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Administrators Guide to the

Missouri Comprehensive
Guidance and Counseling
Program
Developed by:
Carolyn S. Magnuson
Lincoln University
Norman C. Gysbers
University of Missouri-Columbia
Marion . Starr
Missouri Department of !lementary and
Secondary !ducation
"##$
%evised &y:
Dr. Norman C. Gysbers
University of Missouri
'om Sc(limpert
Missouri Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation
Dr. &ragg Stanley
Missouri Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation
)*")
+ Missouri Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation
'(e Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation does not discriminate on t(e basis
of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, or disability in its programs and
activities. -n.uiries related to Department programs and to t(e location of services,
activities, and facilities t(at are accessible by persons /it( disabilities may be directed to
t(e 0efferson State 1ffice &uilding, 1ffice of t(e General Counsel, Coordinator 2 Civil
%ig(ts Compliance 3'itle 4-5'itle -657*859D959ge 9ct:, ;
t(
loor, )*7 0efferson Street,
<.1. &o= 8$*, 0efferson City, M1 ;7"*)-*8$*> telep(one number 7?@-7);-8?7? or ''A
$**-?@7-)#;;> fa= number 7?@-7))-8$$@> email civilrig(tsBdese.mo.gov.
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Missouri Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling <rogram
9dministratorCs Guide
'able of Contents
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E(at 9dministrators are saying about Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling
<rograms DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD..DDDDDD..8
1vervie/ of t(e Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program DDD..?
1rganiFational rame/orG DDDDDDD..DDDDDDDDDDDD..DD....D#
ully -mplementing Aour Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling
<rogramDDDDDDDD.DDDDDDDDDDDDDD..DDDDDDDD...)"
<(ase -: <lanning DDDDDDDDDDDDDDD.DDDD.DDDDD)"
<(ase --: Designing DDDDDDDDD...DDDDD.DDDDD.DDD.))
<(ase ---: -mplementing DDDDDDDDDDDDDD.DDDD.DDD.)8
<(ase -4: !valuating DDDDDDDDDDDDDDD.DDDD..DDD.)7
<(ase 4: !n(ancing .DDDDDD...DDDDDDDD.DDDDDDDD)@
&eyond &arriers to Solutions: 9ctions t(at <romote <rogress DD.DDDDDD...D)$
Closing Comments DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD)$
Appendix A: Curriculum 1vervie/ DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD.@"
Appendix B: Standards and Criteria for Developing Sc(ool Counselor 0ob
Descriptions ...DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD.DD..@@
Appendix C: %eassignment of Duties t(at are &arriers to -mplementation ..DD..D.D@;
Appendix D: Missouri Sc(ool &oards 9ssociation <olicy:
Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling <rograms DDDDDDDDDD..DD8*
Appendix E: &eyond &arriers to Solutions: 9ctions '(at <romote <rogress DDDD..8)
or/ard
P a g e | 3
During my administrative career as a building principal, - /as al/ays fortunate to /orG
/it( e=cellent professional sc(ool counselors. Eit( t(eir support and initial training
about MissouriCs Compre(ensive Guidance <rogram - developed a deep appreciation for
t(e significant role sc(ool counselors play and t(e impact t(ey can (ave on my sc(ool,
students, and t(e effectiveness of my leaders(ip.
No/ /orGing in t(e Guidance and Counseling section at t(e Department, - continue to be
impressed /it( t(e .uality of our compre(ensive guidance program as /ell as t(e
materials and support provided.
'(is manual is designed to provide an overvie/ of /(at administrators s(ould Gno/
about MissouriCs Compre(ensive Guidance <rogram along /it( suggestions on (o/ to
provide leaders(ip for t(e development of t(is critical program.
'(e program is /ell defined and of (ig( .uality. ully implementing t(e guidance and
counseling program is t(e Gey factor in its potential to impact student outcomes, and t(at
canCt (appen /it(out strong administrative leaders(ip and support. Use t(is manual to
en(ance your understanding of t(e programCs purpose, design, and potential impact.
Learn and leadH Aou, your sc(ool, and your students /ill benefitH
'om Sc(limpert, Supervisor
Guidance and Counseling
Missouri Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation
%etired Middle Sc(ool <rincipal
What Administrators are saying about Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling
Programs
1ver t(e years a body of researc( (as been developed t(at demonstrates t(e positive
impact t(at compre(ensive guidance and counseling programs can (ave on sc(ools and
P a g e | 4
students. '(e purpose of t(is guide is to assist administrators in developing a better
understanding of compre(ensive guidance and counseling programs. 'o introduce t(e
guide, t(e aut(ors /ould liGe to s(are /it( you some remarGs from ot(er administrators
about compre(ensive guidance and counseling:
At a time when the act of civility seems to have been placed on the back burner
and prized academic achievement seems to be inspiring unethical actions in local
schools and the national community, school guidance and counseling programs
influenced by the concepts outlined in the Comprehensive Guidance Program
authored by Dr. Gysbers must be supported by school administrators as a means of
providing a moral compass for children navigating the intellectual, social, and
emotional terrain of the !st century.
Roger C. Williams, r. Ed. D., Re!ired school principal
"he most valuable resource for me has been working with e#cellent counselors
who implement a comprehensive guidance program. $e all know the value of
counselors when there is a crisis, but the school counselor serves a much greater
function than %ust providing responsive services. "he guidance program supports our
school improvement plan by giving students the tools to help them succeed
academically and socially in and out of school& skills that are not covered through the
regular classroom curriculum . "his groundwork the counselors have done ma#imizes
the precious time we have to spend with students and parents.
ulie "!eiger, EdD
Principal, "pring#ield Pu$lic "chools
An effective school counselor is a foundation pillar for a school by advocating
for students needs and fostering parent'community support to ensure student
preparedness for learning...(
And% "!ormes
Assis!an! Principal
Rolla unior &igh "chool
Rolla '( "chool Dis!ric!
"he role of the guidance counselor continues to evolve and if the dedicated mission of
our school is to develop our students to be respectful, skillful and confident, it takes
every possible resource we have to make that a reality. )ur counselor continuously
meets those needs through our comprehensive guidance and counseling program to
support the academic, career, and personal'social development of all students as well
as assisting them with individual planning and responsive services. *he plays a vital
role in helping our students e#perience success+
Rand% Glenn

"econdar% Principal Pilo! Grove C)*
*chools often struggle to meet the needs of diverse student populations,
but a diverse student learning community can be celebrated when a comprehensive
guidance program is utilized to level the playing field for all.
Cheri Pa!!erson, Associa!e "uperin!enden! #or Curriculum and +ns!ruc!ion
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"!. oseph Pu$lic "chools
"he Guidance Department at ,ickman ,igh *chool provides a foundation for not only student success,
but also creates a positive climate and culture in our school and community. "he bridge the counselors
have built using the Comprehensive Guidance Program provides support to many groups of people-
students, parents, teachers and administrators. A strong Comprehensive Guidance program is a must for
any successful high school.
Dr. ,race% Conrad, Principal David &. &ic-man &igh "chool
Ee (ope t(is guide /ill serve its intended purpose of informing administrators around t(e
state about compre(ensive guidance and counseling programs and improving
administrator-counselor communication and collaboaration.
Norm Gysbers
'om Sc(limpert
&ragg Stanley
or information on compre(ensive guidance and counseling programs, contact t(e
Guidance and Counseling Section of t(e Missouri Department of !lementary and
Secondary !ducation: 7?@.?7". 8@$@
P a g e | 6
Introduction
'(is administratorCs guide is intended for your use in conIunction /it( t(e Missouri
Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program Manual. -ts purpose is to provide you
/it( information regarding your role in supporting t(e successful implementation of a
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program t(at addresses t(e academic, career, and
personal5social development of all students and supports t(e ongoing mission and vision
of t(e district. E(ile t(e sc(ool counselors in your district are responsible for planning,
designing, implementing, evaluating and en(ancing your districtCs compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program, as t(e instructional leader you (ave a Gey role in
providing leaders(ip and support to ensure t(e full implementation of t(e program.
9s an administrator, your /ords and actions as /ell as t(ose of your &oard of !ducation
communicate bot( t(e importance of and support for your districtCs compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program. -t is essential for you to understand and communicate
to sc(ool staff, parents, and t(e community t(at t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance
and counseling program is an integral part of t(e instructional process.
ully implementing your districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
re.uires leaders(ip from t(e administrtion and from t(e gudiance and counseling staff.
-n guiding t(e full implementation of your compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program, Geep t(e follo/ing points in mind:
". Guidance is a program. -t (as c(aracteristics similar to ot(er educational programs
in your district including:
Grade Level !=pectations t(at aligned /it( t(e S(o/-me Standards t(e
National Standards of t(e 9merican Sc(ool Counselor 9ssociation and t(e
Common Core.
9ctivities and processes to assist students in ac(ieving Gno/ledge and sGills
in academic, career, and personal5social development
<rofessionally recogniFed and certified personnel
Materials and resources
!valuation
). Guidance and counseling programs are developmental and compre(ensive J-").
'(ey are developmental in t(at guidance activities are conducted on a regular,
planned, and systematic basis to assist students in ac(ieving Gno/ldege and sGills
for life-time success. 9lt(oug( immediate and crisis needs of students are to be
met, a maIor focus of a developmental program is to provide all students /it(
e=perience to (elp t(em gro/ and develop. Guidance and counseling programs
are compre(ensive in t(at a full range of activities and services, suc( as
curriculum activities, career and educational planning assistance, information,
consultation, counseling, and referral are provided.
@. Guidance and counseling programs feature a team approac(. 9 compre(ensive
program of guidance and counseling is based on t(e assumption t(at all sc(ool
staff are involved. 9t t(e same time, it is understood t(at professionally certified
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sc(ool counselors are central to t(e program. Sc(ool counselors provide direct
services to students /(ile providing program leaders(ip, consultation, and
collaboration /it( ot(er members of t(e guidance team, members of t(e sc(ool
staff, parents, and members of t(e community.
8. '(e J-") compre(ensive guidance and counseling program is a district program
and t(ose implementing it re.uire t(e districtCs support and encouragement
t(roug( ade.uate funding and t(e allocation of sufficient time for sc(ool
counselors to effectively accomplis( t(e tasGs re.uired to fully implement t(e
program.
7. '(e process of full compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
implementation includes clearly identifying sc(ool counselor roles. '(is re.uires
analyFing your sc(ool counselorsC responsibilities, determining guidance
functions, setting priorities, and reassigning t(ose responsibilities identified as
barriers to implementation. '(e goal is for your sc(ool counselors to focus "**
percent of t(eir time /orGing in t(e guidance and counseling program in order to
address t(e developmental needs of all students.
;. '(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program belongs to t(e sc(ool
district. '(e program continues regardless of /(o t(e sc(ool counselors or
administrators are in t(e district. '(e organiFational frame/orG remains t(e same
across buildings and levels alt(oug( activities and time allotments may vary.
?. 0ust as t(ere is a J-") scope and se.uence of grade level e=pectations for district
academic programs, t(ere is a J-") scope and se.uence of grade level
e=pectations for t(e districtCs guidance and counseling program.
$. 9 Gey concept in t(e process of compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
development and implementation is Kcontinuous improvement.L 9 systematic
process of planning and evaluation is facilitated t(roug( t(e programMs model of
evaluation, N<rogram O <ersonnel P %esults.N
#. 9ligned /it( MS-< Standards, .uality indicators (ave been identified. '(ese
indicators are:
a. 9 Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling <rogram (as been developed
and implemented
b. 9 guidance and counseling curriculum based on current standards and
GL!s is in place
c. 9n individual planning system is in place
d. Students (ave access to responsive services
e. System support and management activities ensure full implementation and
continued improvement of t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program
'(ese guide spells out /(at is means to develop and implement a guidance and
counseling program and describes t(e curriculum, individual planning, responsive
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services, and system support components all of /(ic( maGe up t(e .uality indicators of a
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.

