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Figure 10: NICe Making the Connections

Nordic Innovation Centre - Leading the Pan-Nordic Approach


Nordic Innovation Centre (NICe) is the Nordic Council of Ministe(s operating instrument for promoting an innovative, competilive and knowledge-intensive Nordic business
sector.
Nordic Innovation Cenlre is an important partner in Nordic knowledge plalforms within the areas of innovalion pOlicy, Creative Industries, biolechnology, food safety and
innovative building & construction. It is based on the premise that building common Nordic knowledge markets are vital to all Nordic business life, enabling Ihe Region to
compete in a global markel which is becoming more and more knowledge driven (see: www.nordicinnovation.net).
The tolal project portfolio of the Nordic Innovation Centre consists of approll:imately 120 ongoing projects and networks, plus many completed projects. This indudes 6 ongoing
projects focusing on developing the Creative Industries in the Nordic (and Baltic) Region:
Experience Design in City Tourism: This
project wants to improve the tourists
in the Nordic & Ballic cilies. The
design ell:pefiences will be analysed relating to
how the tourists themselves dosign their own
ell:periences. The results can improve the
deSign of city tourist ell:periences, and help the
cities meet the and behaviour of
the tourists.
A penny for your thoughts: Presently
there are a series of asymmetries that
block effective communication between
potential investors and recipients. The
project aims at building a bridge between
these by producing a guidebook to the
investment process in CI with a focus on
Design.
CSR-driven innovation: Combining design
and business in a profitable and sustainable
way, this project supports the (unused)
potentiat amongst Nordic SMEs 10 combine
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR),
design, innovation and growth.
Creati ve Connector
Projects
Mobile learning environments (MLE): The
MLE project will ell:plore the possible use of
mobile or pervasive learning games in schools
and educational environments of today and
tomorrow. It aims to deliver recommendations
about platforms. applications and business
development.
"
Creative Industries Development Centre:
The Nordic Batlic project seeks to outline the
measures most suited for regional
development of creative industries in Nordic
countries. The project will eKplore the
possibilities for a Nordic model for Creative
Industries development.
Nordic Serious Games (NSG): Nordic
countries have versatile ell:pertise for cross,
sector ell:cellence in the emergi ng field of
Serious Games. This project aims at uniting
and strengthening the Nordic serious
games industry with various coll aborative
actions for raising Nordic countries in the
forefront of the field.
The Creative Directions Framework neatly summarises the key opportunities and
chall enges for Creative Industries development in the Nordic Region. It does so by
articulating how a coordi nated, connecting approach at a Regional level will not only
add value to nati onal and local initiatives, but stimulate knowl edge development and
innovation, drive sector growth and enhance competitiveness for creative
businesses. With many creative busi nesses looking to the Nordic Region as the
preferred unit of exchange, partnership and trade; then it is important that policy-
makers do the same while all owing for the heal th though occasionally fierce
competitiveness between the Nordic nations.
3. Summarising the Key Issues and Opportunities -
the Nordic Creative Economy
~ t seems we are not lacking ideas in innovation and creativity. What is lacking is
giving them a l i f e ~ (Icelandic consultee).
In each Nordic nation, innovati on is prioritised as the lifeblood of the knowledge
economy. The same value is not always placed upon creativity - either in terms of
the commercialisation of creativity (the Creati ve Industri es) or the added value that
creativity brings (from convergence to creative place-making). There are many
excellent Creative Industries projects and programmes but they lack an overarching
policy framework that coordinates activity and maximises connectivity to build
markets, exchange knowledge and generate economies and effi ciencies of scale.
The Nordic Regian has an impressive creative asset base, but this is not being
supported and exploited to maximum effect.
There are many examples of high performance and creative excellence in the Nordic
Region. For example, Sweden and Finland top the Euro-Technology Index, ranking
just slightly behind the United States; and both outperform the US on the R&D Index,
spending 3.70 percent and 3.30 percent of GPO on research and development
compared to 2.62 percent for the United States. Yet these are small economies wi th
comparably small overall investments in R&D: they lack the scale to competitively
broaden their research base, with innovation and creativity explored on a relatively
narrow footprint. With collective, coordinated action across the Nordic Regi on, this
footprint is immediately expanded.
This Section introduces the key 'pressure points' of the Creative Industries sector in
the Nordic Regi on where a pan-Nordic approach will have the most positive impact.
