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SOUTH CAROLINAS PREMIER WEEKLY

INDEX | LIVING HERE | DEATHS |


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GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
8772076
GROUND BREAKING
Taylors clinic
breaks ground on
expansion
B1
Sandra Burge, 72
Mary Martha Greer, 83
Tyler Wayne Hilman, 33
Tony Smith, 52
Nelson Lawton
Stokes, Sr. 93
NOTABLE |
SEASON PREVIEW
Greer adjusts to
life without star
running back
A10
SPORTS |
CLASSIFIEDS B45
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2
CRIME A9
ENTERTAINMENT B3
OBITUARIES A6
OPINION A4
OUR SCHOOLS B4
SPORTS A1012
WEATHER A6

Kohls hiring
in Greer
Kohls Department Store is looking to
hire for its new Greer location. The store
will hold a job fair from Saturday. Aug. 2
through Wednesday, Aug. 6 to fll ap-
proximately 100 part-time positions.
The job fair will take place at the
Greenville Marriott on Aug. 2 from 10:45
a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Aug. 3 from 10:45 a.m.-
7:30 p.m.; Aug. 4 from 11:45 a.m.- 7:30
p.m.; Aug. 5 from 8:45 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
and Aug. 6 from 8:45 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
For more information, visit KohlsCa-
reers.com.
BACK TO SCHOOL: Schedules, contacts and more B712
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 31 75 CENTS
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Garrick Good, CEO of
Cardinal Real Estate Group
Inc., who was involved
with purchasing the Allen
Bennett Memorial Hospital
located on Wade Hampton
Boulevard, is facing four
indictments following le-
gal action resolution by the
City of Greer. Good is fac-
ing indictments including
breach for trust and fraud
in excess of amounts of
$10,000 or more, accord-
ing to Mike Sell, assistant
city administrator.
We have final resolution
on the case concerning Mr.
Garrick Good. Mr. Good
is the individual involved
in purchasing the Allen
Bennett Hospital from us
originally, City Admin-
istrator Ed Drigger said
during the July 22 Greer
City Council meeting. As
[council is] aware, when
that purchase was made,
there was pledge made--a
promissory note concern-
ing how we would be com-
pensated for that property.
As you are aware, we filed
criminal charges against
Mr. Good concerning that
matter. It has now gone to
circuit court and there is
resolution concerning that
issue.
The agreement included
payment of the propertys
$1.4 million purchase
price to the city in full
by Feb. 1, 2011, on which
Good defaulted.
Sell went to the hearing
on behalf of the city and
expressed to the solicitors
office the citys interests
on the matter.
Of course I made sure
they understood that our
primary interest was mak-
ing sure that we were pro-
tecting the interest of our
residents, Sell said. We
came to some agreements,
and what we wanted to see
obviously first and fore-
most was restitution for
the damages done to the
property, and then also
they asked in regards what
type if any other thing we
wanted to see, and we dis-
cussed with them the pos-
sibility of obviously some
probation, some super-
vised probation, but also
some in-house incarcera-
tion. So they took that in-
formation and thats what
they brought before the
judge.
The judge ruled in our
favor with all four counts,
SEE COUNCIL | A6
Greer
expands
technical
offerings
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
More technological ap-
plications are available for
Greer residents, including
the Greer Connect applica-
tion, a GIS mapping tool
available online and for
mobile devices and a Greer
Station parking website.
What we are discover-
ing is that the technolo-
gies that are available to
our community are more
and more being used. And,
as our community contin-
ues to use those technolo-
gies more and more, it is
essential for us to be in a
position as we are to be
informed in using those as
well, City Administrator
Ed Driggers said.
An example of the reach
of technology utilized by
Greer was through the
City of Greer website. Ac-
cording to Driggers, in
June, the citys website
had 26,624 visits from 59
countries with an average
of two minutes and 16
seconds spent on the site.
Of the visits, 69.1 percent
found the website through
search engines, while oth-
ers were directed through
social media or went di-
rectly to the site.
GREER CONNECT
The new Greer Connect
application allows users
to put in service requests
directly from their smart-
phones. For potholes,
overgrown grass or for
questions, residents can
easily contact the city
from online or through a
smartphone.
The application, which
can be downloaded
through the app store on a
cellphone, also allows the
city to communicate with
residents during emergen-
cies, for service updates or
during important events.
SEE TECHNOLOGY | A6
Greer
Idol
down
to three
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Due to inclement weath-
er, the July 18th Greer
Idol competition, as part
of the Tunes in the Park,
was cancelled. Following
the July 25 performances,
three contestants from
Greer Idol Teen and two
contestants Greer Idol
were eliminated.
The five contestants
moving forward in the
Greer Idol Teen compe-
tition are Sophia Noyes,
Keddy Mendoza, Taylor
Lee, Toni Teems and Dev-
on White. Jacob Roach,
Ashley Goss and Isabel
Greene did not receive
enough votes to continue
on in the competition.
The three contestants
moving forward in the
Greer Idol competition are
Lauren Painter, Stephen
Young and Josh Jordan.
Contestants Brian Garner
and James Landeth were
eliminated from the com-
petition.
The next round of Greer
Idol Teen will begin at 6
p.m. and Greer Idol will
begin at 9 p.m. on Friday,
August 1 at Greer City
Park.
City to receive restitution on hospital case
The judge ruled in our favor...that [Good]
would provide restitution to the city in
amount of over $10,000...
Mike Sell
Assistant city administrator

Lyman may approve government change
AMANDA IRWIN | THE GREER CITIZEN
Lyman residents gathered at a special called meeting at Pacifc Place Monday night
to discuss a possible change in government form.





PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Riverside High School football team got a taste of Marine Corps training last week during a program concluding
summer sessions for the Warriors. Marine instructors worked with the players for nearly two hours, leading them
through various physical challenges. Check out the full story inside on page A11.
TRAINING WITH THE BEST OF THE BEST
NEW TECHNOLOGY |
Greer Connect Smartphone
app allows users to put in
service requests
GIS Online Interactive maps
Greer Parking Station
Availability, directions
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Lyman residents filled
the Pacific Place on Mon-
day to get more informa-
tion on the forms of gov-
ernment residents will be
voting on this month and
for a chance to pose ques-
tions to council.
In June, Lyman Council
publicly began a process
that will allow Lyman
residents to vote on Aug.
12 whether to change the
citys form of government.
During a special called
public meeting held Mon-
day night, the controver-
sial topic left residents
with several questions,
but the majority of people
who spoke welcomed the
possibility to change from
a strong mayor to a coun-
cil form of government.
Of the 270 municipali-
ties in South Carolina,
145 have a strong mayor
form of government and
93 have a council form of
government.
Resident Annette Huck-
aby Russo questioned why
the vote on the change of
government had to occur
during a special election,
rather than in November.
The special election is an
added expense to Lyman,
but some donated funds
help offset the cost.
Councilman Tony Wyatt
responded that there was
an urgency because re-
quests from residents. He
also said there was an ur-
gency to hold an election
before it could be legally
blocked.
SEE LYMAN | A3
GODS PANTRY
IN DESPERATE NEED
Gods pantry needs
volunteers, supporting
churches and friends as
giving is down and the
needs are up, and Children
home from school are un-
able to get three meals a
day, and the warehouse is
out of vegetables.
Items can be dropped off
at 100 Enoree Road, Greer,
on Thursdays from 10 a.m.
noon; 2481 Racing Road,
Greer, on Thursdays 1 4
p.m.; or 700 E. Main St.,
Duncan, on Wednesdays 9
11 a.m.
For questions or to vol-
unteer call 963-4441.
THRIFT STORE
TAKING DONATIONS
The Community Chest
Thrift Store, located at
52 Groce Road, Lyman, is
open Thursday and Fri-
day 10 a.m. 6 p.m., and
Saturday 10 a.m. 2 p.m.,
hours may extend if vol-
unteers are available and a
need arises.
Donations of gently used
ladies clothing, accessories
and home dcor items are
being accepted and can be
dropped off at the MTCC,
located at 84 Groce Road,
Lyman, or to setup larger
donations or to volunteer
contact Lyn Turner at 439-
7760.
MEALS ON WHEELS
VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION
Orientation for Meals
On Wheels volunteer driv-
ers will be every Thurs-
day of the year from 9:30
11 a.m. at 15 Oregon St.,
Greenville.
Contact volunteer@
mowgvl.org or 233-6565,
or visit mealsonwheels-
greenville.org.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
DRIVERS NEEDED
The American Cancer
Society needs volunteer
drivers to transport pa-
tients to local treatment
centers.
Anyone interested in
volunteering as a driver
must have a good driv-
ing record, valid drivers
license, automobile insur-
ance and a vehicle in good
working condition. The
American Cancer Society
provides free training for
this program.
For more information,
contact the local office at
627-8289.
GCM SEEKS VOLUNTEERS
FOR SENIOR DINING
GCM needs volunteers to
assist with the Senior Din-
ing from 9 11:30 a.m.,
Monday Friday.
To volunteer or for more
information, call Patsy
Quarles at 877-1937.
SHARONS CLOSET
REQUESTS BOYS CLOTHING
Sharons Closet needs
towels, sheets and cloth-
ing for boys sizes 6 - teen.
Clothing accepted Mon-
day through Friday 8 a.m.
4 p.m. at 783 S. Line St.
Ext., Greer.
GREER RELIEF CALLS ON
VOLUNTEER GARDENERS
As part of a collabora-
tion with the community,
Greer Relief has several
plots and needs as many
volunteer gardeners as
possible ot help grow veg-
etables and flowers. Plant-
ing for a fall garden cur-
rently.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
GCM NEEDS
BIBLES, CANNED FOODS
The Food Pantry needs
boxed gelatin, canned
peas, fruit, potatoes, car-
rots, mixed greens, baked
beans, corn muffin mix
and pasta.
GCM also needs large
print Bibles to distribute
to senior adults in the Se-
nior Dining and Meals on
Wheels programs.
Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
between 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Visit gcminc.org or call
879-2254 for more infor-
mation.
GCM SEEKS DRIVERS
FOR SUMMER MONTHS
Greer Community Min-
istries needs drivers for
Meals On Wheels during
the summer months. Sev-
eral routes are available
and each takes about an
hour, with pickup between
10 and 11 a.m.
To volunteer or for more
information, call Wendy
Campbell at 879-2254.
A Meals On Wheels
driver must be a qualified
driver with a valid drivers
license and have a heart
for serving others. MOW
has 19 delivery routes in
the greater Greer area.
Meals are delivered Mon-
day through Friday.
GREER RELIEF NEEDS
DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS
Weekly Costco donates
bread and pastries to Greer
Relief. Greer Relief needs
volunteers who are willing
to pick up donations and
deliver them to Greer Re-
lief for distribution.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
GCM SCHOOL SUPPLY
DRIVE TAKING DONATIONS
The drive is taking
school supply donations
through Aug. 22. Appli-
cants can fill out forms
and must have a photo ID
of parents/guardian and
social security card.
Donations are accepted
8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday -
Friday. For more informa-
tion, call 877-1973.l ican-
bikegreenvillesc@gmail.
com.
CONCERT IN COURTYARD
AT MANNING PLACE
On July 30 a Concert in
the Courtyard will be held
at Manning Place, located
at 10 Companion Court,
Greer, from 6 - 7:30 p.m.
The GRUMPY OLD JAZZ
MEN will perform and
light refreshments will be
served.
FIRST FRIDAY LUNCHEON,
AUGUST 1 AT CITY HALL
The Greater Greer
Chamber of Commerces
First Friday Luncheon pre-
sented by Greer Memo-
rial Hospital is August 1
from 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m.
at Greer City Hall, 301 E.
Poinsett St.
The event is $10 for
member and $15 for non-
members.
Visit greerchamber.com
to register or for more in-
formation.
FAT COUNTS
INFORMATIONAL SESSION
Find out how to choose
low-fat, low-cholesterol
foods during at the Fat
Count program at the GHS
Life Center on August 4,
8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m.
The event is free, but
registration is required.
Call 455-4010 to register.
PREDIABETES
AND NUTRITION AT GHS
The GHS Life Center is
offering an informational
event on prediabetities,
nutrition and how to live a
healthy lifestyle on August
4 from 6 7 p.m.
The event is free, but
registration is required.
Call 455-4010 to register.
STRESS MANAGEMENT
CLASSES ON AUG. 4
The GHS Life Center is
hosting a session partici-
pants to learn how to con-
trol stress.
The cost is $20. To regis-
ter, call 455-4010.
FIRST TUESDAY ON TRADE:
CRUISE IN NIGHT
Augusts First Tuesday
on Trade is Cruise In Night
and will be held August 5
at Greer Station from 5 8
p.m.
For more information on
the free event, contact Kyle
Mensing with the Greer
Development Corporation
at kmensing@greerdevel-
opment.com.
ICAN BIKE CAMP
BEGINS AUGUST 11
The iCan Bike Camp pro-
gram runs from August 11
15 with several sessions
to choose from and is held
at Taylors First Baptist
Church, 200 W. Main St.
With instruction and the
assistance of trained staff,
teachers and adapted
bikes, individuals with dis-
abilities are taught how to
ride a conventional bike,
giving them independence.
Riders attend a 75-minute
session each day for five
consecutive days and the
week concludes with an
awards ceremony.
The cost of the program
is a $50 registration fee
that is 100 percent re-
funded on the last day of
camp.
For more information or
to register, visit icanshine.
org or email icanbikeg-
reenvillesc@gmail.com.
KID SUPPORT CAMP
AUG. 6 8
A Kid Support Camp for
children who have fam-
ily members with cancer
will be offered on Aug.
6-8 from 8 a.m. noon
through the Cancer Insti-
tute of Greenville Health
System for children ages
7 13.
For more information or
to register, call 455-5809.
INFORMATIONAL SESSION
ON SODIUM, AUG. 11
Salt Sense will teach
guidelines for eating less
sodium on August 11, at
8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and
12:30 p.m., at the Green-
ville Healthy System Life
Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
455-4010 to register.
STRESS: IS IT
WORTH DYING FOR?
Learn about the origins
of stress, how the body
responds to it and its im-
pact on the heart during
sessions on August 13 at
8:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.
at the GHS Life Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
455-1415 to register.
QUITSMOKING PROGRAM
OFFERED ON AUGUST 15
QuitWell 101 will pro-
vide tools to help smokers
quit during a session on
August 15 at 10:30 a.m. at
the GHS Life Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
522-3237 to register.
UNDERSTANDING
CHOLESTEROL
The informational pro-
gram will be held on Au-
gust 15 at 12:30 p.m. and
August 22 at 8:30 a.m. and
9:30 a.m. at the GHS Life
Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
455-5173 to register.
GIRLS ON THE RUN
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Volunteers are needed
for the fall season of Girls
on the Run. Being a runner
isnt required.
Volunteer training ses-
sions on August 17 and
August 24 from 8:30 a.m.
4 p.m. at the GHS Life
Center.
To volunteer, call 455-
3252.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. Please
submit information about
area events, meetings, etc.
to Amanda Irwin at 877-
2076, email to airwin@
greercitizen.com or mail
to The Greer Citizen P.O.
Box 70 Greer, SC 29652.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1
GERMANAMERICAN CLUB
STAMMTISCH at 6 p.m. at
Compadres Restaurant, 8161
Warren H. Abernathy Hwy.,
Spartanburg.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 2
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
MONDAY, AUGUST 4
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 5
THE ROTARY CLUB of
Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m.
at Southern Thymes. Call
334-6177.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
THE LIONS CLUB at Lake
View Steak House, Higway 14
at 5:30 p.m.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
UPSTATE LEWY BODY and
Related Dementia Sup-
port Group from 5-6 p.m. at
The Haven in the Village at
Chanticleer. Call Gail Stokes
at 350-7160 or gstokes@
seniorlivingnow.com.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For more information
or to schedule a performance
call Wesley Welsh at 877-
5955.
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 7
THE GREER CHURCH of God
fellowship building host-
ing a Gospel and Blue Grass
Jam from 6:30-9 p.m. Call
877-3668.
THE SERTOMA CLUB at
Great Bay Oyster House at
6:30 p.m. Call Bob Bowman
at 316-2727.
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at 6 p.m. at the Clubhouse,
500 East Main St., Taylors. Call
Allen Culver at 350-6939.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 9
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
MONDAY, AUGUST 11
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 12
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For more information
or to schedule a performance
call Wesley Welsh at 877-
5955.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
THE ROTARY CLUB of
Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m. at
Southern Thymes.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.


A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
(Formerly Service Experts)
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
864- 288- 7671
621 Keith Drive
Greenville, SC 29607
www.SandersHeatCool.com
6
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y
$25 SERVICE CALL
with repairs
when you mention you saw us in
The Greer Citizen
Call Cindy or Dawn for appointment.
UNDER
NEW
MANAGEMENT
Back to
MEAT & THREE
$7.
49
SENIORS PAY $6.99
Cafe and Catering
Open: Tuesday - Sunday 7:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
219 Trade Street, Greer
Event Catering Available
Call Lauren for more information
864-801-9511
www.SouthernThymesCafeCatering.com
Southern Thymes
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
COMMUNITY
NEWS

R
eading is one of the
most wonderful gifts
we have been given,
and it will help you in all
other things you learn in
life. If you cannot read
well and comprehend the
content, truly it is hard to
learn anything else in life.
That is the reason that
our young people need
to have a love for reading
and really learn all they
can to prepare for their
future. As school begins
in a short few weeks,
emphasis will be put on
reading in our schools
and helping students to
read on grade level, with
additional tutoring if they
are behind or need that
special assistance.
I learn so many lessons
on life from reading, first
the Bible and then from
gifted people who have
lived, experienced and en-
joyed the joys of life--and
the beauty of it all.
Jim Rohn is one of
those authors. This week
I want to share some
thoughts from his book,
Lessons on Life.
There are half-dozen
things that make 80 per-
cent of the difference. The
difference between trium-
phant success and bitter
failure lies in the degree
of our commitment to
seek out, study and apply
those half dozen things.
LEARN TO BE HAPPY
Happiness is an activ-
ity with a purpose. Its
love in practice. Its both
a grasp of the obvious
and the mysterious. But,
it is something that all
ages seek to have. It is in
giving that you find it the
most!
DISCIPLINE YOURSELF
Discipline is the most
critical ingredient for suc-
cess. Its the master key
that unlocks the door to
wealth and happiness, the
glue that binds inspira-
tion to achievement the
bridge between thought
and accomplishment. We
must all suffer from one
of the two pains--the pain
of discipline or the pain
of regret. The differ-
ence is discipline weighs
ounces while regret
weighs tons.
EMBRACE CHANGE
Unless you change how
you are you will always
have what you got. You
can change all things
for the better when you
change yourself for the
better. You cannot change
your destination over-
night but you can change
your direction. It seems
that is where we are as a
state and nation. We need
to change our direction
and follow through with
what we know is the right
thing to do for this state
and nation.
LIVE WELL
Dont just learn to
earn! Learn how to live.
The good life is not an
amount; its an attitude,
an act, an idea and a
discovery.
REMEMBER ALWAYS
Life is worthwhile to
try. Try to make progress.
Life is worthwhile if you
give. Giving starts the
receive process. We need
to design our own life or
someone else will!
As we move forward
in the coming legislative
year, there is so much
we can do to better this
state--tax structure re-
form, education funding
reform, agency reform,
budget process reform
and making sure that our
state rights are sound.
We do not need to leave
our future in the hands
of those who would lead
small lives, argue over
small things, cry over
small hurts and through
lack of the facts and due
to self interest, move us
in the wrong direction for
a future that is not secure
for our children and
grandchildren.
Please contact me any-
time I can be of service to
you or your family. You
are why I serve! Read and
know the facts on issues.
We need to all move
forward with the factual
information that is before
us and we must work
together for the quality of
life for all our citizens.
YOUR VOICE
IN COLUMBIA
REPRESENTATIVE
RITA ALLISON
Moving on and moving forward
He is 91 years old and he
drives a Meals on Wheels
route. Bruce Taylor of
Greer says he would rath-
er wear out his life than sit
around to rust.
Ive still got a little left
to give, Taylor said.
Greer Community Min-
istries (GCM) nominated
Taylor for the Meals On
Wheels Association of
Americas American Vol-
unteer Contest. The minis-
try is asking local Facebook
users to vote for Taylor to
show their support.
The Meals on Wheels
program volunteer that
receives the most votes
through the associations
Facebook app will receive
$1,000 and a fully-pro-
duced video to promote
the work theyre doing in
the community.
Bruce is a dependable
and dedicated driver, said
Wendy Campbell, GCM
Meals on Wheels coordina-
tor. He really cares about
the clients on his route
and he is always willing
to pick up an extra day
if we need him to, espe-
cially if I promise to have
a chocolate treat for him.
Every Monday he checks
in to ensure that the week
is staffed fully. I really
appreciate all he does for
MOW.
Vote for Taylor atface-
book.com/mowaa through
Sunday, Aug. 13. Or visit
the Greer Community Min-
istries Facebook page or
website, gcminc.org and
click on the links provided.
Prizes will be awarded to
the top three vote-getters,
as well as to the entry cho-
sen for the Associations
Staff Pick.
The American Volun-
teer Contest was designed
to recognize volunteers
as the backbone of Meals
on Wheels, said Ellie Hol-
lander, President and CEO
of the Meals On Wheels
Association of America.
Its our dedicated army
of two million volunteers
that delivers not only
one million meals a day
nationwide, but also the
friendly smile and safety
check that enable seniors
to remain independent in
their own homes.
The 2014 American
Volunteer winners will be
honored at the 2014 Meals
On Wheels Annual Confer-
ence and Expo Aug. 26-28
in Scottsdale, Arizona.
Greer Community Min-
istries serves the Great-
er Greer area through
four programs: Meals on
Wheels, Senior Dining,
Food Pantry, and Sharons
Closet. For more informa-
tion, visit gcminc.org.
VOTE FOR TAYLOR |
FROM PAGE ONE
We felt like this was
such an important matter,
such an urgent matter for
the future of Lyman, we
didnt want to allow for
any opportunity for some
legal block to occur, Wy-
att said.
According to Jeff Shack
with the South Carolina
Municipal Association, to
his knowledge, there are no
legal measures that could
block the referendum. But,
because only two forms of
government, one of which
being the present form,
can be placed on a ballot
for a vote unless a town
is first being established,
if a petition was gener-
ated for another form of
government before the
referendum passed, the
form of government the
council wanted available
on the ballot may have
been blocked. Once a town
votes on a form of govern-
ment, the matter cannot
be brought forth for a vote
again for four years.
All councilmembers said
they were in support of
the council-form of gov-
ernment, with Mayor Rod-
ney Turner stating strong
opposition.
I oppose the change of
form of government be-
cause it will impeded the
day-to-day operations of
the town, Turner said.
I was on council for six
years. Ive seen some
things that didnt like, but
I supported the mayor,
and when I became mayor,
I had a good understand-
ing of why he did the
things that he did. The
daily operations I feel cer-
tain will be impeded when
you have seven people to
make those decisions
The fact of the matter is, if
you have a council-mayor
form of government, each
one of these folks includ-
ing myself, will have the
same authority over ev-
erything going on. There
are 145 municipalities in
the state that are a mayor-
council form of govern-
ment. Thats not by chance
folks. Theres a reason for
that. We need to stay the
course
When youve got seven
people telling employees
what to do and person-
alities get involved, thats
going to be a problem. Its
going to impede the pro-
cess, he said.
Turner also added that
council already approves
budgets, policies and ordi-
nances, but the mayor car-
ries out the day-to-day op-
erations and to have seven
people involved in the pro-
cess will slow it down.
Seven people are re-
sponsible for setting the
budget today, and thats
true, Wyatt said. But
theres a lot more that
goes on when the mayor
sees day-to-day opera-
tions, and I think what the
six of us would like to join
and make seven of us to
have a little more say when
theres things that happen
just below the umbrella of
the budget level, a say in
how best to use those dol-
lars.
Resident Teresa Wil-
banks questioned whether
the change of government
would give department
heads more leeway to
make decisions.
I think [Mayor Rodney
Turner] brought up some
good points about if there
are this many people mak-
ing decision, but I also
heard in there that if we
give this then our depart-
ment heads are going to
be able to make some day-
to-day decisions that are
not against the law and
that you dont have to wait
on Rodneys approval
To me it looks like this is
going to speed up the pro-
cess Now do I have the
right impression? Wil-
banks said.
Wyatt said departments
would have a budget, and
only when spending out-
side their budget would
council have to become
involved.
Our vision is not seven
people making every de-
cision collectively, that
would be impractical. The
idea is delegating and
empowering department
heads to make to manage
their departments, Wyatt
said.
However, when Wil-
banks questioned whether
Turner thought employees
didnt possess the ability
to make day-to-day deci-
sion, he affirmed that it
was his experience that
they didnt.
Resident Edward Peeler
expressed his support for
the change of government,
as well, citing that of the
29 employees Lyman has,
theres been a turnover of
46 them since Tuner be-
came mayor.
Turner said when he
came into office criminal
activity was taking place
and people had to be re-
placed.
Resident Glenn Greer
questioned whether con-
tracts the mayor entered
into would be effected by
if a change of government
were to take place. Turner
suggested some contrac-
tual matters he is in ne-
gotiations with currently
are receiving hesitation
as a result of the possible
change.
You used the word con-
tracts. Im going to have
to say I am in negotiations
with some folks now that
Im under what I would
consider a gag order, and
theyre not for sure they
dont want to continue
with one person. So be-
cause I havent talked to
the towns attorney about
this, Im going to have to
answer that yes with reser-
vations right now, Turner
said.
Wyatt said the mayors
speculation was inappro-
priate.
I think thats a specu-
lation. Theres no facts to
support that. Were still
a municipality, an entity.
If we need to appoint a
point person that could be
done, Wyatt said.
According to Shacker,
in all three forms of gov-
ernment the decision to
enter into a contract rest
with the council, though a
person to represent them
can be appointed, such as
the mayor. The mayor ne-
gotiating a contract would
be on half of the town, but
the contract would still
have to be approved by
council.
Jeff Suarez, a Lyman
business owner, ques-
tioned whether council
was in the dark on con-
tractual matters.
They actually approve
the referendum under a
project name a couple
years ago, they dont know
the particulars (of con-
tractual agreements) they
know whos involved be-
cause of the gag order, for
a lack of a better word,
Turner said.
Lyman residents will
have the opportunity to
vote on the form of gov-
ernment for Lyman on
Aug. 12 from 7 a.m. 7
p.m. and all precincts will
vote at Lyman Town Hall,
81 Groce Road. Absentee
voting begins in-person at
the Office of Registration
and Election, 366 North
Church St., Spartanburg,
on Aug. 8 or by mail.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A3
COLUMBUS NC
Calverts Kitchen
Giardini Trattoria
Larkins Carolina Grill
Mountain View BBQ
Openroad Coffee
Scoops N More
Southern Manners
Wolverine Pizza
SALUDA NC
Crust and Kettle
Green River BBQ
Saluda Grade
The Orchard Inn
The Purple Onion
Wildflour Bakery
TRYON NC
10 North Trade Caf & Bakery
Bucks Pizza
Caro-Mi Dining Room
Lavender Bistro
Sidestreet Pizza & Pasta
The Ruby Slipper
CAMPOBELLO SC
The Dutch Plate
GREER SC
Dark Corner Diner
Stomping Grounds
Coffee House & Wine Bar
Wild Ace Pizza & Pub
INMAN SC
Bowens Landing
Bronco Mexican Restaurant
Delightful Dishes
Palmetto Restaurant
LANDRUMSC
Bojangles Landrum
Harvest House of the
Carolinas
Kents Restaurant
Papa Johns Pizza
Soulisas Dining & Music
House
Southside Smokehouse &
Grille
Stone Soup
Subway of Landrum
The Drake House
The Hare & Hound
Twin Palmetto
SPARTANBURG SC
City Range
Converse Deli
Hospice of the Carolina Foothills 864.457.9122 828.894.7000 www.hocf.org
Tank You from Hospice of the Carolina Foothills staf, board,
volunteers and supporters
To the 41 area restaurants who stepped up to the plate to increase awareness of
hospice services and raise funds for the patients and families receiving hospice care.
Meals on Wheels volunteer nominated for prize
Vote for Taylor at
www.facebook.com/mowaa
through Sunday, Aug. 13.
Or visit the Greer Community Ministries Facebook page
or website, gcminc.org and click on the links provided.
Bruce Taylor



BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
The Greer Commission
of Public Works is testing
LED lights on Wade Hamp-
ton Boulevard.
From Pine to Morrow
streets, eight LED lights
line the roadway as part
of a pilot project for the
city. The old high-pres-
sure sodium lights remain
in place, but are not being
used, said Tony Farr, elec-
tric operations manager.
The LED lights are under
a five-year warranty and
shine a different color.
The move to LED lights
is something a lot of mu-
nicipalities are doing, Farr
said.
If all the lights along
the Greer portion of Wade
Hampton were replaced, it
would be from Gap Creek
Road to Fairview, about six
miles.
If the city makes the
switch, what to do with
the old lights remains in
question. The CPW could
possibly scrap them, look
into selling them or use
them somewhere else.
Most towns are chang-
ing lights, Farr said. A
lot of them are going to
LED so there may be no
value on selling them. Un-
til theyre all gone, they
could be used for parts.
But to bring that many in
I dont know where wed
warehouse them. It could
just get to a point to scrap
them.
Commissioner Gene Gib-
son inquired about pole
sharing.
Youve got some sec-
tions of (Highway) 29
where theres not any
pole, all one side of the
road, Farr said. Its going
to be a job to get it on both
sides of the road29 from
Gap Creek to Fairview is
not created equal.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
CPW testing LED lights
along Wade Hampton
Its going to be
a job to get [light
poles] on both sides
of the road29
from Gap Creek
to Fairview is not
created equal.
Tony Farr
Electric operations manager
1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
864-968-1133
CHECKS
CASHED
PAY BILLS HERE
The City of Greer Planning Commission will hold a
Public Hearing at 6:30 p.m. on August 18, 2014 at
Greer City Hall located at 301 E. Poinsett Street on the
following:
DOCKET NUMBER: FDP 2014-13
OWNER: ONeal Village LLC
ADDRESS: ONeal Church Road
PARCEL ID NUMBER: 0633020103003
EXISTING ZONING: PD- Planned Development
REQUEST: Final Development Plan

Documents related to the requests are available for
public inspection in the Planning and Zoning Offce
located at 301 E. Poinsett Street.
LYMAN: Government decided Aug. 12
I was on council for six years. Ive
seen some things that didnt like, but I
supported the mayor, and when I became
mayor, I had a good understanding of why
he did the things that he did. The daily
operations I feel certain will be impeded
when you have seven people to make those
decisions
Rodney Turner
Lyman mayor
I
ts very possible one can develop a
feeling of apathy regarding the secu-
rity of their home and belongings here
in the country.
Guilty as charged.
I have left the house, on occasion, un-
locked just to dash out to the store and
have even forgotten to bring the car keys
in with me upon arriving home. Why,
even in town, it is not uncommon to see
engines running, with keys easily visible
inside, at the post office! In a town of
2,000 inhabitants, many of which are
livestock, its easy to feel a false sense
of safety. That old, nothing will happen
way out here, sentiment, healthy and
well.
But, oh, gentle reader, it has happened
to your Aunty Pam. My negligence in fail-
ing to roll up the drivers side window of
my truck last week resulted in a viola-
tion I had only read occurring in cities:
Squatting.
The occupier was not a 12-year-old
boy, fleeing from gang violence in
Honduras or a family of 8, evicted from
their prior home, owing to non-pay-
ment of rent. This brazen female, all
0.32 (according to Wikipedia) ounces of
her, had worked steadily through the
night, flitting from the branch of the
Pin Oak to between the steering column
and dashboard of my truck, carrying
twigs, leaves, and moss (not unlike an
appetizer I recently had at a vegetarian
restaurant in Asheville) and building a
nest that, from its sheer size, made me
leap backwards upon opening the door
the following morning.
What to do, what to do? If I turned
the wheel, even a smidgen, all the work
of this common household Wren would
crash to the floor, which would be a
good opportunity for the trucks annual
vacuuming, which, actually, consists of
opening both doors, standing back, and
turning on the leaf blower, but if I let it
be, I simply wouldnt be able to drive.
This must be how it feels when hu-
mans lose a home to a tornado, I said to
Paul, as I dismantled the nest bit by bit,
Theres your house one moment, and
the next, poof! Gone.
I dont know that they reason that
far. Paul replied, his leg holding the
terriers, eager to see if any rats were
involved, at bay.
Who knows? I remarked. Maybe
such a tragedy makes them begin to
question all their beliefs- is there a God?
And if there is a God, how could He al-
low this to happen? When all the time, it
isnt Gods fault at all- its just a human
being tearing up their home because its
an inconvenience in my truck.
Way to early for this, said Paul, rub-
bing his eyes. I havent even had my
coffee yet.
Well, its got me thinking, I replied,
warming up, Maybe humans should
stop blaming God when a disaster hap-
pens. Maybe its an invisible being, or
aliens, or global warming responsible
for hurricanes and tornados or volca-
noes and all this time, when a town gets
leveled, everybody says, Where is God?
Whats really going on is that were just
settled on a giant, cosmic, steering col-
umn, maybe--
Maybe, Paul said, turning to walk
across the yard in search of coffee and
sanity, you should roll your window up,
Grasshopper.
Alright, maybe. But the next time I
feel that fault line that runs through the
Carolinas rattle beneath my home, Im
going to look very closely at the ground
and see if I see the words, Dodge Ram,
printed anywhere. You might laugh, but I
have it on very good authority.
A little bird told me.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014



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The Greer Citizen

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T
he Greer Citizen accepts Let-
ters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
When does a document
become a public record?
Calling
pigs
Read John 10:1-5
W
hen [the Shepard] has
brought out all his own,
he goes ahead of them,
and the sheep follow him
because they know his voice.
-John 10:4 (NRSV)
As a little girl on the farm I
was responsible for slopping
the pigs; so I learned how
to call them to the fence for
their feast. Years later, when
my family visited the restored
village of Sturbridge, Mas-
sachusetts, my knowledge of
calling pigs came in handy. As
we strolled along a wide path
toward a barn, we saw people
standing on the fence, shout-
ing and waving their arms. A
herd of pigs huddled under
the shade of a distant tree. The
people were trying frantically
to get the pigs to come to the
fence. I calmly climbed up on
the fence and used my pig
voice. The whole herd of pigs
came running to the fence. The
tourists asked, How did you
do that? I explained simply,
They knew the distinctive call
and responded.
The same is true for follow-
ers of Christ. When we hear the
distinctive call of the one who
knows us by name, we respond
because we know his voice.
John 10:5 says, They will not
follow a strangerbecause
they do not know the voice
of strangers. We hear many
voices in our lives, but only
one, the voice of Jesus Christ
our Lord, can lead us to the
eternal feast.
Thought for the day: The
Lord is my Shepard, and he
knows me by name.
Prayer: Good Shepard, when
we hear you calling us by name,
and name, we know to come
running to your for everything
we need. Amen.
You may have heard that the State Ethics
Commission has a new media policy. Com-
mission Chair James Burns announced at a re-
cent commission meeting that the commission
would be studying a new policy relating to who
could speak for the agency. Without entertain-
ing a motion or taking a vote, Burns announced
that until a new policy were adopted the interim
policy would be that Commission Executive Di-
rector Herb Hayden would be the only one au-
thorized to speak on behalf of the agency.
Leaving aside for the moment whether the
pronouncement of an interim policy under
those circumstances was consistent with the
law regarding the conduct of public business.
The first Executive Director of the Ethics
Commission was Gary Baker who served for 23
years. In those years Baker was always available
to respond to a reporters questions about the
meaning of the ethics law and the requirements
to satisfy the law. Following Bakers retirement
Hayden became Executive Director and followed
Bakers practice of being available to explain the
law.
Cathy Hazelwood, Deputy Director and Gen-
eral Counsel for the commission has for years
been available along with Hayden to respond to
questions from reporters and the public about
the operation of the commission and the re-
quirements of the law. Hazelwood earned the
reputation of being an expert on the law who
could explain it in ways that the public could
understand. If asked about a specific case dur-
ing a time when comment is forbidden by law,
Hazelwood would politely but firmly decline
comment.
Many reporters found Hazelwood to be more
readily available for comment than Hayden, and
over time Hazelwoods name became associat-
ed with most comments from the commission.
And, when you want a legal opinion, it is a good
thing to ask the agencys lawyer.
After Burns announced the new interim poli-
cy, Hazelwood is no longer authorized to speak
for the agency. Burns has said that the decision
is to forestall an impression that as prosecutor
Hazelwood has made up her mind about a case.
Well, since prosecutors must always make a de-
cision about possible guilt prior to initiating a
prosecution. That reasoning rings hollow.
Since the members of the commissions are
the ones who sit in judgment, comments by in-
dividual commissioners about a case might be
inappropriate, but an explanation by the lawyer
for the Commission about what the law requires
is not inappropriate.
The FOIA provides that any document pre-
pared, owned, used or in the possession of a
public body is a public record subject to the
disclosure requirements of the law. Even if the
letter had never been sent, the draft of the let-
ter in the possession of the public body was a
public record. In a similar vein, proposed min-
utes of public body meetings become public
records upon their preparation, not upon their
approval.
Is it appropriate to destroy public records?
All state agencies are required to work with
the Department of Archives and History to de-
velop a record retention policy, but it seems
that most have not. I dont know if the Ethics
Commission has a records retention policy, but
if it does, I suspect it does not have a provision
that says drafts of letters stating the position of
the agency are to be destroyed. Section 30-1-30
of the South Carolina Code of Laws makes it a
misdemeanor to destroy a public record.
I have argued for some time now that we
dont need ethics reform. We need cultural re-
form. We need to develop a culture that does
not tolerate misconduct by public officials and
the silencing of those with the courage to speak
on the record about misconduct. Ironically, it
seems that cultural reform might now be neces-
sary at the Ethics Commission.
This guest editorial was submitted by Jay Bender, a South Carolina Press
Association attorney.
A little bird told me
Just councils
I
ts evident several procedures
in place at council meetings,
whether by state law or local
ordinance, give residents the ap-
pearance of power without any
of the actual clout. When ques-
tions go unanswered, comments
and concerns ignored and votes
pass budgets, ordinances and
resolutions despite residents
opposition, its evident which
councils serve themselves and
which serve constituents.
For this reason, I commend
Lyman and Greer councils for
their transparency, handling of
public feedback and efforts to
listen and respond appropri-
ately to the concerns resonating
from residents voices in their
town halls.
Recently, Lyman held a public
meeting allowing residents
to voice concerns, pose ques-
tions and learn about the two
governments they will vote on
this month. Council members
took sides and gave reason-
ings. I researched and, oddly
but unsurprisingly, laws dont
require public hearings for
a referendum for a change
of government. Yet, for two
hours, the council fielded often
difficult-to-answer but neces-
sary questions and sometimes
received harsh criticisms. But,
because of the steps they took,
voters will be more knowledge-
able and involved when casting
ballots on Aug. 12.
At last weeks Greer Council
meeting, several developed
technological-applications were
presented, including online
publication of Greers budget
and a GIS mapping system that
provides district, council rep-
resentative, parcel and zoning
information. City Administrator
Ed Driggers accurately stated
that these developments en-
able transparency between the
council and its residents. Fur-
thermore, its clear that Greer
Council doesnt lightly cast
votes, and members, though not
required, offer reasonings for
their votes, especially regarding
controversial topics. Again, law
doesnt require this, although
it should, and in many cities,
transparency is truly absent.
When S.C. ruled against
requiring councils to publish
agendas for regularly scheduled
meetings, I was discouraged
because its a disservice to
residents. But when Im at meet-
ings with representatives who
reiterated vocally and through
actions that they fill the seats,
not for themselves but for their
voters, my minimal faith in the
system hangs on.
This must be how it feels
when humans lose a home to
a tornado...Theres your house
one moment, and the next,
poof! Gone.
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY
Dear editor,
The Greer Council of
Garden Clubs (Azalea,
Camellia and Primrose) is
participating in Historic
Trees for Historic Places,
which is the major proj-
ect of The Garden Club of
South Carolina, Inc.
The Greer Council is
asking for help from the
Greer public to find and
document significant trees
and historic places in and
around Greer.
We are looking for his-
toric landscapes, sites, old
trees and heritage plant
material (saplings from
Mt. Vernon for example)
in both private and public
properties of S.C. South
Carolinas historic land-
scapes, trees and heritage
plant material tell the
story of our state. Ravages
of nature, owner neglect
and urban sprawl have
caused irreparable loss of
historic landscapes, trees
and other plant material.
Identification of sites and
specimens may lead to fu-
ture preservation of sites
in our area.
Please call Shirley Carls-
son at 877-7085 or Carol
Dixon at 334-5242 if you
have information to share.
Shirley Carlsson
Greer
BUSINESS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A5
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Chapter 7
vs.
Chapter 13
Q: Whats the differ-
ence between a Chapter 7
bankruptcy and Chapter
13 bankruptcy?
DR: Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy is what most
people think about
when they hear the word
bankruptcy. Its total
bankruptcy, almost like
dropping an atomic bomb
on your entire financial
picture.
Virtually all of your un-
secured debt (except stu-
dent loans, child support
and money owed to the
IRS) is wiped out. These
things are not bankrupt-
able. About 98 percent of
the time, creditors of your
other unsecured debt
things like credit cards
and alike get nothing.
Items that are secured
debt, such as your car or
house, are treated a little
bit differently. If youre
behind on payments, you
may be allowed to get cur-
rent. In most cases, banks
will allow you to re-sign in
a process called reaffirm-
ing the debt.
Chapter 13 bankruptcy
is a payment plan struc-
tured over five years. In
it, you have to pay all of
your secured debt. If it
has a lien on it, you pay
100 percent to keep the
item. You also have to pay
a portion of your unse-
cured debt. Again like
in Chapter 7 debt to
the IRS, child support and
student loans dont go
away. For any other unse-
cured debt, you can pay
a percentage of whats
owed. An overall payment
plan is developed, and
you make those payments
for five years.
Im not a big fan of
either one.
100%
mortality rate
Q: Do you think its
unreasonable to ask my
76-year-old husband to
have a will drawn up?
He had one made when
we lived in Florida, but
we moved to Georgia. He
wont do it, because he
says wills arent recog-
nized in Georgia.
DR: Wills arent recog-
nized in Georgia? Where
did he get his legal advice,
in a bar or pool hall?
Okay, lets straighten
this out. The will he
had drawn up in Florida
wouldnt be recognized
in Georgia, but he could
have one made in Georgia
that would be absolutely
valid and legal. Everyone:
No matter where you
live, you need a will. If
you die without a will in
place, your family has to
go through the court and
jump through all sorts
of hoops to settle the
estate. The process can
take several months. No
one should leave their
loved ones in that kind of
predicament, when having
a will drawn up is such
a simple an inexpensive
process.
Everyone needs a will.
Human beings have a 100
percent mortality rate,
okay? No one is getting
out of this thing alive.
You need a will, a full
estate plan with specific
instructions on what to
do with all your stuff
after you die!


Chapter 13
bankruptcy is a
payment plan
structured over five
years. In it, you
have to pay all of
your secured debt.
Greer Bancshares In-
corporated, parent com-
pany of Greer State Bank,
recently reported a sec-
ond quarter net income
of $434,000 or $0.17 per
diluted common share,
as compared to second
quarter 2013 net income
of $7,761,000 or $3.12 per
diluted common share.
The prior year second
quarter results were atypi-
cal in that they were aided
significantly by a credit to
the loan loss provision for
$1.7 million, as well as a
non-cash reversal of the
deferred tax asset valu-
ation allowance of $5.54
million. The bank repur-
chased $1.98 million of
TARP preferred stock dur-
ing the second quarter.
Total deposits increased
to $262 million, up from
$253 million at Dec. 31,
2013. Total loans out-
standing increased to $189
million, up from $187 mil-
lion at the same date. The
banks non-accrual loans
were 0.86 percent of gross
loans outstanding, down
from 1.36 percent in 2013.
Past-due loans were 0.72
percent of gross loans out-
standing, down from 0.87
percent.
Greer State Bank will
open a new mortgage loan
production office in Clem-
son, which will be located
in the newly constructed
Town Center in Patrick
Square.
This will be the banks
first office located outside
the Greer and Taylors area
and will be open for busi-
ness late September.
Greer State Bank is ex-
cited to expand our foot-
print in the Anderson,
Oconee and Pickens area,
said George Burdette,
president and CEO of the
bank. We look forward
to building new relation-
ships while providing the
best mortgage services for
these communities.
With this expansion,
Greer State Bank has
named Art Wray vice pres-
ident and mortgage loan
officer for the Clemson
office. Until construction
is complete, Wray will op-
erate from a satellite of-
fice, located in downtown
Clemson. In his new role,
Wray will focus on gener-
ating new mortgage loan
originations through his
realtor, builder and past
client relationships.
Art Wray has over 25
years of mortgage lending
experience in this targeted
area, said Tim Strom,
mortgage director. Art is
very involved in the Clem-
son community and we are
fortunate to have him join
our mortgage team.
Wray was previously the
past chair of the Clemson
Area Chamber of Com-
merce and past recipi-
ent of the Duke Energy
Citizenship and Service
Award. He, along with
his wife Lisa and their two
children, reside in Clem-
son and attend Clemson
United Methodist Church.
The American Public
Gas Association (APGA)
has appointed Jeff Tuttle,
General Manager of Greer
Commission of Public
Works, to its board of di-
rectors.
Tuttle was appointed on
July 23 during the 2014
APGA Annual Meeting in
Olympic Valley, California,
where he began a three-
year term.
Mr. Tuttle brings to the
APGA Board of Directors
many years of experience
working in the natural gas
industry, APGA President
and CEO Bert Kalisch said.
His leadership ability and
knowledge of energy is-
sues, especially with natu-
ral gas utilities, will serve
our members and industry
well.
APGA is a national,
not-for-profit association
representing over 700
publicly owned natural
gas distribution systems
in 36 states. APGA is the
only trade association that
solely represents the inter-
ests of public natural gas
systems at the legislative
and regulatory level.
APGA is pleased to have
Mr. Tuttle on the Board
of Directors as we enter
an important time here
in Washington, Kalisch
continued in a statement.
With the many natural
gas issues our industry
faces in Congress, the ad-
ministration and federal
agencies, public gas sys-
tems are presented with
numerous challenges and
opportunities. Our current
supply projection provides
our country with a unique
opportunity to utilize our
domestic natural gas re-
sources to reduce our en-
ergy dependence, increase
overall energy efficiency
and decrease greenhouse
gas emissions. This is best
done by both accommodat-
ing the greater direct-use
of natural gas and putting
more natural gas vehicles
on the road. Mr. Tuttle un-
derstands the issues we
face, and APGA looks for-
ward to his leadership and
guidance over the next
three years to meet these
challenges and to address
the needs of natural gas
consumers.
On I-385
corridor
A 12-mile portion of In-
terstate 385 in Greenville
County is being designat-
ed the Veterans Corridor
of Honor to recognize
those who served in 20th
and 21st century wars.
Signs commemorating
six conflicts will be placed
at two-mile intervals be-
tween markers 22 and 34
and revealed in a ceremo-
ny, scheduled for 10 a.m.
Sept. 5.
At the beginning of the
designated area, on both
the eastbound and west-
bound lanes, will be a sign
reading Entering the Vet-
erans Corridor of Honor.
Acting upon a request
by the Foothills Chapter
(No. 301) of the Korean
War Veterans Association,
the S.C. General Assembly
passed a concurrent reso-
lution sponsored by Reps.
Mike Burns, Dwight Loftis,
Garry Smith and Mark Wil-
lis in the House and Sen.
Tom Corbin in the Senate
to allow the recognition.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association raised the
money to pay for the signs
within a week.
The signs will be placed
in chronological order of
when the wars occurred.
The wars included are:
World War I, World War II
(mile 24), the Korean War
(26), the Vietnam War (28),
the Gulf wars (30) and
other undeclared conflicts
(32) involving U.S. forces.
This is believed to be
the first location where
veterans of multiple wars
involving the United States
have been recognized in
such a fashion on a stretch
of highway.
Veterans and family
members of veterans are
invited to attend the cer-
emony.
Mile marker 22 is locat-
ed between S.C. Highway
14 and S.C. Highway 418.
Mile marker 34 is located
between Butler Road and
Bridges Road.
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
National Health Center Week
Mayor Rick Danner issued a proclamation recognizing National Health Center Week,
spanning from August 10-16, at New Horizon Family Health Services, Inc. on Tuesday.
The proclamation was presented to staf of New Horizon, shown from left, Stephen
Williams, chief operations of cer; Stephania Priester, marketing outreach developer;
Gayla Loudermilk, practice manager of operations; and Dr. Micheal Rowley, chief medical
of cer.
Tuttle named to APGA
board of directors
Veteran signs
to be unveiled

Jef Tuttle
Greer Bancshares Inc.
reports quarterly profit
Greer State Bank
to expand service
Historic landscapes sought
LETTER TO THE EDITOR |


We look forward
to building new
relationships
while providing
the best mortgage
services for these
communities.
George Burdette
President and CEO, Greer State Bank


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A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
Sandra Burge
Sandra Faye (Smiley)
Burd Burge, 72, died July
24, 2014 at Mountain View
Nursing Home.
A native of Charleston,
West Virginia, daughter of
the late Raymond V. and
Mildred Brown Burd, she
was a former employee of
Michelin and a member of
Praise Cathedral.
Surviving are three
daughters, Laura Marshall-
Powers (deceased Rich-
ard) of Pickens, Lisa Baker
(Dennis) of Simpsonville
and Leah Wolfe (Ed) of
Charlotte, North Carolina;
a son, Greg Burge (Me-
lynda) of Camden; former
spouse and father of the
children, Robert Burge
(Kitty); two sisters, Billie
Young of Delaware and
Karen Seime of Charlotte,
North Carolina; two broth-
ers, Wayne Seime (Laurie)
of Texas and Glenn Seime
of California; fifteen
grandchildren, Thomas
(Juri), Heather (Craig), An-
drew (Beth), Daniel, Billy,
Ashley, William, Brittany,
Jonathan, Alexandria,
Jenny, Matthew, Nicholas,
Isaiah, and Jessica; and
three great-grandchildren,
Owen, Autumn, and Evan.
Funeral services will be
held at 2 p.m. on Friday,
Aug. 8, 2014, at Wood
Mortuary conducted by
Rev. Jerry Madden and
Rev. Eric Campbell. Burial
will follow in Graceland
East Memorial Park.
Visitation will be held
at 6-8 p.m. on Thursday,
Aug. 7, 2014 at Wood Mor-
tuary.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Mary Martha Greer
Mary Martha Mauldin
Greer, 83, of 207 Highland
St., Taylors, died July 25,
2014.
A native of Pickens
County, daughter of the
late V. Elma and Lilly Pace
Mauldin, Mrs. Greer at-
tended El Bethel Baptist
Church.
Surviving are her hus-
band, Robert Hughes
Greer; daughter Tammy
Greer Evergetis of Ridge-
way and three sisters, Mil-
dred Justice, Elaine Busby
and Virginia Free of An-
derson.
Mrs. Greer was prede-
ceased by a daughter, Mit-
zi Ann Greer.
Funeral services were
at 11 a.m. on Monday at
Wood Mortuary conducted
by Rev. Joe Seay. Burial fol-
lowed in Hillcrest Memory
Gardens.
Visitation was held 9:30-
10:45 a.m. on Monday at
Wood Mortuary.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Tyler Wayne Hilman
Tyler Wayne Hilman, 33,
of Landrum, died July 21,
2014 at CaroMont Medical
Center, Gastonia, North
Carolina.
Born in Salmon Arm, BC
Canada, son of Wayne and
Eloris (Lori) Hilman. He
was the owner of Premiere
Concrete and a member of
Resurrection Church.
Surviving in addition to
his parents are his wife,
Michelle Kalliainen Hilman
of the home; four children,
Audra, Holten, Shaelyn,
and Zane; four sisters,
Shantelle Lance, Destiny
Lajoie, Chelsey Hilman,
and Safyra Levell; and one
brother Bridger Hilman.
Funeral services were
held, 11 a.m. Saturday, at
Fellowship Greenville, con-
ducted by Pastor Bradley
Cox and Pastor Seth Cain.
Burial was held, 3 p.m.
Saturday, at Mountain
View Cemetery, Greer.
Visitation was held
6:30-9 p.m. Friday at East-
side Apostolic Lutheran
Church.
The family will be at the
home of his father and
mother-in-law, Rusty and
Jan Kalliainen.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Tony Smith
Anthony Lee Smith, 52,
died July 26, 2014.
A native of Greenville
County, son of Lee Wen-
dell and Jeanne Henson
Smith, he attended Praise
Cathedral Church.
Surviving in addition to
his parents, are one broth-
er, Tim Macho Smith and
his wife Terri of Greer;
a special niece, Aubrey
Smith and a special friend
Wendy Levi.
Mr. Smith was prede-
ceased by a brother, Travis
Shane Smith.
Funeral services were
held 2 p.m. Tuesday at
Wood Mortuary, conduct-
ed by Rev. Jerry Madden
and Rev. Bobby Johnson.
Burial followed in Hillcrest
Memory Gardens.
The family is at the
home of his parents, 8
Lauren Leigh Court, Greer,
S.C. 29651.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be made to Daily
Bread Ministries, P.O. Box
2344, Greer, S.C., 29652.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Nelson Lawton Stokes, Sr.
Nelson Lawton Stokes,
Sr., 93, of 1870 Fews Cha-
pel Road, Greer, died July
26, 2014 at Greenville Me-
morial Medical Center.
A native of Greenville
County, he was a son of
the late Thomas Merton
and Hattie Louise Forrester
Stokes, a retired S.C. State
Constable, a member of
the Bailey Masonic Lodge
No. 146, U.S. Air Force
veteran of WWII and was
a member of Fews Chapel
United Methodist Church.
Surviving are his loving
wife of 66 years, Mildred
Turner Stokes of the home;
two sons and daughters-
in-law, Nelson and Fre-
ida Stokes of Greer and
Keith and Betty Jo Stokes
of Pauline; two daughters
and sons-in-law, Lynne
and Doug Lingo and Patti
and Barry Cason all of
Greer; 17 grandchildren;
10 great-grandchildren
and one great-great-grand-
child.
He was predeceased also
by twelve brothers and sis-
ters.
Funeral services were
held 2 p.m. Monday at
Fews Chapel United Meth-
odist Church, conducted
by Rev. Joseph Cole, Rev.
Nelson Stokes, Jr. and Bar-
ry Cason. Burial followed
in the church cemetery
with Masonic Rites.
Visitation was held 6-8
p.m. Sunday at the Wood
Mortuary.The family is at
the home.
Pallbearers were Nelson
Lawton Stokes IV, Preston
Bishop, Matthew Cason,
Mark Foster, Tyler Cason,
Stuart Boone, Bobby Brad-
ley and Adam Burdette.
Memorials may be made
to Fews Chapel United
Methodist Church, 4000
North Highway 101, Greer,
S.C. 29651.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Isolated Weekend Rain
We will see sunshine, warm temperatures
and a return of isolated rain showers for the
weekend. We will see highs on Saturday and
Sunday in the low 80s with overnight lows
in the middle 60s. After a week with dry,
cool weather we will see temperatures stay
about 10 degrees below normal. Our average
high for this time of year is 90. Have a great
weekend!
The Lego Movie
Where: Moonlight Movie
Greer City Park
Date: Thursday, July 31st
6-10 p.m.

