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2014

Sha Foysal Bin Amin 1010229030


RbT
4/21/2014
A Bite of China
A Bite of China Introduction to Cantonese Cuisine
Cantonese cuisine is a style of culinary art originating from Guangdong Province, also including
Hong Kong and Macao in Southern China, and is one of the 8 subdivisions of Chinese cuisine.
Quite a few Cantonese dishes have been introduced in a documentary of A Bite of China.
Although Guangdong is far away from the central ancient China, the trading port brings in all
kinds of exotic foods and ingredients, building up the diversity of Cantonese cuisine. Besides
some ordinary ingredients, almost all edible meats could be incorporated in Cantonese cuisine.

Cantonese Delicacies
Unlike the cuisine in Northern and Western China, although containing varied edible meats,
lamb and goat seldom appear in Cantonese recipes. Mention to the cooking techniques, almost
every cooking method could be found in Cantonese cuisine.


A Bite of China: The Inspiration of Transformation

Episode-3: The Inspiration of Transformation
Preserved bean curd, black bean sauce, rice wine and pickles all have distinguished aromatic
flavors. These characteristic tastes are attributed to the activities of microbes, which is called
fermentation in Chinese cuisine. In this episode, A Bite of China introduces the stories on how
to transform simple ingredients into delicacies, by deliberately handling the precious heritage in
Chinese cuisine, developed by inspirations of the ancients.

A Bite of China is a 2012 Chinese documentary television series on the history of food, eating,
and cooking in China directed by Chen Xiaoqing narrated by Li Lihong with original music
composed by Roc Chen .It first aired May 14
th
, 2012 on China Central Television and quickly
gained high ratings and widespread popularity.
[1][2]
The seven-episode documentary series, which
began filming in March 2011, introduces the history and story behind foods of various kinds in
more than 60 locations in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The documentary has also
been actively encouraged as a means of introducing Chinese food culture to those unfamiliar
with local cuisine. Various notable chefs such as Shen Hongfei and Chua Lam were consultants
on the project.
A second season of A Bite of China, also consist of seven episodes (plus trailer), is set to air
from April 18 to June 6 2014.
A Bite of China is a 2012 Chinese documentary television series on the history of food, eating,
and cooking in China directed by Chen Xiaoqing and narrated by Li Lihong. It first appeared at
the China Central Television in May 14th, 2012, and quickly gained much popularity.Having
started filming in March 2011, this seven-episode documentary series introduces the history and
story behind foods of various kinds in more than 60 locations all around China.The documentary
has also been actively encouraged as a means of introducing Chinese food culture to those
unfamiliar with local cuisine.
Tofu, also known as bean curd, is a food made by coagulating soy milk and then pressing the
resulting curds into soft white blocks. It is a component in many East Asian and Southeast Asian
cuisines. There are many different varieties of tofu, including fresh tofu and tofu that has been
processed in some way. Tofu has a subtle flavor and can be used in savory and sweet dishes. It is
often seasoned or marinated to suit the dish.
A Bite of China attracted high ratings during its nightly airing on CCTV-1, drawing an estimated
100 million viewers. It also has an overall approval rating of 91% on Douban.Oliver Thring
of The Guardian praised it as "the best TV show I've ever seen about food. I'd hazard it's the best
one ever made.

The background Chinese painting appeared in
the documentary's poster is by Xu Qinsong .
At first, the poster designer used the painting
without permission of Mr. Xu, However, this
copyright issue was later solved by
reconciliation between the artist and the documentary producer.
Of all the food shows I have watched in
the last few years, one of the most
interesting ones is a show on China
Central Television called A Bite of
China. As far as I can tell, there are
currently 7 episodes, all of which are
available online with English subtitles.
A Bite of China is not really a cooking
show. There are no recipes, no advice to home cooks on how to cook this or that. Instead, it
focuses on the culinary heritage of China; how food was and still is grown, how it is prepared,
and what it means to people. It is a very earnest show, carefully highlighting some of the food
culture of the country.
The production values are also just wonderful. The scenes are all beautifully shot and the
directors manage to capture the essence of the scenery, the food, and, most of all, the people.
Simple people, with an interest in food that stems from their desire to make the most of what is
available to them, to follow and build on the traditions their ancestors passed on to them. Their
own earnestness, hard work, and simple values shines throughout the show.
I have long had an interest in Chinese food, that is, authentic Chinese food, but I have not found
good sources for understanding it. As experienced and intuitive as I consider myself when it
comes to food, I profess to being pretty much clueless about cooking Chinese food. I know a few
things about the different regions and some of the techniques, but further than that A Bite of
China scratches some of the itch, but that is not the magic of the show. In fact it has nothing to
do with China, I think, and it could be a cooking show about any region of the world. The
winning element of this show is its focus on the underlying importance of food to people. It
perfectly captures our connection to the earth, the sea, the sky, all the ingredients that come
together to sustain us. And it does so, beautifully.