For the Nordic Region to operate as a high growth, competitive, global leader in the
creative economy, the development of a highly connected fabric of creative poli cy
and infrastructure is required. If the Nordic region is to retain its long-held
competitive advantage in creativity. it needs to reposition itself as a knowledge
broker and connector for the global creative economy, using its collective
knowledge and intelligence to and build effective global creative partnerships
and trading relationships. Figure 11 below sets out an overview of the current
sector profile, with each opportunity focused through a pan-Nordic lens.
3.1 Drivers for Growth in the Nordic Creative Industries
The Creative Industries in the Nordic Region depends on multiple drivers for its
growth and sustainability. They relate to issues of:
42
Demand: sector growth is a direct outcome of a more educated, discerning
and prosperous population. Factors such as the early exposure to culture and
'inspiration" and a society where aspirational goods are those that are
personalised, distinctive and multifariously gratifying; provide the 'demand
climate' for a strong Creative Industries seclor. There are few places in the
world where this is as advanced as in the Nordic Region, yet by country, due
to the small size of markets, demand is low. Proportionately there is plenty of
ability to pay, but payment tends to leak to supply from other parts of the
world, and it certai nly doesn't prioritise supply from other Nordic countries.
Notionally therefore, opportunities exist to nurture demand for Nordic goods
from domestic markets as a priority above goods from other parts of the world.
Such 'Nordic demand for the Nordic' can come from mainstream consumer
markets, and from smarter state procurement for creative goods and services,
and from businesses in other industries for which the importance of creative
services (such as design) is increasingly recognized.
Learning and Skills: the Creative Industries needs a highly skilled workforce
and this it has in abundance in the Nordic Region. For example, high skills
levels positively influence the ability to adopt and exploit new technologies;
they are enablers for innovation; and they equip indi viduals with greater facility
to develop tacit skills. This is a real strength of the Nordic Region. However,
high technical and academic skills levels have not historically been
underpinned by high skills levels in entrepreneurialism. business management,
and finance. In the Nordic region, as in many places, Creative businesses too
often lack the skill s and know-how to reali ze the commercial value of their
ideas. Thi s is due to a mix of structural and cultural factors: the former relates
to the long-term under-provision of management and business training in ' art
school' contexts; and the latter relates to a resistance from many creative
people to commercia lise their ideas or to cross other boundaries such as cede
some control 10 investors or management partners. To maximize the value of
the enormous technical know-how and innovation endeavor of the Nordic
region requires far greater attention to mixing creative and business
disciplines, developing new boundary-crossing collaborations (e.g. between
technologists and content providers; scientists and artists). and capilalizing on
the uncommon ground of core general education and induslryspecific skills
needs.
"
(J n or den
Figure 11 : Creative Industries SWOT for t he Nordic Region
, .
Proportionately high levels of research and
, .
Inadequate evidence and intelligence base for the
10
development investment Creative Industries
10
Strengths
2. Global teaders in tCT penetration and take-up 2. A fragmented policy landscape - with duplication and
Weaknesses
3. Creative approaches to educalion - e.g. work-based
low levels of connectivityfcoordination
learning 3. Underdeveloped entrepreneurial skills - creativity is
4. Excellent models of incubation and cluster
not effectively commercialised
development, often with a cross-disdplinary focus 4. Distance and dimate - leads to a challenging
5. Proportionately large markets - strong demand for
economy at the periphery
creative products and services 5. Insufficient interdisciplinary research, with innovation
6. Strong investment and commitment to cultural
and creativity too disconnected
infrastructure 6. Small domestic markets
7. Social cohesion and tolerance: high quality of life 7. Under-exploited global markets
8. Design as a specialist sector and a driver of 8. Other than with 'Scandinavian Design', an under-
competitiveness defined profile at a gtobal scale, lacking a strong
9. Cultural planning and creative-place-building sits at the
'creative brand'
heart of civic and economic development agendas 9. The increasingly diverse population is under-utilised
10. The IPR & taxation landscape is relatively coherent.
as a market and creative asset
10. Relatively small cities:: low local economies of scale.
, .
To grow domestic markets - e.g. products and services
, .
The weak and under-coordinated evidence base
10
for non-Creative Industries businesses means that the Creative Industries does not have the 10
Opportuniti es
2. To grow global markets through a joint Nordic offer
profile and support it requi res Threats
3. To develop enlrepreneurialism: creativity:: business
2. Emergent economies become creative powerhouses
4. To increase the growth of scalable creative businesses
3. Low in-migration from the 'global creative class' '" tess
5. To maximize the diversity advantage of the population
vitality in the Nordic region
6. To develop interdisciplinary approaches to research,
4. High costs & low entrepreneurialism squeeze growth
networking and clusters
5. Creativity and innovation are under-connected
7. To enhance theoretical and practical education, and
6. Local and Regional interests are not aligned
research - building on existing strengths 7. Pan-Nordic approach nallens importanllocal
8. To grow lhe knowledge economy through creative
differences
place-building 8. Cultural planning is 100 instructive and inflexible
9. To advance knowledge exchange through networking 9. Diverse communities remain at the margins
10. To be a global creative connector through the above. 10. Complacency- where Is the crisis?
"
Peopl e and Partnerships: the Nordic Region has an increasingly diverse
population, yet the Creative Industries remains predominantly white.
