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Table of Contents

UJ~ V(

Student Guide

Chapter 1: Network Basics

10

Chapter 2:

Network Printing with HP

37

Chapter

3:

New Technologies

71

Chapter 4:

Printing Technologies Basics

89

Chapter 5:

Mono Laser Technology

112

Chapter

5:

Color Laser Technology

120

Chapter 7:

Color Access Control

141

Chapter 8:

Inkjet Technology

153

Chapter 9:

Scanner Technology

163

Chapter 10:

Allin One Technology

178

Chapter 11: MFP Technology

184

Chapter 12:

LaserJet Naming

205

Chapter 13:

Important Resources

207

LctL A

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Tec~nical

INSTRUC OR INTRODUCTION

4

-

some facts abpul the instructor

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Student Guide

HP CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM

- login to your regioool Partner Portal (HP teamer ID required) -· Enter Prometrk Testing Center

Test Number:

HP2·B76

(1/i

-To take the Imaging and Printing Exam please enter the appropriate HP Partner Portal for your region.

-You need to have an HP Learner ID to enter the Prometric Test Center.

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Te hnical

 

.

GROUP INTRODUCTION AND EXPECTA IONS

-Your name

-The company you work for

- position rwithin the

Your

company

- IT and ~ P experience

Your

-The

last printipg device you have used

 

-Tell

us what ypu expect from this course

'""''

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• •

• •

• •

•,

.,

• L • • • • • • • • • • • • •

L

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Te hnical

AGENDA

DAY 1

- Network Basics

 

-

TCP/IP4 & v6

- Network Printing

ith HP

 

Oieni/SetvG,"

Concept

Pr· ting

and f'eor2Poer

4 HP Unlversol Pri t Driver

HP Jotdired Sol u ions

 

-

N<.twork Monos omen! SoluiTons

- New Te<:hnologie

~ HP FutureSrnort

·OX? • HP w.lxonnocl ~ prinl'ing

d~- f········· J

:

Printing Ted1nology. Basta

.-·Electronic. Process.

• Printer la"!J''oge> (PCl3,5,6 """'"' PS

of lqser Printing

'

Transmit Qn<:e ( RIP 0!1al '

- Job-Re«mlk>!l

HP Cartridge System Physical Process of laser Printing

Monc Laser T.chnology

• Re>oluti011 Enhon<erno11f Todm'ology

• fo<t Re>1200/ Pro Resolution

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9

AGENDA

DAY 2

- Color loser TiJ:chnology

• Phyo;irol Prcn:ess of Color la~w Prinfln.g

• HP lrno~REI, HP CclorSmorl • Troppiog and Adoptive HolftorJiog

- Co/ex Access ControJ

• Mcthodolog-1

Conf~guwtloo

-~ Inkjet Technology

• Physkol Process of Inkjet Prlnting

- Sccmner Tedmology

. Document $coMing

• Hf> SDSS Smort Document Scan Softwo~

• HP ScOllning Technologies

- Allin OneTO<hnology · Officejet Allin One

• HP Soluli'on Center Software-

- MFP Technology

• SMlPI\ lDAP

• Embedded Scanning Solutions

• HP Digital Sending Software

- HP losede-t Naming

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Ol • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

oo(~o.).

~ f·Ul~Al-

11

NETWOF K BASICS

For devices to communicate in a network you need

• o connection

• free IP (internet protocol)

addresses within the same address spoae

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS ~in 4-oc:tets, defined by the Internet Protocol 4 ~~EZ~EZ~~~~~- ~
NETWORK BASICS
~in 4-oc:tets, defined by the Internet Protocol
4
~~EZ~EZ~~~~~- ~

-For devices on a network to communicate, each must have an address on the network. In a TCP/IP network, this address is known as an Internet Protocol (IP) address. lndividuaiiP addresses uniquely identify devices on a network so they can communicate with each other.

-IP addresses are made up of 32 bi!ts of information, arranged as four octets in the format xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx. The information in these octets translates into a network ID and a host ID (network device ID). The next generation of IP addressing, Internet Protocol Version 6 (1Pv6) is currently in limited use. 1Pv6 will become increasingly available as more applications incorporate support. The 1Pv6 specification was completed in 1997 by the Internet Engineering Task Force. 1Pt6 is backward compatible with the existing IP addressing protocol (1Pv4) and allows more networks and network devices to be defined. Under 1Pv6, IP addresses have 128 bits formatted as six octets (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx).