Overview of the
The Missouri Comprehensive
Guidance and Counseling Program
'(e Missouri Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling <rogram 3MCGC<: consists of
t(ree maIor elements: content, an organiFational frame/orG, and resources. 3See igure
".: '(e content element contains suggested student content standards and grade level
e=pectations 3GL!Cs: t(at a sc(ool district may /is( to consider for its students to master
as a result of t(eir participation in t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program. '(e organiFational frame/orG contains si= structural components and four
program components. Suggested allocations of t(e sc(ool counselorCs time across t(e
four program components are also provided. '(e resource element presents t(e (uman,
financial, and political resources re.uired to fully implement t(e program.
COT!T
1ne of t(e assumptions upon /(ic( t(e MCGC< is based is t(at t(ere is guidance and
counseling content t(at all students s(ould (ave t(e opportunity to learn. 3See 9ppendi=
9.: -n t(e MCGC<, guidance and counseling content is e=pressed as grade level
e=pectations t(at students need to ac(ieve along /it( t(e grade level e=pectations t(ey
ac(ieve in academic, career education and ot(er subIects so t(at t(ey can compete
successfully in an internationally competitive, tec(nological /orld. '(e content element
of t(e MCGC< contains student grade level e=pectations grouped into t(ree broad areas:
9cademic Development, Career Development and <ersonal Social5Development.
Academic "evelopment#
9pplying SGills Needed for !ducational 9c(ievement
9pplying t(e SGills of 'ransitioning &et/een !ducational Levels
Developing and Monitoring <ersonal !ducational <lans
Career "evelopment#
9pplying Career !=ploration and <lanning SGills in t(e 9c(ievement of Life
Career Goals
Jno/ing E(ere and Qo/ to 1btain -nformation about t(e Eorld of EorG and
<ost Secondary 'raining5!ducation
9pplying !mployment %eadiness SGills and t(e SGills for 1n-'(e-0ob
Success
Personal$%ocial "evelopment#
Understanding Self as an -ndividual and as a Member of Diverse Local and
Global Communities
-nteracting /it( 1t(ers in Eays t(at %espect -ndividual and Group
Differences
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9pplying <ersonal Safety SGills and Coping Strategies
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&igure '
Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program
!lements
Content Organi(ational &ramewor)
*esources
%uggested +se of Counselor Time ,Percentage *ate-
!lementary Middle50unior Qig( Qig(
Sc(ool
Guidance and Counseling Curriculum @7-87 )7-@7 "7-)7
-ndividual Student <lanning 7-"* "7-)7 )7-@7
%esponsive Services @*-8* @*-8* )7-@7
System Support "*-"7 "*-"7 "7-)*
'otal "** "** "**
ote. '//0 of a school counselor1s time should be devoted to the implantation2
delivery2 and management of the guidance and counseling program#
Strands
Personal#$ocial
%evelopment
Academic
%evelopment
Career
%evelopment
Structural
Componen
ts
%e&nition and
Philosoph'
Guidance
Program
(acilities
Advisor'
Council
Guidance
)esources
$ta*ng
Patterns
+udget
Program
Components and
Sample Processes
Guidance Curriculum
Classroom Presentations
$tructured Groups
Individual Student
Planning
Appraisal
,ducational and
Career
Planning
%evelopment o-
Personal Plans o-
$tud'
Post.$econdar'
/ransition
Responsive Services
0ndividual Counseling
$mall Group Counseling
Consultation
)e-erral
System Support
Program Management
Program ,valuation
(air $hare
)esponsi1ilities
$ta2 and Communit'
)elations
Consultation
Committee Participation
Communit' 3utreach
Program Advocac'
Human Resources
Counselors
/eachers#$ta2
Administrators
Parents#Guardians
$tudents
Communit' Mem1ers
+usiness#4a1or Partners
Financial Resources
+udget
Materials
,5uipment (acilities
Political Resources
$chool +oard Policies
6ational and $tate
4a7s8 )ules8 and
)egulations
4ocal $chool %istrict
Administrative
Guidelines
Pro-essional Association
Guidelines and ,thical
$tandards
P a g e | 11
O*GAI3ATIOA4 &*AM!WO*5
'(is section describes in detail t(e organiFational frame/orG of t(e MCGC<. '(e
frame/orG contains si= structural components, four program components, and suggested
distributions of sc(ool counselor time.
%I6 %T*+CT+*A4 COMPO!T%
'(e si= structural components are an important part of t(e organiFational frame/orG of
t(e MCGC< because t(ey define it> describe t(e rationale on /(ic( it is based> and
(ig(lig(t t(e resources, materials, staffing, and e.uipment t(at are re.uired to develop
and manage it effectively. '(e si= structural components are: 3a: definition and
p(ilosop(y, 3b: guidance and counseling program facilities, 3c: advisory council, 3d:
guidance and counseling resources, 3e: staffing patterns, and 3f: budget.
'# Program "efinition and Philosophy
'(e definition of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program identifies t(e
centrality of guidance and counseling in education and describes, in broad
outcome terms, t(e grade level e=pectations, 3Gno/ledge and sGills: students /ill
master as a result of t(eir participation in t(e program. -t also identifies /(o
delivers t(e program and (o/ t(e program is organiFed. '(e districtCs statement
of p(ilosop(y for its compre(ensive guidance and counseling program identifies a
belief system and is derived from t(e overall educational goals of t(e sc(ool
district and from t(e educational goals for t(e state of Missouri.
7# Guidance and Counseling Program &acilities
'o implement a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program, a guidance and
counseling center s(ould be establis(ed in eac( building of t(e district. '(e
guidance and counseling center s(ould be accessible and large enoug( to
ade.uately (ouse all of t(e programCs personnel, resources, and e.uipment. '(e
minimum re.uirements for a guidance and counseling center are:
9 /ell-organiFed display of guidance and counseling resource materials and
e.uipment
<rivate offices, properly e.uipped and soundproofed
9de.uate space for individual, small-, and large-group use
9de.uate storage space
8# Advisory Council
9n advisory council provides support, offers advice, revie/s present activities, and
encourages ne/ activities to meet t(e goals of a sc(ool districtCs compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program. 9dvisory council members(ip may include
parents5guardians, sc(ool board members, students, community leaders, agency
personnel, and teac(ers.
'(e advisory council members s(ould (ave a s(ared ent(usiasm for students and
guidance and counseling. '(e council may be organiFed at t(e district or building
level. -n small districts, t(e councilCs responsibilities may be assumed by or be
P a g e | 12
organiFed /it(in e=isting advisory groups suc( as building or district-/ide career
education advisory councils.
9# Guidance and Counseling *esources
'o develop and manage a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
effectively, appropriate guidance and counseling resources are re.uired. '(ese
resources include e.uipment and materials, staff e=pertise, and community resources
:# %taffing Patterns
or a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program to function fully and
effectively, ade.uate staffing is re.uired. '(is means t(at t(e minimum state standard
for sc(ool counselor-to-student ratio must be met. '(e minimum standard re.uires
one sc(ool counselor for every 8*"-7** students in grades J-"). Qo/ever, t(e
desirable standard is one sc(ool counselor for every @*"-@?7 students in grades J-").
-f a district (as more t(an one sc(ool counselor, a (ead sc(ool counselor or director
s(ould be identified. Central coordination ensures t(at program planning, designing,
implementing, evaluating, and en(ancing taGe place in a timely manner. 9 reduced
caseload is (ig(ly recommended for (ead sc(ool counselors or directors so t(at t(ey
can manage t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program effectively. inally,
and most importantly, ade.uate secretarial5clerical support personnel must be
assigned to t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program to ensure effective
program delivery.
;# <udget
'(e guidance and counseling programCs budget s(ould be included in t(e budget-
planning process at bot( t(e district and building levels. &udgets s(ould be
establis(ed annually consistent /it( ot(er departments in t(e sc(ool to ensure t(at t(e
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program (as t(e resources to develop,
implement, and manage its program effectively. '(ese budgets s(ould be separate
from ot(er district and building budgets 3e.g., special education, at-risG, testing:.
&O+* P*OG*AM COMPO!T%
9ll of t(e re.uired activities and services of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program are grouped into four interactive program components: 3a: guidance and
counseling curriculum, 3b: individual student planning, 3c: responsive services, and 3d:
system support.
'(e first t(ree program components provide direct activities and services to students and
parents5guardians. '(is means t(at t(e content of a compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program Rt(e student grade level e=pectations R is delivered t(roug( t(e
activities and services of t(ese t(ree components. '(e guidance and counseling
curriculum is designed to be t(e center of t(e developmental5preventative part of a
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program and t(us contains t(e bulG of t(e
activities to assist students in ac(ieving appropriate guidance and counseling grade level
e=pectations. 9t t(e same time, (o/ever, it is important to remember t(at t(e activities
and services of t(e individual student planning and responsive services components also
provide many opportunities for students to ac(ieve appropriate guidance and counseling
grade level e=pectations contained in t(e content element of t(e MCGC<. '(us, all t(ree
direct service components contribute to student attainment of appropriate grade level
P a g e | 13
e=pectations in different but important /ays. '(e fourt( program component, system
support, contains t(e management activities and services re.uired to support a district
guidance and counseling program as /ell as t(e ot(er educational programs of a district.
'# Guidance Curriculum
9re t(ere Gno/ledge, sGills, and attitudes t(at all students need to ac.uire t(at s(ould
be t(e instructional responsibility of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
programS '(e ans/er is yesH '(ey are e=pressed as grade level e=pectations 3GL!Cs:.
'(us, a curriculum component is a necessary part of a compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program t(at /ill address a maIority of t(e grade level e=pectations
contained in t(e content element.
'(e guidance and curriculum consists of structured developmental activities
presented systematically t(roug( classrooms and large groups from Gindergarten
t(roug( grade "). '(e purpose of t(e guidance curriculum is to facilitate studentsC
optimal gro/t( and development by assisting t(em to ac.uire competencies t(at
promote academic development, career development, and personal social
development. Guidance curriculum activities are delivered t(roug( suc( strategies as
t(e follo/ing:
%tructured Groups = Sc(ool counselors conduct structured groups suc(
as career days in t(e guidance and counseling center or ot(er sc(ool facilities.
Classroom Presentations = Sc(ool counselors R /orGing
collaboratively /it( teac(ers R teac(, teac( in teams, and assist in teac(ing
guidance and counseling curriculum activities in classrooms.
Guidance curriculum activities are developed in a variety of /ays. -n )**7 and )**;
a state /ide committee of counselors, counselor educators, and state department
personnel developed learning activities based on t(e ne/ standards and grade level
e=pectations. '(ese are /eb-based activities t(at counselors and teac(ers can access
by linGing to t(e Guidance e-Learning Center: '(e long-range goal is to develop a
Tliving curriculumL t(at can gro/ as counselors and teac(ers develop ne/ learning
activities t(at address t(e guidance and counseling standards and grade level
e=pectations.
9lso, it is important to /orG closely /it( teac(ers to organiFe /(ere and /(en
guidance curriculum activities /ill be taug(t. '(e format of t(e learning activities
indicate (o/ t(ey are cross-referenced to t(e Missouri S(o/-Me Standards and
provide effective /ays to /orG closely /it( classroom teac(ers to ac(ieve t(e
educational goals of t(e district.
7# Individual %tudent Planning
Do students and t(eir parents5guardians (ave t(e rig(t to e=pect t(at t(e sc(ool
district is sensitive and responsive to studentsC uni.ue life career needs, including
t(eir needs for goal setting and career planningS '(e ans/er is yesH '(us, an
individual student planning component in a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program is needed.
