbps
UTP (Category 5)
STP (Type 1, 2)
100 m
Copper cable of
100 Mbps
100BASE-FX 100 Mbps
GI/MMF wavelength 1300 nm
62.5/125 m
412 m (half duplex)
2000 m (full duplex)
Optical fiber
cables of 100
Mbps

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Installing Network Devices
Power Dispatching
When the power of one of network devices such as a hub is shut down, the entire
communications of all devices attached to the network device stop. You should
determine the power routing considering the scope of effects as described above. In the
case where the reliability is severely required, it is recommended to prepare backup
powers, or duplex network devices, each of which be powered via separate routing.
Selecting Devices
As far as possible, install network devices including a hub for each area, with minimum
number of wirings among the area. Choose network devices according to the purpose,
among several types e.g., devices for mounting to a 19-inch rack, to a desktop or to a
wall. For the number of ports, it is recommended to choose a hub with more ports than
you actually use at present, in consideration of the future expansion or the use as a port
for monitoring when failures will occur. According to the environment (temperature,
moisture, dust, noise, etc.) where the network device is installed, select the optimum
one.
Checking LED Display
LEDs for checking statuses are implemented on each network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Generally, LEDs are also implemented on ports of network adapters and network
devices. When finished connecting the cable, you need to check if the Link light flashes,
and Act, Send, Rcv and other lights flash while communication is performed.
Table Network Interface LEDs of FCN/FCJ
Colors Names Contents
Yellow LINK Connection is normal
Orange ACT Send/receive

For the LED displays of hubs or network adapters, refer to the manual of each device
since the number and role of each LED differ by the device.
Communication Test
When you finished setting the device and connections, check if the communication is
normally established by executing Ping command or other methods.
Replacing Network Devices
You can replace network devices such as hubs, cables or routers on-line. The
communication stops while the device is replaced; however, it starts again when you
connect the cable after the replacement. If the control network is duplexed, the network
has the feature to switch communication paths automatically, enabling to change the
device maintaining the communication. Please follow the right steps to change the
device checking the messages notifying the failure or the recovery of the network.
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Restrictions on total distances of networks
According to the 100BASE-T/10BASE-T standards, cables of up to 100 meters can be
used. It is possible to extend the total distance via hubs on many levels with cascade
connections. However, if a repeater hub is used, the following restrictions are applied to
total distances:
If a repeater hub is used with 10BASE-T cables:
The total distance is up to 500 meters, with up to 4 levels in cascade connections
and within 100 meters for cable lengths between devices.
If a repeater hub is used with 100BASE-T cables
The total distance is up to 205 meters, with up to 2 levels in cascade connections,
within 100 meters for cable lengths between devices and within 5 meters for cable
length between hubs (IEEE802.3u Standard).
If a network requires a total distance exceeding these restrictions, use switching hubs or
routers to configure such a network.

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1.5 Communication Protocols
This chapter explains the communication protocols used in the devices that
configure STARDOM system.

STARDOM system uses Ethernet for control networks and the upper control system
information network. For network layers and transport layers, the industry-standard
TCP/IP is employed.
Communications between VDS Data Server and FCN/FCJ
For communications between VDS data server and FCN/FCJ, a communication protocol
based on Fast Ethernet and TCP/IP is employed.
Time Synchronization
FCN/FCJ has SNTP client functions and time adjusting functions as standard features,
enabling to synchronize times among nodes. In addition, it is possibe to operate the
SNTP server feature by installing a time synchronization server portfolio in the FCN/FCJ.
Utility Communications
Configuration tools for defining FCN/FCJ or field network devices and designing control
logics, establish communications with FCN/FCJ using dedicated protocols. More
specifically, the tools download definitions of devices defined on Resource Configurator
or other configuration tools, download control logics created on Logic Designer, and
execute maintenance communications of control logics using Logic Designer.
Communications between VDS Data Server and VDS HMI Server
OPC-DA is employed for communications between VDS data server and VDS HMI
server, or VDS data server and other computers.
Communications between VDS HMI Server and HMI Client
HMI client does not require any software other than Web browsers. For communications
between HMI and VDS HMI server, HTTP used by a Web browser is employed.
Network Features of FCN/FCJ
FCN/FCJ normally supports the protocols needed to communicate with open network
devices: receiving and sending mails, HTTP, FTP, TELNET, and other protocols.




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2. Network Features of STARDOM
This chapter explains basic network features of STARDOM system.

2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations
Several examples of basic network configurations are shown in this section.
Small Two-layered System (Standard)
In this type of network, the control system information network connecting HMI clients
and the broadcast domain of the control network connecting controllers are separately
configured. This is one of the standard system configurations of STARDOM. Generally,
two network adapters are mounted on a VDS data server; one is used for control
network, and the other is used for control system information network.

FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
PLC
Control Network (Up to 126 controllers)
HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
Upper
Computer
(Up to 4 VDSs)
(Up to 32 controllers per VDS)

Figure Small Two-layered System
Restrictions on Implementation
The maximum node number connected to a control network: 126
The maximum number of controllers including FCN/FCJ and PLC connected to a
single data server: 32
The maximum number of VDS data servers connected to a control network: 4
The maximum HMI clients (sessions) connected to a single VDS HMI server: 50
There are no restrictions on total distances of the network.
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Routing of communication frames is needed if a control system information network
directly communicate to devices on a control network. For routing, use VDS as a
router or set a local router between the control system information network and the
control network. In consideration of the features of a control network, performing
real-time and reliable communications, you should not include frames unnecessary
for the network by routing.
SEE ALSO
For the maximum number of data objects and data points upon per VDS data server, see "2.3
Communication Performances".
For IP address settings on a small two-layered system, see "3.1 Small Two-layered System
(Standard)".
For examples of configuration with routing, see "3.6 Connecting Routers to Control Networks".

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Small One-layered System
On a small system, HMI clients can be connected to a control network when there is no
need to configure a control network and a control information network separately. In this
case, one network adapter mounted on a VDS is sufficient.

FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
HMI Client
PLC
Control Network (up to 126 devices)
HMI HMI
(Up to 4 VDSs)
(Up to 32 controllers upon a VDS)

Figure Small One-layered System
SEE ALSO
For restrictions on implementation, see "Small Two-layered System (Standard)" in this section.
For IP address settings on a small one-layered system, see "3.2 Small One-layered System".

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Medium Scale Two-layered System
This medium scale system consists of several VDSs. A VDS HMI server collects and
consolidates data from VDS data servers, giving these data to HMI clients. You can
implement VDS HMI data server functions on one of VDS data servers.

In the following cases, it is recommended to connect several VDS data servers.
Many controllers to be connected
Many data points
Controllers are distributed in remote areas
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
Control Network1
Upper
Computer
HMI
Control System Information Network
VDS
HMI Server
...
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
Control Network2
...
HMI
(Up to 4 VDS data servers)

Figure Medium Scale Two-layered System
Restrictions on Implementation
The maximum number of VDS data servers connected to a single VDS HMI data
server: 4
SEE ALSO
For other restrictions on the implementation, see "Small Two-layered System (Standard)".
For the number of maximum data objects and data points upon a single VDS HMI data server, see
"2.3 Communication Performances".
For IP address settings on a medium scale two-layered system, see "3.3 Medium Scale Two-
layered System".

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Three-layered System (Remote Operations)
For example, this network configuration may contain remotely installed HMI clients (e.g.
in offices) monitored via intra-company information network (e.g. intranet). For the
purpose of improving securities, routers or other devices are connected between the
information network and the control system information network.
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data
Server
PLC
Control Network
HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
VDS
HMI Server
VDS
Data
Server
Router
...
... ...
Remote Area
Information
Network
Router

Figure Three-layered System
SEE ALSO
For restrictions on implementation, see "Small Two-layered System (Standard)" and "Medium Scale
Two-layered System".

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2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address
Settings)
This section explains IP address settings of FCN/FCJ and VDS connected to
control networks of STARDOM.
Rules for IP Address Allocation
STARDOMs control networks can take two types of configurations: single and duplex.
Moreover, CPUs can be duplexed in the FCN, where an IP address is allocated to each
of the duplexed CPUs. The rules for IP address allocation in each configuration are
described below:
Single Network Configuration
[If the FCN does not use a configuration of duplexed CPUs]
There are no restrictions on the IP addresses that can be used.

[If the FCN uses a configuration of duplexed CPUs]
Arbitrary IP addresses can be set to both the control side CPU and the standby side
CPU of the FCN. Use the Resource Configurator and specify an IP address for the
control side CPU. Then, select the Detail button of the General tab under CPU
Module, remove the tick for Auto in the IP address checkbox for the standby side
CPU, and explicitly specify an IP address for the standby-side CPU.

TIP
If there are multiple control system network domains, change the respective network addesses.
e.g.
Domain 1: 192.168.0.0
Domain 2: 192.168.1.0
When the FCN has duplexed CPUs, the IP address of the standby side CPU is, by default,
automatically allocated on the basis of the IP address of the control side CPU according to certain
rules as explained in the IP Address Decision Rules section in 2.6 Duplexing Control Network
Therefore, if the default IP address of the standby side CPU is used as it is, specify a value for the
IP address of the control side CPU in such a way that the value will not contradict the IP address of
the standby side CPU.
In a single network configuration, the default value for the IP address of the standby side CPU can
be changed by the Resource Configurator. Therefore, if you wish to designate an arbitrary IP
address for the control side CPU, change the default value for the IP address of the standby side
CPU, too.

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Duplexed Network Configuration
[If the FCN does not use a configuration of duplexed CPUs]
It is recommended to use class C private addresses of IPv4.
The setting procedures of IP addresses are explained as follows:

Set an address in the range of 192.168.x.1-192.168.x.254, in which x is a multiple
of 3 in the range of 0-252.
Set a subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.
Specify the address of a default router connected to the control network for the
default gateway. If you do not connect a router to the control network, it is not
needed to specify the address.
Example of IP address settings
IP address: 192.168.3.1
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: none
This setting reserves 192.168.4.1 and 192.168.5.1 as IP addresses.

[If the FCN uses a configuration of duplexed CPUs]
Basically, use IP addresses according to the same rule as in the case of not using a
configuration of duplexed CPUs.
However, IP addresses must be within the range of 192.168.x.1 192.168.x.126 so that
no contradiction will occur in the automatic IP address allocation for the standby side
CPU of the FCN to be described later. In this case, an IP address for the standby side
CPU will fall within the range of 192.168.x.129 192.168.x.254.
TIP
When several network domains exist, different addresses should be set to each of them.
e.g.
Domain 1: 192.168.0.0
Domain 2: 192.168.3.0
IP addresses with X other than multiples of 3 are automatically used as physical IP addresses (PIP-
A and PIP-B).
It is recommended to define each IP address allocation depending on the device; for example, the
controller begins from 192.168.x.1 and the VDS begins from 192.168.x.101, etc.
If you set IP addresses other than those of Class C, read the IP Address Decision Rules section in
2.6 Duplexing Control Network and set the IP addresses for automatic allocation in such a way
that they will not be the same as the IP addresses of other devices. Notice that, in a duplexed
network, automatically allocated IP addresses cannot be changed with respect to both IP addresses
for PIP-A and PIP-B or the IP address for the standby side CPU.
The FCN/FCJ allows a configuration of separated networks (in which two network ports are used as
separate networks). However, in this network configuration, use the same concept as in the case of
a single network to decide IP addresses.