- IPX/SPX was built on MAC address (Media Access Control)

-Format: 12 hex digits (0-9 A-F)

-Unique for each network card, not flexible, not easy to remember

- TCP/IP is binary code (0 or 1)

- Format: four octets per 8bit = 32 bit => xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx

-one octet= 8bit (Ox8 = 000; 1x8=255)

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Guide

"

I

"

of the IP;o~Ciressdefines the netwOrk doss the

.

comPUter or ldevke bek:irigs to, Depeneling on th~network doss the by the ~rst,the first two or the {irsllhree hosts with the some network IDIcon cominunicote

.

I

-Network Classes are used to identify meaningful groupings of IP ::.puLt:l

of

possible IP space available n the internet is limited. When the Interne~ the IP space had to be divid d in such a way that it could be split) ma categorized based on the ne d of the government agency, univer~ity, company. Creating different etwork classes accomplished this.

ted,

- IP ad~resses are split

into tw

parts:

• Netw4>rk ID : IP Address spaces I aside to define, locations, organizations, ~lc.

• Hostlb: IP Address space reserv d for devices like computers, printers, serve~s, etc

- Different IP Class Networks:

·Class~: Addressing for very connect to the Internet

- Exomples: The U.S. Army owns 17.x.x.x

·Class IB: Addressing for medium connect to the Internet

- Examples: BBN Com

·Class !C: Addressing for smaller in blocks of 4 to the public)

organizations with hundreds of thousands br millions

I

6.x.x.x I IBM owns 9.x.x.x I HP owns lS!.x.x.

large organizations

with many hundreds I~ tho

'

owns 128. l.x.x I Carnegie Mellon University

izafions with no more than 254 hosts t~ rnn

thA

(sold

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

- Subnets and Subnet Masks

-The Internet Address Classes accommodate three scales of IP networks, where the 32-bits of the IP address are apportioned between network IDs and host IDs depending on how many networks and hosts per network are needed. However, consider the class A network ID, which has the possibility of over 16 million hosts on the same network. All the hosts on the same physical network bounded by IP routers share the same broadcast traffic; they are in the same broadcast domain. It is not practical to have 16 million nodes in the same broadcast domain. The result is that most of the 16 million host addresses are not assignable and are wasted. Even a class B network with 65 thousand hosts is impractical.

-In an effort to create smaller broadcast domains and to better utilize the bits in the host ID, an IP network can be subdivided into smaller networks, each bounded by an IP router and assigned a new subnetted network ID, which is a subset of the original class-based network ID.

-This creates subnets , subdivisions of an IP network each with their own unique subnetted network ID. Subnetted network IDs are created by using bits from the host ID portion of the original class-based network ID.

flli

NETWORK BASICS

&>tow';

I om the DHCP server and everyone who wpnls !o join too network comes to

me first!·

t!i12h1l!.:i;l

-The DHCP server works like he reception at the hotel. The receptid>•,n ta

tudent Guide

i

s c9re tho.·tevery

guest gets a room. As soon sa guest is leaving the room is availoble gail fo th next guest- by this the hotel wor s very effective and a high degree of!. cap city tili at on.

-Just like hotel rooms IP addr sses are a scarce resource. The DHCP wei orne

ntw

network devices and allocat s unused IP addresses and checks at jregul r inthvblslif an

'

I

address is still in use.

'

i

-Think of smart phones that a so need an IP address (by the provid$r's

emails or surf the internet. If

and allocated to the next m bile device asking for an IP address. :

witched off the IP address is immedicjJtely

HCPj tol ch~ck for

ark~d ~s Jnused

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

u.ffiGi--

vw

1

1

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,

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What is a DHCP Sefver'?

static

MAC

C>OlOx""""""

OO~xxxxxx*

OOJOxxxxx)QO('

0010

"""""

ooill>OO<x""""

OdtOxXnxli'XX

OOlOXXXx)l;:xJ<X

OOK!X<>«X>XX

OO!OxxXJ<'<X"f

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dynamic

.