'(e foundation for individual student planning is establis(ed during t(e elementary
sc(ool years t(roug( guidance and counseling curriculum activities in /(ic( students
P a g e | 14
participate. Self-confidence development, t(e ac.uisition of learning-to-learn sGills,
interpersonal relations(ip sGill development, decision-maGing sGill building, and
a/areness and beginning e=ploration of educational and occupational possibilities are
sample subIects covered during t(ese years. SubIects suc( as t(ese continue to be
covered t(roug( t(e activities of t(e guidance and counseling curriculum during
middle sc(ool and (ig( sc(ool, providing ne/ information and e=periences to enable
students to regularly update, monitor, and manage t(eir plans effectively.
&uilding on t(e foundation provided in elementary sc(ool, students begin to plan for
t(e future during t(e middle sc(ool years t(roug( t(e individual student planning
component. During t(is period, studentsC plans focus on (ig( sc(ool course selection,
considering graduation re.uirements and t(e re.uirements for t(eir postsecondary
educational and occupational goals, culminating in a Personal Plan of *tudy.
Guidance and counseling curriculum activities continue to support and guide t(e
planning process.
During t(e (ig( sc(ool years, personal plans of study developed in t(e middle sc(ool
are revie/ed and updated regularly in accordance /it( studentsC post-secondary
personal, educational, and occupational goals. '(e individual student planning
component provides time for regular individual /orG /it( students as /ell as group
sessions focusing on individual student planning. Guidance and counseling
curriculum activities continue to support student planning by giving emp(asis to t(e
development and use of sGills in decision maGing, goal setting, and planning. '(e
importance and relevance of strong academic, and career, and personal5social
development sGills are stressed. '(e goal is for studentsC personal plans of study to
become pat(/ays or guides t(roug( /(ic( t(ey can use t(e past and present to
anticipate and prepare for t(e future.
-ndividual student planning activities (elp all students to plan, monitor, and manage
t(eir academic, career, and personal5social development. Eit(in t(is component,
activities are designed to (elp students evaluate t(eir educational, career, and personal
goals and to develop personal plans of study no later t(an t(e $t( grade in
collaboration /it( parents5guardians. -n t(is component, t(e sc(ool counselor plans
and directs t(e activities. '(ese activities are generally delivered on an individual
basis or by /orGing /it( individuals in small groups. '(e focus is on (aving students
individualiFe and personaliFe t(eir planning. -ndividual student planning is
implemented t(roug( suc( strategies as t(e follo/ing:
Appraisal = Sc(ool counselors /orG /it( students in analyFing and
evaluating t(eir abilities, interests, sGills, and ac(ievements. 'est information
and ot(er evaluation data form a basis for developing s(ort-term and long-
term plans /it( students and t(eir parents5guardians.
!ducational and Career Planning = Sc(ool counselors /orG /it(
students to use personal-social, educational, and career and labor marGet
information to manage t(eir personal plans of study. '(e involvement of
parents5guardians and ot(er sc(ool staff is critical in planning a program t(at
meets t(e individual needs of students.
Transition = Sc(ool counselors assist students in maGing t(e transition
from grade to grade and sc(ool to sc(ool or sc(ool to /orG.
P a g e | 15
!ducational and career decision maGing, planning, and goal setting are primarily t(e
responsibility of students and t(eir parents5guardians. <ersonal plans of study developed
as a result of individual student planning activities come in a variety of formats. 1ne
format is t(e traditional 8- to ?-year educational plan. 9not(er format is a student
portfolio eit(er in paper or electronic form.
'(e foundation of personal plans of study /ill be t(e sc(oolCs Program of *tudy /(ic(
include a non-duplicative se.uence of academic and tec(nical education instruction
around career clusters and related grade appropriate career related e=periences. '(roug(
t(e individual student planning process, t(e personal plan of study /ill reflect:
'(e course/orG needed to complete t(e program of study including state and
local graduation and assessment re.uirements
Grade appropriate career-based opportunities and relevant co-curricular activities
in /(ic( t(e student /ill engage. Suc( activities may include but are not limited
to Iob s(ado/ing, service learning, interns(ips, volunteer activities, after sc(ool
employment, and C'S1
'(e postsecondary goals of t(e student /(ic( /ill be revie/ed annually and
revised as necessary. '(e Missouri Sc(ool -mprovement <rogram re.uires t(at all
students (ave a personal plan of study built around a career pat( and5or cluster
beginning no later t(an t(e end of $
t(
grade.
9t t(is point, only a fe/ programs of study templates /ill (ave been developed.
Qo/ever, all students /ill still (ave a personal plan of study. -f a student is pursuing a
career area for /(ic( a program of study template (as not been developed t(roug( t(e
model process, t(en t(e personal plan of study /ill be developed /it(out a template or a
sc(ool can use sample templates t(at can be found on t(e career clusters /ebsite:
///.careerclusters.org. !ven small sc(ools /it( a limited number of courses can
develop templates for t(e personal plan of study using t(e career pat( frame/orG. '(e
idea is t(at /e provide students /it( a /ay to frame t(eir career and educational planning
Ra language so to speaGRabout careers t(at does not limit t(eir options but e=pands
t(em by (elping t(em envision a number of /ays in /(ic( t(eir sGills and interests can
be used. <rograms of Study are a re.uirement under <erGins -4 Legislation. 9rea Career
Center Directors, /ill (ave additional information.
"he .ole of the *chool Counselor in /ndividual *tudent Planning
Sc(ool counselors are a/are t(at:
-ndividual student planning is a Gey component of t(eir compre(ensive guidance
and counseling program
Developing, revie/ing, and revising personal plans of study is an essential piece
of individual student planning
-ndividual student planning is at t(e (eart of a strong career development process
of career a/areness, e=ploration and decision maGing t(at begins in t(e
elementary grades.
'(us, sc(ool counselors play a pivotal role in (elping students gain t(e Gno/ledge and
sGills necessary for t(em to be able to maGe good decisions regarding t(eir post-
secondary plans.
P a g e | 16
'(e Guidance Grade Level !=pectations provide t(e roadmap for sc(ools to develop a
strong and meaningful career development process for all students, and t(e <rogram of
Study process provides sc(ools an effective /ay to develop a rigorous and relevant
curriculum and to create t(e templates t(at can guide t(e individual planning process and
t(e development of rigorous and relevant personal plans of study.
8# *esponsive %ervices
S(ould sc(ool counselors be available and responsive to special or une=pected needs
of students and parents5guardiansS '(e ans/er is yesH '(us, t(e purpose of t(e
responsive services component is to /orG /it( students /(ose personal
circumstances, concerns, or problems are t(reatening to interfere /it( or are
interfering /it( t(eir (ealt(y academic, career, and personal5social development.
Specific issues some students face include academic success, career c(oice, c(ild
abuse, cultural diversity, dropping out of sc(ool, educational c(oices, family loss,
relations(ips, sc(ool attendance, stress, substance abuse, and suicide. 9s a result,
t(ere is continuing need for individual counseling, small-group counseling,
consultation, and referral. '(e responsive services component also supports t(e
activities in t(e guidance and counseling curriculum and individual student planning
components.
<arent5guardian involvement /it( and participation in t(e activities of t(is component
are critical in (elping students overcome barriers to t(eir, academic, career, and
personal5social development. <arent5guardian involvement may include referring t(eir
c(ildren for assistance, /orGing /it( sc(ool counselors to identify issues of concern,
giving permission for needed services, and providing (elp in resolving issues.
%esponsive services are implemented t(roug( t(e follo/ing: individual counseling,
small-group counseling, consultation, and referral.
Individual Counseling = Sc(ool counselors provide individual
counseling for students /(o are e=periencing educational difficulties,
personal concerns, or normal developmental tasGs. -ndividual counseling
assists students in identifying problems, causes, alternatives, and possible
conse.uences so t(at appropriate action can be taGen.
%mall=Group Counseling = Sc(ool counselors provide small-group
counseling to students /(o need and /ill benefit from a small-group setting
to address t(eir needs and concerns. -nterventions may taGe t(e form of
s(ort-term issue groups or crisis intervention groups t(at deal /it( suc(
topics as social sGills, anger management, relations(ip issues, grief issues,
and study sGills.
Consultation = Consultation is an interactive process t(at sc(ool
counselors provide to (elp parents5guardians, teac(ers, and administrators
address t(e academic, career, and personal social needs of students.
*eferral = Sc(ool counselors use sc(ool and community referral sources
t(at deal /it( crises suc( as suicide, violence, abuse, and terminal illness.
'(ese referral sources may include mental (ealt( agencies, employment and
training programs, vocational re(abilitation, Iuvenile services, and5or social
services.
P a g e | 1
'(e responsive services component is different from t(e guidance and counseling
curriculum and individual student planning components in t(at t(e services involved
are provided in response to individual needs. 'o conduct t(e services of t(is
component, it /ould be useful to (ave district-/ide /ritten plans and policies
concerning confidentiality, t(e reporting of suspected c(ild abuse, and referrals. 9
clear district-/ide policy about confidentiality of information /ill enable sc(ool
counselors to respond to inappropriate re.uests for information and /ill (elp guide
t(eir /orG /it( students, parents5guardians, teac(ers, and administrators. 9s
mandated reporters, sc(ool counselors are re.uired by la/ to report suspected c(ild
abuse. 9 district-/ide /ritten policy and plan /ill inform t(ose involved of t(e
procedures t(e district follo/s. -t is also necessary to compile a listing of referral
sources available as /ell as (ave guidelines regarding /(en and (o/ to maGe
referrals.
9# %ystem %upport
Does a districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program re.uire an ongoing
support system to /orG effectivelyS Do t(e educational system of t(e district and t(e
staff involved re.uire ongoing support t(at can best be provided by sc(ool
counselorsS '(e ans/er to t(ese .uestions is yesH '(us, a compre(ensive guidance
and counseling program re.uires a system support component. '(e administration
and management activities of a districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program are located in t(is component as are activities t(at support ot(er educational
programs. '(e system-support component is implemented t(roug( activities suc( as
program management, fair-s(are responsibilities, professional development, staff and
community relations, consultation, committee participation, community outreac(, and
evaluation.
Program Management = '(is includes t(e planning and management
tasGs needed to support activities conducted in t(e districtCs
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program. Suc( activities mig(t
include conducting time5tasG analyses> developing a yearly calendar of
activities> developing a yearly budget> /riting reports regarding t(e
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program> establis(ing priorities
for t(e year> and, identifying resources needed to implement t(e program.
&air=%hare *esponsibilities = '(ese are t(e responsibilities t(at are
re.uired of all members of t(e sc(ool staff. air-s(are responsibilities
may include tasGs suc( as bus duty, playground duty, class5club
sponsors(ip, and taGing ticGets at sporting events. &arriers to
implementation are tasGs suc( as t(ese t(at sc(ool counselors are
assigned above and beyond t(ose of ot(er staff members. -t is important
to note t(at /(en t(ese types of activities are assigned to sc(ool
counselors above and beyond t(ose assigned to ot(er staff members,
t(ese activities are considered barriers to implementation. or furt(er
e=planations of barriers to implementation, see Section --- for additional
information.
Professional "evelopment = Sc(ool counselors need to be involved in
regularly updating t(eir professional Gno/ledge and sGills. '(is may
involve participation in regular sc(ool in-service training, attending
P a g e | 1!
professional meetings, completing postgraduate course /orG, and
contributing to professional literature.
%taff and Community *elations = '(is activity involves orienting t(e
staff and t(e community to t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program t(roug( ne/sletters, local media, and5or sc(ool-community
presentations.
Consultation and Collaboration = Sc(ool counselors consult and
collaborate /it( teac(ers and ot(er staff members in order to provide
information and receive feedbacG on t(e emerging needs of students.
Committee Participation = Serving on departmental curriculum
committees, community committees, or advisory boards represents
e=amples of /ays to support ot(er programs in t(e sc(ool and
community and to gain support for t(e guidance and counseling program.