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Network Configuration of the FCN/FCJ
The FCN/FCJ has two network ports per CPU. These ports can take the following three
network configurations:
Single network configuration (in which network port 2 is not used)
Duplexed network configuration
Separated network configuration (connected to two separated networks)
Each configuration is set in the Network Group combo box of the Basic Configuration
tab in the CPU Module Setting window of the Resource Configurator.
The overview of how each network configuration works is described below:
Single Network Configuration
A single network is configured as follows:
VDS
Control Network
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
FCN/FCJ
Single CPU
FCN FCN
duplexed CPU
192.168.0.101
192.168.0.1 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.130
Router
Network for PLC
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
PLC1 PLC2
192.168.20.1 192.168.20.2
192.168.0.124
192.168.20.124

Figure Example of a Single Network Configuration
If control right is alternated when CPUs are duplexed in the FCN, IP addresses are
changed as follows:
FCN
(standby)
1
2
FCN
(control)
1
2
192.168.0.130 192.168.0.2
Without IP
Alternation of Control
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(stop)
1
2
192.168.0.2
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(standby)
1
2
192.168.0.2 192.168.0.130
APC
Without IP
Without IP
Without IP
Without IP
Without IP
Without IP

Figure Operations when Control Right is Alternated in a Single Network Configuration
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Duplexed Network Configuration
A duplexed network is configured as follows:

VDS
Control Network
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
VIP (NetAdr): 192.168.0.0
FCN/FCJ
Single CPU
FCN FCN
duplexed CPU
192.168.0.101 (VIP)
192.168.0.1 (VIP) 192.168.0.2 (VIP)
PIP-B (NetAdr):
192.168.2.0
192.168.1.101 192.168.2.101
192.168.1.1 192.168.2.1
192.168.1.2
192.168.2.2
192.168.1.130
192.168.2.130
Control System Information Network
Subnet mask 255.255.0.0
172.16.1.64
PC
172.16.1.21
PIP-A (NetAdr):
192.168.1.0
NetAdr: Network Address

Figure Example of a Duplexed Network Configuration
If control right is alternated when CPUs are duplexed in the FCN, IP addresses are
changed as follows:

192.168.0.2 (VIP)
192.168.1.2 (PIP-A)
Alternation of
Control
192.168.0.2 (VIP)
APC
Without IP
192.168.1.130 (PIP-A)
192.168.2.130 (PIP-B) 192.168.2.2 (PIP-B)
192.168.1.130 (PIP-A)
192.168.2.130 (PIP-B)
PIP on the left remains as it is.
192.168.0.2 (VIP)
192.168.1.130 (PIP-A)
192.168.2.130 (PIP-B)
192.168.1.2 (PIP-A)
192.168.2.2 (PIP-B)
PIP on the right
remains as it is.
Without IP
FCN
(standby)
1
2
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(stop)
1
2
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(standby)
1
2

Figure Operations when Control Right is Alternated in a Duplexed Network Configuration
TIP
VIP means a virtual IP address. PIP-A and PIP-B mean physical IP address A and physical IP address
B respectively. For details, see Various IP Addresses in 2.6 Duplexing Control Network

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Separated Network Configuration
In a separated network configuration, port 1 of the FCN/FCJ is used for a control
network, while port 2 is used for a network independent of the control network: for
example, it is connected to a network dedicated to PLC, in which one port is used for
PLC communications.
However, when connecting PLCs or PCs to the FCN/FCJ via a network, the network
must be configured to avoid having influences on FCN/FCJ control by communication
load lead from other devices.
SEE ALSO
Refer to 2.7 Cautions for Network Configuration when connecting devices other than VDS and
FCN/FCJ devices to the network.

This network configuration has the following restrictions:
No routing can be performed between port 1 and port 2.
With respect to FCN/FCJ communications using the communication function block,
port 1 allows communications via routers (communications to separate subnets),
while port 2 does not.
Separated networks are configured as follows:
192.168.20.1
VDS
Control network
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
FCN/FCJ
Single CPU
FCN FCN
Duplexed CPU
192.168.0.101
192.168.0.1 192.168.0.130
Control system information network
Subnet mask 255.255.0.0
172.16.1.1
PC
172.16.1.21
PLC1 PLC2 PLC3 PLC4
192.168.20.3
192.168.20.2
192.168.40.1 192.168.40.2
192.168.40.3
192.168.40.131
Router
PLC5
192.168.60.1
192.168.40.124
192.168.60.124
192.168.0.2
Network 2
dedicated to PLC
Subnet mask
255.255.255.0
Network 3
dedicated to PLC
Subnet mask
255.255.255.0
Network 1
dedicated to PLC
Subnet mask
255.255.255.0

Figure Example of a Separated Network Configuration
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If control right is alternated when CPUs are duplexed in the FCN, IP addresses are
changed as follows:

FCN
(standby)
1
2
FCN
(control)
1
2
192.168.0.130 192.168.0.2
192.168.40.131
Alternation of Control
FCN
(control)

1
2
FCN
(stop)
1
2 192.168.40.3
Without IP 192.168.0.2
Without IP
FCN
(control)
1
2
FCN
(standby)
1
2
192.168.40.131
192.168.0.2 192.168.0.130
APC
192.168.40.3
192.168.40.3

Figure Operations when Control Right is Alternated in a Separated Network Configuration
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IP Address Settings to FCN/FCJ
You can configure IP addresses to an FCN/FCJ on Resource Configurator as follows:

1. Connect a PC on which Resource Configurator is installed to FCN/FCJ, and start
Resource Configurator on the PC. Resource Configurator and FCN/FCJ must be
connected on the same broadcast domain. The IP addresses cannot be set via a
router.

2. To the network interface1 of FCN/FCJ, connect an Ethernet cable. IP addresses
cannot be correctly configured if you use the interface2.

3. Start FCN/FCJ in IP addresses setting status. If the LED is flashed as in the table
below, FCN/FCJ is in that status.
Table Flashing Statuses of LED
LEDs Statuses
HRDY High speed flashing
CPURDY Low speed flashing
CTL Lighted out
TIP
IP addresses are written to an FCN/FCJ system card (Compact Flash). An FCN/FCJ system card, to
which IP addresses has never been configured, becomes IP address setting status automatically when
powered on. If an IP address is reconfigured to an FCN/FCJ system card that already has IP
addresses, reboot from the maintenance window on a Web browser in IP addresses setting status, or
press a shutdown switch of FCN/FCJ. For the detailed sequence, see the corresponding manuals or
online-help files.

4. Select [File] and then [IP Address Settings] from the menu of Resource Configurator
to display the IP address setting dialog.

5. On the IP address setting dialog, configure IP addresses and subnet mask
corresponding to the displayed MAC address. Configure a default gateway as
necessary. When you finished all settings, click [OK].
TIP
The IP address setting window of Resource Configurator is displayed using the BOOTP protocol; if
FCN/FCJ with no IP addresses is connected, Resource Configurator displays MAC address of the
FCN/FCJ on its IP address setting window. Be sure to input the IP address for each device so as to
accord with the contents of the HOSTS file. The duplicated IP addresses due to incorrect-inputs must
be carefully avoided.

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With these settings, the IP address settings of the single control network configuration
have been completed. If you are to have the duplexed or separated control network
configuration, perform the following settings:
6. Use the Resource Configurator to connect to the FCN/FCJ and configure a control
network. For detailed operation methods, see the Network functions section on the
[FCN/FCJ Setting] [CPU Module Setting] page of the Resource Configurators
online help and set a duplexed or separated network configuration.
IP Address Settings to VDS
You will set IP addresses to a PC onto which you will mount functions of VDS (VDS data
server, VDS HMI server, and HMI client).

Configure the same network addresses of FCN/FCJ to the network interface of VDS
data server connected to the control network. If you do not use the duplexed control
network function, configure the IP addresses according to the Windows standard
procedures.
VIP (Virtual IP Address) Settings
If you use the duplexed control network function, you need to start FCN/FCJ connection
setting tool to configure virtual IP addresses (VIP).
SEE ALSO
For settings of the duplexed control network function and VIP, see "2.6 Duplexing Control Network".

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Creating HOSTS Files
The correspondences between IP addresses connected to a control network and host
names are managed in HOSTS files. The HOSTS files are referred for host name
resolution while communicating, or IP address settings of FCN/FCJ on Resource
Configurator.
TIP
HOSTS files are used for managing each node with the logical name. If you set nodes to be managed
with only IP addresses, it is possible to omit the procedure to create HOSTS files.

VDS
On Windows 2000, HOSTS files exist in the following directory.
%windir%\system32\drivers\etc
Using editors like notepad, input host names and IP addresses of all nodes connected to
the control network. If you use the duplexed control network function, describe VIPs as
IP addresses.
The following lines indicate an example of inputs to a HOST file. This example contains
comments to easily identify devices configuring the control network, however not
required.
Input example:
192.168.0.1 FCN01 #STARDOM FCN
192.168.0.2 FCN02 #STARDOM FCN
192.168.0.65 PLC01 #PLC
192.168.0.101 VDS01 #STARDOM VDS
192.168.0.102 EWS01 #Config PC
FCN/FCJ
Open the maintenance homepage on a Web browser to edit HOST files of FCN/FCJ.
Input IP addresses and host names in the system setting file window of this homepage,
and when finished typing, click the [OK] button.
SEE ALSO
For the operating sequence up to opening the system setting file window, see "2.5 FCN/FCJ Network
Features".

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2.3 Communication Performances
A STARDOM system collects and monitors data from controllers via networks.
Therefore, it is important to estimate communication performances of the
network. This chapter details the approximate scale of a standard STARDOM
system and how to estimate communication loads.
Standard System Scale
The approximate calculation of data (data object number, data point number) and
communication time (data acquisition time, starting time) are indicated in the table
below:
Table Approximate Traffic
Types Items Specifications
Amount of data per FCN/FCJ At most 3200 points/sec
Data number per VDS data server
At most 400 objects/sec,
At most 6400 points/sec
Communication time per object
(accessing a single object, 100 Mbps)
At most 50 ms
VDS data server
and FCN/FCJ
Communication time per 100 objects
(accessing several objects, 100 Mbps)
At most 400 ms
Amount of data per VDS data server
At most 400 objects/sec,
At most 6400 points/sec
Amount of data per VDS HMI server
At most 1600 objects/sec,
At most 25600 points/sec
VDS data server
and VDS HMI server
Communication time per object 100 ms or less
HMI clients per VDS HMI server At most 50 clients
VDS HMI server
and HMI client
Communication time per object 100 ms or less
Necessity of Network Load Calculation
It is necessary to calculate network load factor accurately when you construct a large-
scale system or employ low band including wide area network as the communication
infrastructure. For a small high-speed network system, the accurate calculation is not
always necessary, however, it is recommended to estimate approximate network load
factor.
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Estimating Network Load
It is possible to estimate network load by calculating the entire traffics passed through
hubs, nodes, and ports of hubs (see the figure below). It is necessary to estimate the
amount considering features of two types of hubs: switching hubs and repeater hubs. A
repeater hub forwards frames received from a port to all ports; therefore, traffics
received by and forwarded to all ports of hubs should be calculated. On a switching hub,
a unicast communication between two ports is not forwarded to other ports. As indicated
in the figure below, calculate traffics that may be passed through each port of hubs. In a
general configuration, it is presumed that communication loads center on the port
connected to VDS data server or the port connecting switching hubs.

Switching HUB Switching HUB
VDS
Data
Server
VDS
HMI
Server
FCN VDS
HMI
FCJ PLC

Figure Estimating Network Load
TIP
When estimating system performances, you should include CPU loads of FCN/FCJ and the one of VDS
data server, in addition to network communication loads.

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Reducing Network Load
If it becomes clear that the network is overloaded as the result of calculating network
load factor, the following methods can reduce the load.
Leave only data needed to be referred and window needed to be displayed
Lengthen the interval of updating data
Employ a switching hub and configure the system so as to minimize collisions on
communications between devices
Configure the system so as to minimize communications between switching hubs
Employ broadband network configurations for the loaded part of the network; e.g.
supporting gigabit, or employing port aggregation (a function to use multiple ports
for the connection of two hubs and to enable high throughput using them as one
network connection).
Divide a broadcast domain using the VLAN or Layer3 switch.
Use a switching hub with higher data forwarding performance.
Distribute the loads to several VDS data servers.
Distribute the loads to several FCNs or FCJs.
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Network Load Factor Calculation (Steady State)
A network load factor can be calculated from total traffic per second.
R (%) = 100 * (VDSD + OPCD + HMID + FCXD + PLCD + ETCD) / A ......................... (1)
The steady-state network load factor (R) should fall within the following range.
R (%) < 20..................................................................................................................... (2)
When the value falls within the range above, the real time processing is guaranteed to a
degree even if collisions frequently occur on the communication frame.
VDSD
VDSD is the traffic (byte) per second that occurs between FCN/FCJ and VDS data
server. It can be calculated as follows:
VDSD = VDSD(DA) + VDSD(AE) + VDSD(DG) [byte] .................................................. (3)
VDSD (DA)
VDSD (DA) is the amount of data access communication (byte) per second to be
calculated from the number of data points and sampling period. If several sampling
periods exist, it should be the total amount calculated from each sampling period.
VDSD(DA) = DataNum * 50 / T(DA) [byte] .................................................................... (4)
DataNum: number of data points
T(DA): data sampling period (sec)
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a data point is assumed to be 50byte.
VDSD(AE)
VDSD (AE) is the amount of data per second to be calculated from the amount of
message occurrences.
VDSD(AE) = MsgNum * 160 [byte]................................................................................ (5)
MsgNum: number of messages per second
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a message is assumed to be 160 byte.
VDSD(DG)
VDSD (DG) is the amount of diagnostic communication (byte) that occurs when the
duplexed network function is enabled. It is calculated from the number of nodes for
which the duplexed network function is enabled and the diagnostic transmission interval.
VDSD(DG) = NodeNum * 300 * Ntpgy / T(DG)[byte]..................................................... (6)
NodeNum: number of nodes
Ntpgy: network topology
Ntpgy= 1: single LAN, dual LAN
T(DG): diagnostic communication interval (sec)