Temps: Mostly sunny and
warm. Low 80s at start.
90
70
3.79
26.42
-1.10
6:37 AM
8:33 PM
Aug. 17 Aug. 25 Aug. 3 Aug. 10
75/60 ISO 78/60 ISO
77/53 ISO 78/56 ISO
82/72 ISO 82/73 ISO
83/75 ISO 84/76 ISO
83/66 ISO 83/67 ISO
81/67 ISO 83/68 ISO
85/70 ISO 86/70 ISO
86/63 ISO 85/63 ISO
75/60 Iso. showers
78/60 Iso. showers
77/62 Iso. showers
80/62 Iso. showers
83/66 Iso. showers
83/66 Iso. showers
85/68 Iso. showers
85/68 Iso. showers
84
65
85
66
81
65
83
66
83
66
85
67
86
68
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook
FROM PAGE ONE
as part of a plea through
Mr. Good, through con-
fessions of guilt that he
would provide restitu-
tion to the city in amount
of over $10,000, and the
judge also indicated that
there would be supervised
probation for a period
of six months, he said.
[Goods] activities must
be reported to his pro-
bationary officers about
where hes going. They
did not elect to do any in-
house incarceration at this
point.
Within the next six
months another hearing
will be held to determine
the exact amount of resti-
tution to be paid by Good.
Because of the ruling, any
income tax returns Good
files will be given to the
city and other parties in-
volved in the case until
restitution is paid.
Talking with the solici-
tors after they felt good
about it, we felt good
about it because as we
said, our ultimate goal
was to get restitution for
the damages done to the
property, Sell said.
In other business, coun-
cil passed the first read-
ing of an ordinance for a
referendum for alcohol
sales, excluding liquors,
on Sundays for off prem-
ises consumption. The or-
dinance would allow resi-
dents to vote on whether
they want to allow alcohol
sales in the city. The ordi-
nance was passed with a
6-1 vote, with councilman
Wayne Griffin opposing.
The ordinance was
brought forward by coun-
cilman Wryley Bettis and
Reno Deaton with the
Greer Economic Develop-
ment.
For starters, council
should know that I dont
really have a dog in this
fight But I do know a
lot of people that shop
on Sundays in the City of
Greenville and thats reve-
nue that were losing, and
thats where I come from
Im from the economic
development side of my
brain, Bettis said. In con-
junction with Reno Dea-
ton, our Economic Devel-
opment head, we look at
it as an opportunity. Were
always looking for ways to
benefit businesses in the
city, and this is a way to
recoup some revenue from
them and possibly gener-
ate a fair amount of new
revenue, and to me, this
could potentially be an
offset in the future to al-
low us to lower some mill-
age that would be offset
by funds coming in from
these taxes and whatnot.
Bettis and Deaton pre-
sented the ordinance as a
business opportunity that
could give the city taxes to
delegate elsewhere.
Really part of the pro-
cess of economic develop-
ment is continuing, contin-
ually evaluating the tools
in our toolbox, especially
as it pertains to commer-
cial development, Deaton
said. We try to make sure
that were focusing on new
fill development, make
sure that were providing
the tools for our existing
businesses to reach their
full potential, hire as many
people as they possibly
can, to make sure that we
are meeting the quality of
life needs of our growing
community, and certainly
to make sure that were
cleared in what differenti-
ates us from our competi-
tors gives us competitive
advantage.
We certainly find our-
selves at a very interest-
ing time in this commu-
nity, Deaton added. Both
of our county councils
have opted to place bal-
lot referendums before
the voters in our respec-
tive counties So it would
seem that the time is now
perhaps to put before the
voters of Greer this ques-
tion, as to whether or not
its appropriate again
whether or not its ap-
propriate Greer consider
the sale of alcohol for off
premise consumption on
Sundays. I dont offer any
opinion one way or anoth-
er to the ultimate issue,
whether thats appropri-
ate or not and certainly
those opinions will vary in
our community
Councilman Jay Arro-
wood hesitatingly cast his
vote, explaining that he
saw pros and cons to both
side of the controversial
issue.
I will say that tonight
my vote will be yes, but
that does not indicate
how I will vote on second
reading, Arrowood said.
If theres individuals out
there who have helped
with me deciding, who
would like to give me more
information, Im very open
for that...
The next Greer City
Council meeting is August
12 at 6:30 p.m. at Greer
City Hall.
FROM PAGE ONE
GIS ONLINE
Greer GIS Planner Justin
Kirtz further developed
the online GIS accessibility
by creating a more visually
appealing and user-friend-
ly interface for individuals
to utilize online or through
smartphones.
This is already live, this
is available on our website
right now We wanted to
make something a little
more interactive, a little
more easy on the eyes,
Kirtz said. Its something
simple, its just taking the
information we had before
and making it into a more
presentable manner.
Some of the new tech-
nology can be found on
the City of Greers web-
page under the depart-
ments tab. While the same
information is available, it
can now be seen through
interactive maps, with dif-
ferent base map options
available.
The maps are fully in-
teractive and depending
which map is in use, us-
ers can view the GSP en-
virons, city limits, zoning
and council districts. The
maps also have the capa-
bility to provide parcel in-
formation and allows for
parcel search options for
Greenville and Spartan-
burg counties. Parcels can
be searched by address,
owner name and parcel
number.
The new thing is these
are fully compatible with
all mobile devices, so you
can go on an iPad right
now and pull that up and
it will work just the same,
Kirtz said.
The updated mapping
system is only one of two
like it in the Upstate, ac-
cording to Kirtz, and it
has already been tested
with realtors in the area
for feedback.
Right now in the Up-
state area, there are only
two other cities that have
online GIS capabilities,
and one of them is the City
of Greenville, which is ob-
viously the largest one in
the area, and then Green-
wood, Kirtz said. Other
than that, pretty much no
other city has this capa-
bility right now, so were
in good company I would
say.
Through the application,
individuals can plot points
and put a radius around
the point to locate the
schools, churches, govern-
ment facilities and parks
surrounding the defined
point.
This is a great econom-
ic feature for people who
are moving into the area,
businesses that are look-
ing into the area or just
residents in the area who
want to know about where
they live It offers the
opportunity for people
who are maybe moving
into the area, they can find
a location in the city, click
on it and we have sev-
eral different interactive
tools that are available to
them, Planning and Zon-
ing Coordinator Glenn
Pace said. They can put a
one-mile radius around a
location where theyd like
to live, it shows churches,
schools, government facil-
ity locations and different
things like that to help
them make their decision
for the future.
The information is the
most up-to-date informa-
tion currently available for
the Greer area. Annexa-
tions, parcel information
and zoning changes are
updated weekly. Pace said
he predicts the application
is more than 90 percent
accurate.
Two forms of the appli-
cation exist, one of which
is compatible with PCs
and desktops, the other of
which is compatible with
Macs and mobile devices.
This is a capability that
we now have that we have
not always enjoyed and its
good for us to allow your
staff to do the job that
theyre tasked and chal-
lenged to do. But, its also
a great tool for our com-
munity and we believe we
will see better use of that
as we continue to move
forward, Driggers said.
GREER PARKING STATION
After conducting a park-
ing study, the Greer De-
velopment Corporation
determined that Greer
has 685 free public park-
ing spaces available at all
times, with an addition
440 spaces available after
business hours. Realizing
the availability of parking
wasnt the issue, the idea
to create an application to
find parking developed.
Greer Development cre-
ated a parking application
that is more detailed than
the previous map with
that merely showed where
parking lots in Greer were
located. The updated,
more user-friendly map
allows users to locate
parking lots with turn-by-
turn directions and more
up-to-date information on
which public parking lots
are open.
The map can be found
at greerstation.com/park-
ing. When the user clicks
on a lot they are told how
many spaces are available
at the lot, the lot name
and whether its a 24-hour
public lot. If the lot is only
available after hours, then
after 5:30 p.m. the lot will
show up on the interface.
When you click with the
lot along with the infor-
mation, if you let it access
your location services
you can click and get driv-
ing directions from your
current location, Kyle
Mensing with Greer Devel-
opment said.
We think this is a ben-
efit not just for parking
normally, but the fact
that, like with after hours
lots, we can time sensitive
when material appears,
he said.
The ability to alter what
lots are available when al-
lows lots shown as avail-
able to be altered when
there are road closures
and special events.
For more information
on the new technologies
available through the City
of Greer or the Greer De-
velopment Corporation,
visit cityofgreer.org or
greerstation.com.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
TECHNOLOGY: Will help with parking



COUNCIL: Alcohol ordinance passes 6-1
BACK TO SCHOOL
CELEBRATION
St. Mark United Method-
ist Church in Taylors will
host a back to school cele-
bration weekend beginning
Friday, Aug. 8 and lasting
through Sunday, Aug. 10.
Revival will begin at 6:30
p.m. on Friday. There will
be workshops for children
and youth from 2-4 p.m.
on Saturday and games
from 5-8 p.m. There will
be a back to school conse-
cration service at 10 a.m.
on Sunday. For more infor-
mation, call 848-7141. The
church is located at 911 St.
Mark Road in Taylors.
YARD SALE AT BETHEL
UNITED METHODIST
Bethel United Method-
ist Church will host a yard
sale, car wash and will
serve hot dogs plates on
Saturday, Aug. 2 begin-
ning at 7 am at the church,
located at 105 East Arling-
ton Ave., Greer. For more
information, call 879-
2006. In the event of rain,
yard sale will be moved
inside to the church social
hall.
CALVARY HILL REVIVAL
AUGUST 35
Calvary Hill Baptist
Church will host a revival
from Aug. 3-8 beginning
at 5:30 p.m. Sunday night
and 7 p.m. Monday-Fri-
day. The church is located
at 100 Calvery Hill Church
Drive in Lyman. For more
information, call 968-
0493.
CAROLINA FAITHRIDERS
HOST BIKE NIGHT
Carolina FaithRiders will
host a Bike Night at The
Lil Rebel on Saturday,
Aug. 2 from 5-8:30 p.m.
The event will feature a
music, food, and a bike
show with trophies award-
ed for first, second, and
third place at 8:30 p.m.
(Voting ends at 8 p.m.)
The restaurant is located
at 2608 Locust Hill Road
in Taylors. Bike Night is
sponsored by Washington
Baptist Church Motorcycle
Ministry. For more infor-
mation, contact Ross Bur-
gess at 908-8130 or parts-
manross@aol.com.
ABNER CREEK
HOSTING SIMULCAST
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will be hosting:
THE WORD: CLOSER TO
HOME with Beth Moore.
The Living Proof Live Si-
mulcast will take place
Saturday, Sept. 13 from
9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Tick-
ets are $25 per person
(including lunch) and are
available online at abner-
creekbaptist.com. The si-
mulcast will be broadcast
at 2461 Abner Creek Road
in Greer.
EBENEZER WELCOME
OFFERING FREE FOOD
The Bread of Life Food
Pantry at Ebenezer Wel-
come Baptist Church, 4005
Highway 414, Landrum, is
open on Thursdays from
2-4 p.m. The pantry is
open to families in need of
assistance. Photo ID is re-
quired. For more informa-
tion, call 895-1461.
APALACHE BAPTIST
CHURCH GOLDEN HEARTS
The seniors plan to eat
out at Chick-Fil-A in Greer
at 6 p.m. on July 31.
Senior Adult Vacation
Bible School is on the
calendar for August 4-8
(Monday through Friday,
6 p.m.) at Apalache Bap-
tist Church. There will
be a different Bible Study
Leader for each of the five
nights: Monday Rev. Ed-
die Cooper (ABC Pastor),
Tuesday- Rev. Jerry Bry-
ant, Wednesday - Rev. Jim
Carpenter, Thursday Dr.
Trenton Connley, and Fri-
day Rev. Butch Howard
(all members of ABC). Din-
ner will be served to the
group each night after the
bible study sessions in the
CLC. Senior VBS is an an-
nual event held each year
at ABC where the group
enjoys a week of bible
study, food, fun and fel-
lowship.
A one day trip is sched-
uled August 18 for the
Golden Hearts (place
and time to be announced
later).
The seniors will meet at
Petes Restaurant in Greer
on August 28 at 6 p.m. for
the evening meal.
GRIEFSHARE
FAIRVIEW BAPTIST
Fairview Baptist Church,
1300 Locust Hill Road,
Greer, will host Grief-
Share, a support group led
by Carol Allen, on the sec-
ond Sunday of each month
from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Carol Allen at 292-
6008.
SINGLES BIBLE STUDY AT
PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST
Pelham Road Baptist
Church, 1108 Pelham
Road, Greer, hosts a Sin-
gles Bible Study each Sun-
day from 6-8:30 p.m.
Send us your church
news to Billy@greerciti-
zen.com or call 877-2076.
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
309 Northview Drive
848-1935
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BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
Rudy and JoAnn Ash-
more have always believed
in helping those in need
and in investing in their
community especially
their church, Grace United
Methodist.
In fact, the Ashmores,
although not charter
members, have attend-
ed the church since the
doors opened in 1959 and
still support the church
through tithes and offer-
ings, despite being home-
bound due to health is-
sues. JoAnn served as the
churchs organist for more
than 30 years and led
many of the womens mis-
sion groups several of
which even won awards.
Rudy was an usher and a
board member as well.
Now the church has
decided to give back to a
couple that has poured so
much of themselves into
the lives of others. On
Saturday, more than 20
people from the 81 fami-
lies that are members at
the church gave up their
Saturday to help build
an ADA handicap ramp
to help the Ashmores get
in and out of their house
more easily.
JoAnn was diagnosed
with Parkinsons Plus,
which means that she has
another underlying condi-
tion. She also has had mul-
tiple strokes, which has
impaired her speech and
mobility, and osteo-arthri-
tis. Rudy is losing his hear-
ing and eyesight, has had
several cases of skin can-
cer and had knee and hip
replacement surgeries.
The Ashmores live on
a quiet street in Greer,
where the neighbors all
look after each other,
and they have lived in the
same house for 54 years.
The only other house they
have lived in together was
another house on the same
street.
But now the house has
become dangerous for
the Ashmores as there are
steps everywheresteps to
get from the enclosed car-
port (now a sitting room)
as well as steps leading up
to the front porch. JoAnn
has broken her pelvis and
her wrist but could not
undergo surgery due to
her other health problems.
Rudy has fallen down the
stairs as well and crawled
up the stairs before calling
for help.
But where she needs
him, [Dad] pushes
through, said Angie
Kruse, who is one of the
Ashmores daughters. He
picks her up. The chal-
lenge is the steps.
Angie and her sister, Al-
lison (Kellum), had been
talking to their parents
for awhile about having a
ramp put in the front of
the house off of the front
porch, but the Ashmores
had been resistant to the
idea.
Pastor [Robert] Cox
was here one day when
the Home Health nurse
was here, Kruse said. He
didnt know that there was
a need, but my parents al-
ways say that somebody
else needs it more than
they, and they arent going
to take away from them.
But Pastor Cox was pretty
insistent about it.
Once Pastor Cox knew
what needed to be done,
he set to seeking help
from within his own con-
gregation.
I saw a need, Cox said.
Parkinsons doesnt get
better, and she had had a
number of falls. We had
money left over from some
other projects, so we went
through the proper chan-
nels and had the money
reallocated to build the
ramp. This was really an
act of love.
Cox was also pleased
to find that there were a
number of builders in the
church who were willing
to donate their time and
expertise. John Hooper, an
engineer at BMW, knew the
ADA guidelines that had
to be met for the ramp and
was able to get the proper
measurements approved
for the project.
According to the Ameri-
can Disabilities Act, there
must be no more than one
inch per foot for the slope
of the ramp in length. The
ramp built for the Ash-
mores ended up being 41
feet. In addition to mak-
ing sure the proper mea-
surements were made,
the group wanted to make
sure that they didnt take
away from the value of
the home in case the Ash-
mores ever want to sell it.
For this reason, the ramp
is a freestanding struc-
ture, which can be easily
removed.
The group met for de-
votions at the Ashmores
home at 8:30 a.m. and then
began work right away
in order to get it built in
just one day. Many of the
church ladies brought the
group lunch, and even the
teens were involved in
helping.
This was a one-time
event, Cox said. But Im
hoping well continue to
meet the needs of our
shut-ins as needed. I am
so pleased [with the out-
come.] This is an indica-
tion of the love and care in
our congregation.
Rudy and JoAnn were
married on April 18, 1954,
and have spent their lives
as productive members
of the Greer community.
Rudy worked at the Greer
Mill for years and then
worked at Apalache Mill
as a supervisor in the
weaving room for over 52
years. JoAnn worked as
the executive secretary for
Southern Home and then
Connorgan before settling
in at Sagem-Lucas Indus-
tries until she retired in
1990.
In addition to their two
daughters, the Ashmores
also have two sons-in-law,
Randy Kellum and Ken
Kruse, as well as several
grandchildren Austin
Johnson, George and Kai-
tlyn Kellum, Hope Kel-
lum, Josh Kruse, Jessica
Kruse, and Derek Pitman.
Their daughter, Angie,
has settled nearby in Well-
ford, and daughter Allison
moved from Florida to
Athens, Georgia, in order
to be closer as well.
The Ashmores daugh-
ters may not be involved
at Grace UMC themselves
anymore, but they can still
see the compassion that
the small church has for
its members.
Its always been a
church of helping and lov-
ing people, Kellum said.
They trust Gods hand.
Grace UMC is located at
627 Taylor Road., just off
of Memorial Drive Ext.
Grace UMC builds handicap ramp for members
PHOTO | COURTESY OF KATIE CRUICE SMITH
Dewitt Jones is just one of more than 20 church members from Grace UMC who
donated their time and abilities to help build a ramp for longtime members Rudy and JoAnn
Ashmore, who are now homebound.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
JoAnn Ashmore has been a member of Grace UMC since
it opened its doors. Now, at 81 years old, she is receiving
help from her beloved church family as she sufers from
Parkinsons Plus.
This is an indication of the love and care
in our congregation.
Robert Cox
Grace UMC pastor
CHURCH
NEWS

301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
ASHMORE
BROTHERS
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SINCE 1930
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Ofce Hours:
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400 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer
Free Estimates
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Rental Car Competitive Rates
State of the Art Equipment & Facilities
www.bensongreer.com
989-0099
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Pleasant Hill Baptist 4899 Jordan Road Greer
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer 877-7724
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
Trinity Fellowship Church
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
1700 N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville 244-6011
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 895-3966
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
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The Greer Police Depart-
ment is investigating an
early Monday morning
burglary at S.C. Gun Com-
pany in which three male
subjects stole 16 guns.
Officers responded to
the business at 6:45 a.m.
Monday in reference to an
alarm call that indicated
a glass break sensor had
been set off. When officers
arrived, they found the
front door of the business
had been shattered and
the owner of the business
confirmed that numerous
guns were missing from
inside the store. Surveil-
lance videos show three
black males were involved
in the burglary, one of
who threw a large piece of
concrete through the front
door of the store, allowing
entry to be gained by all
three subjects. Once inside
the store, subjects used
a hammer and the large
piece of concrete to break
out the glass counter tops
and remove numerous
handguns. A shotgun was
also stolen from inside the
store. All three subjects
had their faces covered
and wore gloves during
the burglary. Greenville
County Forensics was
called to the scene.
MAN DIES FROM
290 BRIDGE FALL
A man died Sunday eve-
ning after witnesses say he
climbed the ledge of the
S.C. 290 Bridge and then
jumped to his death.
An incident report ob-
tained from the Duncan
Police Department states
that an officer responded
to the scene shortly before
7 p.m. to find a body lying
in the emergency lane of I-
85 that had been covered
up by witnesses who had
attempted to help the man.
The man was pronounced
dead at the scene.
WELLFORD POLICE ARREST
COUPLE FOR MAKING METH
FROM FOX CAROLINA
NEWS PARTNER
Wellford police said
they received a complaint
about possible drug activ-
ity at a home and discov-
ered a couple had been
making meth around their
15-year-old son.
Police said they respond-
ed to the Main Street house
on Monday around 8:15
p.m. where they encoun-
tered Johnny Stafford, 46.
The investigators spoke
with Stafford, saying why
they were there, and they
were invited inside the
home, according to the
police report. Once inside,
police asked to see the
backyard and on they way
out, they noticed two clear
bottles that looked like
shake-and-bake meth labs
on the porch, police said.
Officers said they also
saw a large burn pile with
a plastic bottle and white
powder in the backyard.
When they asked Staf-
ford about the items, po-
lice said he found them
and moved them to the
porch to get them out of
the yard.
When police said they
believed it was meth and
needed to get everyone out
of the home, officers no-
ticed the bottles had dis-
appeared from the porch.
The report said Stafford
got the bottles from where
he hid them in a bedroom.
According to police, the
home was rented by Staf-
ford and his wife, 48-year-
old Martha Stafford, along
with their son.
Both Staffords were ar-
rested and charged with
manufacturing metham-
phetamine, methamphet-
amine waste disposal and
manufacturing metham-
phetamine in the presence
of a child.
TAYLORS WOMAN
CHARGED WITH MURDER
A Taylors woman is be-
hind bars after authori-
ties say she stabbed her
husband to death at The
Granite at Taylors apart-
ment complex last Satur-
day night. Ramona Delo-
res Gilmore, 32, of 174
Pinecroft Drive, Taylors,
has been charged with
murder and possession of
a weapon during a violent
crime.
Deputies received a 911
call regarding a possible
stab victim at The Gran-
ite at Taylors apartment
complex shortly before
9 p.m. last Saturday and,
upon arrival, located a de-
ceased male victim with a
stab wound to his chest
inside apartment building
G. Through the course of
the investigation, police
learned Gilmore got into
an argument with her hus-
band before fatally stab-
bing him in the chest.
GCSO SEEKS SHOPLIFTING
SUSPECT WHO PULLED GUN
The Greenville County
Sheriffs Office (GCSO) is
asking the public for help
in identifying a man who
shoplifted at Target on
Woodruff Road and then
pulled a gun on a loss
prevention officer who
attempted to apprehend
him.
According to a press re-
lease from the GCSO, the
man walked into the Tar-
get, located at 1112 Wood-
ruff Road, last Tuesday at
8 p.m. and began placing
items in both his shopping
cart and pockets before at-
tempting to exit the store
without paying for the
items. A loss prevention
officer approached the
suspect, and the suspect
then pulled a silver hand-
gun out of his pocket and
pointed it at the loss pre-
vention officer before run-
ning to the parking lot and
fleeing in a cream colored
vehicle.
The suspect is described
as being a white male
standing 61 with brown
or blonde hair. He has
a scorpion tattoo on his
left arm as well as various
other tattoos on his arms,
legs and neck.
Anyone with informa-
tion regarding this inci-
dent is asked to call Crime
Stoppers at 23-CRIME.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department or The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office or The Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice or The Duncan Police
Department. All suspects
are to be considered inno-
cent until proven guilty in
the court of law.)
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Michael Ethridge, 50, of
203 Ashler Drive, Greer,
has been charged with two
counts of grand larceny
and one count of conspir-
acy.
According to incident
reports, an officer went to
the above address in an ef-
fort to locate Ethridge who
was wanted out of Green-
ville County for grand lar-
ceny and conspiracy. The
officer located Ethridge at
the residence and placed
him under arrest. He was
transported to a location
on Wade Hampton Boule-
vard where he was picked
up by the Greenville Coun-
ty Sheriffs Office.
DRIVING DIRTY
Clyde Ernest Travis, 56,
of 205 Lindsey Ridge Way,
Lyman, has been charged
with uninsured vehicle,
improper tag, driving un-
der suspension and mis-
representing ID to law en-
forcement.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
on routine patrol and
was running license plate
numbers in the A&G park-
ing lot when she saw a tag
on a black Chevy truck
that was registered to a
Mazda.
The officer waited on the
subjects to return to the
truck and then followed
them onto Wade Hamp-
ton where she initiated a
traffic stop on the truck
and its driver, Travis. The
officer learned Travis did
not have a drivers license
or vehicle registration.
He told the officer he got
the tag from a friend and
put it on the vehicle be-
cause the vehicle was not
yet registered. Travis also
provided the officer with a
false name and false date
of birth. It was learned he
had two active warrants
out of Greenville County.
He was arrested and
turned over to Greenville
County.
UP IN SMOKE
Alaxa Taylor Mazyck,
17, of 308 Chartwell Drive,
Greer, has been charged
with simple possession
of marijuana. Elizabeth
S. Hane, 17, of 515 Riello
Drive, Greer, has been
charged with simple pos-
session of marijuana and
possession of drug para-
phernalia.
According to incident re-
ports an officer responded
to Chartwell Drive in refer-
ence to a complaint of sus-
picious acts. Upon arrival,
the officer observed a tan
Hyundai parked in the
pool area that had three
subjects inside.
Upon approaching the
vehicle and making con-
tact with its occupants,
the officer detected a
strong smell of marijuana
coming from inside the
vehicle. When asked about
the marijuana, one of the
occupants (Mazyck) ad-
mitted to throwing it out
when the officer arrived
on scene. She retrieved a
baggie of marijuana along
with a glass pipe and a
lighter. Mazyck told the
officer she and (Hane) had
bought the marijuana and
smoked it before the third
subject arrived.
They were arrested and
transported to The Greer
City Jail.
BUSTED
Gary Robert Adams, 35,
of 115 Keith St., Greer, has
been charged with driving
under suspension (third)
and faulty equipment.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol on Highway
80 when he observed a
black pick up truck trav-
eling Northbound with a
shattered windshield and
unsecured headlights.
The officer initiated his
blue lights but the vehicle
continued to drive slowly
before eventually stop-
ping. Adams told the of-
ficer that he didnt have a
drivers license. The offi-
cer learned Adams license
was suspended and this
was his third offense.
He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
RETURN TO SCENE
Ray Anthony Glenn, 47,
of 45 Dunbar Court, Greer,
has been charged with
shoplifting.
According to incident
reports, an officer was dis-
patched to Walmart in ref-
erence to a shoplifting call.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the complainant
who stated she recognized
the suspect (Glenn) from
a shoplifting incident that
happened the previous
night. She told the officer
she observed Glenn exit
the store with a shopping
cart full of unpaid mer-
chandise, at which point
she took him into custody.
Glenn admitted to the of-
ficer he attempted to steal
the merchandise. The
items totaled $117.03.
Glenn was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Joseph Dawson, 31, of
355 Harrison Ridge Road,
Duncan, has been charged
with shoplifting, posses-
sion of drugs and posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer respond-
ed to Tractor Supply on
West Wade Hampton Bou-
levard in reference to a
shoplifting in progress. A
second officer responded
to the scene and located
the subject (Dawson) in
the restroom. Dawson had
on his possession a pack
of hypodermic needles
(that he had taken off the
shelf of the store) and
eight small pills that were
believed to be Oxycodone.
Dawson was placed under
arrest and told officers he
took the pack of needles
and used one of which to
inject two Oxycodone pills
into the back of his hand.
He was transported to
the Greer City Jail.
ASSAULT AND BATTERY
Donald Lee Smith, 41,
of 3686 Ballenger Road,
Greer, has been charged
with assault and battery,
malicious damage and be-
ing drunk in public.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to an address
on West Wade Hampton
Boulevard in reference to
a fight in progress. Upon
the officers arrival, he
met with the victim who
stated Smith came to his
shop and began spinning
his tires in the parking
lot. He stated Smith then
came inside the store at
which point he (the victim)
asked Smith to leave. Since
Smith refused to leave, the
victim attempted to call
the police at which point
Smith pushed him into a
glass door before kicking
him several times. The of-
ficer also spoke with other
employees who witnessed
the altercation.
Smith, who was intoxi-
cated, was placed under
arrest and transported to
the Greer City Jail.
TWO FOR ONE
Lakeisha Quinyon Gray-
son, 28, of 315 William
Freeman Way, Duncan, has
been charged with failure
to comply, faulty equip-
ment, and driving under
suspension (third).
Carlos Remon Ramage,
37, of 112 E. Church St.,
Greer, has been charged
with failure to appear and
open container. According
to incident reports, an of-
ficer was on routine patrol
when he observed a green
Honda traveling on East
Poinsett Street with inop-
erable tail lights.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver Grayson.
Upon approaching the ve-
hicle, the officer was told
by Grayson that her li-
cense was suspended.
The officer confirmed
that Graysons license was
suspended and this was
her third offense. He also
learned she had an active
warrant with Greer police
for failure to comply. She
was placed under arrest.
The officer obtained
identification from the
passenger (Ramos) and
learned he had an active
warrant out of Greenville
County for failure to ap-
pear. He too was placed
under arrest. A search of
the vehicle yielded two
open containers of beer
under the front passenger
seat.
Grayson was transport-
ed to the Greer City Jail.
Ramage was turned over
to Greenville County.
DUS
Cassandra L. Rector, 25,
of 801 S. Main St. 28, Greer,
has been charged with:
driving under suspension,
uninsured vehicle, and
failure to surrender a sus-
pended tag.
According to incident
reports an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a black Honda driv-
ing on South Main Street
with a suspended tag.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver (Rector). The
officer learned Rector had
a suspended drivers li-
cense and had no proof of
insurance or registration
for the vehicle.
Rectors license plate
was also suspended.
She was arrested taken
to the Greer City Jail.
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A9
1921 Hwy. 101 South
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
Greer, SC 29651
864-968-1133
CIGARS
S.C.s Largest Humidor
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Tuesday morning, Greer police combed this stolen Nissan Pathfnder for evidence that
could lead to a suspect. The cars owner, Gran Simmons, said the vehicle was stolen from
his driveway at some point Monday night and discovered by police around 7 a.m. Tuesday
morning. The vehicle, found near the intersection of Trade Street and Cannon Avenue,
had sustained major damage and had evidently been wrecked.
Greer police investigate gun shop burglary
Ramona D. Gilmore
CRIME REPORT |
Johnny Staford
Martha Staford
SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
A10 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA


BY LELAND BURCH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer Highs 2014 foot-
ball season, known among
Jacket Backers as Life Af-
ter Quez, gets underway
Friday with the start of fall
practice.
Quez Nesbitt, the Yellow
Jackets all time rushing
leader, graduated in June
after having paced Greers
dominant run of three con-
secutive region champion-
ships built on a record of
28-wins and eight losses.
The top priority during
pre-season drills will be
replacing Nesbitt, and the
plan appears to be run-
ning back by committee.
I dont know that you
can replace a talent like
Quez. Those types just
dont come along very of-
ten, said veteran head
coach Will Young. So rath-
er than a one-man attack,
we hope to attack with
three or four from differ-
ent places on the field. And
we will lean a little more
on (quarterback) Mario Cu-
sanothat is we will throw
the ball a little more. We
have several receivers who
could be running backs for
other teams.
Unfortunately, Nesbitt
was not the only gradu-
ation loss, so the Yellow
Jackets will be challenged
to repeat he 2013 record
of 10-3 that included last
SEE GREER | A12
At regional
tournament
in Florida
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
A group of Blue Ridge
baseball standouts will hit
the road this weekend in
search of an opportunity
to represent South Caro-
lina at the Senior Little
League World Series.
The team will compete
in the Southeast Regional
in Parrish, Florida this
weekend with the winner
earning a trip to the World
Series in Bangor, Maine.
Weve yet to be defeat-
ed, head coach Steven
Rabbit Shealey said. We
only allowed five runs in
the state tournament and
weve only allowed a total
of six runs all year out of
15 games.
The team won the dis-
trict tournament via for-
feit, but defeated Chester
(5-0), Florence (9-1) and
Summerville (14-4) in the
state tournament two
weeks ago.
Shealey said his guys are
ready to make some more
noise in Florida.
Were getting all fired
up to go, he said. Ive
got some of the best ball
players around. I think Ive
got the best baseball play-
ers in the Blue Ridge area.
Theyre looking forward
to the challenge and if we
take them to the World Se-
ries, it will be the first time
ever in the history of Blue
Ridge.
Blue Ridge will open the
Southeast Regional with
either Tennessee or Vir-
ginia.
The team includes Eli-
jah Henderson, CJ Brooks,
Travis Lancaster, Jacob
Wilbanks, Chase Joines,
Gibson Metcalf, Brandon
Southern, Nathan Hebert,
Ben Mathews, John Coker,
Blake Cannon and Gavin
Vautour.
Right now, we have su-
per pitching, we have su-
per defense and we have
super hitting, Shealey
said. I can take my very
last batter and they can
become No. 1 and No. 2
batters. Thats how good
my hitting is.
You love a team like that
where you have no weak
places, he said. Against
Florence, we didnt allow
but one run and that was
because of a hit batter. We
never walked a soul. My
pitchers dont walk people
and thats the key to win-
ning. All my pitchers are
very accurate.
The head coach said he
has will not have to worry
about whether or not his
team will perform.
Theyre all leaders,
Shealey said. Ive got a
team full of leaders and
good men. I cant say weve
got one guy because all
nine are important. These
guys are a super good
bunch to coach.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Riverside football
team got quite the sur-
prise last week during the
teams final summer work-
out session.
Players reported to the
practice field to find a
team of U.S. Marines wait-
ing. What ensued was 90
minutes of intense train-
ing.
They didnt know what
to expect initially, Gun-
nery Sgt. Peter Lyons said.
This is something they
had not experienced be-
fore so they were a little
apprehensive at first. Af-
ter they got into the thick
of it, we noticed that they
kind of loosened up. They
were trusting us and fol-
lowing our instructions
and doing the best they
could to challenge them-
selves.
Head coach Phil Smith
told some players the
day before they would be
getting a surprise. While
some thought this meant
new uniforms, Smith had
something different in
mind.
I thought it was awe-
some, Smith said. I kept
it a surprise that they were
coming. They really didnt
know what they were get-
ting themselves into.
Lyons said the Marine
Corps works with local
high school students in
different ways throughout
the year.
We partner with pretty
much all the high schools
in the local area, Lyons
said. We work with dif-
ferent coaches, as well as
teachers and administra-
tors just to touch base
with the students and find
out what their plans are
for the future.
After several stations of
workouts, signs of fatigue
began to show the faces of
the players.
At some point they
were probably a little fa-
tigued, Smith said. As
hard as coach (Joe Novo-
tasky) has been pushing
them, you could really see
first hand that it has really
paid off. Theyve been go-
ing non-stop. It was a little
bit more difficult than
what theyre used to, but
I think it kind of summed
up everything weve been
working on all summer.
Lyons said several play-
ers told him it was a dif-
ficult challenge.
I spoke to a couple of
the football players after
the fact and asked them
specifically how it was in
comparison to some of
their workouts, he said.
They said it was defi-
nitely more intense and
more demanding. We were
challenging them to a full
body workout.
This type of training can
provide a valuable experi-
ence for students thinking
about a career in the mili-
tary, Lyons said.
The Marines Corps is
very important. Its who
our country depends on to
go out there and win the
battles our country has to
fight, he said. The Marine
Corps is very much depen-
dent on leadership and
being able to obey orders
SEE TRAINING | A12
Two-a-
days
A
s area football players
gear up for the first
week of full-contact
practice, I cant help but
be overcome with nostal-
gia.
I remember my first
practice on the high
school football team like
it was yesterday.
I was one of the first
kids in the locker room
the morning of the first
two-a-day. I wanted to
make sure the coaches
saw me, took notice of
my ability to be punc-
tual. I laced up the cleats,
strapped on my oversized
shoulder pads and put
on the helmet that never
would fit me right.
I saw a few familiar
faces from my middle
school. Of course, they
were mixed in with kids
I didnt know, so I was a
little hesitant to talk to
anyone. I mostly just kept
to myself and tried to fo-
cus on what I was there to
doearn a valuable spot
on the roster.
Everything was going
according to plan until
they started dividing play-
ers into their positions. I
was a wide receiveror at
least thats what I thought
I was. If you needed some-
body to make a catch in a
tight spot, I was your guy.
I had the hands and speed
of Randy Moss.
But, as they were divid-
ing players into groups,
something horrible hap-
pened. Somehow, look-
ing at my 59 150-pound
frame, the coaches saw fit
to put me in a group of
linemen. What was hap-
pening? I had only been
at practice for an hour
and already my talents
were being misused. My
dreams of being a star
wide receiver, playing
football for the University
of Miami and entering
the NFL draft were gone
in the blink of an eye. A
lineman?
Continuing my efforts
to please the coaches at
all costs, I accepted my
new position. I looked
enviously over at the
kids that got sorted into
the receiver group and
acknowledged that my
dream was now over.
It wasnt long until I
was dealt my first big hit.
Every other player in my
group outweighed me by
at least 20 pounds, so
I knew I didnt stand a
chance. Two at a time, the
coach put us in a three-
point stance and told us
to go on his whistle.
Go meant run as hard as
you can at the other per-
son, hitting them with as
much force as you could
muster.
I dont really remember
my first hit. I remember
being shocked by it. I
remember being dazed.
But, the hits that followed
were much more memora-
blemuch more painful.
A few hours later I was
doing grass drills in 90-
degree weather. For those
that arent familiar with
the term, a grass drill
requires you to sprint
in place and fall to the
ground when the whistle
blows, repeating as many
times as possible. By
the end of our second
practice that day, I was
throwing up.
I wasnt in shape, I was
getting hit by guys that
were bigger than me and
my dreams of playing
wide receiver had been
shattered. But I perse-
vered.
I started at defensive
lineman that year.
A lot can happen when
you show a willingness to
stick with something and
put forth hard work.
For area players, these
next couple of weeks
might be the hardest, but
they may also be the most
memorable.
Warriors train with Marines
PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Riverside football players perform a drill at the command of a U.S. Marine instructor, who trained with the group for 90 minutes. The Marines work
with several schools throughout the local area to provide leadership training and ofer career opportunities for students.
Yellow Jackets
adjust to life
after Quez
FILE PHOTO | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer will be looking to fll a hole this season, adjusting to
life without star running back Quez Nesbitt.



They were trusting us and following our
instructions and doing the best they could
to challenge themselves.
Gunnery Sgt. Peter Lyons
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
A team from Blue Ridge is on its way to Florida this weekend to compete for a chance to
appear in the Senior League World Series representing South Carolina.
Blue Ridge competes for
World Series appearance
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN A11
A game
of
Chance
BY MARK VASTO
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
F
rank Chance walked
into Clark Griffiths
office one morning in
1914 and couldnt hide
his dismay. There sitting
at the Washington Sena-
tors owner/managers
desk was Harry Kingman,
the lanky 61 left-handed
pitching prospect that
Chance had coveted and
tried to sign a year previ-
ous.
Im sorry, Frank, King-
man said. I just thought
Id have a better shot in
Washington.
Chance -- as in Tinker
to Evers to Chance -- was
at this time the player/
manager for the New York
Yankees. Widely respected
by his peers and players
alike, Chance was strug-
gling to build the Yankees
into a formidable team.
The dog days of July were
upon them, and Chance
wanted to make a move.
The Senators had Walter
Johnson as staff ace, and
Chance wasnt happy at
being outmaneuvered by
Griffith. However, it was
Kingmans desire to be an
everyday fielder at first
base. He had developed
a pretty good home-run
swing, and he wanted to
put it to use more than
once every five days.
Chance was having none
of it. He left Griffiths
office with both King-
man and his consider-
able pride intact. During
the game, Kingman hit a
shot just outside the foul
pole. Kingman went on
to strike out and draw a
walk in his other three at-
bats, but Chance had seen
enough, and Kingman saw
his last major-league ac-
tion. He was on the roster
for another season, but
he never threw a pitch.
Chance thought he was
too wild, an observation
Kingman had literally
drilled into Chances left
bicep during a batting
practice. Faced with the
option of reporting to the
minors, Kingman chose
another path:
He went to China.
On paper, Kingmans ca-
reer was just another cup
of coffee. Chances chance
signing of Kingman, how-
ever, turned out to be far
more historic. Kingman
wasnt going to China to
play baseball; he actually
was the first Chinese-born
baseball player in the
major leagues. Kingman
was born in North China,
the first child of two
Christian missionaries
from Massachusetts. His
baseball career over, King-
man returned to China
and became a missionary
himself.
In later years he became
a legend at the Stiles Cen-
ter at UC-Berkeley, where
he managed junior-varsity
baseball and worked for
the YMCA. Later, he and
his wife started a lobbying
firm in Washington, D.C.,
and from a little office on
K Street he made contri-
butions to the game that
he never did on the field,
working not only to help
mistreated Asian workers
but to integrate the game
of baseball.
Kingman also was the
last Chinese-born player
to play in the bigs, but the
Major Leagues have again
cast their eyes on China
and its potential mega-bil-
lion-dollar sports market.
South Korea, Taiwan and
Japan have taken to the
game, so why should 1.2
billion Chinese sports
fans be different? With a
revitalized league, govern-
ment-mandated television
contracts and foreign
baseball advisers putting
cleats on the ground, you
dont need to be a wise
man to say that the next
Say Hey Kid will arrive
sometime sooner than an-
other century. Baseball is
a game of patience, after
all ... and often a game of
chance.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Returning a veteran
group of seniors for 2014,
the Greer High volleyball
team has gone back to the
basics over the summer.
With practice and try-
outs around the corner,
head coach Traci Far-
rington expects her team
to take shape in the com-
ing weeks.
The girls have been
working really hard this
summer on their funda-
mentals and their tech-
nique, Farrington said.
Of course, we dont have
tryouts until August 4th
and 5th, so I dont have a
set team, but everyone has
worked hard.
Farrington already sees
plenty of potential.
Weve got a good many
girls coming from the mid-
dle school that have some
potential to be good play-
ers, she said. Ive got six
seniors returning and one
junior that was on the
team last year. Thats re-
ally exciting to have those
girls work together and be
leaders.
Several upperclassmen
will need to step up for
the Lady Yellow Jackets,
including seniors Zoe
Nicholson, Bailey Estes, Ju-
lia Sudduth, Kellyn Taylor,
Lauren Jarecki and Madi-
son Bates.
Most of those seniors
weve worked with in some
capacity since we were in
seventh grade, she said.
Whether it was a clinic or
a camp or a middle school,
theyve been around. Its
just been really fun to
see where they were then
and how far theyve come
now.
Farrington said her team
has shown commitment
and the desire to succeed.
They just all seem to
be really committed, she
said. They really want
to build the program and
their work ethic has been
great.
The Lady Yellow Jack-
ets are also setting some
goals.
We want to be a com-
petitive team, Farrington
said. No matter who were
playing, we always want to
be competitive. We also
want our seniors to be
good role models, whether
it be in the classroom or
on their court. We want
them to lead by example.
To make the type of run
the team wants to make,
Greer needs to focus on
defense and working to-
gether.
Theyve really been
working on their quickness
and being really tough on
defense, she said. Their
goals have been to work
on playing together and
playing with discipline.
They want to place higher
in the region than ever be-
fore.
Their passion has really
shown and I think thats
going to make a differ-
ence this year, she said.
They dont want a ball to
hit the floor. They want to
be tough on defense and
work on being hard hit-
ters.
Returning
six of eight
top players
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
After a postseason run
that nearly took the Reb-
els all the way last winter,
Byrnes boys basketball
coach Layne Fowler said
his team is continuing to
build momentum.
The team recently
wrapped up summer
workout sessions and the
head coach said the Reb-
els showed plenty of prog-
ress.
This has been our best
summer in my four years,
Fowler said. Weve had
great participation and
weve played about 30
games. We know its just
the summer so I dont
make a big deal of it, but
I do think moving on into
this season, winning al-
ways helps.
Byrnes is coming off a
season in which it visited
the third round of the
playoffs for the first time
in 21 years.
Going 18-10 and mak-
ing it to the third round
last year was good, but at
the same time, Hillcrest
has knocked us out the
past two years and theyve
got all their guys back, he
said. Its going to be a dog
fight, but its just another
thing that is going to pre-
pare you for the playoffs.
With more than 30
games during June and
July, Fowler said his team
got experience it could not
get anywhere else.
You get to see a lot of
kids work on things and
get game experience that
you cant just simulate in
practice, he said. Im re-
ally excited. Im always ex-
cited with a new team and
a new season, but our pro-
gram has gotten better.
The basketball team has
had to work side by side
with the football team,
which has required sev-
eral players to double up
on workouts.
Were going to have sev-
en or eight varsity players
that also play football,
Fowler said. To be honest
with you, theyre very big
parts of what were doing.
Tavin Richardson is
going into his fifth year
with us. Hes got some-
thing like 32 Division I of-
fers for football, he said.
Jaylen Foster might have
been our most valuable
player over the summer
as a point guard and hes
a receiver and a defensive
back for football.
Fowler said developing
a relationship with new
Byrnes football coach Bri-
an Lane has been an easy
task.
Coach Lane and I kind
of grew up together, he
said. Brian and I have
known each other forever.
We havent been together
a long time, but this sum-
mer, we just did a good job
of sharing guys. Without
that communication, there
would be a void there. The
seven I have, I guess five of
those are starters for him,
so its very important.
People try to talk about
specialization, but Im a
firm believer that kids
ought to play more than
one sport. Youll even hear
college coaches talking
about that now. They want
guys playing multiple
sports because the burn-
out rate is a lot lower.
Fowler said Tegan Wa-
ters, Ray Miller, Bouvier
Howard and Tyrique Glenn
will also play a big role for
the Rebels heading into
another year.
Were going to miss
Janson Brown and Syverio
Jones, he said. They were
really important in that big
run at the end of the year.
Ill miss those guys per-
sonally. They were good
captains and good leaders.
But, were coming back
with six of our top eight
players and were bringing
up guys from the JV that
had good summers.
Fowler said this team
has a chance to become
more sound as a new sea-
son approaches.
People say it doesnt
mean anything, but thats
a lie. If it didnt mean any-
thing, we wouldnt do it,
Fowler said. Every year
in the last few years, our
program has gone up. We
just look so much more
like a team this summer.
Were better in all phases.
Defensively, I still think
weve got a lot of work to
do, but offensively weve
moved the ball better and
we rebounded well.
The potential for the
Rebels is through the roof,
Fowler said.
I think the sky is the
limit, Fowler said. Our
expectations are going to
be higher. Every year were
going to start a little slow
and thats a direct result
of bringing guys off the
football field. This year it
could be even more slow
when youre bringing sev-
en or eight in. But, in the
long run, it works out for
us. I think in January were
better in January when
most teams are better in
November and Decem-
ber.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
It has been a year of
growth and hard work for
Riverside senior quarter-
back Ryan Cerino, and he
is hoping to see it pay off
on the field this fall.
The teams offensive
leader has had to provide
stability for the Warriors
this summer, and head
coach Phil Smith said Cer-
ino will play a vital role on
this years team.
Hes got a natural abil-
ity to be a leader, Smith
said. Most of the time,
your quarterback has to be
the leader on the field and
off the field. The kids look
up to him and hes does a
great job. When a quarter-
back has that kind of pres-
ence its a good thing for
him and its a good thing
for our program.
Smith has installed a
new offense for the team
this summer and Cerino
said his teammates have
responded well.
I think everything has
gone well, Cerino said.
It was tough working out
over the summer early in
the mornings, but strug-
gling together is going to
make us better and thats
what happened over the
summer.
The offseason adjust-
ments have given players
an opportunity to be bet-
ter utilized, he said.
I think were in the
right offense, he said.
Its playing to everyones
strengths. Were putting
everyone in the right po-
sitions so they can be the
best they can be to try to
help the team.
Cerino has focused on
improving his mechanics
in the pocket this sum-
mer.
Ive been working on my
foot work and my mechan-
ics, he said. Before this
year, I wasnt really that
sound of a quarterback
mechanically, but Ive re-
ally focused on that going
through progressions and
trying to become smart-
er.
Smith said his quarter-
back provides a needed
spark.
Hes gotten stronger
and his arm has gotten
stronger, he said. Hes
one of our stronger ath-
letes on the team and he
plays quarterback. You
dont see that very often.
Hes throwing the ball
with more velocity and
hes running the offense.
That has been a real asset
for us.
Hes going to do every-
thing you ask him. Hes
going to do things right
on the field and off the
field.
With practice starting
up on Friday, Cerino said
he is hoping to see a lot
of energy from his fellow
Warriors.
Were looking for a lot
of energy, Cerino said.
We want to have fun too.
This is my senior year so
its supposed to be fun.
With a group of expe-
rienced players to work
with, improving on last
season should be a simple
formula.
Weve got a lot of re-
turners coming back so
we didnt really lose that
much, Cerino said. We
are in the right offense
and our defense is look-
ing good. Everyone is a lot
stronger and faster.
Competing in 7-on-7
tournament play over the
summer has helped Cerino
judge the teams progress.
We were able to see
other teams and where
we stack up, he said. We
wont be as nervous when
we see these guys on Fri-
day nights.
A SPORTING VIEW |
Byrnes hoping to remain
a threat next postseason
Hard work paying off for Cerino
FILE PHOTO | THE GREER CITIZEN
Riverside quarterback Ryan Cerino, pictured right, has been focusing on improving his
arm strength and mechanics this summer.
Were looking for
a lot of energy. We
want to have fun
too...
Ryan Cerino
Riverside quarterback

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
After a deep playof run earlier this year, the Byrnes boys
basketball team hit the weight room for a few extra reps.


PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Greer volleyball team will return six seniors this fall in
hopes of staying in the hunt for a region title.
Greer volleyball
gets back to the
fundamentals


This has been
our best summer
in my four years.
Weve had great
participation and
weve played about
30 games.
Layne Fowler
Byrnes boys basketball coach
BY REID SPENCER
NASCAR WIRE SERVICE
Ty Dillon held off a
charging Kyle Busch in
the closing laps of the
Lilly Diabetes 250 at In-
dianapolis Motor Speed-
way, but he had to win the
first NASCAR Nationwide
Series race of his career
with a fuel cell approach-
ing empty.
Dillon grabbed the lead
from Busch, the pole win-
ner, moments after a re-
start on Lap 77 of 100.
He soon opened a lead of
one second over the most
prolific winner in series
history, but it wasnt with-
out some pinpoint calcula-
tions on the part of crew
chief Danny Stockman.
In what was a family af-
fair of the first order, Mike
Dillon, the drivers father
and spotter, told Ty Dillon
to start backing up his cor-
ners with six laps left. Dil-
lon promptly lost a third
of a lead that had grown to
more than 1.2 seconds.
Team owner Richard
Childress, Dillons grand-
father, broke into the ra-
dio channel a lap later.
You cant give up that
much to him, Childress
said. Go for it.
From that point on,
Mike Dillon and Stockman
kept repeating the same
mantra, Hammer down!
and Dillon obliged, get-
ting to the finish line .833
seconds ahead of Busch.
Matt Kenseth ran third,
and Kevin Harvick fourth.
Boy, that was all I had,
Dillon said. When youve
got the best in the business
behind you, its tough. Its
tough to stay focused and
not give up.
As the highest finisher
among four eligible driv-
ers for the Nationwide
Insurance Dash 4 Cash,
Dillon pocketed an extra
$100,000, but the impor-
tant thing was his first win
in the series.
The car started getting
a little tight, but we had
speed all weekend, Dillon
said. We got out front,
and she unleashed.
Harvick led a race-high
33 laps but fell victim to
the timing of a late debris
caution on Lap 71. The
five laps run under yel-
low before the final restart
gave Dillon and Busch the
margin they needed to get
to the end of the race on
fuel.
In Buschs estimation,
the outcome hinged on the
Lap 77 restart.
I gave it away on that
last restart there in Turn
1, Busch said. I got down
in there, and the car never
turned, and the car on my
inside, Ty, drove right on
by me. He got the lead, and
it was over from there.
I tried to maintain with
him and tried to do a few
things to get by him the
first few laps before I got
tight. And as soon as I got
tight, he distanced me,
and that was it.
Joey Logano finished
fifth, followed by Paul
Menard, Brian Scott, Kyle
Larson and Trevor Bayne.
Regan Smith ran 10th and
trimmed the series lead of
JR Motorsports teammate
Chase Elliott, who came
home 12th, to four points.
BY REID SPENCER
NASCAR WIRE SERVICE
As he crossed the yard
of bricks, and the signifi-
cance of his fifth victory at
Indianapolis Motor Speed-
way hit him like a ton of
bricks, Jeff Gordon rev-
eled in the moment that
propelled him to victory in
the John Wayne Walding
400 at The Brickyard.
God! I finally had the
restart of my life, Gordon
shouted into his radio mic,
recalling the move just
15 minutes earlier that
launched him past Hen-
drick Motorsports team-
mate Kasey Kahne on Lap
144 of 160 in Sundays
marquee NASCAR Sprint
Cup Series race.
Twenty years removed
from his victory in the
inaugural Brickyard 400,
Gordon finished 2.325 sec-
onds ahead of Kyle Busch
who with teammates Den-
ny Hamlin and Matt Kens-
eth finished 2-3-4 in the
20th Sprint Cup race of
the season.
The win was the 90th
of Gordons career, third-
most all-time, his sec-
ond of the season and, of
course, his record fifth at
IMS, breaking a tie with
teammate Jimmie Johnson
for most Cup wins at the
Brickyard. The win also
clinched Gordon a spot in
the Chase for the NASCAR
Sprint Cup, assuming he
attempts to qualify for the
remaining six races of the
regular season.
And though open-wheel
purists may blanch at the
notion, Gordon is the first
driver in any series to win
five races on the legend-
ary 2.5-mile oval that has
played such an integral
role in the history of mo-
torsports in the United
States.
Im not very good on
restarts and wasnt very
good today, but I finally
got the restart of my life
today when it counted
most, said Gordon, who
gave Chevrolet its 12th
straight Cup victory at
Indy. Once I got clear, I
was thinking like, I cant
believe this is happening
now...
I was trying so hard
with 10 (laps) to go not to
focus on the crowd, add-
ed Gordon, who increased
his series lead over team-
mate and ninth-place fin-
isher Dale Earnhardt Jr. to
24 points. Every once in a
while, Id glance up there
and I could see the reac-
tion. I was trying not to let
it get to me and not think
about it too much. And yet
you cant help it.
Its such a big place and
such an important victory
and a crucial moment in
the season and the cham-
pionship, and those emo-
tions take over. I have my
kids here. Theres nothing
better, especially at one of
the biggest races, to have
your family here. ... This
one is for all those fans
throughout the years and
all weekend long. Theyre
saying We believe you
can get number 5. We got
number 5yes!
If Gordon had trouble
believing the outcome,
team owner Rick Hendrick
did not. In fact, Hendrick
had a premonition about
the race.
I told (Gordon) this
morning, This is your
day, Hendrick recalled.
For him to break that tie
(with Johnson), its pretty
special. I remember the
first one (1994) and how
good it felt.
This one feels just as
good.
Joey Logano ran fifth,
and Kahne slipped to sixth
in the final 17-lap run af-
ter leading 70 laps and,
for most of the afternoon,
looking to be the likely
winner.
Kahne grabbed the lead
from Denny Hamlin after a
restart on lap 73, bringing
Kyle Busch with him. For
the next 24 laps, Kahne
maintained an advantage
over Busch that fluctuated
between one and two sec-
onds until Trevor Baynes
No. 21 Ford spun and
smacked the inside guard
rail in the short chute be-
tween Turns 3 and 4 to
cause the third caution of
the afternoon.
Clint Bowyer, who had
come to pit road moments
before Baynes spin, had
the luxury of staying out
while other lead-lap cars
stopped under yellow and
led the field to green on
Lap 102. Seconds later,
however, Kahne retook
the lead, and Bowyer soon
slipped back to fourth
behind Kahne, Busch and
Gordon.
Busch surrendered sec-
ond place to Gordon on
Lap 113 and used the op-
portunity to duck behind
the No. 24 Chevrolet and
free a piece of paper de-
bris that had attached it-
self to the grille of the No.
18 Toyota. Gordon quickly
pulled away and began to
close on Kahne, knock-
ing a 2.6-second deficit
to two car-lengths by the
time Ryan Truexs Toyota
stalled on the track.
Use one of the freaking
exits, Gordon screamed
rhetorically on his radio,
but Truexs car came to
a stop, and NASCAR had
no choice but to call the
fourth caution.
Kahne and Gordon led
a large contingent that
opted to stay out on the
track under the yellow,
but Kahne faltered on the
restart, opening the door
for Gordon to pass on the
outside through Turns 1
and 2 as Kahne slipped
back to fifth.
And that restart, as No.
24 crew chief Alan Gus-
tafson had predicted dur-
ing a quick interview be-
fore the final green-flag
run, decided the race.