'p

192h680J

MAC

i

:z:::

 

IP

 
 

192.1&6.012

OOlOii<AAX)O(X

192il68.0.4

@61\li."""'

1921168.0.5

OOJO.x>«><;

,

192.168.0.5

192il68.Q.I>

OOlO'f'xx."""

1<72168.0.6

192 1 168.0.?

192.168.0.~

l92ll68.0S

19'2;168.0/l

i

OOIO'"""'xl<l<X

ovq.il~$ago:ht

192.168.0.9

192168.0.1

ovoilol>le 6goln

192.168.0.3:

ovoi!oblo og<>lil

192.168 0.4

-The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is an auto-configuration protocol used on IP networks. Computers that are connected to IP networks must be configured before they can communicate with other computers on the network. DHCP allows a computer to be configured automatically, eliminating the need for intervention by a network administrator. It also provides a central database for keeping track of computers that have been connected to the network. This prevents two computers from accidentally being configured with the same IP address.

-In the absence of DHCP, hosts may be manually configured with an IP address.

Alternatively 1Pv6 hosts may use st¢lteless address auto configuration to generate an IP address. 1Pv4 hosts may use link-local addressing to achieve limited local connectivity.

-In addition to IP addresses, DHCP also provides other configuration information, particularly the IP addresses of local caching DNS resolvers. Hosts that do not use DHCP for address configuration may still use it to obtain other configuration information.

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S:)ISYS )I OM13N

Ll

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

OK. So from now on you

are 192.168;2.11

N<::uw:1.11

And you ore

192.168.214

flj)

-IP addresses are unique and by this valuable. There is one exception which is called private network

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tudent Guide

I

NETWODK BASICS

,

'

.,

S'

~~

·,:,,-; ·".

,

.~~

;

;~vote~nd~servedaddresses

Private .~dd '

sses: . h

.

.

lO.O.O.Q- 1(/,255.'455•.255

172.16.0.0 172.31.255.255

192.168,0.0- l92.l68.255:255

R~rved A

resses {$9me examples): '

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{cloisA)

(class f> l i

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(do$$ B)

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255.25.:}.25 .255

 

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Braa

.224.Q.O,l

169,254).0.

.

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·· · 169.254.255.+55 A~lomolicP~iviteII' Addressing

MultlcastfOfH?sls; .

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- Private Address Space

-In March 1994, the Internet ~ssignedNumbers Authority (lANA) r~sen address space for private int~rnets(RFC1597 and RFC1918).

-Because private addresses h ve no global meaning, routing infor111atio

i

d bltckb of the IP

I

ab~ut

ril. te

networks will not be propag ted on inter-enterprise links, and pack.• ets ith plriv te ource

or destination addresses sho ld not be forwarded across such links. Ro ters in et not using private address sp ce, especially those of Internet service pr ider~,a e

expected to be configured t

If such a router receives sue

protocol

large companies is to conse ve the globally unique address space by t usilng it. here

global uniqueness is not req ired.

arks

reject (filter out)

routing information <il.· bou priv~te e~orks.

information, the rejection will not be ltreat d asIa r ut ng

dvantage of using private address sp~ce f r thellnt rn t at

error. The obvious

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

192.168.2.14:

I won! Ia communicate with

yo-u~

I

)

)j-'%' 2

r<!-lCP

·= ~~.

'--,,~

I

up?

-----~

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11 Plll6o(A

A

,_;;.z tJ

w"""WIJ

;:;t E:>.l.u·W

~\.~LJ. luo \)~<A>,rvv IJ~).

1 't 'Z · 0 .<D . I ct 'l ~v o c , o <Jv~-"---~~

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21

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

22

NETWORK BASICS

~

s!l<;nw:.-.n

Coyright ©20 10 HP corporate presentation.

Hit I'm the Domain Nome Server - or for my friends: DNS!

I know all of !he names

and their IP addresses. Just ask me!

This is what I call .serviced!

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All rights reserved.

(I!J

NETWO~K BASICS

Hey l92.168.t3:

I'd like to

communicate

ith

Britney••.

~$1.lWZ H

ow:~

1'nl!J>$:lj'

1ml~~

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tudent Guide

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

192.168.2.14:

This DNS is making

life so much easier

~s:n< \~Z!t

DHQ"'

l'n1$a.:tU

nN•

192.168.2.!1:

Yeoh!