If a network is not duplexed, you do not consider the above. To simplify, the overhead to
communicate a message is assumed to be 300byte.
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OPCD
OPCD is the traffic per second that occurs between VDS data server and VDS HMI data
server. It can be calculated as follows:
OPCD = OPCD(DA) + OPCD (AE) + OPCD (HDA) ...................................................... (8)
OPCD (DA)
OPCD (DA) is the traffic that occurs when the data on VDS data server changes in
reference to the data that is monitored on a Web browser of HMI client. OPCD (DA) per
second can be calculated as follows:
OPCD(DA) = DataNum * 100 [byte] .............................................................................. (9)
DataNum: number of data items
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a data item is assumed to be 100byte.
OPCD (AE)
OPCD (AE) is the traffic (byte) that occurs when a new message occurs on VDS data
server when the message window is displayed on a Web browser of HMI client. OPCD
(AE) per second can be calculated as follows:
OPCD(AE) = MsgNum * 160 [byte] ............................................................................. (10)
MsgNum: number of messages per second
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a message is assumed to be 160byte.
OPCD (HDA)
OPCD (HDA) is the data traffic that occurs when the historical trend window is displayed
on a Web browser of an HMI client. OPCD (HDA) per second can be calculated as
follows:
OPCD(HDA) = HdaDataNum * 800 [byte] ....................................................................(11)
HdaDataNum: number of historical trend data points
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a historical trend data point is assumed to be
800 bytes.
HMID
HMID is the traffic per second (byte) between VDS HMI server and HMI client, which
can be calculated as follows.
HMID = HMID(DA) + HMID(AE) + HMID(HDA) ........................................................... (12)
HMID (DA)
HMID (DA) is the traffic that occurs when the data on VDS HMI data server changes in
reference to the data that is monitored on a Web browser of HMI client. HMID (DA) per
second can be calculated as follows:
HMID (DA) = 1800 + DataNum * 150 [byte] ................................................................ (13)
DataNum: number of data items
HMID (AE)
HMID (AE) is the amount of data communication that occurs when an alarm summary
window is displayed on a Web browser of HMI client. HMID (AE) per second can be
calculated as follows:
HMID(AE) = AeNum * 2700[byte] ................................................................................ (14)
AeNum: number of message generation per second
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HMID (HDA)
HMID (HDA) is the data traffic that occurs when the trend window is displayed on a Web
browser of HMI client. HMID (HDA) per second can be calculated as follows:
HMID(HDA) = 10000 + HdaNum * 100 [byte] .............................................................. (15)
HdaNum: number of displayed trend pens per second
FCXD
FCXD is the traffic (byte) via the communication FB, which can be calculated as follows.
FCXD = DataNum * 50 [byte] ...................................................................................... (16)
DataNum: number of data items
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a data item is assumed to be 50byte.
PLCD
PLCD is the traffic (byte) between PLC and VDS data server or PLC and FCN/FCJ,
which can be determined by the communication protocol, amount of data, data updating
method, data interval, etc.
With FA-M3, PLCD can be calculated as follows.
PLCD = DataNum * 20 [byte] ...................................................................................... (17)
DataNum: number of data items
To simplify, the overhead to communicate a data item is assumed to be 20byte.
ETCD
ETCD is the traffic that occurs by the factors other than the above communications.
A
A is the transmission rate on a line (byte/sec). With Fast Ethernet, it will be as follows.
A = 12500000 (byte/sec) ............................................................................................. (18)
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Network Load Factor Calculation (Startup)
VDS and HMI perform communications differently at startup and at steady state. In
some cases, a startup can consume longer time; you should additionally calculate each
starting time.
Starting Time of VDS Data Server
This subsection explains the calculation of communication time, through calculating
traffic occurs when the first communication starts (a session is established) between
FCN/FCJ and VDS data server.
The communication to establish a session includes uploading time of database
(ADLST.csv) for accessing data, and reading time of messages.
The communication time can be calculated as follows:
VDSST [s] = (SesOp + DataNum * 100 + MsgNum * 160 [byte]) / A........................... (20)
SesOp: time for establish connections
DataNum: number of data items
MsgNum : number of messages per second
A: transmission rate on a line (byte/sec)
To simplify, it is assumed that the amount of database per a point of data be 100byte
and the overhead to communicate a message be 160byte.
While starting up, VDS data server reads all messages managed by FCN/FCJ. When
calculating communication time, you need to consider that VDS data server reads off the
maximum number of messages (MaxMsgNum).
Starting Time of HMI Client
Through calculating traffic occurs during the time between starting of HMI client (by
specifying the URL on a Web browser) and being ready for monitoring data on HMI, the
communication time can be calculated. Actually, in addition to the communication time,
the time for authorizing each logon and displaying graphics are added. The
communication time should be considered as an approximate guide for starting time of
HMI client. The communication time can be calculated as follows:
HMIST [s] = (HMID(STT) + HMID(APP) + HMID(GRA) ) / A + HMID(INT) .................. (22)
HMID (STT)
HMID (STT) is the traffic on HMI client from invoking a server on a Web browser to
logging on.
HMID (STT) = 20 [kbyte] ............................................................................................. (23)
HMID (APP)
HMID (APP) is the traffic that occurs when displaying a graphic window only for the first
display of the window.
HMID (APP) = 500 [kbyte] ........................................................................................... (24)
HMID (GRA)
HMID (GRA) is the size of a graphic file (.sgr). For a typical graphic window, the
following should be assumed as an approximate value.
HMID (GRA) = 100 [kbyte] .......................................................................................... (25)
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HMID (INT)
HMID (INT) is the time from the completion of downloading a graphic display program till
the completion of a display. While this time depends not on communication time but on
the PCs CPU performance, the following should be assumed as an approximate value:
HMID (INT) = 20 [sec] ................................................................................................. (26)
If displayed again using the same Web browser, the following should be assumed as an
approximate value:
HMID (INT) = 5 [sec]

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Example of Network Load Estimation
For the example of network load estimation, we assume the following small system
configuration.
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
HMI Client
PLC
Control Network
HMI HMI

Figure Example of System Configuration
A VDS data server and an HMI server was implemented on a single PC, with two HMIs,
a PLC (FA-M3) and an FCN and an FCJ are connected on a same network domain. The
VDS data server acquires data from two FCNs, a FCJ, and a PLC, and monitors these
data using two HMIs.
Network Wiring
As indicated in the figure below, a 100 Mbps switching hub connects all devices.
Switching HUB
VDS
Data Server
FCN 1
VDS
HMI 1
FCJ PLC
VDS
HMI 2
FCN 2

Figure Example of Connecting Network Devices
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Data for Estimating Traffic of Data on Controllers (Example)
FCN1 FCN2 FCJ
Number of objects 5 5 3
Number of data points 80 80 48
Number of operation
and monitoring points
80 80 48
Maximum messages 1000 1000 1000
Data acquiring interval
(S)
1 1 1
Example of Calculation of Traffic on Ports
HMI 1 HMI 2
Data
Server
FCN 1 FCN 2 FCJ PLC Remarks
VDSD(DA) - - 11400 4000 4000 2800 -
VDSD(AE) - - 4800 1600 1600 1600 -
Assuming 10/sec per
FCN/FCJ
VDSD(DG) - - - - - - -
OPCD(DA) - - - - - - -
OPCD(AE) - - - - - - -
OPCD(HDA) - - - - - - -
HMID(DA) 4800 4800 9600 - - - - Assuming 10 % changes
HMID(AE) 45 45 45 - - - - Assuming 1 message/sec
HMID(HDA) 12000 12000 24000 - - - - Monitors 20 points
FCXD - - - 500 500 - - Assuming 10 points
PLCD - - 600 600 Monitors 30 points
ETCD - - - - - - -
Total 16845 16845 50490 7100 7100 4200 600
R(Communication
load)
0.135 0.135 0.404 0.057 0.057 0.034 0.005

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2.4 Security
This chapter explains the security features on STARDOM networks.
Security on Control Networks
For communications between VDS data server and controllers, the original idea is
applied to the design of session management and database, to prevent wiretapping
activities, passing-off, and tampers from outside of the networks.
Security Features between VDS Data Server and VDS HMI Server
For communications between VDS data server and VDS HMI server, DCOM is
employed ensuring security functions working with the Windows-system user
management.
SEE ALSO
For the detailed information on security functions, see "VDS/ASTMAC Security"(IM 34P02D12-01E).

Security Features between VDS HMI Server and HMI Client
Considering the features of HMI client that can be set on remote offices via a LAN or
WAN, it is furthermore important to ensure security functions for this type of network.
Between VDS HMI server and HMI client, an authorization was given by user name and
password at logging on of the user. The typed password is encrypted before
transmission. If you use a WAN, the security control described above is insufficient. You
should connect routers supporting VPN, which allows communication frames to be
encrypted, preventing wiretapping activities, tampers and other accesses from outsiders.
In addition, a firewall should be implemented between external networks and internal
networks to minimize accessing from outside; basically, only HTTP communications to
HMI server are authorized.
SEE ALSO
For cases of installing firewalls and VPN routers, see "3.11 Operation with Remote HMI".

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2.5 Network Functions of FCN/FCJ
FCN/FCJ supports Web server functions, forwarding files, and sending/receiving
mails that are general communication protocols on TCP/IP. FCN/FCJ also is able
to operate and acquiring data independent of VDS.
Maintenance Homepage (Web Server)
FCN/FCJ comes with Web server functions. When you access on a Web browser, the
maintenance homepage is displayed. In this homepage, you can refer to setting
information and maintenance information; configure parameters, reboot and other
operations on Web browsers.

You can change settings using the maintenance windows in the sequence below.

1. For a URL on a Web browser, type the IP address of the FCN/FCJ adding /mnt at
the end of the address; the maintenance homepage is displayed.

2. Clicking the link of "Maintenance Menu" on the homepage opens the maintenance
menu. Since the page is normally displayed in online mode, you can only refer to
parameters. If you want to configure or change the parameters, you should reboot
the FCN/FCJ in maintenance mode.

3. Clicking the link of [Reboot] displays the reboot window. On this window, select
"Reboot(Maintenance Mode)" and click [OK].

4. After rebooted, follow the sequence described in step1 to open the maintenance
homepage.
System Setting File
You can edit the system setting file on the window displayed when you click the link of
[Edit] in "System Setting Files" on the maintenance menu.
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FCN/FCJ Java Functions
FCN/FCJ Java functions allow the user to create Java applications, enabling to provide
Java applications with various services of the OS, e.g. access to hardware including RS-
232-C, access to various data of the control function, and send/receive mails, which
ensures radical trimming of man-hours needed for programming, and strong
maintainability and reliability. FCN/FCJ Java functions provide multi-task environment for
Java applications; the application unit is referred to as Duolet. For the details, see the TI
STARDOM FCN/FCJ Java Function Programmers Guide and the online help of the
FCN/FCJ Java Application Development Kit.
Development Environment
The user can originally develop Java applications using the Java development
environments of Sun Microsystems, Inc., the FCN/FCJ Java Application Development
Kit, and Webmetry basic library portfolios.
Example of Application
You can easily create Java applications, e.g. monitoring a given data, detecting original
alarms, or diagnosing I/O paths. It is also possible to forward alarms or other information
to mail servers or beepers.
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JEROS Basic Configuration
On a Web browser, you can define basic operations of the system by editing JEROS
basic setting files. The following table shows the list of setting items.
Table Setting Items in JEROS Basic Configuration File
Functions Setting items Keys Default values
Host name HostName None
IP address IpAddress None
Subnet mask SubnetMask Default mask
Network
Default gateway GatewayAddress None
Serial communication Console display COM port ConsoleComPort None
System shutdown Shutdown timer ShutDownTimer 30 sec
Java start parameter JavaStart None
Java execution
Additional Java class path AdditionalClassPath None
Start FTP server FtpdStart YES
FTP server
FTP server data reception timeout FtpdDataTimeout 60 sec
Start Web server HttpdStart YES
Web server
HTTP open space HttpOpenSpace /JEROS/WWW
Maintenance Security in maintenance operations MaintenanceSecurity NO
DNS client Start DNS client DnsStart NO
SNTP client Start time synch client SntpStart NO
Time zone Set time zone TIMEZONE JST::-540

Table Setting Items in Duolet Environment Setting File
Functions Setting items Keys Default values
Log server name LogServerName None
Server transmission log level LogServerLevel INFO System log
other logs submitted
Duolet monitor Shutdown password ShutdownPassword None
Start Duolet RootDuolet None
Duolet storage address RemoteClassBase None Duolet
Duolet wait time (msec) DuoletTimedOut 10000 ms
Communication port number SystemPort 34101
Communication time out NetTimeOut 500 msec
Communication retry times NetRetryTimes 3
Communication
Communication trace output NetTrace OFF

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Send and Receive Mails
You can send and receive internet mails on FCN/FCJ. On remote FCN/FCJ, it is easy to
transmit warning messages to an administrator without any intermediate manual
operations, contact to a mobile of someone by transmitting a message, etc. You can
also remotely send a mail for checking conditions of the site to be replied to FCN/FCJ.
For sending, SMTP protocol is used; for receiving, POP3 is used.
SEE ALSO
For an example of system configuration for send/receive mails, see "3.12 Send Mails to/Receive Mails
from VDS and FCN/FCJ".

PPP (Point to Point Protocol) Connections
You can exchange data by installing a modem to a serial port of FCN/FCJ via a public
line. You can access from a PC to FCN/FCJ.
SEE ALSO
For an example of the system configuration with PPP connection, see "3.13 Monitoring and
Maintaining FCN/FCJ Remotely".


CAUTION
If you duplex a CPU of FCN, this feature is unavailable.