A12 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/ GETTY IMAGES
Jef Gordon led the pack as the checkered fag came down Sunday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He is pictured
celebrating with a burnout on his way to victory lane.
Jeff Gordon takes race at Indianapolis
Dillon holds off Busch
for first series victory
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/ GETTY IMAGES
Ty Dillon and his team kiss the bricks in Indianapolis after
a big win in the closing laps.
FROM A10
in all situations. Without a
environment like that, the
military doesnt work.
Some of those football
players that arent going
to join the Marines, they
can still see this as a way
to recognize those who do
make the choice to join
and the sacrifices they
make.
Smith said the team has
continued to improve each
week throughout the sum-
mer.
It just shows how hard
theyve been working all
summer, he said. I knew
they were going to go af-
ter it and do the best they
could with what we put in
front of them. Thats all
we can ask.
Riverside has finished
each 7-on-7 tournament
with a winning record af-
ter wrapping up a winless
2013 just a few months
ago.
Were so much further
ahead this year than we
were last year, he said.
I do believe were stron-
ger and were faster. I
think were more in shape
and prepared going into
camp.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
FROM A10
gasp regular season losses
at Blue Ridge and Seneca
plus a mauling by state
champion Daniel in the
playoffs. Gone are such
standouts as Emanuel Kel-
ly, Ty Campbell, Raymond
Booker, Malek Johnson,
Tay Woods, and Rolland
Nall.
We have to replace
practically all of the defen-
sive line and holes at line-
backer, Young notes.
But the cupboard is not
entirely bare. Offensive re-
turnees joining Cusano in-
clude Dorian Lindsey who
leads a receiving corps of
Zach Glidden, Zeke White-
side and youngsters Tyrek
Fleming and Nate Jeffer-
son.
Dorian become a real
go-to guy this summer,
notes Young. Not a single
player on the team at a
skill position is a senior.
Another key returnee
is junior running back
Adrian McGee who may
be more valuable as a re-
ceiver and defensive back
than a replacement for
Nesbitt. Adrian is a heck
of a receiver, and an excel-
lent strong safety on de-
fense. So we will be look-
ing at a freshman, Quay
Thackston, at running
back, as well as Lindsey,
because McGee cant do
everything, Young ex-
plains.
DEFENSIVE PLUGS
The Yellow Jackets are
plugging junior Jordan
Hawthorne into the defen-
sive line along with young-
sters Pierce Bishop and
Corey Styles. The second-
ary also gets reshuffling,
especially since linebacker
Tyler Wright will be side-
lined for five weeks with a
knee injury. Deandre Mo-
ren moves to cornerback
along with newcomer Tory
Pride.
The offensive line re-
turns nearly intact and
should be the strength
of the team. Sophomore
Noah Hannon slides over
to left tackle to replace
Nall, and Mead Cook steps
in at center for Hannon.
The rebuilding began
in the weight room last
January and has contin-
ued through the summer.
Young said his players
have really worked this
summer, including line-
men lifting weights four
days a week and skill kids
involved in 7-on-7 games.
The kids seem to be in
pretty good condition to
start practice, and I feel
good about the participa-
tion.
About 100 players, var-
sity and JV, are expected
to start practice on Fri-
day. The first four days
will consist of workouts
in light gear, followed by
contact work in full pads
beginning next Wednes-
day. That marks the open-
ing of Camp Swarm at
the school. Football play-
ers will spend the night
at school on Wednesday
and have two-a-day drills,
morning and late evenings
until traveling to Gaffney
for the first scrimmage on
Friday, August 8 at 6 p.m.
As the pre-season con-
tinues, the Yellow Jackets
will scrimmage at Pick-
ens on Tuesday, Aug. 12;
battle Byrnes in the Byrnes
Jamboree on Aug. 15; will
host Boiling Springs on
Aug. 19 at 6 p.m. for Meet
the Jackets and finish by
facing Daniel in the Daniel
Jamboree on August 22.
The season opens on
August 29 when Greer will
host old rival Clinton in a
non-region game at 7:30
p.m. at Dooley Field.
Greer will not field a C
or freshman team again
this year, but Young said
the program would contin-
ue to emphasize the mid-
dle school, or D team.
We have had about 65
of those kids working out
during the summer, and
some of them look pretty
good, he said.
The D team will start
practice on August 12,
and participate in a jam-
boree at Woodmont on
September 3 before open-
ing the season the follow-
ing week.
GREER: Opening with Camp Swarm
TRAINING: Warriors show improvement
YELLOW JACKET FOOTBALL
BACK IN ACTION
The Greer High football
team is back in full swing
with practices beginning
this Friday. Greer will en-
ter Camp Swarm on Aug.
6, 7 and 8, followed by a
scrimmage with Gaffney
at Dooley Field at 6 p.m.
on Aug. 8.
On Aug. 12, the team
will travel to Pickens for
a scrimmage with the Blue
Flame at 6 p.m. Greer will
kick off against Byrnes on
Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. the By-
rnes Jamboree.
On Aug. 19, the Yellow
Jackets will host Meet
the Jackets at Dooley
Field, followed by a scrim-
mage with Boiling Springs.
Events begin at 6 p.m. On
Aug. 22, Greer will travel
to Daniel for a scrimmage
at 6 p.m.
WASHINGTON BAPTIST
HOSTS SPORTS CAMP
Washington Baptist
Church will host a camp
featuring six different
sports on July 30 from 7-
8:30 for ages 6-14 at 3500
N. Highway 14 in Greer.
No registration is re-
quired and the event is
free and open to the pub-
lic.
CAROLINA RAVENS YOUTH
FOOTBALL REGISTRATION
Registration is now un-
derway for the fall season
of Carolina Ravens youth
tackle football (ages 6-12)
and cheerleading (ages 5-
13).
To register online, visit
ravensfootballsc.com.
For more information,
call 423-4550.
REGISTRATION OPEN
FOR GOODWILL MUD RUN
Registration has opened
for the fall edition of the
Goodwill Mud Run, which
will take place on Satur-
day, Sept. 13 at SC-TAC
(formerly the old Donald-
son Center).
Teams of four will run
3.5 miles while navigat-
ing 35 unique obstacles in
this Marine Corps inspired
course.
Event officials say the
funds raised from the
mud run will help further
Goodwills mission of pro-
viding job training and job
placement services that
assist South Carolina resi-
dents searching for em-
ployment.
For more information on
the fall Goodwill Mud Run,
visit the official event web-
site at goodwillmudrun.
org.

SPORTS
ROUNDUP

LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
B
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
The night the Taylors
Free Medical Clinic opened,
it saw 10 patients. At that
time, it was open one day
a week.
On Monday, the ninth
anniversary of opening its
doors, it took the next step
in serving its patients.
The Taylors Free Medical
Clinic broke ground this
week on an expansion that
will nearly double their
square footage. The clinic
will add exam, waiting and
pharmacy space.
Theres a greater de-
mand for our services and
well be able to handle
and process and meet the
needs of our patients in a
much more efficient way,
said Karen Salerno, ex-
ecutive director. Theres
more and more people,
unfortunately, since our
criteria is under 165 per-
cent of poverty, the major-
ity of our patients werent
helped by the ACA (Af-
fordable Care Act). Were
in a state where you have
to be under 50 percent of
the poverty to apply for
Medicaid. Youre not fully
subsidized on the ACA un-
til 138 percent of poverty.
Theres a whole popula-
tion between 51 and 137
that still dont have any
options.
Salerno hopes to have
the expansion done within
a year.
It sounds like a little
bit longer than you would
think, but our goal is to
stay completely functional
the whole time so we can
continue to meet the needs
of our patients and honor
the commitment that was
made to them, she said.
Currently, the clinic tri-
ages, prepares and treats
patients in the same room.
The building itself is 3,280
square feet. The expansion
will add 2,185 square feet.
The clinic averages 130
appointments each week.
In addition to primary
care, it has specialty clin-
ics like gynecology, coun-
seling and chiropractic.
Last year, the pharmacy
filled more than 23,000
prescriptions.
It has grown tremen-
dously, Salerno said.
God has blessed us every
step of the way.
With the expansion,
there will be separate tri-
age rooms and a separate
waiting area for the phar-
macy. A larger patient
education room will also
be added. It will help with
efficiency and crowd con-
trol, Salerno said.
People have questioned
why the Taylors Free Medi-
cal Clinic is adding on to
its existing location in-
stead of finding a newer
or bigger space, said Rus-
sell Ashmore, one of the
clinics cofounders.
The location, at 400 W.
Main St. in Taylors, is spe-
cial.
Weve been asked, Why
dont you locate to a larger
building instead of expand-
ing this facility, Ashmore
said. My answer to that is
this is holy ground. Thats
why we stay.
Ashmore is currently
the vice chairman of the
board. His cofounder,
James Hays, serves as
chairman of the board.
The two conceived the
idea for the clinic while
on a mission trip abroad.
The clinic is living the
gospel, Hays said.
Its one thing to talk
the gospel and its anoth-
er thing to live the gos-
pel, Hayes said I think
Taylors Free Medical Clin-
ic lives the gospel every
day that these doors are
open. Im so excited that
we can expand now.
The plans price out at
about $600,000, but Saler-
no hopes to do it closer
$300,000 with donations
and volunteer labor. Those
interested in helping do-
nating time, money, exper-
tise, materials can call
the clinic at 244-1134.
The Taylors Free Medical
Clinic is open 9 a.m.-4:30
p.m. Monday-Wednesday
and Friday and 1-9 p.m.
Thursday. More informa-
tion is available at taylors-
fmc.org.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
With school just a few
weeks away, band camps
are in full swing and foot-
ball teams are wrapping
up 7-on-7 tournaments.
Its no different for Blue
Ridge Highs choir.
For the first time, the
choir is getting a head
start on the school year,
said Laura Morris
Our priorities are, we
have All-State auditions
in November so were try-
ing to learn our audition
pieces for that, Morris
said. We also have two
pretty difficult pieces for
the state championship
this year, so were getting
a head start on that.
During the three-day
camp, the group of 30
sophomores, juniors and
seniors, covered a lot of
ground.
Ive never heard of any
choir doing it. Im excited
about it, Morris said. We
usually start off in the
morning, just warming
up and doing some sight
reading. Then we take
turns with all the pieces
throughout the day. So, a
lot of singing.
Last year, the mens
choir placed first in the
Class AAA division at the
state championship and
placed third among all
the divisions. The concert
choir placed fourth, with
a margin of less than one
point.
They were right under
third place, she said.
Morris graduated from
Seneca High, which has
an excellent choral pro-
gram. Her choral teacher
inspired her to pursue the
same career. The 2014-
15 school year will be her
second year at Blue Ridge.
Morris student-taught at
Blue Ridge under Bruce
McIntyre, who is now at
Hillcrest High.
This year, again, Im go-
ing to take the whole group
to state. Im planning on
taking a small chamber
ensemble group. We will
also probably take a girls
group or a guys group,
but were kind of feeling
out this week whether the
guys or girls are better, ba-
sically. The girls are win-
ning as of right now.
Senior Bailey Tyler is
excited for the upcoming
year and anticipates doing
better than last year.
Being a senior, usually
youre thinking its not
going to be that great be-
cause a lot of people left,
Tyler said. I think were
actually going to be really
good this year with the
way Ms. Morris has pre-
pared us and the students
that are coming up. Even
though a lot of them have
never been in choir before.
Shes telling them what to
expect, things like sight-
singing. Shes already pre-
pared them and we havent
really started yet.
Morris is a friend as well
as a teacher, she said.
You can talk to her
about anything, which is
awesome to us because we
get to treat her not only
as a teacher, but also as a
friend, Tyler said.
The friendship is how ju-
nior Antyn Cookes ended
up in choir. This will be his
first year.
She met me through
band and thats how we
got interested in choir,
Cooke said. A lot of the
choir students have band
experience, he said.
Im just amazed that
kids this young can make
as beautiful music as they
can. There are times I lit-
erally just start giggling
in class because I cant
believe that they have that
mature sound and a lot of
the new ones this coming
year have never been in
choir before and theyre
really stepping up.
Taylors Free Medical Clinic to expand
God has blessed us
every step of the
way.
Karen Salermo
Executive director
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Board members James Hayes, Russell Ashmore and Mike Burns break ground for the Taylors Free Medical Clinic expansion with Karen
Salerno, the clinics executive director.
KATIE JONES | THE GREER CITIZEN
Taylors Free Medical Clinic broke ground on this new
addition that will nearly double its square footage.
Blue Ridge choir holds boot camp
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Blue Ridge High choral director Laura Morris leads a team of 30 sophomores, juniors and
seniors in the frst-ever summer boot camp in preparation for the 2014-15 school year.
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Blue Ridge High choir spent a few days last week
warming up their voices and sight reading.
Im just amazed
that kids this
young can make as
beautiful music as
they can.
Laura Morris
Instructor

BY SAM MAZZOTTA
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
DEAR PAWS CORNER:
I have a cat and two bud-
gies, and I am moving sev-
eral states away. I plan to
drive and bring all three
with me. Im worried that
Tiger will stress out the
budgies, though. Can I
keep the peace between
these pets? -- A Reader,
via email
DEAR READER: One
way, maybe the best
way, to travel with pets
of different species is to
keep them out of sight of
one another, and under
control.
Tiger should be placed
in a carrier with a favorite
blanket and toys to keep
him occupied. The birds
should stay in their cage
(or if necessary, a smaller
travel cage). The change
of location and the cars
motion could be stressors
as well, so minimize their
exposure by covering the
cage while youre driving.
And do not leave your
pets alone in the car, even
for a few minutes, and
even if the weather seems
cool. I know Ive repeated
this advice all summer,
but I see incidents several
times per week on the
news, so many owners
still dont realize the
danger. The temperature
in a hot car can rise very
quickly, even with the
windows opened a bit.
So plan your trip care-
fully. At each rest stop,
take the birds cage
outside and uncover it in
a shady area so they can
get some fresh air. Take
Tigers carrier out, or if
hes a well-behaved cat,
put him on a leash (while
hes still in the car so he
doesnt escape) and let
him explore a safe, shady
area.
If Tiger is a terror in the
car -- yowling or other-
wise being stressed -- talk
to his vet beforehand
about medicating him to
keep him calm during the
journey.
Send your questions
or comments to ask@
pawscorner.com.
MILESTONES
The Greer Citizen


B2 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
$
$
$
$
O
ne Itemat Regular Price
Coupon Coupon
COUPON FOR IN-STORE OR ONLINE USE!
Cash Value 1/10.
Coupon
Code:
Offer good for one item at regular price only.
One coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes CRICUT products, Tim Holtz Vagabond Machine, Silhouette CAMEO Machine,
candy, helium tanks, gift cards, custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals or class fees.
A single cut of fabric or trim by the yard equals one item.
Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.
TAYLORS
Wade Hampton Blvd & Fairview Road
Grace Hall in Greer, was
the 2 p.m. setting on May
31, 2014, for the marriage
of Mary Bethany McGee, of
Greer, and Philip Edward
Rush, of Thomaston, Geor-
gia. Performing the cer-
emony was the Rev. Tim
Barton. A reception fol-
lowed, also held at Grace
Hall.
Wedding music was
provided by Collin Der-
rick and Albert Spear who
presented instrumental
hymnal selections on the
guitar and mandolin.
The former Miss McGee
is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Jim McGee, of Greer,
and granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. James Hairston,
of Greer. A 2006 graduate
of Greer High School and
2009 graduate of North
Greenville University with
a B.A. degree in English,
she earned her Master of
Arts degree in teaching in
2011 at Converse College.
She is an English teacher at
West Forsyth High School.
The groom is the son of
Rev. and Mrs. Dale Rush,
of Thomaston, Georgia. A
2008 graduate of Ander-
son University with a B.S.
degree in Business, he is
employed by Infor Global
Solutions.
Given in marriage by
her father, the bride was
attended by her sisters,
Megan and Melissa McGee,
as her maids of honor.
They served with Margaret
Poston, Meredith Cooper
and Charity Reed, as her
bridesmaids.
Mr. David Rush and Mr.
John Rush attended their
brother as his best men.
The couple is presently
at home in Cumming,
Georgia, after a wedding
trip to Yellowstone Na-
tional Park.
Mrs. Philip Edward Rush
McGee Rush
WEDDINGS |
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
I
love back to school
time. It helps that
Im not going back to
school and dont have
kids headed back.
Let me rephrase: I love
the idea of back to school.
I love the idea of getting
a brand new start. A real
new start, not like New
Years starts. A new year
is great and all, but come
January 2, what really
changes? You dont buy
new outfits for the new
year. You dont get new
supplies for the new year.
A new teacher means
no preconceived notions
its like getting a new
job without interview-
ing or applying. Sort of.
You know, without the
paycheck.
It was so wonderful to
see my friends after 10
weeks off. There are times
now when I dont see
dear friends for 10 weeks
or longer, but its not
fun. Its because were all
scattered geographically
and logistically. Work,
families, limited vacation
and limited funds have all
gotten in the way.
Those problems existed
when I was younger, but
someone else solved
them. My job was to
behave and not throw up
in the car.
I am fully away that Im
romanticizing the return
to school. Like I said, Ive
aged out of the return-to-
school fun. When I was 16
or so, summers came to
mean working a part-time
job.
Ill probably take
advantage of the tax-free
holiday and other back to
school deals, but I wont
be replacing my wardrobe
or anything extreme.
When was the last time
you wore an entirely new
outfit, shoes, socks and
underwear included?
Never mind a new lunch
box or new crayons and
everything in between.
And college! Was there
anything better than leav-
ing for college? Buying
dorm stuff, collaborating
with roommates, finagling
a schedule with no morn-
ing classes.
Let me be the first to
tell you, graduate school
is nothing like the first 17
years of my education.
It is serious business.
Tons of reading. Tons
of work. No partying.
No meal plan. No baking
cookies in the tiny, hor-
rible dorm hall kitchen.
The program Im in is
entirely online. While it
has its perks (pajamas,
mainly), it has its down-
sides, too: its easy to let
things slip by. Summer
classes are fast-paced be-
cause theyre compressed.
It requires a lot of self-
discipline, of which I have
questionable amounts.
Exhibit A: I spent a
recent, rainy Saturday
cleaning, baking and read
an entire novel instead of
doing school stuff.
Im really enjoying the
one class Im taking at the
moment, but a throwback
back to school moment
would be nice. Having
three months off was a
great way to recharge
and I didnt appreciate it
like I should. Hindsight is
20/20.
Im jealous of all the
kids who are returning to
school, but who are too
young for summer jobs or
internships.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Returning to school is a chance
for a fresh start
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES
Can cat and parrots survive car trips?
PAWS CORNER |


BY RICHARD ECKSTROM
SOUTH CAROLINA COMPTROLLER
J
uly 21 marked the
anniversary of one
of Americas great
triumphs.
Forty-five years earlier,
the eyes of a nation were
transfixed to their black
and white TV sets to
watch history unfold as
an American astronaut
stepped foot on the grey
lunar soil. Neil Armstrong
became the first man to
stand on ground not of
this Earth.
It was a remarkable feat,
one that is unparalleled
in world history. Since the
beginning of mankind,
humans had gazed at the
bright sphere hundreds of
thousands of miles away,
wondering what it was
like. At 10:56 p.m. on July
21, 1969, a human was
walking on it.
So uncertain was the
Apollo 11 moon landing
mission that President
Nixon had a speechwriter
prepare him an address to
the nation in case catas-
trophe occurred. The con-
tingency plans included
phone calls to the wives
of Armstrong and fellow
astronauts Buzz Aldrin
and Michael Collins. But
three days after Arm-
strongs historic steps,
the men returned home
safely, splashing down
in the Pacific Ocean near
Hawaii. They received a
heros welcome.
Our space flights and
moon-landings have
yielded great knowledge,
which has helped us
understand our solar
system, as well as monu-
mental advancements in
science, technology and
innovation.
But perhaps the real
value in space explora-
tion lies in its power to
inspire. It reminds us that
nothings out of reach
that theres little we cant
accomplish when we put
our minds to it.
Striving for the impos-
sible often brings out the
best in people.
At the time of the Apol-
lo 11 mission, America
was a nation in tumult.
Among other things, we
were mired in war in
Vietnam. But the success
of the Apollo 11 mis-
sion rekindled a sense of
national pride. Our young
countrywhich had gained
independence from Impe-
rial rule less than 200
years earlierhad become
the first to put a man on
the moon. We had beaten
our Cold War adversary,
Russia, in the race to do
so. And with just months
to spare, we had fulfilled
the 1961 promise of
President John F. Ken-
nedy, who had vowed to
send an American safely
to the lunar surface and
back before the end of the
decade.
Even during a turbulent
period, space exploration
gave Americans some-
thing to cheer about.
In many ways, America
remains a troubled na-
tionbeset by polariza-
tion, partisan gridlock
and anxiety about the
future. Our leaders cant
seem to agree on how to
solve our many problems.
Late last year, as many
federal offices shut down
for 16 days, I couldnt
help but reflect on how a
society that once sent a
man to the moon couldnt
even operate a function-
ing government.
Given the tremendous
challenges we face,
perhaps the key to our
future lies in our ability to
rediscover the ideals that
made America greatthe
ideals of reaching high
to achieve great things,
of continually striving to
improve, and of pulling
together to overcome
shared obstacles.
Maybe whats needed,
now more than ever, is a
renewal of the American
spirit--the spirit that built
a nation from scratch,
and that put a man on the
moon.
An achievement
worth remembering
SOCIETY DEADLINE
WEDNESDAY, 5 P.M.
No anniversary under 25 years
Birthdays 12 and under only please
Local area connection required for publication
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with one column photo
$15.00
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with 2 column photo
(anniversaries, engagements
& weddings)
$25.00 (black and white)
$100 for color
* All other items not mentioned can be
published at local advertising rates
Since the beginning of mankind, humans
had gazed at the bright sphere hundreds
of thousands of miles away, wondering
what it was like. At 10:56 p.m. on July 21,
1969, a human was walking on it.
SPLASH N DASH
Splash N Dash, for
kids ages 3-16, starts at 8
a.m. August 2 at the GHS
Family Y and includes a
pool swim followed by a
cross country run. There
is a fee of $15. To register,
visit ghs.org/splashndash.
FROM SHELL
SHOCK TO PTSD
This free event is at
6 p.m. August 6 at The
Warehouse Theatre and is
part of an ongoing series
designed to encourage
dialogue on issues involv-
ing veterans. The event
precedes the August 8-30
run of Strange Snow, a
play about a Vietnam vet
fighting his demons and
struggling with the past.
To learn more, visit ware-
housetheatre.com.
GREER OPRY HOUSE
HOLDS LINE DANCING
Classic Country Band
with Ed Burrell at 8 p.m.
Admission is $9. Free line
dancing from 6:30-7:30
p.m. each Saturday night.
STOMPING GROUNDS
EVENTS
Stomping Grounds holds
jam, Celtic session
Stomping Grounds hosts
Old Time Jam with Bob
Buckingham, every first
and third Tuesday of the
month. Buckingham in-
vites anyone who has a
banjo, guitar, bass, fiddle,
etc. to come and jam from
7-9 p.m. Even if you dont
play, come listen to this
group of musical folks.
For more information, call
Bob at 423-5576.
Stomping Grounds
now has a Celtic Ses-
sion 7-9 p.m. every other
Wednesday. This is an
open session to Irish/
Scottish folk music and
anyone can participate.
Please call Alan Dillman
for more information at
828-329-2640.
7:30-10:30 p.m. August
1: Gene Holdway, acous-
tic folk music. Holdway
provides a humorous, fun-
filled evening while sing-
ing songs by James Taylor,
Bob Denver, etc.
7:30-10:30 p.m. August
2: Robert Bertinelli, acous-
tic rock music.
GLT PRESENTS
SPLISH SPLASH 2
The Greenville Little
Theatre presents Splish
Splash 2 August 14-17.
The tribute to the 1950s
is back. GLTs Upstate tal-
ent performs such songs
as Splish Splash, Sum-
mertime Blues, Book
of Love, Great Balls of
Fire, Mack The Knife
and more. There will be
four performances.
Tickets prices are $30
with discounts available
for seniors, children and
groups of 10 or more.
Showtimes are 8 p.m. Au-
gust 14-16 and 3 p.m. Au-
gust 17. Call the box office
at 233-6238 or visit green-
villelittletheatre.org for
more information. Green-
ville Little Theatre Box Of-
fice is located at 444 Col-
lege St., Greenville, and is
open Monday through Fri-
day from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
GLT presents The Com-
plete Works of William
Shakespeare (Abridged)
Greenville Little The-
atres Studio 444, its al-
ternative series, presents
The Complete Works of
Shakespeare (Abridged)
by Adam Long, Daniel
Singer, and Jess Winfield.
Performances will take
place at on July 31-August
2 at 8 p.m. and Sunday,
August 3 at 3 p.m. The hi-
larious comedy parodies
all 37 of Shakespeares
plays with only three ac-
tors in about 90 minutes.
Its fast, its silly, and you
dont need to be a Shake-
spearean scholar to laugh
your codpiece off.
The show will be di-
rected by GLTs Associate
Director, Katie King. It fea-
tures Todd Janssen, Evan
Harris and Sam McCalla.
All tickets are $15 and
are available through
our website or at the
Box Office. Tickets can
also be purchased at the
door. Call the Box Office
at 233-6238 or visit green-
villelittletheatre.org for
more information. Green-
ville Little Theatre Box Of-
fice is located at 444 Col-
lege St. on Heritage Green,
and is open Monday-Friday
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
CONCERTS IN PARK
NEWBERRY OPERA HOUSE
Live entertainment every
Friday evening in the sum-
mer, beginning at 7 p.m.,
June 27-August 8. Bring
your a blanket or lawn
chair to enjoy relaxing
music under the setting
summer sun. For more in-
formation, contact the Box
Office at 803-276-6264 or
online at newberryopera-
house.com
August 1: Doug and Bun-
ny Williams
August 8-9: Newberry
Community Players
August 15: Movie in the
park - City
BJU ANNOUNCES
20142015 SCHEDULE
Bob Jones University
announced the schedule
for the Universitys 2014-
2015 Concert, Living Gal-
lery and Drama Series.
The series will once again
bring to Greenville world-
renowned artists and ex-
citing performances. All
performances are open to
the public.
The 2014-2015 BJU
Concert, Living Gal-
lery and Drama Series
schedule is as follows:
BJU Symphony Orchestra
Oct. 28 p.m.
Founders Memorial Am-
phitorium (FMA).
The Universitys Sym-
phony Orchestra, under
the director of Dr. Michael
W. Moore, presents an
evening with guest artist
David Kim, concertmas-
ter of The Philadelphia
Orchestra. The program
will feature Camille Saint-
Sans Violin Concerto No.
3, Jules Massenets Medi-
tation from Thais, and
other works.
The Taming of the Shrew
Nov. 2021 at 8 p.m.;
Nov. 22 at 2 p.m.
Rodeheaver Au-
ditorium (RA)
Suitors, suitors every-
where for the charming Bi-
ancaand not a prospec-
tor in sight for her ornery
sister, Kate. But, when Pe-
truchio strides into town
in pursuit of a bride, Kate
insists that a twenty-mule
team couldnt drag her
down the aisle. The Clas-
sic Players strike gold in
the rip-roarin production
of one of Shakespeares
best-loved comedies.
Cantus Jan. 27 8 p.m.
FMA
Cantus is a professional
vocal chamber ensemble
consisting of nine men
singing in a TTBB (tenor,
tenor, baritone, bass)
voice arrangement. This
group is known for its in-
novative concert program-
ming, often drawing from
numerous genresinclud-
ing classical, folk, spiritu-
als and orchestral-vocal
repertoire.
Rivals on the Road
Living Gallery Ri-
vals on the Road
April 23 at 4:30 p.m. and
7:30 p.m.; April 42, 4:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Rivals on the Road will
highlight the struggles of
two characters as each in
his own way deals with
who Jesus of Nazareth re-
ally is and how they will
respond to the Messiah.
See great paintings come
alive in life-size re-cre-
ations on the Rodeheaver
stage as choirs, instru-
mentalists and costumed
actors re-create scenes
from our Lords ministry
on earth.
Information and tickets
are available at bju.edu/
tickets. For further infor-
mation, call 770-1372. In-
dividual tickets for all pro-
ductions will be available
for purchase on Sept. 1.
CHAPMAN CULTURAL
ARTS MUSIC MOSAIC
A quick stroll along the
Spartanburg Music Trail
reveals that Sparkle City
has a rich musical history
worthy of tooting its own
horn, but all of those fa-
mous artists were strug-
gling singer-songwriters
at some point. Chapman
Cultural Center is hosting
several of Spartanburgs
best up-and-coming mu-
sicians for Music Mosaic,
an arts benefit concert,
on Sunday, August 3, 3-5
p.m.
Music Mosaic is a show-
case of talented musicians
who live and perform in
local communities. It is
an opportunity for these
musicians to shine on the
Chapman Cultural Center
stage, but also to give back
to their community. Pro-
ceeds from Music Mosaic
will benefit arts education
in Spartanburg County.
The line-up of musicians
is Jeremy Willis, Kylie O,
Not Even Brothers, Anna
V, Nick Evangelista, Rohn
Jewell and Barleycove.
Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter started Music Mosaic
last year to further show-
case the participating art-
ists in its weekly Sundays
Unplugged program. Each
Sunday, 2-4 p.m., a singer-
songwriter is highlighted
in a casual mini-concert,
free to the public. Both the
Singer-Songwriter Concert
series and Music Mosaic
are made possible by a gen-
erous gift from Jeanie and
Patrick OShaughnessy.
Concessions will be
available for purchase in
the lobby for the duration
of the concert. Tickets to
Music Mosaic are $5 per
person, and can be pur-
chased either online or at
the Ticket Office. For more
information, call 542-ARTS
or visit ChapmanCultural-
Center.org.
CHAPMAN CENTER
AUGUST EVENTS
Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter in downtown Spartan-
burg, the lead arts agency
for Spartanburg County,
announces all August 2014
events in the visual and
performing arts, science
and history.
History Exhibit: Maps
Alive!: August 1-31
Spartanburg Regional
History Museum is cur-
rently exhibiting Maps
Alive!, a collection of his-
toric and artistic maps of
Spartanburg, South Caro-
lina, and the surrounding
area, provided by local
volunteer and map enthu-
siast Ron Swain. Free and
open to the public Tues-
day-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5
p.m. and Sunday, 1-5 p.m.
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter. Ends August 31. For
more info, call 596-3501.
Art Exhibit: COLORS: Au-
gust 1-15
Spartanburg Art Museum
is showcasing more than
50 works of art for this an-
nual exhibition. All works
were created by COLORS
students from across the
County at seven sites dur-
ing the past school year.
As an outreach program
of SAM, COLORS pro-
vides underserved youth
a creative outlet to work
with artists after school
in a safe and supportive
environment. Exhibition
on view through August
15. Free and open to the
public Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun-
day, 1-5 p.m. at Chapman
Cultural Center. For more
info, call 582-7616.
Art Exhibit: For the Love
of Light: August 1-28
Artists Guild of Spartan-
burg will host Two Pho-
tographers: For the Love
of Light, a photo exhibit
by members Terry Daven-
port and Skip Woodward,
August 1-28. Free and
open to the public Mon-
day-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5
p.m. and Sunday, 1-5 p.m.
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter. Public reception will
be Thursday, August 21,
6-9 p.m., free and open to
the public. For more info,
call 764-9568.
Art Exhibit: Daniel
Cromer: A Retrospective:
August 1 - Sept. 27
Spartanburg Art Muse-
um is exhibiting impres-
sive watercolors by Daniel
Cromer who, after living
and working in New York
and London as a success-
ful commercial artist, re-
turned to his Spartanburg
roots to devote his time
and talents to creative
practice. His watercolor
landscapes and portraits
are immediately recogniz-
able, and are in corporate
and private collections
across the Southeast. This
expanse of A Retrospec-
tive illustrates the depth
of Cromers talents and his
love for painting. Showing
July 17-Sept. 27 at Chap-
man Cultural Center in
Spartanburg Art Museum,
Tuesday-Saturday, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 1-
5 p.m. Free. For more info,
please call 582-7616.
Sundays Unplugged:
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Every Sunday afternoon,
1-5 p.m., Chapman Cul-
tural Center is open for
the publics relaxed en-
joyment. In addition to
visiting Spartanburg Art
Museum, Artists Guild
of Spartanburg Gallery,
Spartanburg Regional His-
tory Museum, Spartanburg
Science Center, and the
Student Galleries, a local
musician provides free
live music 2-4 p.m. This
is a wonderful way to kick
back and de-stress in a
culturally enlightening en-
vironment. For more info,
call 542-ARTS.
Artful Thursdays:
August 7, 14, 21, 28
Carolina Foothills Artisan
Center in Landrum spon-
sors weekly Artful Thurs-
days where local artists
demonstrate their craft.
For more info, please call
461-3050.
Opening Reception for
Daniel Cromer: A Ret-
rospective: August 9
Spartanburg Art Museum
will host a free and pub-
lic reception for its Daniel
Cromer: A Retrospective
art exhibit on Saturday,
August 9, 5-7 p.m. at
Chapman Cultural Center.
It will celebrate the incred-
ible talents of Cromer and
his 60 years as a practicing
artist. The evening will in-
clude great food, a signa-
ture summer cocktail, lots
of friends, and an amazing
exhibition. For more info,
call 582-7616 or visit Spar-
tanburgArtMuseum.org.
SAMs Family Program-
ming: Watercolor Land-
scapes: August 10
Spartanburg Art Mu-
seum (SAM) will host one
of its Family Programs,
Watercolor Landscapes,
on Sunday, August 10, 1-4
p.m. at Chapman Cultural
Center. This will be in as-
sociation with the current
exhibit by artist Daniel
Cromer.
Learn a few simple tech-
niques to create your own
favorite imaginary water-
color landscape. Free for
Household-level donor
members; $2 per child for
non-members. For more
info, please call 582-7616
or visit SpartanburgArt-
Museum.org.
Theatre Tickets Go on
Sale: August 11
Tickets for The Spartan-
burg Little Theatres 2014-
2015 season go on sale to
the public beginning Mon-
day, August 11. To make
purchases, please visit
ChapmanCulturalCenter.
org. For more purchasing
options and information,
call 542-ARTS.
Yoga at SAM: August
13
Spartanburg Art Mu-
seum (SAM) will offer a
public yoga class Wednes-
day, August 13, 5:45-6:45
p.m. at Chapman Cultural
Center. It will be taught by
Catherine Querin of Yo-
galicious. A $5 donation
is requested for participa-
tion. Bring your own mat.
For more info, call 948-
5364.
History Lunch & Learn:
August 15
Spartanburg County
Historical Association
will host a public Lunch &
Learn lecture about 18th
century food on Friday,
August 15, 12:30-1:30
p.m. at Chapman Cultural
Center.
The speaker will be Tim
Foster, gardener at Walnut
Grove Plantation, and he
will present a virtual tour
of the Plantations garden
as he discusses the cul-
tural significance of 18th
century food in the mod-
ern world.
Admission is $5 or $15
with boxed lunch provided
by Palmetto Palate.
For more info, call 596-
3501.
Pinkalicious Audition
Workshop: August 16
Spartanburg Youth The-
atre will hold an audition
workshop at Chapman Cul-
tural Center on Saturday,
August 16, 9 a.m.-noon.,
for its upcoming musical
Pinkalicious. Participants
must be in grades 3-12.
The cost is $25, and pre-
registration is required.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