Let's see how

good he is

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(Qj)

NETWORK BASICS

/I

!lHCP

Hf,.tl~.~.l

192168.2.3:

I'd like to visit

httr.://www.hp.c · You hove the addre s?

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tudent Guide

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

~s:;n.-:;,~~H

m~<.:F

http://www.hp.com

Hm, seems not to be inside this network. But let me ask a friend of mine

GoliH l!'s

http:/I 15.20157.22

tliJ

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27

NETWO~K BASICS

~>fil1l®V1

Coyrig~t ©201 0 HP corporate presentation.

15.201.57.22?

Bvl this is a compl~!ely

diflerem netwo~,

actvolly a doss A ~tet!

!0

All rights reserved.

tudent Guide

(IJ

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

let me introduce myself: l"m the gateway or router and I am the connection to other networks.

~ra.tm<:t.1l

Thors why I have 2 fP addresses: one for our privote network and one from the provider's network!

(1/J

-The gateway's service is called network address translation (NAT) as the gateway is keeping track of all requests by the nodes of the private network.

-Important: from the perspective of the internet the gateway is the only node to be seen, the rest of the private network is invisible.

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29

-.

~%tl~>~.:'H

p

;--Anyway. If you wont

communkole with solllel)ne not within our nelwo Come lome.

o••

1~,}

192.168.2.1:

Con you help me with htlp://15.201.57. 22?

'--------+"', (//)

tudenl Guide

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

NETWORK BASICS

http://15.201.57. 22?

Sure. let me get this for you.

-

rntemet

·'~0~;~

&>M~

~1l~!~~lf

/'-.

,,

-

I

~

~/

/

!,_

~- "-. -

"il

,,.

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(liJ

Guide

-This is a screenshot of the nerwork connection details of a Windows -By now you should understa~dall the information given.

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

WHAT IS IPV(j?

- lPv6 is the next generation TCP/IP protocol vefsion

- Benefits oi1Pv6

next generation TCP/IP protocol vefsion - Benefits oi1Pv6 • A LOT of addresses • Effident and

• A LOT of addresses

• Effident and extensible !P datagram format

• Plug and Play (through stateless ouhconfigmatlon) for !ower n<a!work mainl&noru:e

• Improved host and rouer discovery

• lmprovoo Mobile IP support

• End-to-End security - IPsecmandated

• Scalability

• Coexistence with l?v4

• No NAT {network oddre.s lrandotion ~ multiple 1Pv4 addresses to one port address)

(flj

-Version 6 of the IP Protocol. Defined in RFC 2460.

-Everything about 1Pv6 is BIG. An 1Pv4 address is 32 bits, an 1Pv6 address is 128 bits.

-This means there are enough addresses for every person on the planet to have a couple of hundred million or so each.

-1Pv6 has been around since at least 1995 but the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) initiative of the mid-nineties pushed back any pressing need for 1Pv6.

-1Pv6 is big and complex in comparison with 1Pv4. This fact alone keeps users from implementation if they have any choice in the matter.

-Nevertheless the time is getting close where there will be little choice. Here are some reasons:

-The 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) decision to use 1Pv6 for increasingly functional mobile equipment.

-5 of the 13 DNS root-servers are advertising both 1Pv4 and 1Pv6 access (as of 2004). According to a RIPE-49 presentation 8 of the 13 are actually 1Pv6 enabled.

-Increasing demand for end user address transparency e.g. VoiP.

-The 1Pv4 vs 1Pv6 debate is also about the bigger discussion between those that see NAT (since it hides end user addresses- removing address transparency} as being inherently evil and those who see it as being a life saving technology that may indefinitely postpone the use of 1Pv6.

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IPV6:

A FEW MORE ADDRESSES

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-How big s the address space of 1Pv4?

·232 =

-4.294.96 .000

'tudent Guide

• •

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-How big s the address space of 1Pv6?