Webmetry Functions
Webmetry functions are class libraries to create monitoring applications on Web
browsers of PCs on networks by acquiring data on controllers. By using data display
applets (digital, bar, and trend displays) on Web browsers along with data
communication part to the applets, simple monitoring windows can be obtained only
through programming of data acquisition part.
These functions are enabled by using the Webmetry basic libraries in the FCN/FCJ Java
Application Development Kit.
The following table shows estimated operating performances of monitoring windows
using Webmetry.
Table Performances of Webmetry
Items Contents
Data point numbers Approximately 50 points
Interval 1-2 sec
Simultaneously connected clients 5 clients (Web browser)

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FTP Client and Server
This function is to exchange files or data between external systems and FCN/FCJ.
Through this function, it is possible to forward files from FCN/FCJ to your data server or
from external systems to FCN/FCJ.
InfoWell
InfoWell is a package running on FCN/FCJ Java functions. It is unprogrammed and
enables you to create web pages or send e-mails.
This package allows you to use simple settings and send information from an FCN/FCJ
without Java programming knowledge.
InfoWell enables you to perform all settings in a Web page. You can also make basic
settings of the above-mentioned JEROS simply using this package.
InfoWell is comprised of the following portfolios:
Web Application Portfolio
The Web Application Portfolio is a function with which an FCN/FCJ becomes a Web
server to allow transmission of control function data to various Web pages.
E-mail Application Portfolio
The E-mail Application Portfolio is a function to use data messages of FCN/FCJ control
functions as triggers to send e-mails.
SEE ALSO
For details, see the IM "InfoWell.


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2.6 Duplexing Control Network
A control network connecting VDS data servers and controllers, requiring real-
time operations and high reliabilities, supports duplexed network function. By
duplexing network between nodes, VDS data servers and controllers can switch
immediately and automatically even if one of the communication paths fails,
minimizing affects on applications.
Scope of Duplexing Network
The duplexed network function provided on STARDOM is implemented in control
network layer and effective in the scope of broadcast domain of the control network. The
following figure shows the scope of a network duplexing.







Scope of Duplexing
Network





Scope of Duplexing
Network






Scope of Duplexing
Network
FCJ FCN
Router HMI
HMI
VDS
HMI Server
FCN FCJ FCN FCJ PLC
Router
Information System Network
Control System Information Network
VDS
Data Server
VDS
Data Server
VDS
Data Server
PLC
HMI
Control Network

Figure Scope of Duplexing Network
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Features
Duplexing of STARDOM control network is attained by general-purpose network
adapters, device drivers, network devices (switch, cable, etc.) based on TCP/IP
protocol. Each node has several network interfaces and controls communication paths
between them by routing table. For applications, the duplexed network is invisible
because they communicate using each node name or IP address. It is outstanding for
short switching time between network paths and seamless switching for applications. In
addition, you can connect devices that do not have the duplexed network function like
PLCs to the duplexed control network.
Related Terms
The following subsections explain an example of dual network and related terms.


FCN/FCJ
PLC
HUB-A HUB-B
A B


VDS
Data Server
A B
Dual Interface Device
HMI
Single Interface
Device





FCN/FCJ
A B B A

Control
-side


Standby
-side

Figure Basic Configuration of Duplexed Network
Network-A
The network indicated in solid lines is referred to as Network-A, which is used normally.
If Network-B is used and an abnormal situation is detected in Network-B, Network-A is
used as a substitute for Network-B.
Network-B
The network indicated in dotted lines is referred to as Network-B. If an abnormal
situation is detected in Network-A, Network-B is used as a substitute for Network-A.
HUB-A
A hub used for Network-A is referred to as HUB-A.
HUB-B
A hub used for Network-B is referred to as HUB-B.
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Two Networks
In duplexed STARDOM network, there are two routes for nodes engaged in
communications: the above-mentioned Network-A and Network-B. Two respective
networks are on an equal basis. Which network is used for data communications is
determined in each node (peer-to-peer) engaged in communications.
Therefore, if we focus on a certain VDS, there can be a situation in which Network-A is
used between the VDS and a controller, while Network-B is used between the VDS and
another controller.
However, if a node is activated in a situation where both network cables of the node are
properly connected to networks, Network-A is generally used.
Single Interface Device
A single interface device is the node that has only a single network interface for control
networks or does not have STARDOM duplexed network function.
Dual Interface Devices
Dual interface device is the node that has dual network interfaces for control networks
and STARDOM duplexed network function. It refers to FCN/FCJ and VDS which has
configured duplexed network function.
Interface A
The first network interface on each node is referred to as interface A. Network interface
of a single interface device is interface A. On VDS, the network interface to which VIP
and PIP-A are configured is interface A. On FCN/FCJ, network interface1 is interface A.
Interface B
The second network interface on each node is referred to as interface B. Network
interface of a single interface device does not have interface B. On VDS, the network
interface to which PIP-B is configured is interface B. On FCN/FCJ, network interface2 is
interface B.
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Various IP Addresses
For realizing the duplexed network, it is necessary to configure virtual IP addresses and
physical IP addresses for nodes. An application simply recognizes virtual IP addresses.
Physical IP addresses are used for maintenances of communication paths through the
duplexed network function. If you do not use the duplexed network function, the
distinction between virtual and physical IP addresses is not needed; replace virtual IP
addresses to IP addresses for understanding this manual.
Virtual IP Address (VIP)
VIP is the typical IP address defined by a node. Resource Configurator defines this IP
address. General applications communicate using node names and VIP. A VIP is
configured for a network interface for which PIP-A is configured.
Physical IP Address (PIP)
PIP is the IP address configured in network interfaces and created automatically based
on rules defined in advance.
Physical IP Addresses A (PIP-A)
PIP-A is the IP address configured to interfaces on interfaces A sides. PIP-A of each
node is set so as to be identical Net ID. General applications do not realize this address.
Physical IP Addresses B (PIP-B)
PIP-B is the IP address configured to interfaces on interfaces B side. PIP-B of each
node is set so as to be identical Net ID and different from the one of PIP-A. General
applications do not realize this address.
IP Address Decision Rules
Physical IP addresses (PIP-A, PIP-B) when FCN/FCJ networks are duplexed or the IP
address of the standby side CPU when CPUs are duplexed in the FCN are decided
according to certain rules, depending on the virtual IP address (VIP) to be set by a user
to the FCN/FCJ.
The IP calculation rules are described below.
If the user wishes to build a control network without using private IP addresses of class
C, understand the rules below and set a virtual IP address (VIP) without causing
contradictions.
Necessary Information Prior to Deciding IP Addresses
Although IP addresses are usually expressed as four decimal numbers such as
192.168.1.1, they are internally treated as 32-bit binary numbers. For the notation of
192.168.1.1, a 32-bit number is divided into four 8-bit numbers from the top, each of
these being converted into decimal numbers and connected with a dot (.). This address
becomes C0A80101 if expressed in hexadecimal notation.
An IP address is divided into a network address and a host address according to its
subnet mask.
A subnet mask is set as, for example, 255.255.255.0. A network address is decided by
an IP address and a subnet mask are respectively converted into binary numbers and a
logical AND of each bit is performed. If an IP address is 192.168.1.1 and a subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0, they are converted into hexadecimal numbers of C0A80101 and
FFFFFF00 respectively. Thus, the network address is C0A80100 = 192.168.1.0.
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A host address is an address after a network address. If an IP address is 192.168.1.1
and a subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, it is 01 as a hexadecimal number and 1 as a
decimal number.
Physical IP addresses (PIP-A, PIP-B), when FCN/FCJ networks are duplexed, or IP
addresses of two CPUs, when CPUs are duplexed, are decided by using network
addresses and host addresses of the virtual IP address (VIP).
Rules for Deciding the PIP of a Single CPU and the Duplexed Network
Configuration of an FCN/FCJ
In a single CPU and duplexed network configuration of an FCN/FCJ, physical IP
addresses (PIP-A, PIP-B) of FCN/FCJ are decided on the basis of the virtual IP address
(VIP) according to the following rules:
[PIP-A]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 1 to the VIPs network address
Host address: the same value as the VIPs host address
[PIP-B]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 2 to the VIPs network address
Host address: the same value as the VIPs host address
If these rules are applied to a VIP of 192.168.1.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0,
hexadecimal network addresses are C0A80200 and C0A80300 for PIP-A and PIP-B
respectively, while hexadecimal host addresses are 01 for both PIP-A and PIP-B. Their
IP addresses are shown in the table below:
Table IP Addresses when an FCN/FCJ Network is Duplexed
IP Address (Hexadecimal)
VIP 192.168.1.1 (C0A80101)
PIP-A 192.168.2.1 (C0A80201)
PIP-B 192.168.3.1 (C0A80301)
TIP
Subnet masks do not necessarily have to be set per 8 bits: for example
255.255.255.0 (FFFFFF00 in the hexadecimal notation: the network address is the
leading 24 bits) or 255.255.0.0 (FFFF0000 in the hexadecimal notation: the network
address is the leading 16 bits). They can be set like 255.255.255.192 (FFFFFFC0 in
the hexadecimal notation: the network address is the leading 26 bits). In this case,
too, 1 is added to the network address for PIP-A, while 2 is added to the network
address for PIP-B.
In a duplexed network configuration, PIP-A/B cannot be changed via the Resource
Configurator. Therefore, set the values to a VIP so that no contradictions will occur
to PIP-A/B in the above rules.

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Rules for Deciding the IP Address of a Duplexed CPU and a Single Network
Configuration of an FCN
In a duplexed CPU and single network configuration or a separated network
configuration of an FCN, the IP address of the standby side CPU is decided on the basis
of the IP address of the control side CPU according to the following rules:
Network address: the same value as the network address of the control side CPU
Host address: a value obtained by setting the most significant bit of the host
address of the control side CPU as 1
If these rules are applied to an IP address of 192.168.1.1 with a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0 for the control side CPU in a single network configuration, the network
address remains C0A80100 and the host address is 81 (10000001 in the binary
notation) in the hexadecimal notation with respect to the IP address of the standby side
CPU.
Thus, the IP address of the standby side CPU is C0A80181 = 192.168.1.129.
IP addresses of control side/standby side CPUs are shown in the table below:
Table IP Addresses of Control Side/Standby Side CPUs
IP Address of Control Side CPU (Hexadecimal) IP Address of Standby Side CPU (Hexadecimal)
192.168.1.1 (C0A80101) 192.168.1.129 (C0A80181)
In this configuration, the IP addresses of two duplexed CPUs are alternated every
time they switch from the control side to the standby side and vice versa.
TIP
In a single network configuration or in a separated configuration, there is no distinction between the
virtual IP address (VIP) and the physical IP address (PIP). IP addresses are simply treated as those
of the control side/standby side.
The IP address of the standby side CPU when CPUs are duplexed in the FCN is, as mentioned
above, the value obtained by setting the most significant bit of the host address of the control side
IP address as 1. For the IP address of the control side CPU, therefore, use a host address whose
most significant bit is 0. For example, if a subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 and 1 to 126 (01 to 7E in
the hexadecimal notation) is used for the host address of the control side CPU, the host address of
the standby side CPU becomes 129 to 254 (81 to FE in the hexadecimal notation). Similarly, if a
subnet mask is 255.255.255.192 and 1 to 62 (01 to 3E in the hexadecimal notation) is used for the
host address of the control side CPU, the host address of the standby side CPU becomes 65 to 126
(41 to 7E in the hexadecimal notation).
In a single network configuration or in a separated configuration, the standby side CPUs IP address
decided according to the above rules can be changed via the Resource Configurator.

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Rules for Deciding the IP Address of a Duplexed CPU and a Duplexed
Network Configuration of an FCN
In a duplexed CPU and a duplexed network configuration of an FCN, the PIP-A/B of
left/right CPUs are determined on the basis of the FCNs VIP regardless of the control
side/standby side according to the following rules:
[PIP-A of the left CPU]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 1 to the VIPs network address
Host address: the same value as the VIPs host address
[PIP-B of the left CPU]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 2 to the VIPs network address
Host address: the same value as the VIPs host address
[PIP-A of the right CPU]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 1 to the VIPs network address
Host address: a value obtained by setting the most significant bit of the VIPs host
address as 1
[PIP-B of the right CPU]
Network address: a value obtained by adding 2 to the VIPs network address
Host address: a value obtained by setting the most significant bit of the VIPs host
address as 1
As described above, host addresses of the PIP-A/B of the right CPU are the values
obtained by setting the most significant bit of the VIPs host address as 1. If this is
applied to a VIP of 192.168.1.1 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 (the host address
is 01 in the hexadecimal notation), the PIP-A/B host addresses of the right CPU become
81 in the hexadecimal notation (10000001 in the binary notation) or 129 in the decimal
notation.
If these rules are applied to a VIP of 192.168.1.1 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0,
PIP/A and PIP-B are decided as in the table below:
Table IP Addresses of Righ/Left CPUs

IP Address of the Left CPU (Hexadecimal)
IP Address of the Right CPU (Hexadecimal)
VIP 192.168.1.1 (C0A80101) < to be allocated to the control side CPU >
PIP-A 192.168.2.1 (C0A80201) 192.168.2.129 (C0A80281)
PIP-B 192.168.3.1 (C0A80301) 192.168.3.129 (C0A80381)

In this configuration, VIP allocations of two duplexed CPUs are changed every time
CPUs switch from the control side to the standby side and vice versa. However, PIP-A
and PIP-B are fixed for use without being changed.
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TIP
The IP address of the right CPU when CPUs are duplexed in an FCN is, as mentioned above, the
value obtained by setting the most significant bit of the VIPs host address as 1. For the VIP,
therefore, use a host address whose most significant bit is 0. For example, if a subnet mask is
255.255.255.0 and 1 to 126 (01 to 7E in the hexadecimal notation) is used for a host address of
VIP, a host address of the right CPU becomes 129 to 254 (81 to FE in the hexadecimal notation).
Similarly, if a subnet mask is 255.255.255.192 and 1 to 62 (01 to 3E in the hexadecimal notation) is
used for a host address of VIP, a host address of the right CPU becomes 65 to 126 (41 to 7E in the
hexadecimal notation).
In a duplexed network configuration, PIP-A/B cannot be changed via the Resource Configurator.
Therefore, set the values to a VIP so that no contradictions will occur with PIP-A/B in the above-
mentioned rules.