Community Outreach = Community outreac( activities are designed to
(elp sc(ool counselors gain Gno/ledge about community resources and
referral agencies, field trip sites, employment opportunities, and local
labor marGet information. '(is may re.uire
sc(ool counselors to periodically visit postsecondary sc(ools and local
businesses, industries, and social service agencies.
!valuation = !valuation consists of t(ree maIor components /(ic( is
conceptualiFed as K<rogram O <ersonnel P %esults. K
Program evaluation asGs t(e .uestion, K'o /(at e=tent is t(e
program in placeSL and is measured using t(e -nternal
-mprovement Document found in 9ppendi= D.
Personnel !valuation asGs t(e .uestion, K'o /(at e=tent is t(e
program staffed /it( (ig(ly sGilled sc(ool counselorsSL, and is
measured using t(e Guidelines #or Per#ormance)Based "chool
Counselor Evalua!ion.
*esults evaluation asGs t(e .uestion, K'o /(at e=tent is t(e
program (aving an impact on relevant student outcomes suc( as
ac(ievement, attendance, and be(aviorSL See Section --- for
detailed information on results evaluation.
%uggested "istribution of Total %chool Counselors1 Time
9ppropriate use of a sc(ool counselorCs time is crucial in developing and implementing a
districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program. '(e four program
components provide t(e structure for Iudging appropriate allocation of t(e sc(ool
counselorCs time. 1ne criterion to use in maGing suc( Iudgment is t(e concept of program
balance. '(e guidance and counseling curriculum, individual student planning, and
responsive services program components represent t(e direct services sc(ool counselors
provide to students, parents5guardians, teac(ers, and t(e community. '(e system support
program component organiFes t(e indirect services of t(e program. '(e assumption is
t(at sc(ool counselorsC time s(ould be spread across all four program components.
Qo/ever, t(e first t(ree components /ill liGely need more t(an ?7U of t(e time. <er(aps
total time s(ould be in an $*:)* ratio /it( $*U to/ard providing direct services to
students, parents5guardians, teac(ers, and t(e community and )*U to/ard providing
indirect services to t(ese groups. Care must be taGen, (o/ever, to /atc( t(e time given to
P a g e | 1"
system support tasGs because t(e prime focus for t(e sc(ool counselorsC time is t(e direct
services to students and parents5guardians t(roug( t(e program components of guidance
and counseling curriculum, individual student planning, and responsive services. inally,
it is important to realiFe t(at if t(e districtCs program is /ell run, it already provides
substantial support for ot(er sc(ool programs and personnel as /ell as t(e community.
9not(er criterion is t(at different grade levels re.uire different allocations of sc(ool
counselorsC time across t(e program components. or e=ample, at t(e elementary level,
more of t(e sc(ool counselorsC time may be spent /orGing in t(e guidance and
counseling curriculum /it( less time spent on individual student planning. -n (ig(
sc(ool, t(ose time allocations /ill most liGely be reversed. Qo/ personnel in a sc(ool
district or sc(ool building allocate t(eir time depends on t(e needs of t(eir students,
parents5guardians, teac(ers, and t(eir community. urt(er, once c(osen, t(e time
allocations are not fi=ed forever. '(e purpose for maGing t(em is to provide direction to
t(e program, administration, and sc(ool counselors involved. 'ime allocations can be
c(anged based on ne/ly arising needs. Qo/ever, /(en somet(ing ne/ is added,
decisions /ill (ave to be made about /(at needs to be removed or reprioritiFed. '(e
assumption is t(at sc(ool counselors s(ould spend t(eir time on fully implementing t(e
guidance and counseling program. %emember t(at t(is includes t(e fair-s(are
responsibilities found in t(e system support component. Sc(ool counselors and
administrators /(o participated in field-testing t(e MCGC< recommended t(e suggested
time percentages seen in igure " on page $.
*esources
>uman *esources
'(e (uman resources of a districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program R sc(ool counselors, teac(ers, administrators, parents5guardians,
students, community members, and business and labor partners R all (ave roles
to play in t(e guidance and counseling program. 9lt(oug( sc(ool counselors
coordinate t(e program and are t(e main providers of guidance and counseling
services, t(e involvement, cooperation, and support of teac(ers and administrators
are necessary for a successful program t(at offers a full array of guidance and
counseling activities. '(e involvement, cooperation, and support of
parents5guardians, community members, and business and labor partners are also
critical for full student participation in t(e guidance and counseling program.
&inancial *esources
9ppropriate and ade.uate financial resources are critical to t(e success of a
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program. '(e financial resource
categories re.uired for a program include budget, materials, e.uipment, and
facilities. 9 budget for t(e guidance and counseling program is needed to fund
items in t(ese categories and t(en allocate t(ose funds across t(e buildings and
grade levels of t(e district. Materials and e.uipment are needed so t(at t(e
guidance and counseling activities across t(e four program components can be
fully implemented. Eell-designed guidance and counseling facilities in eac(
building, organiFed to meet t(e needs of t(e guidance and counseling program are
also re.uired.
P a g e | 20
Political *esources
'(e political resources of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
include sc(ool board policies, pertinent state and federal la/s, rules, and
regulations, local sc(ool district administrative guidelines, and professional
association position statements and et(ical standards. Clear and concise board of
education policies are mandatory for t(e successful operation of compre(ensive
guidance and counseling programs in sc(ool districts. '(ey represent statements
of support and courses of action or guiding principles designed to influence and
determine decisions in sc(ool districts> t(ose t(at pertain to guidance and
counseling programs must consider pertinent la/s, rules, and regulations and
standards as t(ey are being /ritten, adopted, and implemented.
P*OG*AM COMPO!T% %+MMA*? C>A*T
E(en t(e four program components are fully developed in a local district, a c(art can be
created t(at provides brief descriptions of eac( of t(e four program components. Suc( a
c(art includes t(e purposes of t(e components> t(e topics addressed, and sc(ool
counselorsC roles. igure ) is a sample of suc( a c(art s(o/ing sample topics. 9 c(art liGe
t(is one can be created for a districtCs program to s(o/ at a glance t(e services and
activities sc(ool counselors deliver t(roug( a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program to students, parents5guardians, and t(e community.
P a g e | 21
&igure 7
Missouri Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling
<rogram Components
Guidance Curriculum
<rovides guidance and
counseling content in a
systematic /ay to all
students J-")
Purpose
Student a/areness, sGill
development, and application
of sGills needed in everyday
life
Topics Addressed
9cademic Development
Study SGills
Developing <ersonal
<lans of Study
<re-employment SGills
0ob <reparation
<ost-Secondary Decision
MaGing
Career Development
Career 9/areness
Career !=ploration
Career and !ducational
<lanning
<ersonal5Social Development
Self-Concept
Conflict %esolution
<ersonal %esponsibilities
<eer riends(ip
Decision-MaGing SGills
Substance 9buse
<revention <rogram
Cross-Cultural
Understandings
%chool Counselor1s *ole
Structured Groups
Classroom <resentations
Individual
%tudent Planning
9ssists students in
planning, monitoring,
and managing t(eir
academic, career, and
personal5social and
development
Purpose
Development and use of
<ersonal <lans of Study
Topics Addressed
Course Selection
'ransitioning:
- Grade to Grade
- Sc(ool to Sc(ool
- Sc(ool to Career
Multiple-Aear
<lanning
inancial 9id
Jno/ledge of Career
1pportunities
Career 9/areness
-nterest -nventories
Career S(ado/ing
EorG Qabits
Setting <ersonal Goals
Decision-MaGing
SGills
%chool Counselor1s
*ole
9ppraisal
!ducation and
Career <lanning
'ransitions
*esponsive
%ervices
9ddresses t(e immediate
needs and concerns of
students
Purpose
<revention, intervention
Topics Addressed
9cademic Concerns
Sc(ool-related
Concerns:
- 'ardiness
- 9bsences and
'ruancy
- Misbe(avior
- Sc(ool-9voidance
- Dropout <revention
%elations(ip
Concerns
<(ysical5Se=ual5
!motional 9buse
Grief5Loss5Deat(
Substance 9buse
amily -ssues
Se=uality -ssues
Coping /it( Stress
%chool Counselor1s
*ole
-ndividual Counseling
Small-Group
Counseling
Consultation
%eferral
%ystem
%upport
-ncludes program, staff,
and sc(ool support
activities and services
Purpose
<rogram delivery and
support
Topics Addressed
Guidance and
Counseling <rogram,
-mplementation and
Management
<arent5Guardian
!ducation
'eac(er59dministrator
Consultation
Sc(ool -mprovement
<lanning
Counselor <rofessional
Development
%esearc( and
<ublis(ing
Community 1utreac(
<ublic %elations
air-S(are
%esponsibilities
- &us Duty
- <layground Duty
- Class5Club
Sponsors(ip
- 'aGing 'icGets at
Sporting !vents
%chool Counselor1s *ole
<rogram Management
air-S(are
%esponsibilities
<rofessional
Development
Staff and Community
%elations
Consultation
Committee
<articipation
Community 1utreac(
!valuation
P a g e | 22
&ully Implementing ?our
Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program
'(ere are five p(ases in t(e process of moving your districtCs compre(ensive guidance
and counseling program to/ard full implementation: planning, designing, implementing,
evaluating and en(ancing. !ac( p(ase and t(e steps involved are briefly described belo/
follo/ed by suggestions for your involvement and support. or detailed discussion of
eac( p(ase and t(e steps involved, see t(e Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and
Counseling Program Manual .
Phase I. Planning
'(is is t(e commitment p(ase for continous improvement. '(e district and5or building
level guidance and counseling staff and advisory council s(ould:
%tep '. !stablish the vision. Develop a vision for guidance and counseling t(at
aligns /it( t(e sc(ool district5building vision and mission
%tep 7. <uild the foundation. &uild t(e foundation by establis(ing a definition
and p(ilosop(y t(at aligns /it( district5building goals and develop t(e frame/orG
for implementing t(e program.
%tep 8. Assess the current program# 9ssess t(e current program and activities
to determine t(e degree of implementation and resources available. '(e current
program is assessed to determine /(at already e=ists and /(at gaps e=ist in full
implementation. 9ction plans can t(en be developed to move to/ard full
implementation
%uggestions for Administrators
Demonstrating administrative leaders(ip and support is critical at t(is point in t(e
development of t(e program as it /ill generate ent(usiasm and energy among
staGe(olders.
%uperintendent and Other "istrict 4evel Administrators
&ecome familiar /it( t(e language of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program and Gno/ledgeable about its purpose and role in supporting t(e overall
mission of t(e sc(ool.
Meet /it( your sc(ool counselors, building administrators, guidance and
counseling advisory committee, and any ot(ers /(o are involved in implementing
your guidance and counseling program.. '(e purpose of t(e meeting is to
communicate t(e support of district level administration and to discuss t(e
improvement process including decision-maGing aut(ority, budget, time lines,
progress reports, and communication c(annels.
1fficially communicate to all faculty and staff t(e importance of t(e guidance and
counseling program in addresssing t(e developmental needs of students and
encourage t(eir support and involvement in its implementation.
<rovide opportunity for t(e guidance and counseling staff to report to t(e &oard
of !ducation on a regular basis on t(e progress being made to/ard full program
implementation and t(e programs impact on student outcomes.
P a g e | 23
-ncorporate t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program implementation
process into t(e districtCs annual sc(ool improvement planning, and budgeting
process.
<uilding 4evel Administrators
&ecome familiar /it( t(e language of a compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program and Gno/ledgeable about its purpose and role in supporting t(e overall
mission of t(e sc(ool..
Sc(edule regular meetings /it( your sc(ool counselors to discuss progress,
successes, c(allenges, and needs for program improvement.
-f your building organiFational structure includes departments and department
(eads, be sure t(e guidance and counseling program is identified as a department
and t(at a lead or (ead sc(ool counselor is identified. -nclude t(e (ead sc(ool
counselor in meetings of t(e leaders(ip team. -nclude t(e guidance and
counseling program in t(e curriculum revie/5strategic planning processes of t(e
building.