·2'28 = 340. 82.366.920.938.463.463.374.607.431.768.211.456

i

-More tho ~a 1000 IP planet

I

for every rn 2 of thj?

if/f)

:

• • •

I

-The most important issue ad Uressed by 1Pv6 is the need for increa$ed I 32-bit address space is near ~exhausted, while the number of Internet grow exponentially. The exh pustion of 1Pv4 addresses has been lopg a

various techniques have

add res es: 1Pv4's sers fOr tin es to icipqtec , a nd

bee nintroduced to extend the life of the e!xistir SIPvft

Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR).

I

I

i

a workaround for the lack of add~ss s ace, I the

I

infrastructure, including Nehvork Address Translation (NATL Dynamic ~ ost qon igL ration

Protocol (DHCP), and Class! l:>ss

-While these techniques prov de

y f Jil to

meet the requirements of the Internet's end-to-end architecture andl pee to-p~er

applications. Additionally, re sidential broadband

contactable global addresse s, which are unsupportable with curreht IP ddr~ss on version

strategies, pooling, and othe r temporary allocation techniques.

Internet requires 'alwc {5-0nj al wa JS-

I

I

s:l

pddr~SSE

• • I

- How~ver, 1Pv6 is much more than just a software fix to provide mqre IP

·Improved efficiency in routing ar d packet handling

·Support for autoconfiguration an~plug and play

·Support for embedded IPSec

·Enhanced support for Mobile IP

·Elimination of the need for

Increased number of multicast ac dresses, and improved support for multicast,

lmd mobile computing devices

(NAT)

netwc rk address translation

i

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

IPV6: ADDRESS REPRESENTATION

Format:

- xxxx:xxxx:xxxx: xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx

• where xxxx is o 16 bits hexadecimal field

• successive fields of 0 ore represented os ::, but only once in an address:

0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 = ::1

-The last four 8 bits can use decimal representation of 1Pv4 addresses:

•0:0:0:0:0:0:192.168.1.1

- = ::192.168.1.1 (compr<>Ssed form)

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·1Pv6 Address Types

·The type of IP address is defined by a variable number of the top bits known as the binary prefix (BP). Only as many bits as required are used to identify the address type as shown in the following table which was defined in RFC 3513:An alternative form that is sometimes more convenient when dealing with a mixed environment of 1Pv4 and 1Pv6 nodes is x:x:x:x:x:x:d.d.d.d, where the 'x's are the hexadecimal values of the six high-order 16-bit pieces of the address, and the 'd's are the decimal values of the four low-order 8-bit pieces of the address (standard 1Pv4 representation). Examples: 0:0:0:0:0:0:13.1.68.3 O:O:O:O:O:FFFF: 129.144.52.38

Use

Binary Prefix

Description/Notes

 

i

Unspecified

00

0

1Pv6 address= 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 (or ::) Used before an address allocated by DHCP (equivalent of 1Pv4 0.0.0.0)

loop back

00

1

1Pv6 address = 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 (or ::1) local PC loopback (equivalent of 1Pv4 127.0.0.1)

Multicast

1111 1111

link-local

11111110

locallAN scope. lower bits assigned by user.

unicast

10

Site-local

1111 1110

local Site scope. lower bits assigned by user. This binary

A note in RFC 3513 suggests that lANA should continue to

unicast

11

prefix has been marked Reserved by lANA to reflect the

Global

All other

currently unsupported state of Site-local addressing.

Unicast

values

allocate only from the binary prefix 001 (as in RFC 2373 version) for the time being.

(/J)

WHAT ARE TCP/IP-PORTS?

Some examples

 

FTP

20/21

Telnet

23

SMTP

25

HTTP

80

SNMP

161

LDAP

389

 

4242

Oi bt<1ll '-- ?c::¥W m_

$C t=rV-1 A IL6

ment

1783

 

8000

 

Proxy

8080

PrinterPorl

9100

i fliJ

Student Guide

'

-Each process that wants to c mmunicate with another process ider11.'tifie~·tsel~[tofhe

TCP /IP protocol suite by one or more ports. A port is a 16-bit number,

host protocol to identify tow ich higher level protocol or opplicoti~np

must deliver incoming messa es.