SEE ALSO
For an example of IP address value, see "3.8 Duplexing Networks".


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Various Topologies
For duplexed control networks, various network topologies can be employed. The
following subsections explain each topology briefly, and which to be employed through
comparing each feature.
Single LAN


FCN/FCJ
PLC
HUB
A B


VDS
Data Server
A
Dual Interface Device
HMI
Single Interface
Device





FCN/FCJ
A B B A

Control
-side


Standby
-side

Figure Single LAN Configuration
In this configuration, the network path is not duplexed, which does not provide
alternative path on the occasion of network failure.
Dual LAN


FCN/FCJ
PLC
HUB-A HUB-B
A B


VDS
Data Server
A B
Dual Interface Device
HMI
Single Interface
Device





FCN/FCJ
A B B A

Control
-side


Standby
-side

Figure Dual LAN Configuration
This is a network topology where network interfaces of nodes are duplexed and cables
and hubs connecting them each other are duplexed, as well as physically independent.
The highest fault tolerance is assured.
Connect single interface devices to HUB-A. The network is not duplexed on a single
interface device and used only with Network-A.
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Guide for Selecting an Optimum Network Topology
The following table lists features of network topologies, which may be helpful as a
measure for selecting the optimum topology.
Table Comparing Network Topologies
Single LAN Dual LAN
Reliability Low High (No common part )
Network load Low Low
Cost (Network devices) Low High
Wiring Simple Relatively complicated

Choose the optimum network topology according to the features of your application
(intended purpose, connecting devices, location, etc.).
For a standard network configuration that consists of FCN/FCJ and VDS, it is
recommended to employ dual LAN in the light of reliability and easy maintenance.
Internal Operations in the Duplexed Network Function
This section explains the internal operations in the duplexed network function of
STARDOM.
Network Status Table (NSTBL)
Network functions of FCN/FCJ or VDS connected to a control network manage statuses
of network interfaces (network statuses) of each node as a network interface status
table (NSTBL). For nodes with the duplexed network function, information of standby
side network interface is also managed. All VDSs and FCNs/FCJs have NSTBLs used
for algorisms of network failure, switching between network paths, network recovery, etc.
NSTBL contains the following information:
Table Example of Network Status Table
Network Path Information Device
Index
VIP PIP-A PIP-B
Network-A Network-B
1 192.168.0.1 192.168.1.1 192.168.2.1 OK OK
2 192.168.0.2 192.168.1.2 192.168.2.2 OK OK
3 192.168.1.130 192.168.2.130 OK OK

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Diagnostic Communication Frame
Duplexed network function of FCN/FCJ or VDS connected to a control network performs
periodically multicast transport of network interface statuses as diagnostic
communication frames, for updating NSTBL. The diagnostic communication frames
store NSTBL managed by the node. A node that received diagnostic communication
frames of other node updates its NSTBL based on the information stored in that frame.
Diagnostic communication frames are transmitted by each dual interface individually.

The default diagnostic communication interval is 500ms. The two consecutive failures of
diagnostic communications are recognized as a failure, making switching time 1000 to
1500 ms when diagnostic communication interval is 500ms.
Diagnostic communication frames are sent in conjunction with the number of duplexed
devices (such as FCNs or VDSs) to a network and are received by the devices. These
devices process frames every time they are received: the greater the number of
duplexed devices, the greater the reception processing of diagnostic communication
frames, thereby increasing the load on CPUs. Therefore, if the number of duplexed
devices is substantial, the transmission cycle of diagnostic communication frames
should be extended.
The table below provides a guide for the number of devices and diagnostic cycles.
Table Guide for the Number of CPUs and the Diagnostic Cycles
Number of CPUs
Diagnostic Cycle (msec)
Remarks
Up to 12 500 Default value for diagnostic cycles
13 to 25 1,000
26 to 37 1,500
38 to 50 2,000
51 to 62 2,500
63 to 75 3,000
76 to 87 3,500
88 to 100 4,000
101 to 112 4,500
113 to 125 5,000
126 to 137 5,500
138 to 150 6,000
151 to 162 6,500
163 to 175 7,000
176 to 187 7,500
188 to 200 8,000
201 to 212 8,500
213 to 225 9,000
226 to 237 9,500
238 to 248 10,000

Note: The number of CPUs is the total number of FCNs/FCJs/VDSs in a network which uses the network duplex function (if
CPUs of an FCN are duplexed, the number of CPUs is 2).
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SEE ALSO
For the communication load of diagnostic communication frames, see "2.3 Communication
Performances".

Network Failure
A network failure is the status where one of dual network paths is unavailable. The
network failure is managed per node. If diagnostic communication frames cannot be
received from a node, the network path to the node is recognized to be failed, which is
notified to the operator as a message. The cause of failures can be as follows: failure of
network interface of own node, failure of network interface of the destination node,
failure of network devices (hubs and cables) on the network path between the two
nodes, communication jamming due to the temporary noises, etc.
Switching between Network Paths
If a network failure to a node is detected, Routing Table is automatically changed,
switching immediately over another of dual network paths.
Network Recovery
The node that detects a network failure continues to monitor the failed network. If the
recovery is detected, the message notifying the network recovery is sent to the operator.
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Supporting Duplexed CPU of FCN
When a control side CPU (controlling the system) of FCN fails, the control right is moved
to a standby side CPU (: this side always equalizes with the control side and in waiting
status to receive the control right in the case that the control side fails). The equalization
between the control side and standby side is performed via the control network. The
CPU that newly acquires the control right continues to communicate, by succeeding the
network information (virtual IP addresses, host names, etc.) of the CPU that previously
had the control.
Other nodes that had been communicated with FCN whose CPU was switched, detect
the switching between network paths, switching over another path automatically. This
function ensures seamless operations for applications of the nodes that had been
communicated with the FCN.
Host Name and IP Address
A host name and IP address (VIP) with duplexed CPU is consistent and can be
recognized as a single device for applications of a client (e.g. VDS). When the switching
takes place between CPUs in FCN, the VIP is also moved to the CPU that takes control
immediately.
Standby Side CPU Network Interface Status
The network interface statuses of the standby side CPU are always checked and the
results are reflected to NSTBL.
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2.7 Cautions for Network Configuration
Connecting other devices on to network
The communication loads between FCN/FCJ and other devices such as PLC, field
devices, PC may influence the control function shown in the following table.
Table Influences on FCN/FCJ Communication Protocol
Protocol Method Effects on FCN/FCJ
Unicast Communications to one
specific node
Multicast Communications to one
specific group of nodes
Communications to any devices other than FCN/FCJ never
adversely affect FCN/FCJ.
Broadcast Communications to all
nodes in the network
As communication processing has high priority, all types of
communication frames, including irrelevant ones, are received by
the FCN/FCJ. When broadcast communication loads are too high,
the control processing of the FCN/FCJ is influenced (for example,
processing delay can occur).

The broadcast communications increase the communication loads, so that connecting
FCN/FCJ to the network with broadcast communications should be avoided.
If the connections are required, separate broadcast domain via router or VLAN shown in
the following documentation.
SEE ALSO
For the use of routers, refer to the following:
1. Figure Example of a Single Network Configuration and Figure Example of a Separated Network
Configuration in 2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings)
2. 3.6 Connecting Routers to Control Networks


CAUTION
1. The broadcast communications are also used as ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol). If a number of devices using ARP are connected to the network, the
massive broadcast communications may occur.
2. Even if under not frequent broadcast communication environment, the massive
broadcast communication might occur due to the abnormal condition of devices.
Therefore the switching HUBs with the broadband suppression function are
recommended to be installed.



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3. Examples of Network Configurations
Devices and functions provided by STARDOM are highly independent, enabling to
construct various systems in combination with other open devices. This chapter
explains needed information for constructing a system and examples of network
configuration.

3.1 Small Two-layered System (Standard)


FCJ
HUB
1 2


VDS
Data Server
1
2
HUB
HMI
2
HMI
1
Control System Information Network
Control Network


FCN
1 2
I/O I/O I/O I/O

Figure Example of Small Two-layered System
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Connection
Implement a network adapter on VDS, connect FCN/FCJ and HMI on the same control
network. Use port 1 for network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address Setting in Small Two-layered System
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
FCJ 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
1 172.16.1.1 Windows setting Control system information network
VDS data server
2 192.168.0.101 Windows setting Control network
HMI1 172.16.1.21 Windows setting Control system information network
HMI2 172.16.1.22 Windows setting Control system information network
SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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3.2 Small One-layered System

FCJ
HUB
1 2

VDS
Data Server
1 HMI
2
HMI
1
Control Network

FCN
1 2
I/O I/O I/O I/O

Figure Example of small One-layered System
Connection
Implement a network adapter on VDS, connect FCN/FCJ and HMI on the same control
network. Use port 1 for network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address Configuration in Small One-layered System
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator Single network setting
FCJ 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator Single network setting
VDS data server 1 192.168.0.101 Windows setting
HMI1 192.168.0.121 Windows setting
HMI2 192.168.0.122 Windows setting
SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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3.3 Medium Scale Two-layered System


FCJ 1
HUB
1 2

VDS
Data Server 1

1
2
HUB
HMI
2
HMI
1
Control System Information Network
Control Network


FCN 1
1 2

VDS
Data Server 2
1
2


FCJ 2
1 2
HUB

FCN 2
1 2
I/O I/O I/O I/O I/O I/O I/O I/O

Figure Example of Medium Scale Two-layered System
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Connection
Implement two network adapters per VDS, one for control network connecting FCN/FCJ,
the other for control system information network connecting HMI or upper computers.
One of VDSs is used as an HMI server. Use port 1 for network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address Setting in Medium Scale Two-layered System
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN1 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
FCJ1 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
1 172.16.1.1 Windows setting Control system information network
VDS data
server1
2 192.168.0.101 Windows setting Control network
FCN2 1 192.168.20.1 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
FCJ2 1 192.168.21.2 Resource Configurator
Control network
Single network setting
1 172.16.1.2 Windows setting Control system information network
VDS data
server2
2 192.168.20.101 Windows setting Control network
HMI1 172.16.1.21 Windows setting Control system information network
HMI2 172.16.1.22 Windows setting Control system information network
SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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3.4 Installing Controllers in a Field as Standalone
An autonomous controller FCN/FCJ can be installed on the devices of the field as
a standalone controller. VDS is not needed for this type of configuration.



FCN/FCJ
Resource Configurator
Web Browser
Ethernet
Cross Cable
1 2 Serial Port
Modem
WAN
I/O I/O
RS232C
Cable

Figure Example of Standalone Installation
Configuration and Maintenance
When you perform configurations, maintenances or checks of devices, connect a PC on
which Resource Configurator and Web browser are implemented, to the interface1 of
FCN/FCJ (see the figure above).
Using Ethernet cross cable, the wiring without network devices (e.g. hubs) are obtained.
However, you can use hubs and straight cables as usual.
Remote Connection
Connecting a modem to a serial port of FCN/FCJ enables connections to a WAN. You
can create an application for accessing and monitoring information acquired by
FCN/FCJ once a day.
SEE ALSO
For remote connections, see "3.13 Monitoring and Maintaining FCN/FCJ Remotely".

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When Duplexing CPU
When CPU is duplexed on FCN, the equalization from the control side to the standby
side is performed via the control network. Therefore, even when the FCN is installed as
a standalone controller, it is necessary to connect the control side and the standby side
over the network in the case that the CPU is duplexed. Use a cross cable to connect
network interface2 or use a straight cable and a hub to connect network interface1.