-nclude regular reports at faculty meetings from t(e guidance and counseling
department regarding program activities, critical issues and impact relevant to t(e
sc(ool mission.
<eriodically acGno/ledge t(e /orG of t(e sc(ool counselors and t(e advisory
committee.
Phase II. "esigning
%tep 9. "etermine program direction# '(is is t(e p(ase in /(ic( t(e program
design and direction are determined in order to address district5building goals t(at
support t(e ongoing mission of t(e sc(ool. Eit(in t(e designing p(ase:
!=isting program activities are evaluated and effective practices are
identified.
'(e Missouri Guidance Planning "urve% is administered.
'(e results of t(e Missouri Guidance Planning "urve%, CS-< Goals, and ot(er
relevant student, sc(ool and community data are used to establis( priorities
for t(e guidance and counseling program.
'(e results of t(e assessment of t(e current program provide information
about t(e activities and resources t(at need to be maintained in t(e desired
program as /ell as about activities t(at need to be eliminated t(at interefere
/it( t(e full implementation of t(e guidance and counseling program
<riorities, timelines, and calendars for implementation are establis(ed. Sc(ool
counselor time is determined to s(o/ t(e percentage of time to be spent in
eac( of t(e four program components 3Guidance Curriculum, -ndividual
<lanning, %esponsive Services, and System Support:.
0ob descriptions for sc(ool counselors are revie/ed and revised as necessary
to reflect t(e /orG re.uired for full implementing t(e guidance and counseling
program. . See 9ppendi= & for sample Iob descriptions.
Staff development is provided to facilitate t(e integration of t(e guidance and
counseling program into t(e instructional process, sc(ool programs and
activities.
9 program manual describing t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program is developed. '(e state manual provides guidelines for
P a g e | 24
developing a local guidance and counseling program manual. -f a local
program manual currently e=ists it s(ould be revie/ed and updated a
necessary to reflect any c(anges in t(e program as it moves to/ard full
implementation.
%uggestions for Administrators
During t(is p(ase of t(e transition, a great deal of /orG is re.uired of t(e guidance and
counseling staff and advisory committee. Aour continued leaders(ip role in supporting
t(e full implementation of t(e guidance and counseling program /ill (elp ensure t(at t(e
/orG continues /it( dedication and ent(usiasm.
%uperintendent and Other "istrict 4evel Administrators
MaGe provisions for clerical support, facilities and resources to (elp to assist /it(
t(e implementation process.
EorG /it( your building level administrators and sc(ool counselors to develop
Iob descriptions for sc(ool counselors t(at commit "** percent of t(eir time to a
fully implemented guidance and counseling program.
MaGe t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program a part of t(e districtCs
compre(ensive sc(ool improvement program and budgeting process.
<uilding 4evel Administrators
Support procedures for conducting t(e Guidance <lanning Survey and collecting
ot(er relevant sc(ool and community data
%emove barriers to implementation 3responsibilities t(at are not guidance
functions and are not e=pected of all faculty members: t(at your sc(ool
counselors are performing. '(ese tasGs are identified as a result of t(e sc(ool
counselor time and tasG analysis. Consider t(ese tasGs in lig(t of /(at is N1'
being done for students t(roug( your districtCs guidance and counseling program
because your sc(ool sc(ool counselors are spending some of t(eir time
performing tasGs not related to t(eir guidance and counseling program. &arriers to
implementation contrast /it( Kfair-s(areL responsibilities t(at are t(ose
responsibilities in /(ic( all faculty members play a role:
0air1share responsibilities are t(ose responsibilities all faculty members
must assume at one time or anot(er suc( as (all monitoring or supervising
t(e cafeteria. air-s(are responsibilities are included in t(e System
Support component.
2arriers to /mplementation are t(ose assigned to t(e sc(ool counselor
but not to ot(er faculty members. '(ese responsibilities include
developing master course sc(edules, serving as substitute, or acting as t(e
principal in (is or (er place 3see pages )* and @;-@# of t(e "!a!e Guidance
and Counseling Manual for additional information on fair s(are and
barriers to implementation.
P a g e | 25
Understanding t(e impact of barriers to implementation on t(e ability of sc(ool
counselors to directly /orG /it( students is imperative if sc(ool counselors are
going to maGe an impact on relevant student outcomes. or e=ample:
E(at is t(e impact of professional sc(ool counselors spending )* percent of t(eir
time on Koff tasGL dutiesS &ased on "$* seven period days in a sc(ool year
sc(ool counselors /ould lose @; days or )7) clocG (ours of time providing direct
services to students and t(eir parents. E(at direct services could be provided if
sc(ool counselors (ad @; more days or )7) more (ours available in t(e sc(ool
yearS
!lementary school students could receive
o )** more @* minute classroom guidance units on academic, career, and
personal5social issues
o "** more (ours of individual and small group counseling
Middle school students could receive
o ?7 more classroom guidance units on academic, career, and
personal5social issues
o 7* more (ours to develop and begin to use personal plans of study
o $$ more (ours of individual and small group counseling
>igh school students could receive
o 7* more classroom units on academic, career, and personal5social issues
o $$ more (ours to plan for t(e future using t(eir personal plans of study
o ?7 more (ours of individual and small group counseling
EorG /it( your sc(ool counselors to develop sc(ool counselor Iob descriptions
t(at reflect "** percent involvement in t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program.
-nclude t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program on t(e agenda of
faculty meetings and in ot(er communications /it( faculty, parents, and t(e
community and provide updates on current activities and contributions to student
success
&e actively involved in t(e development or revie/ and revision of your districtCs
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program manual.
Phase III. Implementing
'(is p(ase puts t(e program into action after your &oard of !ducation officially approves
t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program and adopts a policy t(at guides its
operation. ully implementing a CGC< re.uire leaders(ip and management sGills in
order to develop effective teams and partners(ips, and in order to ac.uire and allocate
resources to implement, evaluate, and en(ance t(e program 9 programmatic perspective
of CGC focuses on student outcomes, and sc(ool counselors, teac(ers, and administrator
all play a crucial role in implementing a CGC< t(at fully addresses t(e academic, career,
and personal social development of all students.
P a g e | 26
%tep :. Approve the Program. Qave t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program approved by t(e &oard of !ducation: '(e local board of
education adopts a policy t(at reflects a fully implemented, compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program as outlined by t(e Missouri Sc(ool &oard
9ssociation
%tep ;. 4aunch the Program . '(e program is officially launc(ed /it( t(e
actual implementation of activities and an event to signal to t(e sc(ool community
t(at t(e program is under/ay. '(is can occur even t(oug( t(e program (as not yet
been fully implemented. Communicating t(e districtCs long-range plans for a fully
implemented compre(ensive guidance and counseling program /ill (elp generate
support t(roug(out t(e transition. -n- service development activities are
conducted to ensure t(at t(e entire faculty and staff are a/are of t(eir roles in t(e
districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program, and master planning
calendar of all guidance activities is developed and made available.
%tep @. Manage the program#. Management activities (elp ensure t(at t(e
program runs smoot(ly t(roug(out t(e year. %egularly sc(eduled meetings /it(
t(e principal, advisory council meetings, Geeping t(e calendar current, and t(e
faculty, staff and community up to date on activities /it(in t(e program,as /ell
program evaluation are some of t(e essential activities /it(in t(e management
function.
%uggestions for Administrators
%uperintendent and Other "istrict 4evel Administrators
E(en t(e districtCs guidance and counseling program is ready for &oard approval,
sc(edule enoug( time on t(e &oard of !ducation agenda to allo/ for a t(oroug(
presentation and discussion.
acilitate t(e implementation process by maGing sure t(at t(e budget is ade.uate
for implementing t(e program, t(e facilities are ade.uate for carrying out t(e
program, t(e plan for reassignment duties t(at act as barriers in its operation, and
everyone is a/are t(at t(e district is committed to fully implementing its
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
EorG /it( t(e guidance and counseling staff to ensure appropriate updates
t(roug( sc(ool and local media.
E(en (iring ne/ teac(ers, sc(ool counselors, administrators, and staff, (elp t(em
to understand t(e p(ilosop(y be(ind t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program and t(eir roles in it. Qelp t(em see t(eir potential for
contributing to student development t(roug( t(eir involvement in t(e guidance
and counseling program as /ell as (o/ it supports district and buildlng
improvement plans and goals
<uilding 4evel Administrators
EorG /it( your sc(ool counselors as t(ey manage t(e transition to t(e full
implementation of t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
or e=ample, revie/ Iob descriptions and brainstorm ideas about /ays to involve
t(e faculty in t(e program. .Support t(e implementation of a plan for t(e
reassignment of responsibilities t(at act as barriers to implementation so your
P a g e | 2
sc(ool counselors can spend "** percent of t(eir time /orGing /it( students,
parents, and teac(ers 3see 9ppendi= C:.
%emind t(e faculty of t(e importance of t(eir roles in t(e districtCs compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program suc( as participating in and follo/ing t(roug(
/it( guidance curriculum learning activities, integrating guidance GL!S in t(eir
curriculum /(ere appropriate, supporting and being involved in t(e individual
student planning process and /orGing /it( sc(ool counselors to remove student
barriers to learning
Phase IA. !valuating. Program B Personnel C *esults
'(is p(ase uses t(e formula, <rogram O <ersonnel P %esults to ans/er t(e .uestions:
'o /(at e=tent is our guidance and counseling program implementedS
9re our sc(ool counselors being supervised and evaluated appropriatelyS
Qo/ does t(e guidance and counseling program impact relevant student
outcomesS
%tep D. Assess the degree of comprehensive guidance and counseling
program
,GCGP- Implementation. ,he +n!ernal +mprovemen! Revie. Documen!,
developed by t(e Missouri Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation,
is designed to assit sc(ools in determing t(e level of guidance and counseling
program implementation. -t is structured in suc( a /ay t(at it allo/s sc(ool
districts to taGe an (onest looG at t(eir program and identify areas strengt(s and
of concerns. -t also provides a framewor) for developing concrete action plans
for program improvement#
%tep E. %upervise and evaluate school counsleor performance. '(e Missouri
Department of !lementary and Secondary !ducation (as developed a continuum
for sc(ool counselor standards and .uality indicators. '(ese standards, /(en
finaliFed /ill be incorporated into a revised version of t(is manual.
%tep '/. Measure student outcomes that are impacted by the CGCP. '(e
purpose of fully implementing compre(ensive guidance and counseling program
is to provide t(e time and resources for sc(ool counselors to /orG /it( students,
teac(ers, and parents to advance t(e academic, career, and personal social
development of all students. 9s /it( any program it is essential t(at results
evaluation is included as part of its implementation. '(e .uestion about sc(ool
counseling is no longer, KE(at does a sc(ool counselor doS,L it is KQo/ are
students different because of t(e /orG of t(e sc(ool counselor and t(e guidance
and counseling programSL 9 state-/ide training program in results based
evaluation (as been developed by t(e Department and is available on-line at t(e
Guidance e-Learning Center.
P a g e | 2!
%uggestions for Administrators
%uperintendent and Other "istrict 4evel Administrators
<romote evaluation as a positive and essential aspect of t(e program and
emp(asiFe t(e opportunity for gro/t( and program improvement provided by t(e
evaluation process.
Use t(e -nternal -mprovement %evie/ and t(e continuum for sc(ool counselor
standards and .uality indicators 3/(en publis(ed: as primary district-/ide
program and personnel evaluation procedures
!=pect sc(ool counselors to develop, implement and s(are results based
interventions t(at address important sc(ool issues and student be(aviors.
!=pect sc(ool counselors to develop a compre(ensive evaluation plan based on
t(e formuala t(at includes a calendar and dates for evaluation components to be
completed and presented
<uilding 4evel Administrators
EorG /it( t(e steering committee to develop a plan /it( met(od, procedures, and
dates to conduct program evaluation using t(e --%
&ecome familiar /it( and use t(e continuum for sc(ool counselor standards and
.uality indicators.