-Basically there are two types of port:

,

.

sed

fY t

e

ost-to·

grof ( rofess) it

·

1

I

- Well-~nown: Well-known pots belong to standard servers, for example Telnrt ses port

23. Well-known port numbe s range between 1 and 1023. Well-krhow port~u b rs are

typically odd, because early systems using the port concept requir~d a

odd

e

en pair of re the 0 and

ports for duplex operations. ost servers require only a single port. Ex ptio,ns

BOOTP server, which uses t

o: 67 and 68 and the FTP server, which u es tv.(o:

 

I

21.

I

The well-known ports are co trolled and assigned by the Internet 4-ssig ed ~u

Authority (lANA) and on mo t systems can only be used by system! pro

programs executed by privil ged

to be able to find servers wit out configuration information. The well-kn wn ~or nJmbers

are defined in STD 2- Assi ned Internet Numbers. i

ssesl or~y

is tolall

users. The reason for well-known 1 port

wlclients

- Ephe~eral:Clients do not n ed well-known port numbers becaus~the initiJte

communication with servers nd the port number they are using isi cont ine~in thel UDP

(User Datagram Protocol) d port number, for as long as

numbers have values greate than 1023, normally in the range 10(24 t 655~5.Ajlient can use any number allocat d to it, as long as the combination of' <tra spo~t p ot col, IP address, port number> is un que. Ephemeral ports are not controlled b IA~A nd can be used by ordinary user-devel ped programs on most systems. Confvsion duelto w

tagrams sent to the server. Each clien~ pro

t needs it,

by the host it is running onj

Eph

ss i~ al ocbted a

mer~l ort

I

different applications trying 0 use the same port numbers On one host, IS avrid d py writing those applications to request an available port from TCP/IP or urin~ th

35

installation of the applicatio .

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

TCP/IP-COMMAND LINE UTILITIES

Some examples:

orp

ftp

ipcanfig

netsfal ;,e~\1.-t;~,"'l>OL)'"j""ICill::. ;).f

nslookup

ping

tracer! ro~ -ooov o<: ,.,:vt>.vJ

telnet ~-;$ P•~Q_,

;.~)

-ooov o<: ,.,:vt>.vJ telnet ~-;$ P•~Q_, ;.~) ~~n;,-s_ (1/) -Command Line Utilities are - arp- view

~~n;,-s_

(1/)

-Command Line Utilities are

- arp- view or update the Address Resolution Protocol tables

- ftp - invoke the file transfer protocol program

- ipconfig- view or configure network interface parameters

- netstat - display network statistics

- nslookup - look up IP addresses and associated information through a Domain Name Server

-ping -send an ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) echo message to a remote system to test connectivity

-tel net- log in to a remote host

- tracert - display messages from routers along the path of a set of test datagrams

36

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L£ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Tek:hnical

WHAT lSI A NETWORK PRINTER?

A nelwo<k printer is a normal printer (loserJel/ Oesklet}lhot hos been sel\lp toj be used by other usj.rs. The printer con be connec!ed locally or direclly to the nehfrk

,

·~··

/C~

%~1.1~ZH

-

fliJ

-Many individuals believe thr a network printer is always connect$.d di like printer 2 on this slide, b t a network printer can be connecteq dir' as well. A network printer c n be accessed from different clients Cit the

(liJ

Student Guide

CLIENT-SERVER PRINTING

Every print iob is delivered lo o print server ond the print server oduo!ly priots,

~

~

"'""'2

""''

fi/J

-This the most common way of network printing today.

-A print server can be for example a Microsoft Windows PC that is sharing its locally connected USB printer.

39

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Te hnical

~-----+--------------------~'--41

CliENT/~ERVER PRINTING-~& ~

'1'

'1'

<l

'l

Server dep

server must be online lor printing

no feedbac

the dient Network T~ !fie

print jobs"' nt through netlvork mice (clien ->server->printer)

Queue Mo ogement necessary

ndent

from the

printer to

'

~Cost Controlling in combination with a cost controlling soflware

~ Print Jlilb Controlling central spooling of print job~ and prioritizing

~ Driver Distribution

,

'

'

1

~

server

centrally for all clients (Point& Print) t>l~t

provides printer drive'IS

!