Control
-side
Resource Configurator
Web Browser
Ethernet
Cross Cable
1 2 1 2

Standby
-side
Ethernet
Cross Cable
Resource Configurator
Web Browser
Ethernet
Straight Cable
HUB




FCN

Control
-side
1 2 1 2
Standby
-side




FCN

Figure Standalone Installation with duplexed CPU
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3.5 Connecting Simple HMI to Standalone
Controller in a Field
This section explains the configuration for monitoring control operations by
connecting simple HMI with FCN/FCJ installed in the field.
Using VDS as HMI



FCN/FCJ
HMI (Web browser)
Data/HMI Server
Resource Configurator
Ethernet
Cross Cable
1 2
Hub Connecting to
Upper Device
Ethernet
Straight Cable
I/O I/O

Figure Connecting VDS as HMI to an FCN/FCJ
As HMI, use a PC on which VDS Data/HMI Server functions, Web browsers, Resource
Configurator and Logic Designer are installed. For wiring, use Ethernet cross cables to
connect to the network interface1 of FCN/FCJ. There is no problem if you use hubs and
straight cables.
If you connect the network to upper devices, connect from HMI to upper computers.
Configure router functions to HMI if you want to communicate from the upper devices to
FCN/FCJ directly.
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Using Webmetry Functions of FCN/FCJ



FCN/FCJ
HMI (Web browser)
Data/HMI Server
Resource Configurator
Ethernet
Cross Cable
1 2
I/O I/O

Figure Connecting a Web Browser Implemented PC to a single FCN/FCJ as HMI
By using the InfoWells Web application portfolios or Webmetry functions of FCN/FCJ,
you can easily construct an operation and monitoring applications with only Web
browsers. In the figure above, a Windows PC on which a Web browser is implemented
is also used as FCN/FCJ configuration PC. For wiring, use Ethernet cross cables to
connect to the network interface1 of FCN/FCJ. There is no problem if you use hubs and
straight cables.
SEE ALSO
For the InfoWell and Webmetry functions, see "2.5 Network Functions of FCN/FCJ".

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Connecting Programmable Displays to Serial Port



FCN/FCJ
Web Browser
Resource Configurator
Ethernet
Cross Cable
1 2 Serial Port
Programmable
Displays
RS232C
Cable
I/O I/O

Figure Connecting Programmable Displays to FCN/FCJ
Using FA-M3 emulation features of FCN/FCJ, you can connect GP series programmable
displays of Digital Electronics Co. via RS-232C port.

For wiring to programmable displays, use serial communication cables connecting to
COM port of FCN/FCJ.
For configurations of FCN/FCJ, connect a PC on which Web browsers and Resource
Configurator are installed, to the network interface1 of FCN/FCJ via Ethernet cross
cables. There is no problem if you use hubs and straight cables.

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3.6 Connecting Routers to Control Networks
To connect control network devices directly to upper devices like the ones on
control system information network, you need to install routers between the
networks for routing of communication frames.
There are two ways for routing: routing communication frames using a PC on
which VDS data server is mounted, and installing exclusive router devices.



FCJ
Router
HUB
1 2

VDS
Data Server
1 HMI
2
HUB
HMI HMI
HMI
Control System Information Network
Control Network
HUB

FCN
1 2

Figure Connecting Routers to Control Network
Security
The control network is highly secure network requiring real-time operations and
reliability; you need to be careful when you perform routing functions between the
control network and other networks. Take count of securities or loads of control
networks, introducing filtering of unneeded accesses or firewalls.
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Configuration of Routing Information
You need to perform default gateway settings to the devices connected to control
networks that communicate to upper networks.
SEE ALSO
For the configuration of default gateway, see "2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings)".

You need to add routing information besides default gateway settings when connecting
two or more routers to a control network as in the example of this chapter and
configuring routers to switch according to the target device.
How to Configure FCN/FCJ
1. Click the link of [Edit] in "System File Setting" from the maintenance menu. Select
"IP Routing File" on the system configuration file window and click [OK].

2. On the IP routing file edit window, add the routing information in the following
format.
net <destination> gateway <gateway>
host <destination> gateway <gateway>
"net" is the keyword that indicates the <destination> is a network; "host" is the
keyword that indicates the <destination> is a host. Specify names or IP addresses
for <destination> and <gateway>.
e.g.
net 192.168.3.0 gateway vds01
net 192.168.9.0 gateway 192.168.0.252
host hmi10 gateway 192.168.0.252
How to Configure VDS
Add routing information using the ROUTE command on the DOS command window.
e.g.
ROUTE -P ADD 192.168.99.0 MASK 255.255.255.0.192.168.6.10
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3.7 Connecting Several Control Networks to VDS
When connecting devices other than FCN/FCJ (e.g. PLC), you may well connect to
another network, separating physically from the network connecting to FCN/FCJ.
Thereby communications with devices other than FCN/FCJ using exclusive
protocols (e.g. MELSEC-NET, FL-NET) can be guarded from external perturbations
arise from the communications to FCN/FCJ.


FCJ
HUB
1 2

VDS
Data Server
3
1
HUB
HMI
1
HMI
2
Control System Information Network
Control Network1

FCN
1 2
HUB
2 PLC
2
PLC
1
Control Network2

Figure Connecting Several Control Network to VDS
In the example above, three network adapters are installed on a VDS; connecting
network interface1 to control network1; interface2 to control network2; interface3 to
control network3.
Table Example of IP Address Setting when Connecting Several Control Networks to VDS
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator
Control network1
Single network setting
FCJ 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator
Control network1
Single network setting
1 172.16.1.1 Windows setting Control system information network
2 192.168.0.101 Windows setting Control network1 VDS data server
3 192.168.20.101 Windows setting Control network2
PLC1 192.168.20.1
Setting Defined by the
PLC
Control network2
PLC2 192.168.20.2
Setting Defined by the
PLC
Control network2
HMI1 172.16.1.21 Windows setting Control system information network
HMI2 172.16.1.22 Windows setting Control system information network

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3.8 Duplexing Networks
For control networks, it is possible to duplex network interfaces, cables and hubs
using the duplexed network function of STARDOM. This section explains a typical
example of duplexed network system attained through the duplexed network
function of STARDOM.


FCJ
HUB-A
HUB-A
PLC
HUB-B

FCN
Configu-
ration
PC
HMI
Client
HUB-A
VDS
HUB-B HUB-B
FCJ Control
-side
Standby
-side
1
2
1
2 2
1
2 2
1
2
FCN 1 1

Figure Example of Duplexed Network Configuration
Installation of Devices and Wirings
Install hubs for Networks-A and Networks-B separately. Connect a single interface
device to HUBs-A.
SEE ALSO
For the features of network topologies, see "2.6 Duplexing Control Network".

Connecting FCN/FCJ
Connect interface1 to HUB-A, interface2 to HUB-B. For the FCN with a duplexed CPU,
install wirings for both control side CPU and standby side CPU.
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IP Address Setting to FCN/FCJ
Configure VIP to IP addresses using Resource Configurator.
SEE ALSO
For IP address settings to FCN/FCJ, see "2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings)".

For your reference, the examples of IP addresses configured to each network interface
of the FCN with duplexed CPU are indicated as follows:

[Control side] Interface A:
IP address = 192.168.0.1, Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0 (VIP)
IP address = 192.168.1.1, Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0 (PIP-A)
Interface B:
IP address = 192.168.2.1, Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0 (PIP-B)

[Standby side] Interface A:
IP address = 192.168.1.129, Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0 (PIP-A)
Interface B:
IP address = 192.168.2.129, Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0 (PIP-B)
Parameter Settings of FCN/FCJ
Set the Network of CPU Module General of the Resource Configurator to
Duplex.

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Connecting VDS
Install two network interface cards, each of which connects to HUB-A and HUB-B.
IP Address Configuration to VDS
Configure VIP, PIP-A and PIP-B on Windows 2000/XP network configurations. Configure
VIP and PIP-A to the network interface card connecting to HUB-A; configure PIP-B to
the network interface card connecting to HUB-B.
SEE ALSO
For IP address settings to VDS, see "D2.3 IP Address Setting Procedure to VDS" in "FCN/FCJ Guide"
(IM 34P02Q01-01E).

Parameter Settings of VDS
Configure VIP using "FCN/FCJ Connection Setting Tool" of VDS. Start the tool and type
VIP to "Virtual IP Address" in the "General" tab.
Connection and Configuration of Single Interface Device
Be sure to connect a single interface device to HUB-A. If Network-A fails, the
communication also fails because the communications are performed via Networks-A.
Configure VIP for an IP address. For the sequence of configuration, see the manual of
each device.
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3.9 Connecting Devices (e.g.PLCs) Other than
FCN/FCJ to VDS
You can connect devices (e.g.PLCs) other than FCN/FCJ to VDS data server.
Basic (Single) Configuration
You can connect devices other than FCN/FCJ including PLCs on the same network to
which FCN/FCJ is connected. The following example shows a typical configuration and
IP address settings.



FCJ
PLC
HUB
1 2

VDS
Data Server

1 HMI





FCN
1 2 2 1

Control
-side


Standby
-side
2
HUB
HMI

HMI HMI

Control System Information Network
Control Network

Figure Connecting Devices Other than FCN/FCJ to Control Network
Use port 1 as network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address Setting when Connecting VDS and PLC (Single Configuration)
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator Single network setting
FCJ 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator Single network setting
PLC 192.168.0.3
Setting Defined by the
PLC

VDS data server 1 192.168.0.101 Windows setting
Control system information network
(port2) requires individual setting
HMI 192.168.0.121 Windows setting
SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on the number of connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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When Control Network is Duplexed
You can connect devices other than FCN/FCJ to a duplexed control network connecting
FCN/FCJ. The following figure shows a typical example of configuration and IP address
settings.


FCJ
PLC
HUB-B
1 2

VDS
Data Server

1 HMI




FCN
1 2 2 1

Control
-side


Standby
-side
3
HUB
HMI HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
Control Network
HUB-A
2

Figure Connecting Devices Other than FCN/FCJ to Duplexed Control Network
Connect PLCs to Network-A of the control network.
Table Example of IP Address Setting When Connecting VDS and PLC (Duplexed Configuration)
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1/2 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator
Configure only VIP. PIP is automatically set.
Duplexed network setting
FCJ 1/2 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator
Configure only VIP. PIP is automatically set.
Duplexed network setting
PLC 192.168.0.3
Setting Defined by the
PLC
Configure the same network address as VIP set
to FCN/FCJ or VDS.
1
192.168.0.101(VIP)
192.168.1.101(PIP-A)
Windows setting
VDS data server
2 192.168.2.101(PIP-B) Windows setting
Configure VIP and PIP-A to network interface1;
PIP-B to network interface2. Control system
information network side (port3) requires
exclusive IP address.
HMI 192.168.0.121 Windows setting
Configure the same network address as VIP set
to FCN/FCJ or VDS.

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3.10 Connecting PLC to FCN/FCJ
FCN/FCJ can communicate to devices like PLCs, other than FCN/FCJ or VDS, via
control networks. However, the network must be configured to avoid having
influences on FCN/FCJ control by communication load lead from other devices.
SEE ALSO
Refer to 2.7 Cautions for Network Configuration when connecting devices other than VDS and
FCN/FCJ devices to the network.

Basic (Single) Configuration
You can connect devices (e.g.PLCs) other than FCN/FCJ to the same control network to
which FCN/FCJ is connected. The following figure shows a typical example of
configuration and IP address settings.

FCJ
PLC 1 2

VDS
Data Server

1 HMI




FCN
1 2 2 1

Control
-side


Standby
-side
3
HUB
HMI HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
Control Network
HUB
2

Figure Connecting PLC to FCN/FCJ
Use port1 for the network interface of FCN/FCJ.
Use function block for PLC connections as control application of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address when Connecting FCN/FCJ to PLC (Single Configuration)
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator Single network setting
FCJ 1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator Single network setting
PLC 192.168.0.3 Setting Defined by the PLC
VDS data server 1 192.168.0.101 Windows setting
Control system information network
side (port2) requires exclusive IP
address
HMI 192.168.0.121 Windows setting
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SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on the number of connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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When Control Network is Duplexed
The following example explains the configuration when connecting devices other than
FCN/FCJ to a duplexed control network connecting to FCN/FCJ.

FCJ
PLC
HUB-B
1 2

VDS
Data Server

1 HMI




FCN
1 2 2 1

Control
-side


Standby
-side
3
HUB
HMI HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
Control Network
HUB-A
2

Figure Example of Connecting PLC to FCN/FCJ on duplexed Network
Connect PLCs to Network-A of a control network. Use function block for PLC
connections as the control application of FCN/FCJ.
Table Example of IP Address Setting When Connecting FCN/FCJ and PLC (Duplexed
Configuration)
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1/2 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator
Configure only VIP. PIP is automatically set.
Duplexed network setting
FCJ 1/2 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator
Configure only VIP. PIP is automatically set.
Duplexed network setting
PLC 192.168.0.3
Setting Defined by the
PLC
Configure the same network address as VIP set to
FCN/FCJ or VDS.
1
192.168.0.101(VIP)
192.168.1.101(PIP-A)
Windows setting
VDS data server
2 192.168.2.101(PIP-B) Windows setting
Configure VIP and PIP-A to network interface1;
PIP-B to network interface2. Control system
information network side (port3) requires exclusive
IP address.
HMI 192.168.0.121 Windows setting
Configure the same network address as VIP set to
FCN/FCJ or VDS.
SEE ALSO
For the restrictions on the number of connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".