EorG /it( your sc(ool counselors to (elp develop and determine (o/ t(e results
evaluation plan /ill be carried out at t(e building level.
Phase A. !nhancing. Improving ?our Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling
Program
%tep ''. Commit to t(e en(ancement process
%tep '7. &egin t(e en(ancement process by gat(ering needs and evaluation data
%tep '8. MaGe en(ancement decisions on t(e basis of needs and evaluation data
%tep '9. Develop an action plan /it( S.M.9.%.' goals 3Specific, Measurable,
9ttainable, %elevant, 'ime-ramed: to implement t(e plan
%tep ':. /ollo. ,hrough .i!h !he ac!ion plan

!n(ancing a CGC< t(orug( continuous improvement (elps revitaliFe t(e program and
Geeps it relevant to t(e current needs of t(e sc(ool and t(e community. !n(ancing t(e
program in a continual process based not only on data collected over severeal years, but
also on observations of t(e guidance and counseling staff, administration, students,
parents, and t(e community about (o/ /ell t(e program (as been functioning over time.
-n addition, it is based on any ne/ realities t(at are currently present in t(e district.
!n(ancing:
is based on any ne/ realities t(at are currently present in your district
is guided by data collected by t(e sc(ool5district
ensures relevancy for students, for t(e sc(ool and for t(e community
may lead to ne/ or s(ifted priorities for t(e use of sc(ool counselorMs time and
talent
P a g e | 2"
%uggestions for Administrators
%uperintendent and other district level Administrators
Understand t(at t(e en(ancement process is a systemic part of t(e CGC<
!nsure t(at t(e CGC< is in t(e same revie/ cycle as ot(er programs in t(e
sc(ool
Support t(e en(ancement process by maGing it a priority for all programs
<uilding level administrators
Understand t(e need to en(ance t(e program to meet ne/ needs and
c(allenges
Support t(e en(ancement process by maGing en(ancement a priority for all
programs /it(in your sc(ool
!nsure t(at t(e CGC< is in t(e same revie/ cycle as ot(er programs in t(e
sc(ool

P a g e | 30
<eyond <arriers to %olutions.
Actions that Promote Progress

-t is naVve to suggest t(at t(e full implementation of a district-/ide compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program is barrier-free. !ac( district t(at (as made t(e
commitment (as been faced /it( barriers. Moving beyond t(e barriers to solutions is
anot(er point at /(ic( partners(ips and team/orG bet/een administration, sc(ool
counselors, and faculty are essential if c(ange and progress are to be made. '(ose /(o
(ave openly faced barriers and /orGed toget(er to develop creative solutions (ave
emerged /it( a greater commitment to t(eir common goal of a more effective guidance
and counseling program for all of t(eir students.
1ver t(e past )* years sc(ool counselors and administrators (ave been asGed to identify
t(e barriers t(ey faced in t(eir /orG to/ard full implementation of t(eir local programs.
'(ey /ere t(en asGed to identify possible solutions to for eac( of t(e barriers. '(e lists of
barriers t(ey generated /ere combined into nine categories:
". Sc(ool counselor Iob responsibilities do not allo/ "** percent involvement in t(e
guidance and counseling program.
). LacG of administrative support for t(e program
@. Sc(ool counselor to student ratio is too (ig(.
8. 4arious groups resist t(e program.
7. Classroom involvement interferes /it( immediate response to crises.
;. LacG of resources
?. Special Services <rogram taGes time a/ay from t(e compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program.
$. Some teac(ers are resistant to relin.uis(ing time for classroom guidance
activities.
#. LacG of communication
9nticipating t(at some of t(ese barriers may e=ist can (elp local districts to plan /ays of
dealing /it( barriers before t(ey become maIor roadblocGs. 9ppendi= Q of t(is document
consists of suggestions for overcoming t(ese barriers. -t s(ould be noted t(at lacG of
ade.uate state funding /as one of t(e most often mentioned barriers. Limited available
funds is a state/ide issue, but one t(at must be addressed locally /(en setting priorities.
Ee all must /orG at t(e legislative level for increased funding. %ecogniFing t(at funding
is limited, t(e suggested actions are t(ose t(at re.uire no or minimal additional
e=penditure. '(e lists are intended to spur additional ideas.
P a g e | 31
Closing Comments
'(e process of planning, designing, implementing, evaluating and en(ancing a district
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program leads to t(e effective delivery of
guidance services and t(e ac(ievement of student outcomes, t(e goals of /(ic( are to
(elp develop competent and confident learners /(o can maGe successful post-secondary
transitions into furt(er education or to t(e /orGforce. -t is a /ay to bring rene/ed
vitality not only to t(e guidance and counseling program, but also to all areas of t(e
sc(ool t(roug( mutual commitment to t(e concepts of t(e program and itCs role in
supporting t(e overall mission of t(e sc(ool. Aour role as an administrator is a po/erful
one. 9s stated in t(e beginning, you are instructional leaders and t(e aut(ority vested in
administrative positions enables you to accomplis( t(ings sc(ool counselors cannot do
alone. Sc(ool counselors need your administrative leaders(ip and support. 9s active
supporters of t(e program, you can maGe a difference in t(e lives of all students.
P a g e | 32
9ppendi= 9
Guidance Curriculum
1vervie/
P a g e | 33
MI%%O+*I COMP*!>!%IA! G+I"AC! P*OG*AM
%T*A"%2 <IG I"!A% F COC!PT%
%T*A" P%. P!*%OA4 A" %OCIA4 "!A!4OPM!T
<IG I"!A. <S.". Understanding Self as an -ndividual and as a Member of Diverse Local and
Global Communities
Concepts: <S.".9. Self concept
<S.".&. &alancing life roles
<S.".C. CitiFens(ip and contribution /it(in a diverse community
<IG I"!A. <S.). -nteracting Eit( 1t(ers in Eays '(at %espect -ndividual and Group
Differences
Concepts: <S.).9. Wuality relations(ips
<S.).&. %espect for self and ot(ers
<S.).C. <ersonal responsibility in relations(ips
<IG I"!A. <S.@. 9pplying <ersonal Safety SGills and Coping Strategies
Concepts: <S.@.9. Safe and (ealt(y c(oices
<S.@.&. <ersonal safety of self and ot(ers
<S.@.C. Coping sGills
%T*A" A". ACA"!MIC "!A!4OPM!T
<IG I"!A. 9D.8. 9pplying SGills Needed for !ducational 9c(ievement
Concepts. 9D.8.9. Lifelong learning
9D.8.&. Self-management for educational ac(ievement
<IG I"!A. 9D.7. 9pplying t(e SGills of 'ransitioning &et/een !ducational Levels
Concept. 9D.7.9. 'ransitions
<IG I"!A. 9D ;. Developing and Monitoring !ducational <lans of Study
Concept. 9D.;.9. !ducational <lanning for Lifelong Learning
%T*A" C". CA*!!* "!A!4OPM!T
<IG I"!A. CD.?. 9pplying Career !=ploration and <lanning SGills in t(e 9c(ievement of Life
Career Goals
Concepts. CD.?.9. -ntegration of self Gno/ledge into life and career
planning
CD.?.&. 9daptation to /orld of /orG c(ange
CD.?.C. %espect for all /orG
<IG I"!A. CD $. Jno/ing E(ere and Qo/ to 1btain -nformation about t(e Eorld of EorG
and <ostsecondary 'raining5!ducation
Concepts. CD.$.9. Career decision maGing
CD.$.&. !ducation and Career %e.uirements
<IG I"!A. CD.#. 9pplying !mployment %eadiness SGills and t(e SGills for 1n-'(e-0ob
Success
Concepts. CD.#.9. <ersonal sGills for Iob success
CD.#.&. 0ob seeGing sGills
Note: Grade Level !=pectations can be accessed from t(e Guidance e-Learning Center
P a g e | 34
9ppendi= &
Standards and Criteria for Developing
<rofessional Sc(ool Counselor 0ob
Descriptions
,his appendix provides cri!eria #or developing meaning#ul 0o$
descrip!ions a! !he local level. ,he cri!eria are $ased on !he ac!ual
.or- school counselors should per#orm in carr%ing ou! !heir 0o$ !o
#ull% implemen! a comprehensive guidance and counseling
program.
P a g e | 35
'# The school counselor implements the Guidance and Counseling Curriculum
Component through the effective use of instructional s)ills and planning#
Criterion ': '(e sc(ool counselor teac(es guidance and counseling units effectively.
Criterion 7: '(e sc(ool counselor encourages staff involvement to ensure t(e effective
implementation of t(e guidance and counseling curriculum.
29 The school counselor implements the Individual %tudent Panning Component by
guiding individual and groups of students and their parents through the development2
implementation and annual review of Personal Plans of %tudy#
Criterion 8. '(e sc(ool counselor, in collaboration /it( parents, (elps students
establis( goals and develop and use planning sGills.
Criterion 9. '(e sc(ool counselor utiliFes a variety of assessment data and provides
accurate and appropriate interpretation of t(e data t(at assist students in t(e
development of appropriate educational and career plans.
8# The school counselor implements the *esponsive %ervices Component through the
effective use of individual and small group counseling2 consultation2 and referral s)ills#
Criterion :. '(e sc(ool counselor counsels individual students and small groups of
students /it( identified needs5concerns.
Criterion ;. '(e sc(ool counselor consults effectively /it( parents, teac(ers,
administrators and ot(er relevant individuals.
Criterion @. '(e sc(ool counselor implements an effective referral process in
collaboration /it( parents, administrators, teac(ers, and ot(er sc(ool
personnel.
9# The school counselor implements the %ystem %upport Component through effective
guidance and counseling program management and support for other educational
programs#
Criterion D. '(e sc(ool counselor implements and evaluates a compre(ensive and
balanced guidance and counseling program in collaboration /it( sc(ool
staff.
Criterion E. '(e sc(ool counselor provides support for ot(er sc(ool programs
:# The school counselor uses professional communication and interaction with the school
community#
Criterion '/. '(e sc(ool counselor demonstrates positive interpersonal relations /it(
students.
Criterion ''. '(e sc(ool counselor demonstrates positive interpersonal relations /it(
educational staff.
Criterion '7. '(e sc(ool counselor demonstrates positive interpersonal relations /it(
parents5patrons.
P a g e | 36
;# The school counselor fulfills professional responsibilities#
Criterion '8. '(e sc(ool counselor demonstrates a commitment to ongoing professional
gro/t(.
Criterion '9. '(e sc(ool counselor possesses professional and responsible /orG (abits.
Criterion ':. '(e sc(ool counselor follo/s t(e professionCs et(ical and legal standards
and guidelines, as /ell as promotes cultural diversity and inclusivity in
sc(ool policy and interpersonal relations(ips.
P a g e | 3
9ppendi= C
%eassignment of duties t(at are barriers to
implementing a compre(ensive guidance
and counseling programs
P a g e | 3!
Surveys (ave s(o/n t(at sc(ool counselors are still being assigned duties t(at are barriers to
implementation. !=amples of suc( duties are categoriFed belo/ as supervisory, clerical,
special programs and services, and administrative. '(ese activities, alt(oug( important in
t(e life of a sc(ool, need to be reassigned so t(at sc(ool counselors can devote t(eir time to
fully implementing t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
&udget constraints in many districts may preclude t(e instantaneous reassignment of t(ese
duties. 'o ensure t(at t(e transition to a fully implemented compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program is made systematically, (o/ever, it is critical t(at a /ritten displacement
plan is developed as a part of t(e overall implementation plan presented to t(e board of
education. 9 state/ide tasG force of Missouri administrators and sc(ool counselors
developed t(e ideas t(at follo/ for reassignment consideration. '(ey identified barriers to
implmentation, grouped t(em into four categories, and t(en listed possible /ays to (andle
t(e reassignment of t(em.