THINGS
TO DO
By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 11
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Railway Man
(R) Eric Lomax (Colin
Firth) lives a quiet life
with a beautiful woman
who adores him (Nicole
Kidman) and his hobby
hes a train enthusiast.
Forty years before, he was
an English soldier in the
Pacific front, captured by
Japanese forces, tortured
and forced to work on
a railroad. In the 1980s,
one of Erics old com-
rades gives him a tip; hes
found the Japanese officer
responsible for much of
their torment. The quiet
Englishman is caught be-
tween trauma and love, re-
venge and forgiveness.
While the story is un-
questionably powerful
its based on Lomaxs auto-
biography the direction
of the film goes for the
understated, sometimes
to a fault. This movie can
prove thoughtful and sat-
isfying, if youre patient
with the storytelling.
Locke (R) Want to
spend 90 minutes stuck
in a car next to a driver
constantly yelling and be-
ing yelled at via hands-
free phone? Sounds lame?
What if its actually a tight
dramatic thriller expertly
handled by one very tal-
ented actor? Ivan Locke
(Tom Hardy, from Dark
Knight Rises and War-
rior) is speeding through
London at night trying to
do the right thing a one-
night stand is giving birth,
his wife and children are
upset, and a multi-mil-
lion dollar project at work
is imploding. The whole
time, all you see and hear
is just Hardy in the driv-
ers seat.
It works. Once youre
strapped in for the ride,
the movie keeps you
fixed. Hardy is praised
for his fantastic physical
performances Bane in
Dark Knight Rises, and a
charmingly psychotic pris-
oner in Bronson but
here he proves that he can
carry a whole movie while
sitting down.
DOGS OF THE WEEK
Rage (R) The Cage
has come unhinged! Nico-
las Cage! Hes loose, and
hes so pissed. Nick Cage
plays a put-together busi-
nessman with a dark past
he cant erase. Bad guys
come for his daughter,
and Cage must go on the
obligatory paternal ram-
page to get her back or
at least get revenge. He
shoots his way past thugs,
shouts his way past hor-
rendous accents, and gri-
maces as hard as hes ever
grimaced, but its all for
naught. Its not a thrilling
revenge flick. Youll spend
the last act wishing you
could escape The Cage.
Frankie and Alice (R)
A gorgeous go-go danc-
er (Halle Berry) suffers
from blackouts and epi-
sodes of inexplicable be-
havior. Turns out she has
some other people living
in her head a 7-year-old
genius and a racist South-
ern belle. Multiple person-
ality stories are so last de-
cade, and this one doesnt
do anything to stand out
from the melodrama. The
film was finished several
years ago, had a super-
short limited release in
2010, then was kept under
wraps until now. Let that
be a clue.
TV RELEASES
Gunsmoke: Season 10
Vol. One and Two
The Blacklist: Season
1
Bitten: Complete First
Season
The Marx Brothers TV
Collection
Tom Hardy in Locke
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Daniel Cromers art will be on exhibit at the Spartanburg
Art Museum from August 1 - September 27.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B3
REID GRADUATES
FROM SAMFORD
Anna Esther Reid of
Greer graduated from
Samford Universitys Mc-
Whorter School of Phar-
macy during recent com-
mencement exercises. Reid
earned a Doctor of Phar-
macy degree. Reid was one
of 900 students to receive
a bachelors, masters or
doctoral degree in one of
seven ceremonies.
UPSTATE SENIORS REVIVE
BROOK GLENN GARDEN
Two seniors at USC Up-
states Greenville Campus
helped make a positive
change when they decided
to revive a garden at Brook
Glenn Elementary School
in Taylors.
Andri Angrino of Tay-
lors and Amanda Richards
of Greer discovered the
schools small, dilapidated
garden during their Clini-
cal I pre-service teaching
experience. Understanding
the benefits of school gar-
dens, the pair approached
the schools principal, Ber-
nice Jackson, and talked
to her about reviving the
garden. Jackson was pas-
sionate about saving the
garden and worked closely
with the students to de-
sign, implement and build
the schools new garden.
With the help of Brook
Glenn students, teachers
and staff, the school now
has three raised garden
beds, a cucumber patch
and supporting trellis.
The garden will serve
as an outdoor classroom,
engaging students with ac-
tive learning and incorpo-
rating school pride. It also
will provide students with
hands-on, experiential
learning opportunities in
a wide array of disciplines,
including the natural and
social sciences, math, lan-
guage arts and nutrition. A
composting program has
now been integrated into
the curriculum.
USC SUMTER WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 2018
The University of South
Carolina Sumter is excited
to welcome the class of
2018. This incoming class
represents an accom-
plished, diverse group of
individuals who hail from
across the state and even
the Southeast. The two new
students are Jackson Nor-
rell of Taylors and Brooks
Richardson of Greer.
USC Sumter is located
in the heart of the state,
about 45 miles east of the
capital of Columbia, South
Carolina. It is the only
campus is the system that
began as a Clemson Uni-
versity campus and then
later changed to a Uni-
versity of South Carolina
campus. USC Sumter be-
came a University campus
in 1973 and today has an
enrollment of about 1,000
per academic year. USC
Sumter confers two-year
associates degrees and of-
fers baccalaureate degree
programs in business ad-
ministration, elementary
education, nursing, early
childhood education, orga-
nizational leadership and
interdisciplinary studies
through Palmetto College.
For more information, vis-
it uscsumter.edu.
BANK OF TRAVELERS REST
PLEDGES $25,000
The Bank of Travelers
Rest has pledged $25,000
to partially fund a reno-
vation creating a learning
commons at the North-
west Campus of Greenville
Technical College.
The remodeled area
will include an expanded
library for the campus, a
student computer lab, an
office for testing and Dis-
ability Services counsel-
ing, study rooms where
students can be tutored
or work, and a conference
room. The conference
room will be named for
the bank in recognition of
the donation.
WALTON NAMED
TO DEANS LIST
Julia Walton of Greer
(29650) was named to the
Miami University spring
2014 deans list. Miami
University students who
ranked in the top 20 per-
cent of undergraduate stu-
dents within each division
for first semester 2013-
2014 have been named to
the deans list recognizing
academic performance.
ONLINE PROGRAMS BEGIN
AUG. 18 AT GTC
Greenville Technical Col-
lege now offers the chance
to finish a degree online
with four complete pro-
grams offered online for
Fall Semester, beginning
Aug. 18.
An associate in arts de-
gree, which provides the
first two years of a bach-
elors degree, is offered
online. This degree allows
students to transfer cred-
its to four-year institutions
where they complete the
junior and senior years.
In addition, three health
sciences programs may
be completed online. The
nine-month online ad-
vanced certificate in Mag-
netic Resonance Imaging
(MRI) allows the creden-
tialed radiographer to
gain additional skills. MRI
graduates find opportuni-
ties in hospitals, private
diagnostic offices, mobile
imaging companies, and
in sales. The Computed
Tomography program,
requiring one semester
of full-time study, allows
registered Radiologic
Technologists or Nuclear
Medicine Technologists
to increase their market-
ability. The online Health
Information Management
major combines health
care and information tech-
nology, teaching students
to manage health-related
information.
To enroll in these on-
line programs, apply now
at gvltec.edu/apply. Visit
gvltec. edu/gainful-em-
ployment for information
about the educational
debt, earnings, and gradu-
ation rates of students
who attended programs.
FURMAN NAMED GREAT
PLACE TO WORK
The Chronicle of Higher
Education has once again
designated Furman Uni-
versity as a great place to
work. Furman was one of
92 colleges that were rec-
ognized in the Chronicles
seventh annual Great Col-
leges to Work For survey.
The university was listed
in the small school en-
rollment category, which
features institutions with
2,999 or fewer students.
Furman also received
special mention for ex-
celling in the category of
Facilities, Workspace and
Security. The 2014 Great
Colleges to Work For
survey was administered
and compiled by Modern-
Think LLC for The Chron-
icle. This year, more than
43,500 faculty and staff
members were surveyed
at institutions across the
country.
Results were reported
for small, medium and
large institutions. The as-
sessment had two com-
ponents: a questionnaire
about institutional char-
acteristics and a faculty/
staff questionnaire about
individuals evaluations of
their institutions. The as-
sessment also included an
analysis of demographic
data and workplace poli-
cies, including benefits, at
each participating college.
For more information,
visit The Chronicle web-
site or call the Furman
News and Media Relations
Office at 294-3107.
WASHNOCK NAMED
TO DEANS LIST
Caroline Washnock of
Greer has been named to
the deans list for the win-
ter/spring terms at Centre
College, an honor reserved
for students who maintain
at least a 3.6 grade point
average. Washnock is the
daughter of Rick and Pat
Washnock of Greer and is
a graduate of Greenville
Senior High School.
Centre College, founded
in 1819, is a nationally
ranked liberal arts col-
lege in Danville, Kentucky.
Centre hosted its second
Vice Presidential Debate
on 10.11.12, and remains
the smallest college in the
smallest town ever to host
a general election debate.
LOCAL STUDENTS
CHANCELLORS LIST
The University of South
Carolina Upstate announc-
es students named to the
Spring 2014 Chancellors
List. To be eligible for the
Chancellors List, students
must earn a 4.0 and be en-
rolled in at least 12 course
hours.
Duncan
Rachel Downs
Loviisa Hannu
Carl Schuff
Greer
Shaun Belue
Jamie Brown
Tyler Bruce
Matthew Coponen
Michael Dryden
Elvis Foli
Sarah Garner
Laurel Henderson
Patrick Judge
Yvonne Kao
Ashley Klopper
Jillian Knottek
Megan Lanford
Karen Maldonado
Matthew Neely
William Neyman
Lauren Parks
Amanda Richards
Brittany Ross
Raegan Shaw
Anna Sloan
Kelly Thorfinnsson
Heather Vance
Christian Vieweg
Lyman
Kendall Carpenter
Taylors
Nicole Boebel
Jenna Dolan
Brittany Hughes
Kylee Isola
Hieu Nguyen
Sharon Rutherford
Hannah Shepherd
Wellford
Sean Biggs
Charity Hendricks
Khamhou Phimmasone
SCC HONORS WALL
OF FAME INDUCTEES
Spartanburg Community
College inducted five in-
dividuals to the SCC Wall
of Fame for their distin-
guished service and con-
tributions to the College.
To be considered for the
Wall of Fame, individuals
must have made signifi-
cant accomplishments on
behalf of the college and
either have been a fac-
ulty or staff member, or
a member of the Spartan-
burg County Commission
for Technical and Commu-
nity Education, SCC Foun-
dation Board, SCC adviso-
ry committee or a retired
employee.
SCC faculty and staff
inducted the following
individuals to the Wall of
Fame:
SCC Community Sup-
porters - Mr. Oscar M. Full-
er & The Honorable Ponda
A. Caldwell
SCC Faculty - Ms. Mary
H. Belcher
SCC Staff - Dr. Para M.
Jones & Dr. Dan L. Ter-
hune
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
NOTICES
NOTICE All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is
Subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, national origin
or an intention to make such
preference, limitation or dis-
crimination. This newspaper
will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of
the law. Our readers hereby
informed that all dwelling
advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal op-
portunity basis.
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
LEGAL NOTICE
ALL HOUSEHOLD AND
PERSONAL PROPERTY
including living room & bed-
room furniture, stereo equip-
ment, computer equipment,
etc...., now stored in units
22, 23, 17, 43, 16, 18, 20,
48, 29, 47 being the prop-
erty of A. Bunch Cantrell,
J. Bridwell, J. Bowen, C.
Black, L. Peake, L. Peake, L.
Peake, K. Janes, J. Brown,
J. Brown, respectively, is be-
ing sold at auction pursuant
to the ascertain of lien for
rent if debt is not completely
satised before 10:00 a.m.
August 2, 2014.
U-Save Storage,
327 Gap Creek Road,
Duncan, SC 29334.
7-23, 30
LEGAL NOTICE
ANYONE CLAIMING A 1990
RENKEN BOAT, serial #RB-
MAA084B989 and a 1989
Johnson 88 hp outboard
motor, serial #R08534065
should contact 864-561-
0593. If nobody claims
within 30 days an afdavit for
a title on an abandoned boat
and motor will be led with
SCDNR.
7-30-8-6,13
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC HEARING TO
CONSIDER PERMIT
FOR EXCLUSION FROM
COUNTY NOISE
ORDINANCE
A public hearing will be held
Aug 18, 2014 at 5:30 pm by
Spartanburg County Council
. Greer Dragway is request-
ing to have a drag race on
Sept. 6 & 20, 2014. The
events will be held at 1792
Dragway Rd. The requested
exclusion is to run cars with-
out mufers and extend cur-
few to 12 am.
7-30, 8-6
NOTICE OF A
PPLICATION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION.
Notice is hereby given that
DOLGENCORP, LLC in-
tends to apply to the South
Carolina Department of
Revenue for a license/permit
that will allow the sale and
off premises consumption
of BEER/WINE at STORE#
15195 LOCATED AT 2810
S HIGHWAY 14, GREER
SC 29650. To object to the
issuance of this permit/li-
cense, written protest must
be postmarked by the S.C.
Department of Revenue no
later than August 15, 2014.
For a protest to be valid,
it must be in writing, and
should include the following
information:
(1) the name, address and
telephone number of the
person ling the protest;
(2) the specic reasons why
the application should be
denied;
(3) that the person protest-
ing is willing to attend a
hearing (if one is requested
by the applicant);
(4) that the person protest-
ing resides in the same
county where the proposed
place of business is located
or within ve miles of the
business; and
(5) the name of the appli-
cant and the address of the
premises to be licensed.
Protests must be mailed to:
S.C. Department of Rev-
enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box
125, Columbia, SC 29214;
or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.
7-30-8-6,13
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 864-877-2076
RATES
20 words or less: $13.50 frst insertion
Discount for additional insertions
DEADLINE
5pm Monday
for insertion Wednesday
TERMS
Cash in advance. We accept Visa, MasterCard,
American Express, and Discover Card

NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE

HIGHER EDUCATION |
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The Bank of Travelers Rest pledged $25,000 to partially fund a renovation creating
a learning commons at the Northwest Campus of Greenville Technical College.
The conference room room will be named for the bank in recognition of the donation.
SCHOOL
NEWS
AUCTIONS
AUCTION EVERY THURS-
DAY, 11am in old ABC Build-
ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit
auctionzip.com
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
Antique furniture & acces-
sories from Thomas An-
tiques of Cheraw, SC-plus
Edgefeld jugs, sterling, jew-
elry, coins, art, MORE! At Ivy
Auctions, 22931 Hwy. 76 E,
Laurens, SC & online, 9AM,
Sat. 8/02/14. Open 8AM,
864-682-2750. View cata-
logue at IvyAuctions.com
SC4239
ONLINE ONLY AUCTIONS!
Antiques, Estate Furniture,
Real Estate, more! Visit
www.rhlee.com for sched-
uled events & details. R.H.
Lee & Co. Auctioneers, Inc.
Ridgeway, SC 29130 803-
337-2300 SCAL192
ADVERTISE YOUR AUC-
TION in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classifed ad will reach
more than 2.6 million read-
ers. Call Donna Yount at the
S.C. Newspaper Network,
1-888-727-7377.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACA-
TION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more
than 2.6 million S.C. news-
paper readers. Your 25-word
classifed ad will appear in
107 S.C. newspapers for
only $375. Call Donna Yount
at the South Carolina News-
paper Network, 1-888-727-
7377.
HOMES AND LAND FOR
SALE
DOCKABLE LAKEFRONT
TRACT 3.5 Acres: Willing to
sell for $39,900 on a 71,000
ac lake bordering SC and
GA 877-717-5263 my exten-
sion 955. Property offered by
Southland Marketing & De-
velopment.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
SUMMERTREE APTS.:
MOVE INTO SUMMER-
TREE TODAY & RECEIVE
OUR MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
Summertree offers spacious
1 & 2 bedroom apartment
homes with a great location,
just minutes from Spartan-
burg. Units designed for
persons with disabilities
and/or rental assistance
subject to availability. Call
Sandra at (864) 439-3474
to fnd out more. Credit
and background check re-
quired. Section 8 vouchers
welcomed. Equal Housing
Opportunity. Profession-
ally managed by Partnership
Property Management, an
equal opportunity provider
and employer. Apply Today!
7-16,23,30
MOBILE HOME RENT
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH, mo-
bile home, north of Greer.
Large lot, $500 per month.
Deposit and references re-
quired. Call 380-1451.
7-2,9,16,23,30-TFN
HELP WANTED
NATL COMPANY HIRING
LOCALLY. Manangement/
Sales. Great Pay, Rapid
Promotions, Paid Vacation,
Retirement Plan. Interviews
this week. No Experience
required. We Train. Call 864-
498-5177 to schedule your
personal interview.
7-23-30,8-6,13
Auddie Brown Chevrolet,
Darlington SC, needs experi-
enced Sales/Desk Manager.
Excellent compensation,
benefts, company demo,
5 day work week. Contact
Alan Moss, 843-393-4046 or
email resume: amoss@aud-
diebrown.com
EARN $500 A DAY: Insur-
ance Agents Needed; Leads,
No Cold Calls; Commissions
Paid Daily; Lifetime Renew-
als; Complete Training;
Health & Dental Insurance;
Life License Required Call
1-888-713-6020
HELP WANTED DRIVERS
Drivers: CDLA Positions -
Home Daily! Greenville, SC.
$50,000 Earnings + $3,000
Sign-On Bonus. $53,000
Year 1 Earnings!! Home
Daily/Weekends Off, Paid
Weekly, Referral Bonus,
Medical/Dental Coverage,
401K Match, Paid Holidays &
Vacation. Open House Mon-
day-Friday 8a-5p. 610 Leon-
ard Rd, Duncan, SC 29335
866-700-7582
7-30
DRIVERS: Money & Miles
New Excellent Pay Package,
100% Hands OFF Freight,
Great Home time, Monthly
Bonus, 1 yr. OTR exp., No
Hazmat 877-704-3773
7-23,30
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
DRIVER OPPORTUNITIES
$1,000 Sign On Bonus for
Exp Drivers. Be home
most weekends Southeast
regional runs Guaranteed
weekly minimum pay Excel-
lent communication skills,
dedication and timeliness
expected. Drivers are based
out of the ATL Terminal.
Must be 21-yeas or older
with Class-A CDL. At least 6
months OTR experience re-
quired. Call Super Service at
888-408-5275.
7-30
** NEW Drivers /
Class A NEW **
DEDICATED LANES
* Newer Tractors
* Dry Van
* No Touch
* Home During Wk/Wkends
* Run in/out of
Piedmont area
* TRANSITION BONUS!!
$2,000
For immediate
consideration apply
www.transcorr.com
Or call
1-888-446-4642!
6 Months with school
needed
7-30
GUARANTEED PAY! CLASS-
A -CDL FLATBED DRIVERS
NEEDED! Local, regional,
OTR. Great pay package/
benefts/401k match. 1yr exp.
required. Call JGR 864-488-
9030 Ext. 319, Greenville and
Gaffney SC locations. www.
jgr-inc.com
7-30
Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
Qualifed drivers. Home most
weekends. Call: 843-266-
3731 / www.bulldoghiway.
com EOE
Transfer Drivers: Need CDL
A or B Drivers, to relocate ve-
hicles to and from various lo-
cations throughout U.S. - No
forced dispatch: 1-800-501-
3783 or www.mamotranspor-
tation.com under Careers.
ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER
JOBS in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classifed ad will reach
more than 2.6 million readers.
Call Donna Yount at the S.C.
Newspaper Network, 1-888-
727-7377.
WANT TO DRIVE A TRUCK
- No experience? Earn while
you learn. Company spon-
sored CDL Training. Full ben-
efts. Earn $41,500+ 1st year.
1-888-714-3759.
FOR SALE
DESIRABLE SPACES IN
WOODLAWN Memorial Park.
Priced below market value.
Call Jill at 828-526-4706 or
Bill Pace at 864-200-1554.
DirectTV. 2 Year Savings
Event! Over 140 channels
only $29.99 a month. Only
DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS
of savings and a FREE Ge-
nie upgrade! Call 1-800-908-
5974
DISH TV Retailer - Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation!
CALL Now! 1-800-635-0278
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a whole-home
Satellite system installed at
NO COST and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to new
callers, SO CALL NOW 1-
866-981-7319
SERVICES
REECE ROOFING
THIRD GENERATION. For
all your roofng needs, call
864-431-9198 or 864-401-
3693. 40 years experience.
10% off thru July.
6-188,20
All Things Basementy! Base-
ment Systems Inc. Call us for
all of your basement needs!
Waterproofng, Finishing,
Structural Repairs, Humid-
ity and Mold Control. FREE
ESTIMATES! Call 1-800-307-
8128
DIVORCE is tough enough
already! Dont let it hurt your
wallet too! DIVORCE with
or without children $150.00
Guaranteed. Includes
name change and property
settlement agreement. Call
1.888.247.5150 - 24/7.
EDUCATION
LOOKING FOR A NEW
CAREER? Auctioneering is
the answer. Auction School
Classes, August 2-9, Green-
ville, SC. Space is limited, call
now! 864-444-1325. www.
SSAuctioneering.info ssauc-
tioneering@aol.com
MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Get trained as FAA
certifed Aviation Technician.
Housing and Financial aid for
qualifed students. Job place-
ment assistance. Call Avia-
tion Institute of Maintenance
866-367-2513
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Tuesday, August 5, 2014, is
the last day to redeem win-
ning tickets in the following
South Carolina Education
Lottery Instant Games: (649)
Extreme Green; (610) Kings
Ransom; (624) Cash Re-
serve; (632) The Power of 37;
(635) Rockin 9s
YARD SALE
YARD SALE, CAR WASH
AND HOT DOGS PLATES
will be sold on Saturday, Au-
gust 2. 7 am- until @ Bethel
United Methodist Church, 105
East Arlington Ave., Greer.
Church telephone # 879-
2006. In the event of rain,
yard sale will be moved inside
church social hall.
7-30
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive use of the customer advertising
in Job News. Use of this ad outside of Job News is pro hib it ed.
Yard House is NOW HIRING in Greenville, SC!
NEW RESTAURANT opening this fall!
Excellent benets, competitive hourly wages & tips for some!
LNE COOK PREP COOK EXPEDTOR
SERVER BARTENDER BARBACK
HOST BUSSER DSHWASHER
Apply at our website NOW!
http://bit.ly/greenvilleyh
EOE M/F/D/V
Your Job Specics
JN Source Code : SOF 140721 A9 __________________________
Publication Date(s): 7/21 _________________________________
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive
use of the customer advertising in the
publication listed. Use of this ad outside of
the listed publication is pro hib it ed.
Publication: Greer Citizen ________________________________ ________________________________ ________________________________
Market: Greenville, SC ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________
Ad Size : 4.9 x 4 _______________________________________
Recruitment Consultant: Tiffany Price ______________________ Ph: (954)252-6640 ______________________________________
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS THE GREER CITIZEN B5
EMERYS
TREE
SERVICE
Fertilization
Thinning
Removals
Stump Grinding
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
895-1852
HELP WANTED
327 Suber Road
1 & 2 Bedroom
879-2015
NOW LEASING!
JORDAN
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
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Last weeks answers
DIRECT TV TECHNICIANS
MasTec Advanced Technologies is hiring!!!
DirecTV Technicians needed in Greenville
& surrounding areas.
PAID TRAINING STARTS SOON
Apply now online
www.jobsatmastec.com JOB ID 1502
Or call Jami Price 954-218-7894
Your Job Specics
JN Source Code : ATL 140714 A19 _________________________
Publication Date(s): 7/14, 7/21, 7/28 _______________________
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive
use of the customer advertising in the
publication listed. Use of this ad outside of
the listed publication is prohibited.
Publication: Greer Citizen/SC______________________________
Market: Atlanta ________________________________________
Ad Size : 4.9 x 4 in ______________________________________
Recruitment Consultant: George Burdick ____________________ Ph: 770-955-4458 ______________________________________
To schedule an interview, visit KOHLSCAREERS.COM
MUST BE 17 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY

EOE

A DRUG-SCREENING COMPANY
Our new Greer location is hosting a job fair!
Saturday, August 2nd: 10:45 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, August 3rd: 10:45 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Monday, August 4th: 11:45 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 5th & Wednesday, August 6th: 8:45 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
at Greenville Marriott
One Parkway East

Greenville, SC 29615
Kor|'s |s |oo||rg lor greal reW peop|e lo jo|r our lear. As ar Assoc|ale, you'|| lrd a|| lre lr|rgs you'd expecl lror ore ol lre laslesl-groW|rg
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Were currently seeking Associates for the following PART-TIME POSITIONS:
Point of Sale Associates (Register Operators)
Department Associates
Customer Service/Cash Ofce Associates
Early AM Freight Unloaders/Merchandisers
Early AM Ad Set Associates
Jewelry Consultants
Beauty Advisors
Walk-in candidates are welcome at our hiring job fair, but only those who have scheduled an interview in advance
via our website are guaranteed an interview.
Store is located at
Wade Hampton Blvd. & Buncombe Rd.
Break Down Coordinator. Full Time!
7a-4p. Medical, Dental, Vision. 401k. Paid
Vacation/Holidays. General Knowledge of
Tractor Trailer/Diesel maintenance, Strong
computer/ communication skills, able to
multi-task, positive attitude required.
Apply: gptruck.com (non-driver app)
Richard / Lesa: 864-879-4140
AUCTIONS
VACATION
RENTALS
HOMES AND
LAND FOR SALE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
CALL FOR SERVICES
ANNOUNCEMENTS
MISCELLANEOUS
YARD SALE
EDUCATION
FOR SALE
BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Liam demanded that
Hope return Wyatts gift.
Deacon visited Brooke to
see how she was handling
the news about Bills in-
volvement in Ridges ac-
cident. As part of his plan
to win back Hope, Wyatt
convinced Rick to call an
impromptu press con-
ference. Hounded by the
media at the press con-
ference, Hope was put on
the spot about whether
she would accept Wyatts
gift. Meanwhile, a helpless
Liam was forced to watch
Wyatts public display of
affection for the woman
he loved. In front of Dea-
con, Bill made a last-ditch
effort to earn Brookes for-
giveness. Quinn returned
to Los Angeles a changed
woman. Wait to See: Hope
and Wyatt plan a business
trip to Paris.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Bradys fate was decid-
ed. Marlena got a bad feel-
ing regarding John. Nicole
informed Eric of her deci-
sion. Kristen demanded
answers from Daniel. Eve
blackmailed Theresa into
helping her out with a
medical situation. A venge-
ful Sami lured Kayla into
her mission to destroy Ab-
igail. Will decided to strike
back at his mother. Kate
had a mysterious proposal
for Victor. Daniel was hor-
rified by what Kristen was
planning for Brady. Eric
wrestled with his feelings
for Nicole. EJ was stunned
by Victors revelation.
Kristen used force to get
what she wanted from
Daniel. Rafe was curious
about what he saw be-
tween Jordan and Clyde.
Sami dropped a bomb on
Jordan. Clyde gave Ben a
stern warning. Wait to See:
JJ warns Sami to leave his
sister alone.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Julian lashed out at Luke
for the threat against his
family. Dante started to
investigate the lead Jordan
had on the possible mob
boss. Franco got caught
snooping on Carlys com-
puter. While Nikolas con-
tinued to fret over Spen-
cer, Britt was torn about
telling him the truth. Joss-
lyn was keeping something
hidden in her room. Tracy
learned about a possible
eleventh hour cure for Al-
ice. Julian told Sonny he
knew the truth about AJ.
Ava filled Julian in on her
latest business deal. Silas
couldnt remember his
night with Nina. Patrick
and Sam encountered sev-
eral twists and turns dur-
ing their investigation of
Nina. Meanwhile, Silas told
Kiki about his relationship
status with Sam. Wait to
See: Lucas has an enticing
proposition for Felix and
Brad.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Nikki explained to the
court why she couldnt
keep Ians child. Victoria
was shocked by Stitchs
explanation about his past.
Lily comforted Kelly when
she admitted that she
didnt know how things
stood between her and
Jack. Kevin found more
incriminating information
on Stitch. Neil bought a
dream home for Hilary,
Meanwhile, Devon bluntly
told Hilary that he didnt
believe she loved his dad.
Abby got jealous when she
saw Tyler with another
woman. Kevin found him-
self in hot water. Sharon
had another flashback
about her confrontation
with Phyllis in the stair-
well. Lauren was worried
about Fen going to col-
lege out of state. Phylliss
fingers began to twitch.
Wait to See: Gloria is deter-
mined to help Kevin.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I am
69. Two years ago, I had a
heart attack followed by
double bypass surgery;
two vessels on the back
of my heart were blocked.
I had no symptoms. My
doctor, family, friends
and I were stunned. I was
too healthy to have been
struck by a heart attack.
I was at risk due to my
male family members hav-
ing heart issues. My father
died of his third heart at-
tack at age 60. I followed a
heart-healthy lifestyle: low
body fat, healthy weight,
no smoking, no drinking,
no red meat, lots of exer-
cise indoors and out. My
cholesterol readings had
always been in the good
range.
I am now on simvastatin
and losartan daily. I regu-
larly take my blood pres-
sure readings. Since my
heart attack and my sur-
gery, I have followed the
therapy lifestyle diet in
an American Heart Asso-
ciation publication. A year
after my heart attack and
surgery, I had a treadmill
stress test, and all was
well. I see my cardiologist
every six months and my
primary doctor quarterly.
What preys on my mind
the most is whether or not
plaque is building up in
any of my blood vessels,
leading to a killer heart
attack. I wish there was a
noninvasive means to at
least annually determine
the health of my blood
vessels. I do not want to
wait for symptoms to oc-
cur. I want early detection
to prevent another heart
attack. -- M.S.
ANSWER: Your letter
underscores that heart
disease can happen even
when you do everything
right, that a family history
is a significant risk factor
and that heart attacks hap-
pen even in people with
good blood cholesterol.
Your question is about
a screening test for heart
disease, to see whether
there are blockages that
need treatment before
any symptoms develop.
There are two kinds of
tests: those that look at
the anatomy of the heart,
such as an angiogram or
CT angiogram, and those
that look at its function,
such as a stress test.
The problem with pic-
tures of the blood vessels
is that its likely you have
some blockages. However,
small blockages actu-
ally may be more likely to
cause a heart attack than
big ones, since the smaller
ones can rupture and cause
a blood clot, which starts
the heart attack. A stress
test, such as the treadmill
ECHO you did, is better at
showing if the heart is get-
ting all the blood it needs
during exercise.
My colleagues in cardi-
ology and I recommend
a good diet and exercise
regimen, a statin, blood
pressure treatment such
as what you are getting,
daily low-dose aspirin
and a periodic stress test.
An angiogram would be
considered with any new
symptoms.
The booklet on heart
attacks, Americas No. 1
killer, explains what hap-
pens, how they are treated
and how they are avoided.
Readers can order a copy
by writing: Dr. Roach -
- No. 102W, Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Canada with the
recipients printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
***
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but will
incorporate them in the
column whenever pos-
sible. Readers may email
questions to ToYourGood-
Health@med.cornell.edu.
To view and order health
pamphlets, visit www.rb-
mamall.com, or write to
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475.
(c) 2014 North America Synd., Inc.
All Rights Reserved
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN FUN AND GAMES WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
Heart risk:
Like father, like son
Shawn Christian stars as
Daniel on Days of Our
Lives

Parents often note that
kids seem to grow like
weeds. Pants that once
reached to the tops of a
youngsters feet quickly
become too short, while
once-loose shirts may soon
become too snug. Many
parents find themselves
regularly in childrens
clothing departments
stocking up on the basics,
which can put quite a dent
in already stretched-thin
budgets.
Although childrens
wardrobes are added to at
various times of the year,
the bulk of shopping oc-
curs just before the school
year begins. Though cloth-
ing can be expensive,
families need not bust
their budgets when shop-
ping for kids clothing. By
shopping smart and con-
centrating on fashion sta-
ples, its easier to stretch
money further.
Spread out purchases.
Shopping early allows par-
ents to make the most of
sales. Warm weather cloth-
ing generally goes on sale
in July to make room for
new fall lines. Consider-
ing the first few months of
school still may be warm,
short-sleeved shirts will
still have utility and are
generally less expensive
than sweaters and sweat-
shirts.
Staggering purchases
also enables parents to de-
velop a clothing allowance
each and every month in-
stead of having one large
bill at a certain point in
the year. Parents can even
add to their childrens
wardrobes during the holi-
day season, when clothes
tend to get reduced again
for holiday sales.
Dont discount hand-
me-downs. Its trendy to
recycle clothing and also
to be environmentally con-
scious by putting items to
good use again and again.
Aside from you and your
wallet, no one will know
if your child is wearing a
secondhand pair of pants
or a brand new pair. Many
school moms are anxious
to swap clothing with oth-
ers to lessen their own
financial burdens with
childrens clothing. Start
a clothing swap with a
group of friends, and you
may find you have more
than you need in the way
of clothes for the kids.
Take stock of what you
already have. How many
times have you run out
to the grocery store for a
missing ingredient only to
find that very item buried
at the back of the pantry?
The same thing happens
with kids clothes. Before
taking kids clothes shop-
ping, take inventory of
their closets. Have little
ones try on clothes to see
which items still fit and
which can be discarded
or donated. Make a list of
the items you need to cut
down on impulse spend-
ing at the store.
Invest in the right high-
quality pieces. Spending a
fortune for a trendy pair
of pants that may end up
getting ruined on the play-
ground is not the best way
to shop for kids cloth-
ing. However, investing
in a quality pair of shoes
that will last much of the
year is a good investment.
Know when to splurge and
when its okay to shop at
the discount store.
Stock up on staples. A
straight-leg cut of jeans,
some solid colored polo
shirts and an A-line dress
or skirt are some clas-
sic foundation pieces for
childrens wardrobes.
Such items tend to last
longer than trendy items
that may only last a few
months before the next
trend arrives.
Learn to layer. Layering
items can make pieces
look like new by putting
them together in different
combinations. Layering a
summer T-shirt under a
fall hoodie gets use out
of two different seasons
worth of clothes. It also
enables kids to be com-
fortable during unpredict-
able weather.
Leave it to the kids. Par-
ents often worry about
what other parents will
think of their own chil-
drens clothing. Children
do not typically worry
about such things until
their preteen or teenage
years. You may spend
less money on clothing
simply because your child
has a few favorite shirts
and pants he or she wears
over and over. Thats less
laundry for you and less
money you have to spend
on new clothes.
Exempt Items (For full list of
exempt and non-exempt
items, visit http://www.sctax.
org/tax+policy/sales+tax+holi
day+information.htm)
Adult diapers
Aerobic clothing
Aprons
Athletic or sport uniforms or
clothing (but not equipment
such as mitts, helmets and
pads)
Baby bibs
Baby clothes
Baby diapers
Baby shoes
Bathing suits
Belts/suspenders
Blankets
Blouses
Capri pants
Caps
Coats, capes and wraps
Computer hardware service
contracts sold in conjunction
with computers
Computer software
Computer software service
contracts sold in conjunction
with computer software
Computers (computer parts,
such as computer monitors,
keyboards and scanners, when
not sold in conjunction with
a central processing unit (CPU)
and accessories are taxable)
Coveralls
Daily planners or organizers
when used by school children
as a school supply
Dresses
Earmufs
Elastic ponytail holders
Formal clothing (must be
sold; rentals are taxable)
Galoshes
Gloves (batting, bicycle,
dress, garden, golf, ski, tennis)
Graduation caps and gowns
(must be sold; rentals are tax-
able)
Gym suits
Handbags
Handkerchiefs
Hats
Headbands
Hosiery
Jackets
Jeans
Jogging suits
Jumpers
Leg warmers
Leotards and tights
Lingerie
Mittens
Nightgowns
Overshoes
Pajamas
Pants
Pantsuits
Ponchos
Printer supplies
Printers (replacement parts
are taxable)
Rainwear
Sandals
Scarves
School supplies
School uniforms
Scout uniforms
Shirts
Shoes (ballet, baseball, bicy-
cle, boat, boots, bowling
(taxed if rented), cleated, cross
trainers, fip-fops, football,
golf, jazz/dance, soccer, track,
in-line skates, ice skates, run-
ning, etc.) (rentals are taxable)
Shorts
Skirts
Suits
Sweaters
Ties/neckwear
Towels of all types and sizes,
including bath, beach, kitchen,
and sport towels (paper
towels are taxable)
Umbrellas
Underwear
Wet and dry suits
ITEM LISTING FOR SC TAX FREE HOLIDAY AUGUST 1-3 |
Shop for school without busting your budget
BACK TO SCHOOL NEEDS
Greer Community Ministries/
Greer Relief
Pencils
Pens
Crayons
Markers
Notebook paper
Index cards (4x6)
1and 23-Ring binders
Pencil boxes
Pencil pouches for 3-ring
binders
Hand sanitizer
Protractors
Composition books
Folders
Glue sticks
Rulers
Poly folders with prongs
Items can be dropped of at
the GCM ofce, 738 South
Line Street Ext., from 8 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday through Friday,
or at Greer Relief, 202 Victoria
Street, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.
CONSIDER DONATING |
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN BACK TO SCHOOL WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
DISTRICT FIVE CONTACTS |
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Abner Creek
Karen McMakin
2050 Abner Creek Road
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2334
Duncan
Susan Hill
100 South Danzler Road
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2373
Lyman
Tim Henson
1221 Holly Springs Road
Lyman, S.C.
Phone: 949-2330
Reidville
Elizabeth Sima
300 College St.
Reidville, S.C. 29375
Phone: 949-2388
River Ridge
Dr. Glenda Bigby
5960 Reidville Road
Moore, S.C. 29369
Phone: 949-7620
Wellford
Angie Showalter
684 Syphrit Road
Wellford, S.C. 29385
Phone: 949-2385
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS
Beech Springs
Pat Paul 200
South Danzler Road
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-7600
Berry Shoals
Michael Powell
300 Shoals Road
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2300
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
D. R. Hill
Terry Glasgow
1303 Holly Springs Road
Lyman, S.C. 29365
Phone: 949-2370
Florence Chapel
Tammy White
290 Shoals Road
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2310
HIGH SCHOOLS
James F. Byrnes
Jef Rogers
150 East Main St.
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2355
James F. Byrnes
Freshman Academy
Neel Edwards
100 Rowe St.
Duncan, S.C. 29334
Phone: 949-2320
CAREER CENTERS
R. D. Anderson
Applied Technology
Director Sherri Yarborough
1151 Moore-Duncan Hwy.
Moore, S.C. 29369
Phone: 576-5020
DISTRICT FIVE SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS |
Steve Brockman
steve.brockman@spart5.net

Bo Corne
bo.corne@spart5.net

Philip McIntyre
philip.mcintyre@spart5.net

Rick Eitel
rick.eitel@spart5.net

Garry Harper
garry.harper@spart5.net
Patrick Jarrett
patrick.jarrett@spart5.net
Julie McMakin
julie.mcmakin@spart5.net

James Norman
james.norman@spart5.net

Michael Thompson
michael.thompson@spart5.
net
Spartanburg District Five School Board meets the fourth
Monday of every month except July and December at the district
ofce, 100 North Danzler Road, Duncan, SC 29334.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Abner Creek
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-7 p.m.
Duncan
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-6 p.m.
Lyman
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-6 p.m.
Reidville
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-7 p.m.
River Ridge
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-7 p.m.
Wellford
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-6 p.m.
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS
Beech Springs
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 4-6 p.m.
Berry Shoals
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2-6 p.m.
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
D.R.Hill
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 5-7 p.m.
Florence Chapel
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2-6 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOLS
James F. Byrnes High School
Thursday, July 31,
7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 5,
7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
James F. Byrnes
Freshman Academy
Tuesday, Aug. 5,
7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
DISTRICT FIVE BACK TO SCHOOL EVENTS |
SCHOOL HOURS |
Elementary
7:40 a.m.-2:25 p.m.
Intermediate
7:50 a.m.-2:50 p.m.
Middle Schools
F. Chapel 7:50 a.m.-2:50 p.m.
D.R. Hill 7:45 a.m.-2:50 p.m.
Byrnes Freshman & High
8:10 a.m.-3:25 p.m.
864.269.3333
www.southern-eye.com
Greer Memorial Campus 100 Physicians Dr. Greer, SC 29650
Greenville Location 113 Doctors Drive Greenville, SC 29605
Seeing
Is Achieving
Could a vision disorder be
affecting your childs ability to
succeed in the classroom?
It is important to know that a typical school
screening exam cannot detect all vision problems.
Only a comprehensive eye examination can
detect and diagnose the vision problems that may
interfere with your childs performance.
Call us today for an appointment
with one of our childrens vision specialists.
CHILDRENS FRAMES BY:
Vera Bradley Lilly Pulitzer Hello Kitty Nike
New Balance Sketchers Jill Stuart Flexon
Erins World Wildower X-Games and More
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Brushy Creek
Monday, Aug. 19; 4:30 p.m.
Chandler Creek
Friday, Aug. 15, 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Crestview
K4 and K5: Thursday, Aug. 14
5-6 p.m.
1st-5th: Friday, Aug. 15
4:30-6 p.m.
Taylors
Thursday, Aug. 14, 4-6 p.m.
Tigerville
Friday, Aug. 15
1:30-4:30 p.m.
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge
Orientation
6th grade: Friday, Aug. 15
9 a.m.-11 a.m. names A-M
1-3 p.m. names N-Z
7th grade: Monday, Aug. 18
2:30-4 p.m.
8th grade: Monday, Aug. 18
4:30-6 p.m.
Greer
Parent/Student Orientation
6th grade: Thursday, Aug. 14
5:30 p.m.
7th grade: Monday, Aug. 18
6:30 p.m.
8th grade: Monday, Aug. 18
5 p.m.
Distribution of schedules in
the gym.
Northwood Middle
Orientation
7th grade: Thursday, Aug. 14
2:30-3:30 p.m.
8th grade: Thursday, Aug. 14
1-2 p.m.
6th grade: Friday, Aug. 15
9 a.m.-noon
Riverside Middle
Orientation
6th grade: Names A-M
8:30-10 a.m.
6th grade: Names N-Z
1011:30 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 15
7th grade: Names A-M
8:3010 a.m.
7th grade: Names N-Z
1011:30 a.m.
8th grade: Names A-M
12:301:45 p.m.
8th grade: Names N-Z
1:453 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge
Parent/Student Orientation
Monday, Aug. 11
Seniors: 9-11 a.m.
Juniors: Noon-2 p.m.
Sophomores: 3-5 p.m.
Freshmen: 6-8 p.m.
Eastside
Orientation
Grade 12: Wednesday, Aug. 13
10 a.m.-noon
Grade 11: Wednesday, Aug. 13
1-3 p.m.
Grade 10: Thursday, Aug. 14
10 a.m.-noon
Grade 9: Thursday, Aug. 14
5-7:30 p.m.
Names A-K arrive at 5 p.m.
Names L-Z arrive at 6:30 p.m.
Greer Middle College
Monday, Aug. 11, 2 p.m.
or 4 p.m. (Pick your time)
Riverside
Grade 12: Thursday, Aug. 14
8:30-11:30 a.m.
Grade 11: Thursday, Aug. 14
12:30-3:30 p.m.
Grade 10: Friday, Aug. 15
8:30-11:30 a.m.
Grade 9: Thursday, Aug. 14
5:30-8:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 BACK TO SCHOOL THE GREER CITIZEN B9
Serving Upstate South Carolina
for over 60 Years
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Attention College Students...
Going to college in South Carolina, North Carolina,
Georgia or Tennessee and need
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Greer, SC 29650
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OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY
Cleaning Exam X-Rays Fluoride Treatment
$99 Month of August
(c<--o-<c|oo| <,ec|s
Expires 8-29-2014
1ost|ng [1ontat|voJ
VAP Tesl|rg w|rdoW
(0r. 2-8, l0 9-12) .................... 3epl. 2-2
CogAT Tesl|rg (0r. 2) ................ 0cl. 22-21
lT83 Tesl|rg (0r. 2) ................... 0cl. 28-29
VAP Tesl|rg w|rdoW (0pl|ora|)
(0r. 2-8, l0 9-12) ..................... 0ec. 1-12
E0CEP Tesls
(8|oc| l3 0r|y) .................. Jar. 9, 12-15
Exars-Fu|| 0ay (V3 & l3) ...... Jar. 12-15
VAP Tesl|rg w|rdoW
(0r. 2-8, l0 9-12) ...................... Var. 2-2Z
AP Tesl|rg (l3) .................. Vay 1-8, 11-15
3CPA33 .................................... Vay Z-22
(0r. 3: 3c|erce or 3oc|a| 3lud|es)
(0r. 1-8: 3c|erce & 3oc|a| 3lud|es)
E0CEP Tesls (V|dd|e & l|gr)
(l3 Courses) ............... Vay 18-22, 2-29
Exars (V3 & l3) ........................ Jure 1-1
5tato 1ost|ng [Datos 1BDJ
ACCE33 Tesl|rg
(l0 3luderls) .................................... T80
NC3C/3C ALT Tesl|rg
(l0 3luderls) .................................... T80
Erg||sr/LA ard Valr ............................ T80
(0r. 3-8, 11)
wor|Keys (0r. 11) ............................... T80
Othor |mportant Datos
5K ard F|rsl 0rade Reg|slral|or
lor 2015-1 ............................. Jar. 12-15
l|gr 3croo| 0radual|ors .............. Jure 3-5
4K |mportant Datos
la|l 0ays ................................ Aug. 19-22,
................ 3epl. 2, Feo. , Jure 2-1
Pre-Reg|slral|or
lor 2015-1 ............................. Jar. 28-30
3creer|rg (No C|asses) .......... Varcr 18-20
Ca|ondar Dovo|opmont
The calendar is approved each year by the superintendent after considering a recommended
calendar from a committee of PTA representatives, other parents, teachers, principals, and central
offce staff. The calendar committee develops its recommendations after receiving input from parent
groups, school faculties, and departments.
o||g|ous Obsorvancos
School offcials cooperate with students and
employees when they need to be absent to
participate in religious observances. Students
missing school are given an opportunity to
make up work without penalty. Employees
may use personal days (or vacation if appli-
cable) to observe religious holidays.
5tudont Ca|ondar 2014-1b
201b-1 5choo| Ca|ondar
Earliest Student Attendance Day: Monday, August 17, 2015 (Note: Start date can be no earlier than
3rd Monday in August per State Law.)
|mportant Datos
4K-12 5choo| 5tart,Lnd Datos
F|rsl 0ay ....................................... Aug.19
la|l 0ays ................................... Jure 2-1
Lasl 0ay ........................................ Jure 1
{*la|l oa,s are |asr J oa,s ol scnoo|.j
5tudont Ho||days
Laoor 0ay ..................................... 3epl. 1
Teacrer Prol. 0ev./wor|days ... 0cl.1-1Z
E|ecl|or 0ay ...................................Nov. 1
Trar|sg|v|rg 8rea| .................Nov. 2-28
w|rler 8rea| ................... 0ec. 22 - Jar. 2
Teacrer Prol. 0ev./wor|day ......... Jar. 1
VLK 0ay ...................................... Jar. 19
Pres|derls' 0ay ............................Feo. 1
3pr|rg 8rea| .................Varcr 30 - Apr|| 3
Veror|a| 0ay ............................... Vay 25
Makoup Days [|n Ordor of UsoJ
Va|eup 0ay 1 ............................ Varcr 9
Va|eup 0ay 2 .............................. Jure 5
Va|eup 0ay 3 ...............................Apr||
{*ll oa, nor neeoeo, |r oecomes a sruoenr no||oa,.j

|ntor|m rogross oports
1sl 0uarler Reporl ...................... 3epl. 18
2rd 0uarler Reporl ........................ 0ec. 1
3rd 0uarler Reporl .......................Feo. 19
1lr 0uarler Reporl .......................... Vay 1
Grad|ng or|ods
Erd 1sl 0uarler ............................ 0cl. 23
Erd 2rd 0uarler .......................... Jar. 15
Erd 3rd 0uarler ......................... Varcr 21
Erd 1lr 0uarler ............................. Jure 1
oport Cards
1sl Reporl Card ............................ 0cl. 30
2rd Reporl Card ........................... Jar. 23
3rd Reporl Card ..............................Apr|| 8
1lr Reporl Card ............................. Jure 9
|.0. Box 2B4B Sreenv|||e, 3L 29602
B64.355.3100 www.greenv|||e.|12.so.us
[|ev|seo Ju|y B, 2014
to ret|eot 3tote test|ng ohonges
ono rev|seo groouot|on ootes.]
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Brook Glenn
Bernice Jackson
2003 East Lee Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-4700
FAX: 355-4755
Brushy Creek
Charles Davis
1344 Brushy Creek Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-5400
FAX: 355-5413
Buena Vista
Dr. Ann K. Mohr
310 S. Batesville Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-2200
FAX: 355-2214
Chandler Creek
Jane Mills
301 Chandler Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-2400
FAX: 355-2420
Crestview
David Langston
509 American Legion Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-2600
FAX: 355-2613
Mountain View
Jennifer Gibson
6350 Highway 253
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-6800
FAX: 355-6856
Skyland
Dr. Carolyn Styles
4221 Highway 14 North
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-7200
FAX: 355-7215
Taylors
Delaney Sutton
809 Reid School Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-7450
FAX: 355-7477
Tigerville
Diane Jackson
25 Tigerville Elem.
School Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-4600
FAX: 355-4646
Woodland
Wanda Mote
1730 Gibbs Shoals Road
Greer, S.C. 29650
355-0400
FAX: 355-0477
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge
Rebecca R. Greene
2423 E. Tiger Bridge Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-1900
FAX: 355-1966
Greer
Michael Ruthsatz
3032 E. Gap Creek Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-5800
FAX: 355-5880
Northwood
Treva Lee
710 Ikes Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-7000
FAX: 355-7077
Riverside
Katherine Malone
615 Hammett Bridge Road
Greer, S.C. 29650
355-7900
FAX: 355-7918
HIGH SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge
Reena Watson
2151 Fews Chapel Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-1800
FAX: 355-1821
Eastside
Mike Thorne
1300 Brushy Creek Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
355-2800
FAX: 355-2992
Greer
Marion Waters
3000 East Gap Creek Drive
Greer, S.C. 29651
355-5700
FAX: 355-5725
Greer Middle College
Melanie Bargar
138 W. McElhaney Road
Taylors, S.C. 29687
469-7571
FAX: 469-7573
Riverside
Andrew Crowley
794 Hammett Bridge Road
Greer, S.C. 29650
355-7800
FAX: 355-7898
CAREER CENTERS
J. Harley Bonds
Career Center
Director Wayne Rhodes
505 North Main Street
Greer, S.C. 29650
Phone 355-8080
Kenneth E. (Ken) Baxter Sr.
(Area 25)
Debi C. Bush - (Area 19)
Joy Grayson (Area 17)
1906 Dunlin Court
Taylors, S.C. 29687
Phone: 864-421-4650
joy@joy4education.com
Megan Hickerson - (Area 24)
Lynda Leventis-Wells
(Area 22)
Roger D. Meek - (Area 26)
Glenda Morrison-Fair
(Area 23)
Crystal Ball OConnor
Secretary (Area 27)
Danna Rohleder - (Area 21)
322 S. Wingfeld Drive
Greer, S.C. 29650
(864) 848-4933
Danna.rohleder@gmail.com
Charles J. ChuckSaylors
Chair (Area 20)
19 Elmwood Drive
Taylors, S.C. 29687
Ofce: (803) 360-3527
chucksaylors@gmail.com
Pat Sudduth (Area 18)
2525 Country Club Road
Greer, S.C. 29651
(864) 877-0685
sudduthp@bellsouth.net
Lisa H. Wells - Vice Chair
(Area 28)
The Greenville County
School Board meets every
fourth Tuesday at the district
ofce, 301 East Camperdown
Way, Greenville, SC 29601.
Committee of the Whole
meets every second Tuesday.
(Contact information listed for
area representataives.)
4K Full Day
8 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Elementary (5K-5th Grade)
8 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Middle (6th-8th Grade)
8:30 a.m.-3:15 p.m.
High (9th-12th Grade)
8:45 a.m.-3:45 p.m.
GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOL CONTACTS |
SCHOOL HOURS |
SCHOOL BOARD | GREENVILLE CO. BACK TO SCHOOL EVENTS |