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Separated Network Configuration
The figure below shows a configuration example in which network port 1 of the FCN/FCJ
is connected to a control network (for communications with the VDS), while network port
2 is connected to a PLC-dedicated network (for communications with the PLCs).
VDS
HMI
VDS
HMI
VDS Data Server
FCN FCJ
PLC1 PLC2
Control Network
Control System
Information Network
PLC-dedicated Network
2
1
1
2
1

Figure Example of a Separated Network with PLCs Connected to the FCN/FCJ
Table Examples of IP Addresses for Connection between the FCN/FCJ and the PLCs (Separated
Network Configuration)
Nodes Ports IP Addresses Settings Remarks
FCN 1 192.168.0.1 Resource Configurator Single network setting
1 192.168.0.2 Resource Configurator Separated network setting (port 1 address)
FCJ
2 192.168.20.3 Resource Configurator Separated network setting (port 2 address)
PLC1 192.168.20.1
Setting Defined by the
PLC
PLC2 192.168.20.2
Setting Defined by the
PLC
Specify the same network address as the address
of FCJs port 2.
1 192.168.0.101 Windows setting For control networks
VDS data server
2 172.16.1.1 Windows setting For control system information networks
HMI 172.16.1.21 Windows setting
Specify the same network address as the control
system information network side (port 2) of the
VDS.
SEE ALSO
For restrictions on the number of connecting devices, see "2.1 Varieties of Basic Configurations".


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3.11 Operation with Remote HMI
STARDOM realizes Web-based configuration of HMIs, allowing you to easily
construct a system for operation and monitoring remotely via WAN including
telephone lines and internet.
Example of Construction
The following figure shows an example of system configuration using a WAN.
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
PLC
Control Network
HMI HMI
Control System
Information Network
HMI
VDS
Data
Server
Firewall
VPN
Router
Information Network
... ...
Firewall
VPN
Router
Remote Operation
WAN

Figure Example of Remote Operation
As a WAN, you can use ISDN, leased line, frame relay or inexpensive internet. If
you perform operation and monitoring remotely, choose an optimum WAN after due
consideration of traffic at operation and monitoring, available network infrastructure,
etc. To realize a full-scale operation, it is recommended to employ high-speed
infrastructure, assured bandwidth, depending on the scale of operation.
For connection part of a WAN, routers supporting protocols for connecting
telephone lines, ISDN, leased lines, etc. are needed. If necessary, consider the
installation of a firewall, VPN (Virtual Private Network) to acquire the needed
security and band. Firewalls protect against external unauthorized accesses and
tampering. VPN protects against wiretapping activities and passing off. For the
network securities, follow the network policy of your company.
For communication band of the part of WAN, calculate the actual traffic and employ
the infrastructure with excess capacities. Consider the traffic when starting HMIs or
time when events are concentrated as well as steady communication load when
collecting data.
SEE ALSO
For the estimation of traffic, see "2.3 Communication Performances".

For infrastructures of WAN, use services provided by manufacturers of
communication infrastructure of each area (e.g. in Japan, NTT). WAN may be
suspended due to accidents or engineering works. You can set backup WAN or
duplex routers as necessary. See manuals of the router in use for the detailed
procedures.
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Internet Connection
If failures occur in the system at a site, you can send internet mails to remote terminals
from FCN/FCJ or VDS in the field or send mails to a cell phone via telephone lines. With
that it is possible to notify the contact person who is not in the site of important events
immediately. The same person can also simply send Internet mails to ask conditions of
the site. By these functions, a contact person who has received an urgency mail calls
Web browsers using a cell phone or a hand-held device to check conditions of the site.
You can acquire the application that enables these functions.

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3.12 Send Mails to/Receive Mails from VDS and
FCN/FCJ
If failures occur in the system at a site, you can send Internet mails to remote
terminals from FCN/FCJ or VDS in the field or send mails to a cell phone via
telephone lines. With that it is possible to notify the contact person who is not in
the site of important events immediately. The same person can also simply send
Internet mails to ask conditions of the site. By these functions, a contact person
who has received an urgency mail calls Web browsers using a cell phone or a
hand-held device to check conditions of the site. You can acquire the application
that enables these functions.
Example of Construction
The following figure indicates an example of system configuration to realize the following
functions: inquire remote FCN/FCJ or VDS using internet mail functions and send urgent
mails from remote FCN/FCJ to VDS.

FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
HMI Server
Data Server
PLC
Control Network
Cell
Phones,
etc.
Control System Information Network
VDS
HMI
Server
Dial-up
Router
... ...
WAN
POP Server
SMTP Server
HMI

Figure Example of System Configuration with Mail Functions
Connection between the devices of the field and WAN is performed using
commercially available routers with dial-up, ISDN and ADSL connection functions. In
the example above, a dial-up router for analog lines is used. See manuals of each
router for the setting procedures.
To connect to a WAN, take due account of securities.
For send and receive mails, a server dedicated to send/receive mails is required. In
the example above, POP server and SMTP server are installed in a company. If you
cannot install a server for sending and receiving mails, you may use a server
provided by providers or manufacturer of cell phones instead, according to your
condition.
Between a dial-up router and a VDS or FCN/FCJ, install firewalls or VPN routers as
necessary.
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Configurations of FCN/FCJ Mail Functions
FCN/FCJ supports SMTP as send mail protocol; POP3 as receive mail protocol.
Send/receive mail functions of FCN/FCJ can be defined in the maintenance windows on
a Web browser. The following table lists setting items. For details of each, see other
instruction manuals or online help files.
Table Configurations List of Mail Setting File
Functions Setting items Keys Default values
POP3 user name PopUser None
Communication trace output TraceMode NO Send/receive mails
Send/receive log output MailLog YES
POP3 password PopPassward None
POP3 server address PopServer None
Receive mail cycle RecvCycle 0 (m)
Maximum mail size MaxMailSize 2 (Kbyte)
Authorization phase AuthPhase None
Receive mails
Authorization error handling OnAuthError Send
SMTP server address SmtpServer None
Domain name Domain None
Mail sender TrueName None
Error mail send destination ErrorsTo None
Reply mail destination ReplyTo None
Send mail cycle SendCycle 0 (m)
Send mail spool size QueueSize 0 (Kbytes)
Send mail spool type QueueType Memory
Send mails
Maximum send error QueueExpire 5 (times)

Configuration Procedures
1. Click the link of [Edit] in "System Setting File" of the maintenance menu. Select "E-
Mail Configuration File" on the system setting file window and click [OK].

2. On the mail function setting window, perform the needed configuration. For the
detailed explanation, see the online help files.
TIP
When using the E-mail Application Portfolio of the InfoWell, the above configuration can be set in the
portfolios setting window. Therefore, there is no need to be aware of the above E-mail Configuration
File when using the portfolio.

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3.13 Monitoring and Maintaining FCN/FCJ
Remotely
FCN/FCJ is an autonomous network controller, enabling easily to realize systems
for operation and monitoring or maintaining remotely via a WAN.

The following figure shows an example of system configuration for simple operation and
monitoring and maintenances of FCN/FCJ remotely installed, via a WAN including
telephone lines or internet.
FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
PLC
Control Network
Web
Browser
Control System
Inforamtion Network
HMI
VDS
Data
Server
Firewall
VPN
Router
... ...
Firewall
VPN
Router
Remote Operation
WAN

Figure Example of Monitoring Operation from Remote FCN/FCJ
Routing
You need to install firewalls, authorization, and enciphere for securities of connections to
a WAN. In the figure above, routers supporting firewalls and VPN are employed.
The routing operations between a control network and a control system network are
performed on VDS data server in the example above; however, another router can be
installed.
SEE ALSO
For the installation of routers, see "3.6 Connecting Routers to Control Networks".

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Maintenances of FCN/FCJ
By specifying URL of an FCN/FCJ on a Web browser, the maintenance homepage of the
FCN/FCJ is displayed. Using this function, you can check or change configurations of
FCN/FCJ remotely.
Operation and Monitoring on Web Browser
Using the Web Application Portfolio or Webmetry functions, you can construct simple
operation and monitoring windows.

CAUTION
Communication protocols for some Web windows of the Web Application Portfolio and
windows of the Webmetry functions do not generally pass through firewalls. If these
windows need to be displayed via a firewall, set passage to be allowed through the
firewalls port 34170.

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Remote Connection of FCN/FCJ via Modems

FCN
PC
Modem
Office or other sites
Public Circuit
Modem
Remote area
Serial
Cable

Figure Example of Monitoring Operations from Remote FCN/FCJ (Small System)
FCN/FCJ supports PPP connections, easily realizing connections to public line through
modems on a serial port of FCN/FCJ to acquire data via a public line. Communication
from a remote PC to an FCN/FCJ is possible via a public line.
Setting Procedures of PPP (Point to Point Protocol) Connections on
FCN/FCJ
1. Click the link of [Edit] in "System Setting File" from the maintenance menu. Select
"PPP Setting File" on the system configuration file window and click [OK].

2. On the PPP function setting file edit window, perform needed configurations
referring to examples of settings or online help files.

3. Reboot FCN/FCJ in online mode.
TIP
If you duplex a CPU on FCN, this function is not available.

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3.14 Setting FCN/FCJ and VDS Remotely
If you install FCN/FCJ remotely from VDS data server, or in a separated building,
the configuration can be as follows:
FCN FCN
VDS
Data
Server
Control Network
HMI VDS
HMI Server
...
Switching HUB
Optical Fiber Optical Fiber
Area1
Area2 Area3
Switching HUB
Switching HUB
FCN FCN
...

Figure Example of Control Network in Remote Areas
Wiring
If you connect devices in separate buildings or remote places, use optical fiber that
enables long-distance transmissions and is fairly resistant to noise. However, the total
distance of CAT5 twisted pair cable is 100 m at most because it is exclusive of indoor
wiring; it is not appropriate for wiring between separated buildings or in long distances.
To use optical fibers, prepare a switching hub with an optical fiber interface of at least
100 Mbps.
Setting Parameters
There are no parameters to be set.

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3.15 Connecting FCN/FCJ and VDS via WAN
You may want to install VDS and FCN/FCJ in remote places connected via a WAN
(leased line, telephone line, ISDN, etc.). It is difficult to completely ensure
communications between VDS and FCN/FCJ via WAN, because 100 Mbps Ethernet
is assumed to be used for communications between them; in addition, a general
WAN cannot guarantee band or response time and operation test with a WAN is
not performed at developing process.
Example of Construction
The following figure indicates an example of construction. Note that this example only
illustrates reference information, of which operations are not guaranteed. Draw upon
approaches to estimate communication performances in this document; construct a
system based upon understanding of the features of the WAN on your own authority as
an engineer in charge of system construction.










Area1










Area3











Area2
FCN FCN
VDS
Data
Server
HMI VDS
HMI
Server
...
Router
Router
Router
WAN
HUB
HUB
FCN FCN ...
HUB

Figure Example of Control Network via WAN
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Notes for Communication Performances
In the example above, VDS data server acquires data of remote FCN/FCJ. Between a
WAN and the connecting part, routers according to the infrastructure are installed. The
communications between VDS data server and FCN/FCJ include steady data
acquisitions as well as uploading of definition data at starting-up, and concentrations of
events. Therefore, you should employ the infrastructure with excess band for the WAN
to correspond to the traffic during starting-up and event concentration, in addition to the
steady state.
SEE ALSO
For the estimation of communication performances, see "2.3 Communication Performances".

Configurations
Be sure to configure the default gateway of remote FCN/FCJ and VDS correctly.
SEE ALSO
For the settings of default gateway, see "2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings).

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3.16 Connecting Remote Devices to Duplexed
Control Network
This section explains the network configuration when connecting remote devices
to duplexed control networks.
Example of Construction
STARDOM duplexed network function is not available for communications to remote
devices. Therefore, the connection to a WAN is performed only in HUB-A as shown in
the figure below.

HUB-A
HUB-A
HUB-B

FCJ
HUB-B

VDS

HUB-A





WAN
Router
Router
Router
Router
2
1
2
1 FCN

2
1
FCJ

2
1
Control
-side

Standby
-side
2 2
FCN 1 1

Figure Example of Connecting Control Network to WAN
Connection
A router connecting to a WAN is connected to HUB-A as a single interface device. When
performing routing, you need to configure the related devices. For the configuration of
the router, see the instruction manual of each router.
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Duplexing WAN Part
The part of router and WAN can be duplexed using a duplexed network function of the
router. As shown in doted lines in the figure above, connect backup routers to HUBs-A
and to the WAN for the backup side. The WAN on the primary side and on the backup
side should be physically different. With that configuration, if the WAN (or the router
supporting WAN) fails, the path is switched automatically over another one. For a
duplexed network function of a router, see the manual of each router.
TIP
Because the communication band on a WAN is not completely guaranteed, the STARDOM duplexed
control network function does not apply to the part of the WAN network.

Configurations
Be sure to configure the default gateway of the remote FCN/FCJ and VDS correctly.
SEE ALSO
For the settings of default gateway, see "2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings)".

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3.17 Synchronizing Times among Nodes
To synchronize times of event occurrences, you need to synchronize times
among nodes of the control network. On STARDOM, the time between nodes can
be synchronized using SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol; refer to RFC2030), a
general technology for the time synchronization function of Ethernet.
The accuracy of the synchronization is assumed to be 1 second or shorter, which
is because VDS uses a general PC and Windows for the platform, and Ethernet
and TCP/IP for the communication protocol.
Example of Construction
The following figure indicates an example of construction when synchronizing times on
control network.