"upervisor% Du!ies
9. Coordinating and monitoring sc(ool assemblies
'(is is an administrative function and is not vie/ed as a part of guidance and
counseling program responsibilities.
&. Qall duty, cafeteria supervision, bus loading and unloading supervision, and restroom
supervision
'(ese duties could be s(ared e.ually among all staff.
'eac(ers could be assigned to some of t(ese duties as a regular part of t(eir
sc(edules.
4olunteers could assist /it( some of t(ese tasGs.
C. C(aperoning sc(ool functions and at(letic event supervision
'(ese duties could be s(ared among t(e staff.
&ooster club members could assist staff /it( some of t(e at(letic events.
Sc(ool staff could be paid e=tra to taGe on c(aperoning duties.
D. Substitute teac(ing
Sc(ool counselors are not substitute teac(ers. 1n an occasional basis, (o/ever,
sc(ool counselors could conduct guidance and counseling learning activities,
particularly if teac(er absences are Gno/n in advance.
Clerical Du!ies
9. Selling lunc( ticGets
1ffice support staff or cafeteria staff s(ould do t(is.
&. Collecting and mailing out progress reports and deficiency notices
Sorting, stuffing, and mailing are clerical5secretarial functions. 9n individual
could be (ired on a temporary basis to (andle sorting, stuffing, and mailing.
Conferences /it( students regarding progress reports are sc(ool staff functions,
/(ic( includes but s(ould not be limited to sc(ool counselors.
C. Maintaining permanent records and (andling transcripts
P a g e | 3"
<osting grades and test labels is a clerical duty. <art-time (elp could be (ired if a
full-time person is not available to (andle t(ese functions.
D. Monitoring attendance
9ccounting for daily attendance is not a guidance and counseling programCs
function. Qo/ever, it is appropriate for sc(ool counselors to meet /it( students
/(o (ave c(ronic attendance problems.
Computer soft/are pacGages are available to monitor attendance in a very
efficient and effective manner.
!. Calculating grade point averages 3G<9s:, class ranGs, or (onor rolls
Computer soft/are pacGages are available to efficiently and effectively perform
t(ese tasGs.
. Developing and updating t(e student (andbooG
'(is is an administrative function t(at t(e principal or assistant principal s(ould
perform.
G. Developing and updating course guides
Department c(airpersons 3teac(ing staff: (ave t(e responsibility for developing
course descriptions and course guides.
Q. Completing t(e paper/orG related to c(anging studentsC sc(edules
'(e paper/orG involved in c(anging sc(edules, balancing class loads, and
processing student sc(edule cards are clerical functions. -f full-time clerical
assistance is not available, part-time clerical5secretarial s(ould be (ired to (elp at
Gey times during t(e sc(ool year. 9 /ide array of computer soft/are is available
to (andle t(e sc(eduling process including sc(edule c(anges t(at can be
purc(ased to facilitate t(e completion of t(ese important activities.
"pecial Programs and "ervices
9. Sponsoring class clubs and special programs
Sponsors(ip of t(ese activities is a sc(ool staff function usually done on a
voluntary basis. Sc(ool counselors s(ould not be e=pected to assume any more
responsibility for t(ese programs t(an any ot(er person on t(e staff.
<rograms suc( as t(e Missouri Sc(olarsC 9cademy s(ould be t(e responsibility of
administrative personnel or a committee of sc(ool personnel.
&. Coordinating and administering t(e sc(ool testing program, /(ic( includes individual
testing
'(e overall coordination and administration of t(e sc(ool testing program are t(e
responsibilities of t(e administration.
%etired teac(ers could be (ired to (andle t(is responsibility.
Sc(ool personnel could collaborate to accomplis( t(e coordination and
administration of t(e sc(ool-testing program.
Sc(ool counselors assist in interpreting test data to teac(ers, administrators,
parents5guardians, and t(e community> (o/ever, t(ey s(ould not be responsible
for coordinating and administering t(e sc(ool-testing program.
Sc(ool counselors use test data /(en /orGing /it( students to (elp t(em monitor
and manage t(eir academic, personal5social, and career development.
Sc(ool psyc(ologists and sc(ool psyc(ological e=aminers are t(e professionals
/(o are .ualified to do individual testing.
P a g e | 40
C. Completing and managing -ndividual !ducation <lans 3-!<s: and meeting ot(er
special education re.uirements
Sc(ool counselors s(ould not function as case managers for students /it( special
needs.
Sc(ool counselors could be members of t(e team involved in t(e diagnostic
aspects of t(e -!<. Qo/ever, t(ey s(ould not be responsible for t(e development,
implementation, and monitoring of t(e -!< or t(e -ndividualiFed 4ocational
!ducation <lan unless t(ey are funded by special education or by vocational
education funds.
Sc(ool counselors could taGe part in staffings and conferences /(en appropriate
but s(ould not coordinate or c(air t(e staffings, conferences, or -!< meetings.
D. Completing and managing 7*8 <lans
9s /it( -!<Cs sc(ool counselors s(ould not function as t(e case manager for 7*8
plans, but s(ould be a part of t(e team /(en it is /arranted. '(is /ould occur
/(en a student on t(e caseload of a sc(ool counselor is in need of a 7*8 <lan.
Adminis!ra!ive Du!ies
9. Developing t(e master sc(edule
'(is is an administrative function. 9dministrators can seeG input from sc(ool
counselors, but it is t(eir responsibility to plan and develop t(e master sc(edule.
&. 9cting as t(e principal of t(e day
'(e sc(ool counselor s(ould not fill t(e role of acting principal.
%etired sc(ool administrators could be (ired for t(is purpose.
'(is responsibility could be assigned to teac(ers /(o (ave administrative
certification.
'(e superintendent or ot(er central office administrators could be called upon to
act as principal for t(e day.
C. 9dministering discipline
9dministering discipline and assessing conse.uences for student actions are
administrative functions, not guidance and counseling functions. Qo/ever, it is
appropriate for sc(ool counselors to meet /it( students /(o (ave c(ronic
discipline problems.
D. Managing sc(edule c(anges
Students /(o desire or need to (ave t(eir sc(edules revised are encouraged to
first discuss t(e c(anges /it( t(e sc(ool counselor. '(e mec(anics related to t(is
process s(ould be (andled t(roug( administrative c(annels. Muc( of t(e process
is clerical in nature. -t is t(e responsibility of t(e administration to see t(at class
siFes are appropriate and t(at sufficient staff members are available to
accommodate studentsC needs.
P a g e | 41
9ppendi= D
Missouri Sc(ool &oard 9ssociation
Model Guidance and Counseling <olicy
M-SS1U%- SCQ11L &19%D 9SS1C-9'-1N
<1L-CA GU-D!L-N!S 1%
P a g e | 42
S'UD!N' GU-D9NC! 9ND C1UNS!L-NG <%1G%9M
'(e districtMs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program provides important benefits to all
students at all grade levels by addressing t(eir personal, social, academic and career development
needs. '(e program is implemented in eac( attendance area and is considered an integral part of eac(
sc(oolCs educational program. -t is implemented by certified sc(ool counselors /it( t(e support of
teac(ers, administrators and students. '(e guidance and counseling program /ill ad(ere to t(e
standards of t(e Missouri Compre(ensive Guidance and Counseling <rogram and strive to meet t(e
program goals in eac( of t(e follo/ing areas:
Personal and %ocial "evelopment
". 9ssist students in gaining an understanding of self as an individual and as a member of
diverse local and global communities by emp(asiFing Gno/ledge t(at leads to t(e
recognition and understanding of t(e interrelations(ip of t(oug(ts, feelings and actions
in studentsM daily lives.
). <rovide students /it( a solid foundation for interacting /it( ot(ers in /ays t(at respect
individual and group differences.
@. 9id students in learning to apply p(ysical and psyc(ological safety and promoting t(e
studentMs ability to advocate for (im- or (erself.
Academic "evelopment
". Guide students to applying t(e sGills needed for educational ac(ievement by focusing on
self-management, study and test-taGing sGills.
). 'eac( students sGills to aid t(em as t(ey transition bet/een grade levels or sc(ools.
@. ocus on developing and monitoring personal education plans, emp(asiFing t(e
understanding, Gno/ledge and sGills students need to develop meaningful personal plans
of study. <ersonal <lans of Study /ill be initiated for all students no later t(an eig(t(
grade.
Career "evelopment
". !nable students to apply career e=ploration and planning sGills in t(e ac(ievement of life
career goals.
). !ducate students about /(ere and (o/ to obtain information about t(e /orld of /orG
and postsecondary training and education.
@. <rovide students t(e opportunity to learn employment readiness sGills and sGills for on-
t(e-Iob success, including responsibility, dependability, punctuality, integrity, self-
management and effort.
P a g e | 43
9ppendi= !
&eyond &arriers to Solutions:
9ctions '(at <romote <rogress
P a g e | 44
&!A1ND &9%%-!%S '1 S1LU'-1NS:
9C'-1NS 'Q9' <%1M1'! <%1G%!SS
!. 2arrier- *chool Counselors3 4ob .esponsibilities Do 5ot Allow 0or "heir
!667 /nvolvement in the Guidance and Counseling Program.
%ole (as not been defined.
%ole is ambiguous> too many people demand sc(ool counselorCs time.
Compre(ensive guidance and counseling program is add-on to all ot(er
duties.
Duties t(at present barriers to implementation are still assigned to t(e
counselor.
Compre(ensive guidance and counseling program (as been added, but
not(ing (as been taGen a/ay.
'(ere is no time to plan for program development, implementation,
evaluation, and en(ancement.
'o /(om /ould administrative tasGs be assignedS 9dministrators, too, feel
overloaded.
Possible *olutions-
'ime and tasG analysis /ill put in KblacG and /(iteL e=actly (o/ counselors
are spending t(eir time.
Develop a Iob description /it( t(e principal and5or district-level
administration> clarify times to be spent in eac( area of responsibility.
'(roug( t(e time and tasG analysis, identify barriers to implementation and
provide a report to t(e principal so (e or s(e is a/are of t(e actual time t(ese
taGe a/ay from t(e guidance and counseling program.
MaGe ot(ers a/are of barriers to implementation and /(at t(ey do to limit
t(e effectiveness of t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program and
t(e positive impact it can (ave on students.
EorG /it( t(e principal to prioritiFe responsibilities.
EorG /it( t(e advisory council and steering committee to identify alternative
means to address barriers to implementation.
'aGe control of your o/n time. %ule time> donCt let time rule you.
EorG out a /eeGly 5 mont(ly calendar> post and5or distribute to everyone.
9llot a specific time eac( day5/eeG for planning time> be protective of t(at
time.
P a g e | 45
EorG /it( t(e principal, t(e faculty, parents and t(e community to gain
support for removing barriers to implementation.
Set o/n priorities and communicate t(ese to ot(ers.
-dentify program priorities and /(at t(e counselor (as to do to reac( (is or
(er goals.
. 2arrier- 8ack of Administrative *upport
9dministrators do not understand compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program re.uirements.
9dministrators are apat(etic about t(e guidance and counseling program.
9dministrator adds responsibilities t(at act as barriers to implementation3e.g.,
substituting, recess duty, lunc( duty, computer, data entry, and responsibility
for master sc(edule:. '(ere is no Ktop-do/nL support for t(e program>
t(erefore, counselors (ave no real aut(ority to implement t(e full program.
9dministrator sees t(e counselorCs role as strictly responsive services.
Possible *olutions-
<rovide administrators /it( more information about t(e benefits of a
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program. %elate its benefits to t(e
Missouri Sc(ool -mprovement <rogram 3MS-<: and to t(e Sc(ool
-mprovement <lan 3CS-<:
-nvite administrators to attend state /orGs(ops.
%e.uire administrators to be involved in planning. Communicate needs to
administrators in proactive /ays.
&e sure to report successes along /it( Iustification for additional resources.