~Jij) vi.-

""

() t(

~j\.~

'

~

~) Central Driver Management I

~i~ {0

() \'l- IIIJ I_

:

I

I

1

•I

---1-------------i----f/j)-+1 L

 

I

-Above is the list of advantag~sand disadvantages. llhe biggest di~adv ntag~cf th~client-

serve¢ concept is the fact tho the client that is sending the print jop wil

not ~etprp

e

 

feedback directly from the p inter (like paper out or paper jam). T~etrL h is ~ha th

server

is able to provide limited sta us information like "document receiv~d"b t the lserver is not

able to provide information I ke "wrong paper size selected". ' !

-The c!ient-server concept is t ~e most common way of1 installing an~ dist

ibutitg net Vv'ork

e

 

print capabilities. This is histbrically driven, as for a long time prin~ers '1/

ere

onnected

1

locally via parallel or serial

onnection only. With Windows 200~ the

apa

iii y t) print

directly to network

printers b~camepossible

-7 Peer to Peer Concept.

'

.

.I

 

:

el

.~

I

I

 

 

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Student Guide

PEER-TO-PEER PRINTING (P2P)

A peer-to-peer connected printer is al!ached ia the USB/ parallel port af an Hl' Je!dired print server or to <:>n internal Je!direcl cord, which is directly connected Ia a network cable.

~

f';~']

uw

~ t~>'$.U~S

fJ)

-A peer-to-peer connected printer and a network connected printer are both attached to the parallel port of an HP Jetdirect EX print server or an internal Jetdirect card, which is directly connected to a network cable.

-In the peer-to-peer connection, a client computer may have some server functionality yet also performs as a network client.

-In a peer-to-peer printer configuration the Jetdirect solution provides the functions of a print server. No additional resources, like a separate file server, are needed to print from the client directly to the network printer.

41

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Te hnical

!

l

PEER-TO-f EER PRINTING - iJ & ~

t

Server independent

 

even when ~e file/ print-server

share or qu ~ve is not

ovoiloble it

t

is

possible io print

Direct cant pi of

the print jobs

user is olw ys able to delete his

own Print j

b

t

Direct feed ~ck from the printer no need to heck the status of a printer

t

Error messcges about print jobs

di redly fro

the printer bock fa

.f

the print jo

sender

w.) Toner/ink control

nd paper level

r~ No Controlling

c:t Printer driver installation

I

each dient needs his own separate driver

I

I

I

--

fit)

~~--~---

-Above is the list of advantag ~sand disadvantages of peer-to-peer! prin ing. direct feedback from a netw brk printer, we need to install the prin~er dr ·wer

'r o de r to get a~ e ~ch client

AND an additional tool, the HP Jetdirect Port Monitor. We discuss; the < etail~ al )OU

HP Jetdirect Port Monitor latE r during this training.

this

1 :_I \.OVt' \0 SQ'VV CY\.>

i(J ~l,.,-"t"' ~At:;;.A

<;.Cl'LVdt.

{J<o~

"f (J~ \0 0 ~'Q

otJ nh:::~ •J ~=::\,

llh~c

-r

'

42

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• •

i

Student Guide

CLIENT SERVER CONCEPT STILL N0.1

Review

·High costs

-The common Client Server Prinfing creates high costs because of Print spooler-Management

• High traffic

-As the print job is sent twice to the network

BUT:

no other option{?) as in the peer-to-peer concept there is no single point of control and each client needs his own separate driver- this is basically not practical

43

V-

P ~

:::::1

-Lt-1

t

~

~

<-

f tt.-\ tJ\

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(/1)

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals· Tedhnical

I

HP ADDEID VALUE

The HP Solutlon:

• HP Universe Print Driver

;

The Concept

·One (l ?) drhtr lor most printers

<A f P

·Common Ul across PCl and PS & familiar look and feel

- f'fCf<tide!>

- fnoble$

COOllS~tePfC$01ltoi"IOil rJ feoture~ lObS Mci loyovt$

t<l!l"'f hu &ic-r of leo-:'!wd ~kli!s ano~.s prndJt:~

-

!Wdv.:6-'dttoin:d19ro&!5-

RcdtK:e<cl h¢1pd

co!k

·Manage me I Tool for central administration (MPA)

,,.