VDS
Data Server
FCN FCN FCJ

VDS
Data Server
PLC
Control Network
HMI HMI
Control System Information Network
SNTP
Server
SNTP
Client
SNTP
Client
SNTP
Client
SNTP
server in a
company
SNTP
Client
SNTP
Server
SNTP
Client

Figure Example of Construction when Synchronizing Times on Control Network
How to Configure the Time Synchronization Function
SNTP has server and client functions. Server functions allow transmission of their own
times. Client functions allow reception of the time for synchronization of their own times.
It is also possible to run server and client functions simultaneously in order to send
(relay) the time received from another SNTP server to other machines.
SNTP configuration methods in different system configurations are described below:

[If a STARDOM system is connected to the intranet of a company]
As shown in the above configuration example, simultaneously run SNTP server
functions and SNTP client functions in the VDSs to receive the time from the SNTP
server in the company for delivery to the FCNs/FCJs.
TIP
In the domain environments of Windows 2000 and later operating systems, time in client PCs is
automatically synchronized. Therefore, if PCs operating VDSs have been used in such domains, the
SNTP client functions of these VDSs have already been running. In such cases, run SNTP server
functions of the VDSs and send the time to the FCNs/FCJs.

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[If a STARDOM system is independent of the intranet of a company]
If VDSs are already operating on Windows 2000, run SNTP server functions of a VDS,
which is then used as the time master machine. Run SNTP client functions of the other
VDSs and FCNs/FCJs to synchronize their time to the time of this time master VDS.
If VDSs are operating on Windows XP, they do not become time master machines. In
this case, install a time synchronization server portfolio in an FCN or an FCJ, which is
then used as the time master machine. Other FCNs/FCJs or VDSs receive the time from
this time master machine.
TIP
Windows XP allows the operation of SNTP client functions or the simultaneous operation of the SNTP
client and server functions, but not the operation of SNTP server functions only. Therefore, a single
WindowsXP machine cannot become the time master.

[When multiple FCNs/FCJs are used exclusively]
Install a time synchronization server portfolio in an FCN or an FCJ, which is then used
as the time master machine. Other FCNs/FCJs receive time from this time master
machine.
Basic Operations of SNTP
Time synchronization communications are performed between SNTP client functions
implemented on each node and SNTP server connected to a network. There are two
approaches for time synchronization communications: multicasting time to network from
SNTP server functions, and inquiring time to SNTP server from SNTP client, that is a
client-server (unicast) mode.
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Adjusting Time on FCN/FCJ
FCNs/FCJs have SNTP client functions installed as standard features. Moreover,
FCN/FCJ has a function to adjust OS time gradually (smooth adjustment) for
synchronizing with times received by SNTP clients, preventing skips or reverses of time.
By default, it performs time synchronization of unicast communication every 100
seconds; it performs smooth adjustment for the difference of 5 sec or less; and it does
not perform any adjustments for the difference of 500 ms or less. These parameters can
be configured in the maintenance homepage on a Web browser.
In addition, installation of a time synchronization server portfolio on an FCN/FCJ makes
it possible to run SNTP server functions.
Adjusting Time of VDS
VDSs use the time synchronization function of Windows operating systems.
The following descriptions provide setting methods for Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

[If Windows 2000 is used]
To enable SNTP client/server functions, use the FCN/FCJ connection setting tool of
VDS.
To enable SNTP client functions, check "Acquiring Time" on the "Time
Synchronization" tab and type the name of the SNTP server for which you want to
acquire time.
To enable SNTP server functions, check "Time Delivery" on the "Time Delivery" tab
in the FCN/FCJ connection setting tool.
After the above settings have been entered, restart the PC.

[If Windows XP is used]
To enable SNTP client/server functions, use the following methods:
To enable SNTP client functions, activate the command prompt and enter the
following command:
net time /setsntp:(SNTP server computer name or IP address)
To stop SNTP client functions, enter the following command:
net time /setsntp
To enable SNTP server functions, check "Time Delivery" on the "Time
Synchronization tab in the FCN/FCJ connection setting tool. Notice that if this
function is used on Windows XP, SNTP client functions need to be already enabled.
After the above settings have been entered, restart the PC.
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Connecting to External SNTP Server
As necessary, configure settings to perform the time synchronization with your standard
SNTP server or an external standard SNTP server. In the example above, the time is
synchronized between SNTP server in a company and VDS.
TIP
SNTP servers are managed in a tree structure on the Internet. They can be generally accessed.
However, in view of loads on public SNTP servers, it is not practical that all computers acquire time
from public SNTP servers.
Therefore, it is recommended that an SNTP server in your company be used for VDSs. If you wish to
use an external SNTP server, refer for example, to the information that is available at
http://www.ntp.org/.
In some connecting methods to the Internet, SNTP packets may be blocked by firewalls or other
systems.

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Configurations on SNTP of FCN/FCJ
Configurations of SNTP client functions are performed in the maintenance homepage on
a Web browser by editing the SNTP (synch time) setting file. The following table lists
setting items.
Table SNTP Setting Items
Setting items Keys Default values
Operation mode SntpMode UNICAST
Server address1 SntpServer1
Server address2 Sntpserver2
Server address3 Sntpserver3
Server address4 Sntpserver4
Server timeout (ms) ServerResponseTime 3000
Request retransmission RequestRetry 3
Time inquiring polling interval (sec) SyncIntervalTime 100
Maximum ignore time (ms) MaxIgnoreTime 500
Maximum smooth adjusting time (sec) MaxSmoothTime 5
Maximum round trip time (ms) MaxRtt 500
Communication trace TraceMode NO

As a time server address, configure the IP address of VDS; configure the VIP with
duplexed network. In the example above, configure IP addresses of two VDS data
servers to server address1 and server address2. Other setting items operate in default
values without problems. If you want to make advanced settings, change the parameters
referring to the instruction manuals of Duonus or online-help files on maintenance
windows on a Web browser.
Initial Time Setting to FCN/FCJ
Time is not set to FCN/FCJ when shipped. The following sequence explains how to set
time initially to FCN/FCJ.

1. Access to FCN/FCJ on a Web browser and click the link of [Reboot] in the
maintenance menu of the maintenance homepage. FCN/FCJ is restarted in the
maintenance mode.

2. Click the link of [Set Data and Time] in the maintenance menu.

3. Set the present time and click [OK] in the date/time setting window.

4. Open the initial window of the maintenance homepage to check if the time is
correctly set.
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SNTP Client Settings to FCN/FCJ
The following sequence is for the configurations of SNTP operation parameters on
FCN/FCJ.

1. Access to FCN/FCJ on a Web browser and click the link of [Edit] in "System Setting
File" in the maintenance menu on the maintenance homepage.

2. Select "JEROS Basic Setting File" and click [OK].

3. Configure SNTP and time zone. Type "YES" in the part of SntpStart; input the
parameter of your area for TIMEZONE.

4. Configure parameters. Set the time synchronization mode to SntpMode (unicast or
broadcast) and set the SNTP server address to SntpServer. Up to 4 time servers
can be configured. Default values are set to other parameters and can be changed
if necessary. When you finished inputting the parameters, click [OK].

5. Restart FCN/FCJ in online mode.
SNTP Server Settings for the FCN/FCJ
No special settings are required for SNTP server functions of the FCN/FCJ. Installation
of a time synchronization server portfolio in the FCN/FCJ enables you to run SNTP
server functions.

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3.18 Using Hand-held Devices in a Field
You can monitor operations, perform adjustment and maintenance of a device at a
site by connecting hand-held devices to control networks via a wireless LAN.
Example of Construction
The following figure indicates a system with a wireless LAN.

HUB
HUB
FCN HMI FCJ
HUB
Wireless
Access
Point
FCJ
Control
-side
Standby
-side
FCN VDS
Hand-held
HMI
Hand-held
HMI
Wireless
Access
Point

Figure Example of Network Connecting Hand-held Devices and Wireless LAN
Wireless LAN
As a typical wireless communication, you can use the wireless LAN standardized by
IEEE802.11. In the example above, the radio wave called spread spectrum (SS) is used
as the infrastructure mode. The SS mode provides high confidentiality and is resistant
against noise. Prepare additional access points or exclusive communication cards.
How to Set Wireless Devices
Install access points for the IEEE802.11 wireless LAN for each site as in the example.
Connect the access points to hubs (with dual network, to HUBs-A). Install IEEE802.11
wireless LAN adapters on hand-held devices. If the access points and hand-held
devices are physically remote, or radio waves are not well received due to obstructions,
install several access points to use roaming functions. IEEE802.11b communications
are performed with radio waves of 2.4 GHz; be careful if the devices using the same
band exist in the same area.
Securities
Comparing to a cable LAN, a wireless LAN is more vulnerable to tapping and
unauthorized accesses; you need to install security functions including encipher or user
authorization systems. You can use build-in security functions of hand-held devices.
Band
Note that the speed of a wireless communication is slower than the one with cables. As
the maximum communication speed, 11 Mbps (a logical value) can be obtained with
802.11b devices; 54 Mbps (a logical value) can be obtained with 802.11a or 802.11g
devices.
Estimate communication loads using examples in "Communication Performances" of
chapter 2 and choose a wireless LAN device leaving some extra capacities.
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Reliability
Duplexing can be attained by installing several access points. For the detailed
procedures of installation, see the instruction manual of each wireless device.
TIP
Duplexed network function of STARDOM on the part of wireless LAN is not guaranteed in
performances and reliabilities.

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3.19 Connecting Remote Sites Using Wireless
Devices
You may want to connect remote sites, e.g., between buildings, factories or bases
where cable communication infrastructures are not prepared or communication
cables cannot be installed (at sea, in a desert, forest, etc.). In these conditions, it
is relatively easy and inexpensive to install networks with wireless technologies.
Typically, install antennas at two remote sites to communicate using territorial or
communication satellite.
According to your communication equipment and infrastructure of your area,
choose the optimum communication infrastructure. (This document does not
cover the specific communication infrastructures.)
Example of Construction













Remote Area












Data Center
FCJ
HMI
Wireless device
FCN
HUB
HUB
VDS
Wireless device

Figure Example of Remote Connection with Wireless Devices
Install wireless devices and antennas at two remote sites. Connect the wireless devices
to hubs (to HUBs-A with duplexed network) connected to STARDOM devices. For the
types and procedures of installation, see the instruction manuals of each device.
Securities
A wireless LAN is more vulnerable to tapping and unauthorized accesses; you need to
install security functions including encipher or user authorization systems. Most of hand-
held devices have built-in security functions. Read the manuals of the device in use
carefully to configure the device properly.
Communication Band
Estimate communication loads to choose a wireless LAN infrastructure leaving some
extra capacities.
SEE ALSO
For the estimations of communication load, see "2.3 Communication Performances".

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Reliability
Duplex the system by installing several wireless devices or antennas if necessary. For
the detailed procedures of installation, see the instruction manual of each wireless
device.
TIP
Duplexed network function of STARDOM on the part of wireless LAN is not guaranteed in
performances and reliabilities. Installing wireless devices for communications between a VDS and a
controller is not guaranteed. If you actually employ these configurations, be sure to check operations in
advance and construct the system on your own authority.

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3.20 Connecting to Existing ASTMAC
This section explains the points to keep in mind when you connect an existing
ASTMAC and the VDS or FCN/FCJ on the same network.

FCN FCN FCJ
VDS
Data Server
HMI Server
PLC
Control Network
VDS
HMI
VDS
HMI
Control System Information Network
ASTMAC
PLC

Figure Example of Connecting FCN/FCJ and VDS Data Server to ASTMAC
When connecting ASTMAC and VDS on the same network, you can view various data
on ASTMAC (data, trends, reports, and messages) via VDS data server; and data on
VDS (data, trends, reports, and messages) via ASTMAC.
Notices When Setting IP Addresses
STARDOM devices have rules to decide IP addresses. Therefore, when connecting the
VDS or FCN/FCJ to the existing ASTMAC system, you should check if the scope of IP
addresses on the VDS or FCN/FCJ is not used on the ASTMAC system. If they are
duplicated, you should change the settings of the IP addresses.
SEE ALSO
For the rules of IP addresses on STARDOM, see "2.2 Network Basic Definitions (IP Address Settings)"
and "2.6 Duplexing Control Network".





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TI 34P02K25-01E Apr.20, 2006-00 Subject to change without notice. Subject to change without notice.
Revision Information
Title : STARDOM Network Configuration Guide
Manual No. : TI 34P02K25-01E

Sep. 2002/1st Edition
Newly published

Feb. 2004/2nd Edition
Revised
Errors correction
Addition of the new network function of STARDOM
Apr. 2006/3rd Edition
Revised
Addition of Cautions for Network Configuration (for devices frequently conducting broadcast communication)
Error correction (VDS redisplay time)

Written by Open Systems Dept
Industrial Automation Systems Business Div.
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Published by Yokogawa Electric Corporation
2-9-32 Nakacho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8750, Japan