&e assertive enoug( to set priorities and discuss t(ese /it( administrators.
EorG to c(ange administratorsC vie/ of counselorsC role.
!ducate superintendent to t(e need for KdirectivesL from t(at level.
EorG for closer communication bet/een administrator5counselor5state.
MaGe sure all administrators (ave a copy of t(e 9dministratorsC Guide.
9. 2arrier- Counselor1to1*tudent .atio /s "oo ,igh
'oo many buildings may be assigned at elementary level.
-t is unrealistic to e=pect muc( /it( ":",7** 3or even ":7**: ratio.
'(e (ig( elementary caseload allo/s for little more t(an crisis counseling.
Possible solutions-
&ecome politically active and /orG for reduction in t(e ratio.
Solicit teac(ers to become involved in conducting activities in t(e classroom.
Develop a peer (elpers program.
Use (omeroom period as a /ay to reac( large groups of students.
P a g e | 46
Develop a student assistance program to (elp /it( students /(o re.uire a
great deal of support.
-dentify /ays t(e drug-free sc(ools grants could be used to provide additional
(elp.
Qire clerical staff to do routine clerical tasGs to free t(e counselor to /orG
/it( more students.
Conduct more small- and large-group activities.
Use volunteers to perform routine tasGs 3as appropriate:.
:. 2arrier- ;arious Groups .esist the Program.
N1'!: t(is barrier taGes many forms> its symptoms can be seen in eac( of t(e
ot(er barriers. %esistance is a natural part of c(ange and, or a degree, is
present in every person. -t /ill be t(e tasG of t(e guidance and counseling
program steering committee to recogniFe and understand t(e overt and covert
resistance t(at emerges and to address it in a positive /ay.
Staff is resistant to c(ange.
Some parents are resistant to some of t(e topics covered in t(e guidance and
counseling curriculum.
Possible *olutions to *taff .esistance-
!ducate t(e sc(ool staff regarding reasons for c(ange in sc(ool counselorCs
role. -nclude information about sc(ool counselorsC responsibilities, t(e
benefits of program for students and teac(ers and t(e and relations(ip of t(e
guidance and counseling grade level e=pectations to core competencies and
Gey sGills in t(e academic and career and tec(nical education curriculum
areas.
Solicit (elp of administrators in communicating e=pectations for staff
involvement in compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
&e persistent. C(anges in attitude taGe time and patience.
Conduct professional development activities.
-nvolve faculty on steering and advisory committees.
"o Counselors3 .esistance-
-mplement gradually> give counselors opportunity to feel comfortable in ne/
role.
-dentify t(e specific reasons for resistance and /orG to overcome t(em.
Consider KdifferentialL staffing if t(ere is more t(an one counselor. 1ne
counselor could be responsible for classroom guidance and counseling and
anot(er could be responsible for individual student planning, or responsive
services, etc.
P a g e | 4
!mp(asiFe t(e district commitment to t(e compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program and t(e e=pectation t(at sc(ool counselors /ill
implement t(e program.
"o Parent'*pecial /nterest Group .esistance-
Jno/ your community and support base.
!ducate your community /it( numerous positive public relations activities.
9cGno/ledge resistant factions but donCt let resistance intimidate.
Gain endorsements from parent-teac(er-student organiFations.
Gain endorsement of community service groups.
-nvolve individuals /it( diverse vie/points on t(e advisory council and in
/orG groups.
Qold open forums to discuss t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling
program and its benefits to students.
MaGe materials readily available for revie/.
<. 2arrier- Classroom /nvolvement /nterferes $ith /mmediate .esponse to
Crises.
9dministration, teac(ers, and community (ave e=pectations t(at responsive
services are top priority.
<arents5students /(o mig(t come unannounced or in a crisis fear t(at sc(ool
counselors /ill be unavailable.
'(ere is a perception t(at t(e instructions in ,he Missouri Comprehensive
Guidance and Counseling Program Manual do not allo/ for fle=ibility in
responding to crises.
<arents e=pect service on demand.
Possible *olutions-
N1'!: '(e Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program
Manual allo/s for counselors to respond to studentsC needs as appropriate for
t(e local district. '(e critical factor is balance bet/een responsive services
and t(e ot(er programmatic components.
Use time and tasG analysis to get a picture of t(e actual number, t(e time of
day, and types of crises to /(ic( sc(ool counselors responds eac( day5/eeG.
Use t(is information to sc(edule open office (ours.
9dopt a sc(ool policy, based on t(e districtCs p(ilosop(y of guidance and
counseling for all students, regarding t(e sc(ool counselorCs responsibility for
more t(an crisis cases. 3'(is could be a part of t(e sc(ool counselorCs Iob
description.:
'aGe control of time> include specific times for drop-ins in t(e sc(ool
counselorCs sc(edule> publiciFe times to all 3including parents:.
P a g e | 4!
'rain ot(ers in evaluating severity of crises and (o/ to deal /it( situations
temporarily.
Develop an efficient and responsive message system so t(at teac(ers and
students aliGe can communicate a need to see a sc(ool counselor immediately
or on s(ort notice.
-nstitute a peer mediation5conflict resolution program and a procedure for
activating t(e process 3at appropriate times: if t(e counselor is not available
immediately.
-n multiple-counselor sc(ools, arrange sc(edules so t(at someone is al/ays
on call for emergency5crisis situations. <ublis( sc(edule.
=. 2arrier- 8ack of .esources
No budget is provided.
Limited resource materials are provided.
Space does not allo/ privacy> t(ere is no room for resources and not enoug(
space for small-group /orG.
Space allocation for t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program is
not a priority.
'(ere is no clerical support for suc( tasGs as typing, record Geeping, and
filing.
Possible *olutions-
0or 2udget-
!=plore possibilities of alternative funding for services and positions. or
e=ample, federal and state monies (ave been used to provide specific services
for eligible students.
Use business partners as a source for support and resources> solicit funds
from local businesses.
EorG /it( administrators to maGe t(e compre(ensive guidance and
counseling program a part of t(e district and5or building budgeting priorities
and processes
-ncrease public a/areness of t(e resource needs of education. &ecome
politically active> conduct more advocacy activities /it( local sc(ool boards
and t(e state legislature regarding funding needs.
0or >aterials-
Use t(e Guidance e-Learning Center at ///.mcce.org. ree materials are
available.
Use Missouri Connections as a resource> -t is free tool to assist students in
t(eir educational and career planning.
SeeG free and ine=pensive materials.
P a g e | 4"
Net/orG and s(are materials /it( ot(er sc(ool counselors by attending,
district, and state Missouri Sc(ool Counselor 9ssociation 3MSC9:
conferences, and state sponsored professional development /orGs(ops.
0or *pace-
Go on a Kspace /alG.L LooG for places t(at could be rearranged and used for
various purposes. 1ne sc(ool counselor found a staircase landing t(at could
be used to display materials> anot(er found t(e end of a (all/ay to use as a
small-group space.
%earrange e=isting space.
0or Professional Development-
Net/orG /it( counselors in ot(er districts, visit t(eir sc(ools, and initiate
KS(are Days.L
9ttend district and state MSC9 meetings and conferences. 9sG for time to
discuss t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
Develop an area support group of counselors /(o are implementing t(e
program.
Start a support group for teac(ers> plan a KS(are DayL or special event for
teac(ers.
Ne/ counselors are encouraged to participate in t(e state sponsored
mentoring program for sc(ool counselors.
0or Clerical *upport-
Use volunteers /(en appropriate.
Use KGreen '(umbL or Koster Grandparent <rogramL participants.
Use student aides to ans/er t(e p(one, do non-confidential filing, and
manage t(e resource library.
?. 2arriers& *pecial *ervices Programs "ake "ime Away 0rom the
Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program.
-ncreased demands of special services Geep counselors from being able to
fully implement t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
Sc(ool counselors are responsible for all parent contacts.
Sc(ool Counselors coordinate t(e -!< and5or 7*8 processes.
Possible *olutions-
%efer to Section 4 of t(e Manual for complete information concerning
/orGing /it( students /it( special needs.
@. 2arrier- *ome "eachers Are .esistant to .elinAuishing "ime for Classroom
Guidance and Counseling Activities.
Some teac(ers resent time lost from instruction due to mandated state-/ide
testing.
P a g e | 50
'(ere is resistance to adding guidance and counseling to t(e core curriculum
3especially at t(e (ig( sc(ool level:.
'(e core curriculum is so full t(at sc(ool counselors are unable to do
classroom guidance and counseling activities.
'eac(ers see counselor-led classroom guidance and counseling learning
activities as a KbreaG timeL for t(em.
Possible *olutions-
!ducate teac(ers t(roug( in-service and advocacy activities about t(e
compre(ensive guidance and counseling program and t(eir role in it.
!mp(asiFe t(e positives of t(e developmental and preventative approac( to
guidance and counseling.
EorG /it( t(ose /(o are eager to be involved. <ubliciFe successes and
recogniFe classroom teac(ersC contributions.
SeeG administrative support and encouragement for classroom guidance and
counseling.
Use t(e <rior-<roper-<lanning 3<<%: approac(:
Sc(edule time /it( teac(ers early in t(e sc(ool year.
<ublis( a sc(edule and sticG to it.
<lan meaningful classroom presentations.
EorG /it( classroom teac(ers to plan lessons t(at connect guidance and
counseling GL!s to subIect matter GL!s. !stablis( a spirit of cooperation
and common purpose t(roug( one-to-one contacts /it( teac(ers.
!ncourage teac(ers to remain in t(e classrooms /(en sc(ool counselors
present guidance and counseling activities. or e=ample, teac(ers are present
during t(e sc(ool counselorCs lesson enabling t(em to follo/ t(roug( /it(
t(ese concepts in t(eir future /orG /it( students
B. 2arrier- 8ack of Communication
'(ere is a lacG of communication concerning t(e compre(ensive guidance
and counseling program among buildings in t(e district.
'(ere is a lacG of staff understanding about compre(ensive guidance and
counseling programs.
'(ere is an e=isting mind-set about (o/ guidance and counseling is defined
3i.e., responsive services only: and itCs difficult to overcome.
'(e community doesnCt see guidance and counseling as important.
'(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program is unclear to
community and staff.
Possible solutions-
P a g e | 51
Stage a media blitF in t(e sc(ool and t(e community, regarding t(e
importance of t(e contribution to student success of t(e compre(ensive
guidance and counseling program.
<romote t(e idea of program o/ners(ip by involving many groups in eac(
p(ase of t(e program development process
MaGe presentations to various parent5teac(er5business5service groups. 1btain
t(eir endorsement of t(e program along /it( permission to use t(eir
endorsement in future publicity.
MaGe t(e program visible /it(in t(e community.
-nclude information about t(e program in e=isting district ne/sletters and
patron communication mec(anisms.
Develop a compre(ensive guidance and counseling program ne/sletter and
/ebsite reporting t(e activities of t(e program.
%eeducate various groups about t(e c(anging sc(ool counselorCs role and t(e
benefits of t(e compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.
Jeep administrators informed about program activities so t(ey are able to
respond to .uestions from parents and t(e community.
Use t(e advisory council to develop /ays to publiciFe t(e program.
9ppoint someone to coordinate internal communications. %otate
responsibility if t(ere is not a KpaidL coordinator.
Develop an in-(ouse communication ve(icle 3e.g., bulletins, ne/sletter for
teac(ers, /ebsite:.
&ecome an advocate for t(e program.
'(e participants presented t(ese ideas as cited (ere. '(ey are e=amples of t(e /ay people
can /orG toget(er to develop positive solutions to t(e barriers t(at may occur. '(ese ideas
and t(e concept of t(e team approac( to barrier breaGing /ill be useful in local planning.
EorGing toget(er to meet t(e c(allenges /ill give participants a greater sense of o/ners(ip
of t(e districtCs compre(ensive guidance and counseling program.