'~.;

·'--'

f/i)

- HP Universal Print Driver ve1ion 5.1 introduced in May 2010

-Language support then PCL , PCL6 and PostScript

-Supports all HP printers with PCLS, PCL6 and/or PS support introduced afte~N971=

l

U4000 and newer

I

-Operating System Support:

-Supports Microsoft Window

7 32&64bit, Vista, 2000, XP, XP Prqfessilnal ~64} o~d

2003 Server (32/64 bit); Microsoft Windows Terminal Services ard C rix Pr.es$ntcltion

Server Environments

·

I

-Note: For Windows 98, ME and NT 4.0, use the HP Mobile Prin~ingf r Ndte8ooKs '

driver.

9~t.Z 1c000.

I

.

~~th})~~~

\t'\.~ JJ·~w ()u ~

44

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(1/)

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Tedhnical

rs Benefit from the UPD

o ~s.ftlle7.\ 11-i!Pr2A1~c:>~

l s r,ll L4 ~ A<;;.

•!>.z t

"Z.w 1\ I(

0 'C-- I ~c;.~ lA ·

-A

6) T~OI n,t)t.}~\

-

ttLll'-i-6 11.-4

Wt:>£

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~-.

~

ftC

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~ ~i'Ov

. f.liJ

u.-G~ ~ s ~u;.J ~

46

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t-.4 ~"£)-

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Student Guide

HP UNIVERSAL PRINT DRIVER USER MODES (_S>

HP

uJn b£~ ln~tdk,d in

Dynamic Mode

-11lil::Jz';&'jjfj@

or bvth ncde'£> k- suppott rh,>- vs:or'n

Traditional Mode

Allows a user to lind o printer on o network or enter o printer oddress.

device specific driver

fiJ)

-Provides consistent presentation of features, tabs and layouts

-Enables easy transfer of learned skills across products

-Multi language User Interface is a feature that allows drivers or be automatically displayed in the language of the users PC's (based on regional settings).

·For example, a server could be set to German and send to clients in French, English and Polish without manual intervention

·This helps installation and troubleshooting since the user and the admin can see the same driver in their language

·This also greatly simplifies driver management since only one driver is required instead of a driver for each language

-Most of the users might not even recognize that they use the UPD in a Client/Server environment

47

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HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals· Te hnical

HP UNIY RSAL PRINT DRIVER STRATEGY

- UPD is the d

iver platfanm solution for all new HP laser products

being sold lc ~oy

'

I

- Merge devic ~-specificdrivers and UPD developrnenl

- Standardize pn the UPD as the in-box device driver for newly releasing de ices

- Major releas ~& every -6 months to coincide with HW releases

~- UI'D is avail ble in

32 and 64 bit, and I'Cl5, I'Cl6 and I'S

- UI'D is

- UPD is "offic blly" supported only on HI' printers

supp< rted in Windows only

'

Jl- - No PCL3 for UI'O • will continue on the device-specific driver path

48

'>'

'"- ~

•'=' '.>'

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• •

• •

Student Guide

HP MANAGED PRINTING ADMINISTRATION (MPA)

-Management Tool for central administration

• Restrict user or environment access

• Restrict user discovery options

·Wizards set up Managed Print Policies (MPPs) .:

• Wizards set up HP Managed Printer lists (MPls) <. c,.(

t-~fP

-',,,,,

'b'

~{\P

(I""UnCA

!~fl:>

D~

P Mw

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- MPA is a web-based application that allows easy creation of MPPs and MPls

- MPA requires MS liS (Internet Information Server)

- MPPs and MPls are saved in XML format and stored on liS -Graphic Interface requires Sun JAVA RunTime Environment -Both interfaces allow an overview of all MPPs, MPls, User groups and associations

l-{R~

0{,() ~

~PP

Lt(>O

P2P.

49

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-

HP Imaging & Printing Fundamentals- Technical

HP MPL &I HP MPP

- HP Managed Printer lists {MPl)

- HP Managed Print Policy {MPP)

•Whotls th$ individual vser

allowed to do?

fliJ

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HP MPL = displays to end us~rs a pre selected list of printers. Searfh fo necessary

!

-Why see all the printers in th~network? Maybe all printers in the ~epa

- HP MPP = allows IT Administrators to centrally control who is allov.{'ed t, color, duplex, stapling, etc

50

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prin,ersl is !hot

I

i

mentis len~ugh

I

do thdt l.il<e