School is much more
than a place where stu-
dents gather to learn. For
children, school is their
first opportunity for social
development and intro-
duction to people outside
of their family unit. Les-
sons learned in school go
beyond mathematics and
language arts. Students
learn to cultivate individu-
al interests and find other
people who share their in-
terests. Music is one of the
ways like-minded children
come together.
When many people talk
about the benefits of mu-
sic education, theyre
quick to point out all of
the quantitative and mea-
surable results of that mu-
sic education. For instance,
numerous studies have
shown the positive impact
music programs can have
on children in other areas
of study.
Dr. Laurel Trainor, a pro-
fessor of psychology, neu-
roscience and behavior at
McMaster University, has
said that young children
who take music lessons
show different brain de-
velopment and improved
memory compared to chil-
dren who do not receive
musical training. Stanford
University researchers
have found that musical
training improves how
the brain processes the
spoken word, a finding
that researchers say could
lead to improving the
reading ability of children
who have dyslexia and
other reading problems.
Furthermore, in an analy-
sis of data on more than
25,000 secondary school
students, researchers at
the United States Depart-
ment of Education found
that students who report
consistent involvement in
instrumental music during
middle school and high
school perform signifi-
cantly better in mathemat-
ics by grade 12 than those
who do not participate in
music programs.
There are many reasons
why music education can
help to make a child a bet-
ter student, but there also
are other benefits that go
beyond the classroom en-
vironment. Being involved
in music also is a social
endeavor, and music edu-
cation can set the course
for lifelong friends and
help create social groups
that last through school
and beyond.
Music education breeds
familiarity during a school
career, when going from
class to class or from
school to school every year
can be nervewracking and
unfamiliar. Walking inside
of a band room, whether in
elementary school or high
school, can create a sense
of belonging. It is also a
place where students not
involved in sports or other
activities can gather.
Children who move a
lot due to a parents work
may find that joining the
marching band or par-
ticipation in the choir is
the one portion of school
that is familiar no matter
where they attend school.
While neighborhoods may
change and teachers dif-
fer from school to school,
music can be a reliable
constant.
While not every child will
go on to be the next, great
musical sensation, thanks
to music education at
school, he or she will have
learned lessons in working
as a team and other social
benefits that will help in
all areas of life.
SEPTEMBER 13, 2014
Powdersville Premier
Powdersville High School
(Powdersville)
SEPTEMBER 20, 2014
Twin City Tournament of
Bands
Batesburg-Leesville High
School (near Columbia)
Harrison Elliott Tournament
of Bands
Landrum High School
(Landrum)
Pride of Pendleton Marching
Classic
Pendleton High School
(Pendleton)
Mustang Classic
Midland Valley High School
(Midland Valley)
The Blue Machine
Invitational
Edisto High School, Cougar
Stadium (Cordova)
Carolina Low Country
Tournament of Bands
Bamberg-Ehrhardt High
School (Bamberg)
Lorraine Paris Invitational
Newberry High School
(Newberry)
SEPTEMBER 27, 2014
Wildcat Rumble
Woodmont High School
(Piedmont)
Walterboro Band Classic
Colleton County High
School (Walterboro)
Olde English Festival of
Bands
Northwestern/Rock Hill
Schools, District Three
Stadium (Rock Hill)
Swamp Classic
River Bluf High School
(Lexington)
White Knoll Silver
Invitational
White Knoll High School
(Lexington)
The Henry Laurens
Invitational
Laurens High School
(Laurens)
Boiling Springs Festival of
Bands
Boiling Springs High School
(Boiling Springs)
Beach Band Blast
Socastee High School
(Myrtle Beach)
Sandhills Classic Band
Invitational
McBee High School (McBee)
OCTOBER 4, 2014
Palmetto Esprit deCorps
Invitational
Irmo High School, W.C.
Hawkins Stadium (Irmo)
James F. Byrnes Tournament
of Bands
James F. Byrnes High School
(Duncan)
Fin-Fest Tournament of
Bands
St. James High School
(Murrells Inlet)
The Lowcountry Invitational
Marching Band Festival
Wando High School
Stadium (Mt. Pleasant)
Hartsville Tournament of
Bands
Hartsville High School
(Hartsville)
Loy E. Wagner Invitational
Palmetto High School
(Williamston)
OCTOBER 11, 2014
Blue Jacket Fanfare
Aynor High School (Aynor)
Town of Blythewood
Tournament of Bands
Blythewood/Ridgeview
High Schools (Blythewood)
Chesnee Eagle Classic
Chesnee High School
(Chesnee)
Red Devil Invitational
Liberty High School
(Liberty)
Buford Battleground
Invitational
Buford High School
(Lancaster)
Clinton Invitational
Clinton High School
(Clinton)
Garden City Classic
Orangeburg-Wilkinson High
School (Orangeburg)
OCTOBER 18, 2014
AAA/A Upper State
Championships
James F. Byrnes High School
(Duncan)
AAA/A Lower State
Championships
Hartsville High School
(Hartsville)
AAAA/AA Upper State
Championships
Boiling Springs High School
(Boiling Springs)
AAAA/AA Lower State
Championships
West Ashley High School
(Charleston)
OCTOBER 25, 2014
SC State Championships -
AA/AAAA Finals
Spring Valley High School
(Columbia)
SC State Championships - A/
AAA Finals
Batesburg-Leesville High
School (near Columbia,)
NOVEMBER 1, 2014
SC State Championships -
AAAAA Prelims/Finals
Irmo High School, W.C.
Hawkins Stadium (Irmo)


B10 THE GREER CITIZEN BACK TO SCHOOL WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
Our Ministry Goal
To provide quality care for families
in our church and community, which nurtures
the healthy development of your child.
202 West Poinsett Street Greer 879-3946
CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
3 Months-4K
8:45 a.m.-2 p.m. Early & Late Stay Also Available
SOUTH CAROLINA DSS CERTIFIED FACILITY
DanceVisions
115 School Street Greer 879-7458
Where The Vision Becomes Reality
NEW FALL CLASSES & INSTRUCTORS
REGISTER NOW
FOR FALL CLASSES!
Tap Jazz Ballet Clogging Pointe Hip Hop
Tumbling Musical Theatre All Boyz Hip Hop Dance Class for Home Schoolers
Award-Winning Competition Teams
Friday, Aug. 1, 3:30-6:30
Friday, Aug. 8, 3:30-6:30
Saturday, Aug. 9, 9-12
Get Your Kids Off The Couch and Sign Them Up for Dance Classes!
Call or email us at dvclasses@yahoo.com
Music education in schools
boosts more than test scores
MANDY FERGUSON | FILE PHOTO
Marching band and chorus can be enjoyable extracurricular activities for students who
do not gravitate toward sports or academic clubs.
BLUE RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL
Name: Corps of Cadets
Director: Brian Grant
Website: brhscorpsofcadets.com
BYRNES HIGH SCHOOL
Name: Rebel Regiment
Director: Bryan Bone
Website: byrnesband.org
EASTSIDE HIGH SCHOOL
Name: Golden Eagle Regiment
Director: Barry Mullinax
GREER HIGH SCHOOL
Name: G-Force
Director: Jef Norman
Website: greerbands.org
RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL
Name: The Pride of Riverside
Director: Dr. Quintus Wrighten
Website: prideofriverside.org
HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BANDS |
BAND COMPETITION
SCHEDULE
There are many
reasons why music
education can help
to make a child
a better student,
but there also
are other benefits
that go beyond
the classroom
environment.
Blue Ridge Corps of Cadets
Greer G-Force marching band
Todays parents know
that its not always easy
to instill a love of read-
ing in children. Whether
they are watching televi-
sion, dabbling with their
smartphones, toying with
their tablets or engaging
in social media, young-
sters now have more dis-
tractions at their disposal
than ever before. So its
no surprise that many
youngsters may not be too
enthusiastic about aban-
doning their gadgets in ex-
change for curling up with
a good book.
But instilling a love of
reading in kids early on
can pay a lifetime of divi-
dends. Children learn at
a much faster pace dur-
ing their first six years
than at any other time in
their lives, and the right
kind of stimulation during
these years can provide
the foundation for future
learning. In addition, read-
ing at an early age can
inspire a childs creativ-
ity and imagination. The
following are a handful of
ways parents can foster
a love of reading in their
youngsters.
Embrace their hobbies.
When encouraging kids to
read, parents may find it
easier to get them to pick
up a book if that books
subject matter pertains to
a favorite hobby or some-
thing a youngster has ex-
pressed interest in. Use
youngsters enthusiasm
about a given hobby or
interest to lay the founda-
tion for a love of reading.
Dont limit reading to
books. Books are not the
only reading materials that
can foster a love of read-
ing in kids. Local newspa-
pers and magazines have
sparked many kids initial
foray into reading, and
such source materials can
be just as inspiring as nov-
els or short stories. Maga-
zines made for youngsters
give kids something they
can start and finish read-
ing in the same day. Par-
ents should encourage
such exploration, even if
it means leaving novels on
the bookshelf for the time
being.
Read to youngsters.
Another way to foster a
love of reading in young-
sters is to read to them ev-
ery day. Many young kids
just learning to read may
be discouraged if their
reading skills arent pro-
gressing rapidly. Reading
to kids every day can in-
spire them to work harder
at reading.
Discuss reading ma-
terials with your children.
Many people enjoy talk-
ing about books they have
read as much as they en-
joy reading the books,
and kids are no different.
Parents who want their
youngsters to embrace
reading can initiate dis-
cussions about what their
kids are reading, discuss-
ing the plot of novels or
the details of newspaper
or magazine articles.
Extend the reading ex-
perience. After they have
finished a novel, adults
often find it enjoyable to
watch films based on that
novel. Doing so extends
the reading experience.
Kids enjoy such extensions
as well, so reward kids by
taking them to the mov-
ies to see the film version
of a favorite book or to a
museum thats displaying
an exhibit thats relevant
to a book a youngster just
read.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014 BACK TO SCHOOL THE GREER CITIZEN B11
Treatment of Eye Diseases
(Glaucoma, Pink Eye, Dry Eyes)
Pre and Post Operative Care
(Cataracts, Lasik Vision Consultation, Glaucoma)
All Types of Contact Lenses
Extensive Selection of Eyewear
Eye Examinations
Serving You
With Two
Area
Locations
GREER, SC
1014 W. Poinsett St.
864.877.4731
864.877.4011
TRYON, NC
30 New Market Rd.
828.859.5821
www.eyeassociatesofcarolina.com
Few resources are as in-
expensive yet inherently
valuable as your local
newspaper.
For educators, news-
papers can be a valuable
teaching tool as well.
Teachers hoping to instill
a love of reading in their
pupils can put the local
newspaper to work in a
variety of ways.
TEACH KIDS THE
5WS AND THE H
Most adults recall the
lesson of the 5Ws (and
the H). The 5Ws and the
H are Who, What, When,
Where, Why, and How.
Newspaper articles are
typically built around the
rule that encourages re-
porters to answer these
six questions in the first
several paragraphs of an
article. Teachers can give
their students the newspa-
per and tell them to iden-
tify the 5Ws and the H.
Students are likely to
embrace the reader-friend-
ly nature of news articles,
and might just pick up
their mom or dads news-
paper around the house as
a result.
TEACH EDITORIALS VERSUS
HARD NEWS STORIES
When using the news-
paper as a teaching tool,
teachers can give students
two different articles, one
news and one editorial.
Before explaining the
difference, ask kids to
identify the differences.
Chances are, kids will pick
up on the main difference,
that an editorial is an opin-
ion piece that uses facts to
support an idea, while a
news story simply reports
the facts without giving an
opinion.
This can prove a valu-
able lesson for kids to
learn, promoting reading
comprehension and teach-
ing kids to question the
source of their reading
materials in an analytical
way.
ENCOURAGE KIDS TO READ
THEIR FAVORITE SECTIONS
Kids are kids, and they
may not be interested in
the front page stories or
most of whats included
in section A. However,
there are sections in every
newspaper that can appeal
to kids, and teachers and
parents alike should en-
courage their kids to read
those sections that inter-
est them.
The entertainment sec-
tion might have stories
about kids favorite mov-
ies, while young sports
fans are likely to enjoy
articles about their favor-
ite teams and players. The
goal is to get kids excited
about reading, and many
parts of the newspaper
are filled with articles kids
can enjoy.
USE THE LOCAL SECTION
AS A TEACHING TOOL
Kids may or may not be
interested in whats going
on in the worlds finan-
cial markets or even the
nations capital. But the
local section is something
kids can often relate to,
with stories about people
and places theyre familiar
with in their own towns.
Human interest stories
about local residents doing
good deeds or about local
businessmen and women
setting trends might give
kids a greater sense of
pride in their community.
The local newspaper is a
wonderful tool for educa-
tors to use with their stu-
dents. If theres not one
already, teachers should
contact their local school
board or even their local
paper to see if an agree-
ment can be worked out.
Newspapers
help teach kids
in the classroom
YOUNGER READERS
Ball.Sullivan, Mary.
Alphablock.Franceschelli,
Christopher.
The Bathing Costume, or,
the Worst Vacation of
My Life.Moundlic,
Charlotte.
Benjamin Bear in Bright
Ideas!Coudray,
Philippe.
Building Our House.
Bean, Jonathan.
Bully.Seeger, Laura
Vaccaro.
Count the Monkeys.
Barnett, Mac.
The Day the Crayons
Quit.Daywalt, Drew.
Deep in the Sahara.
Cunnane, Kelly.
Eat Like a Bear.Sayre,
April Pulley.
Exclamation Mark.
Rosenthal, Amy Krouse.
Flight of the Honey Bee.
Huber, Raymond.
Flora and the Flamingo.
Idle, Molly.
Fraidyzoo.Heder, Thyra.
Little Santa.Agee, Jon.
Maria Had a Little Llama/
Mara tena una Ilamita.
Dominguez, Angela.
Martin & Mahalia: His
Words, Her Song.
Pinkney, Andrea Davis.
Mitchell Goes Bowling.
Durand, Hallie.
Moo!LaRochelle, David.
Mr. Tiger Goes Wild.
Brown, Peter.
MIDDLE READERS
The Animal Book: A
Collection of the Fastest,
Fiercest, Toughest,
Cleverest, Shyest--and
Most Surprising--
Animals on Earth.
Jenkins, Steve.
Barbed Wire Baseball.
Moss, Marissa.
Battle Bunny.Scieszka,
Jon and Barnett, Mac.
Battling Boy.Pope, Paul.
Better Nate Than Ever.
Federle, Tim. Simon &
Schuster
Bo at Ballard Creek.Hill,
Kirkpatrick.
The Boy on the Wooden
Box: How the Impossible
Became Possible... on
Schindlers List.Leyson,
Leon.
Farmer Will Allen and the
Growing Table.Martin,
Jacqueline Briggs.
How to Catch a Bogle.
Jinks, Catherine.
Knock Knock : My Dads
Dream for Me.Beaty,
Daniel.
The Lightning Dreamer:
Cubas Greatest
Abolitionist.Engle,
Margarita.
Lincolns Grave Robbers.
Sheinkin, Steve.
Monster on the Hill.
Harrell, Rob.
P. S. Be Eleven.Williams-
Garcia, Rita.
Pancho Rabbit and the
Coyote: A Migrants Tale.
Tonatiuh, Duncan.
Rooftoppers.Rundell,
Katherine.
Serafnas Promise: A
Novel in Verse.Burg,
Ann E. Scholastic
Soldier Dog.Angus, Sam.
Feiwel and Friends
A Splash of Red: The Life
and Art of Horace
Pippin.Bryant, Jen.
Sugar.Rhodes, Jewell
Parker. Little, Brown
Treasury of Egyptian
Mythology.Napoli,
Donna Jo.
OLDER READERS
Becoming Ben Franklin:
How a Candle-Makers
Son Helped Light the
Flame of Liberty.
Freedman, Russell.
Counting by 7s.Sloan,
Holly Goldberg. Dial
Courage Has No Color:
The True Story of the
Triple Nickles, Americas
First Black Paratroopers.
Stone, Tanya Lee.
Darius & Twig.Myers,
Walter Dean.
Diego Rivera: An Artist for
the People.Rubin,
Susan Goldman.
Emancipation
Proclamation: Lincoln
and the Dawn of
Liberty.Bolden, Tonya.
Etiquette & Espionage.
Carriger, Gail.
Far Far Away.McNeal,
Tom.
Go: A Kidds Guide to
Graphic Design.Kidd,
Chip.
The Living.de la Pea,
Matt.
March: Book One.Lewis,
John and Aydin,
Andrew.
Paperboy.Vawter, Vince.
Source: American Library Association,
www.ala.org
RECOMMENDED
READING
How to foster a love of
reading in children
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Though youth may have many distractions at their disposal, there are still many ways for
parents to foster a love of reading in their children.
LOCAL LIBRARIES |
GREENVILLE COUNTY
Hughes Main Library
25 Heritage Green Place
Greenville, S.C. 29601
864-242-5000
Hours: M-F 9-9; Sat 9-6;
Sun 2-6
Greer
505 Pennsylvania Avenue
Greer, S.C. 29650
864-877-8722
Hours: M-Th 9-9; F-Sat 9-6
Pelham Road
1508 Pelham Road
Greenville, S.C. 29615
864-288-6688
Hours: M-Th 9-9; F-Sat 9-6
Taylors
316 W Main Street
Taylors, S.C. 29687
864-268-5955
Hours: M-Th 9-9; F-Sat 9-6
SPARTANBURG COUNTY
Headquarters Library
151 South Church Street
Spartanburg, S.C. 29306
864-596-3500
Hours: Sun 1:30-6; M-F 9-9;
Sat 9-6
Middle Tyger
170 Groce Rd
Lyman, S.C. 29365
864-439-4759
Hours: M, T, Th 10-8;
W, F, Sat 10-6; Sun 1:30-6
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The Greer Citizen
for your student or your
students classroom, visit
greercitizen.com


B12 THE GREER CITIZEN BACK TO SCHOOL WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 2014
FAMILY FEATURES
Dairy and breakfast go
hand in hand. With so
many types of milk, chees-
es and yogurts available,
its easy to find breakfast
combinations that set the
curve for success as the
kids head back to school
this fall.
Children who eat a morn-
ing meal perform better in
the classroom and have
better overall nutrition.
Research shows that kids
who eat breakfast have
better memory, attention
and behavior, and score
higher on tests.
In addition to the wide
variety of dairy foods that
make school day break-
fasts easy, dairy also gets
an A-plus for nutritional
and economic value. Dairy
delivers a unique package
of nine essential nutrients
in a variety of tasty and
affordable options. For ex-
ample, one 8-ounce glass
of milk delivers calcium,
potassium and vitamin D
and costs only about 25
cents.
Recognizing the im-
portant role breakfast
and dairy foods play for
school children and their
success in the classroom,
dairy farmers and milk
processors nationwide
have organized the Great
American Milk Drive, a
Feeding America program
to deliver gallons of milk
to hungry families who
need it most.
Meanwhile, to boost
breakfast success for your
family this school year,
consider these tips:
Keep breakfast foods
on hand such as ready-to-
eat cereals, yogurts, white
and flavored milks, and
fruit.
Build a breakfast bur-
rito bar. Prepare toppings
such as shredded cheese,
diced ham, tomatoes and
olives the night before. In
the morning, just scram-
ble eggs, warm tortillas
and fill with your favorite
toppings.
Save money on dairy
foods by buying milk by
the gallon, cheese in block
form and shredding it
yourself, and plain, low-
fat yogurt by the quart
and stirring in your own
flavorings, such as honey
or fresh fruit.
Whip up a yogurt
smoothie or build a yogurt
parfait, such as this recipe
for a Fruit Salsa Yogurt
Parfait provided by the
Midwest Dairy Council.
Or, bring more smiles to
the table with the Fruity
Splash Smoothie.
Find more at www.
DairyMakesSense.com.
PHOTO COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES
This school lunch can be made more healthy by swapping the white bread with whole
grain bread and choosing low-fat milk over a sugary juice pouch.
Classroom success
begins with breakfast
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Nutritious dairy foods give kids an essential boost
FAMILY FEATURES
Brown bag lunches and
back to school go hand
in hand. As youre gear-
ing up for the start of a
new school year, its the
perfect time to stock the
pantry with healthy sack
lunch options and after
school snacks, too.
While schools across
the nation are adopting
new U.S. Department of
Agriculture standards to
increase kids access to
healthy food, parents who
pack lunch at home can
take similar steps to rein-
vent the traditional brown
bag into a more nutritious
(and fun) lunch that kids
will enjoy.
AFTER SCHOOL SNACKS
After-school snacks need
to be satisfying and fun,
but not full of sugar, salt
and unneeded fat. Help
your kids snack smarter
with these tips.
Encourage kids to
invent their own snack
mixes by combining dry,
whole-grain cereal, dried
fruit and unsalted nuts or
seeds.
Serve apples with nuts
and raisins (as tempera-
tures chill, try baking ap-
ples for a warm and deli-
cious treat).
Offer frozen juice bars
made from blended fresh
fruit or 100 percent juice.
Invite the kids to partici-
pate by making their own
concoctions adding whole
or crushed berries or ba-
nanas for added nutrition.
SANDWICH SWITCH-UP
Brown bag sandwiches
dont have to be boring.
Swap a traditional sand-
wich for one of these two
fresh takes from NuVal.
Pair humus dip with
whole-grain bread points
or multi-grain tortilla
chips. Add baby carrots,
cucumbers, cherry toma-
toes and cubed (1/3 cup)
low-fat cheddar cheese
chunks for dipping.
Mix together 1/3 cup
low-fat cheddar cheese
with shredded lettuce
and tomatoes. Add flavor
with black olives and fresh
salsa or guacamole, then
roll into a corn tortilla or
whole-grain pita wrap.
BROWN BAG SWAPS
Make your kids brown
bag lunch a tasty adven-
ture, while adding nutri-
tional value with these
healthful tips from NuVal
and the U.S. Department
of Agricultures MyPlate:
WHOLE GRAINS
Swap white bread for
whole grain or 100 per-
cent wheat.
FRUITS AND VEGGIES
Pair carrots, cucumbers
and grape tomatoes with
yogurt dip, or smear apple
chunks with almond or
peanut butter.
DAIRY
Include a serving of low-
fat or fat-free dairy, such
as 1 cup of yogurt, 2 slices
of Swiss cheese, 1/3 cup
low-fat cheddar cheese or
1 cup of fat-free or low-fat
milk.
SALTS AND FATS
Swap salty, high-fat chips
for popcorn or multi-grain
tortilla chips or vegetable
chips.
PROTEIN
Provide 2 ounces of lean,
roasted, low-salt beef,
pork, chicken or turkey, or
non-meat options such as
2 ounces of raw or roasted
seeds or nuts.
Build a better bag lunch


Hours: Tuesday - Friday
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Saturday
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
John R. Stewart, O.D.
8648484808
MEMBER
STEWART FAMILY EYE CARE
14055 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Located Inside the Greer Walmart
R
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c
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2
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1
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1
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BACK TO
SCHOOL
EYE EXAMS
Focused on Quality Vision Care
for the whole family
CALL
TODAY
848-4808
FRUIT SALSA YOGURT PARFAIT
Servings: 8
Prep time: 15 minutes
1 can (15 ounces) peach slices
in juice
1 can (8 ounces) pineapple
chunks in juice
2 peeled and chopped kiwis
1 cup chopped strawberries
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cin-
namon
1/4teaspoon ground ginger
1 carton (32 ounces) non-fat
vanilla yogurt
Drain peach slices, discarding juice. Drain pineapple chunks,
reserving juice. Chop peaches and pineapple.
Toss peaches, pineapple, kiwi, strawberries, brown sugar, spic-
es and reserved pineapple juice in medium bowl.
Layer a half cup of yogurt with six tablespoons of fruit salsa in
each of eight parfait glasses or dessert dishes. Serve immediately.
FRUITY SPLASH SMOOTHIE
Servings: 2
Prep time: 5 minutes
1 cup fat-free milk
5-7 large, unsweetened
frozen strawberries
1 medium banana, cut into
chunks
1 tablespoon honey
3/4 cup orange juice
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Combine all ingredients in blender; blend until smooth and
creamy. Pour in glasses. Note: For frozen fruit pops, pour leftover
smoothie into small plastic cups. Cover cups with plastic wrap, in-
sert stick and freeze.

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