Furthermore, very settled and established approaches to learning and skills in
each Nordic country introduce a relatively uniform, well-educated workforce.
Without diversity - be it ethnic, cultural, or in terms of skills - it is likely that
opportunities will be pursued uniformly and problems left unsolved exactly
because of this uniformity. By providing opportunities for diverse communities
to enter the Creative Industries, new supply and demand is immediately
nurtured that wi ll introduce new ways of seeing and new mechanisms for
pursuing opportunities and solving problems. Similarly, by working collectively,
across the Nordic Region, a greater diversity of perspectives and approaches
is accessed. Indeed, by encouraging diversity of entry, partnership and
approach, competitiveness is advanced because new ideas and techniques
provide the type of churn required for innovation. Moreover, more diversity in
people and partnerships will introduce the Nordic Region to creative
businesses and indivi duals seeking the positive challenge of engaging wi th
different perspectives in culture and business. Currently, the relatively diverse,
risk-taking, sometimes edgy dynamism of, say, London and New York, is more
attractive to such 'markets' than the relatively homogenous Creative Industries
sector of the Nordic Region.
Connections: Competitiveness in the Creative Industries requires knowledge
to be developed through collaborations that traverse boundaries - be they
sectoral, geographical, technological or cultural: "(N)o single firm can hope to
go it alone without mobilising outside e s o u r e s ~ (Work Foundation 2007
p.143). Networks, connectivity and collaboration are critical here - allowing for
risk-sharing, gaining access to new ideas and markets, pooling resources,
negotiating IPRs, and developing efficiencies. Though difficult to
operationalise, social and business networks are an absolute necessity for a
dynamic, innovative and growth-orientaled Creative Industries sector.
However, in the Nordic Region, they are 100 few, too narrowly delivered (e.g,
they do not easily cross sectoral boundaries), occaSionally too top-down (slate
directed), and in some cases too ill -defined. The most effective network
models in the Nordic Creative Economy are those which are driven from the
bottom-up in a local context. For example, clusters such as the Cable Factory
in Helsinki provide the proximity and 'face-time' required to develop networks
of trusting collaboration. By connecting successful local networks to digital
networks and trade fairs that operate across the Nordic Region, the above-
mentioned diversity (sectoral, loeational, cultural) is able to travel while being
underpinned by tangible, visible, local connections in the cluster.
Investi ng for Growth: The Nordic countries have each shown strong
commitment over a long period to investing in arts and culture as a public good
that is of intrinsic value in society as well as a generator of demand and supply
in the Creative Industries. The Region is also a world leader in providing a
mixed economy model for investing in creativity and innovation (utilising public,
private and third sectors); with multiple innovation funds, incubator projects
and very hi gh levels of research and development (although, arguably,
investment has overly focused on institutions and bui ldings rather than
people). Indeed, much of the success of the Creative Industries and wider
knowledge economy in the region can be attributed to a willi ngness to invest
and spi rit of exploration from the state. However, despite high growth in the
Creative Industries, businesses in the sector are widely perceived to miss out
on the opportunities to grow enjoyed by businesses in other 'knowledge
sectors'. In the Creative Industries, a mix of investment readiness and investor
"
readiness factors add to the already significant challenges facing small
businesses in attracting growth, development and project financing, especially
in terms of equity (rather than debt) investment (see Figure 12 below).
In thi s uncertain setting, Creative businesses in the Nordic Region struggle to present
the investment case to a market that finds greater comfort in 'lower risk' sectors and
activities. Of course, risk is defined by the level of available market intelligence and
an appreciation of business models. As has been shown, the evidence base for the
Creative Industries in the Nordic Region is underdeveloped and lacking in
coordination. Without a coordinated push to harmonise evidence and promote its
legitimacy, informational asymmetries will continue to undermine the investment
potential of the Creative Industries and thus diminish growth opportunities. Added to
this:
A high proportion of creative businesses do not deploy robust business
planning methods, they lack the management and entrepreneurial skills
required to make a business 'fly', and they show a marked lack of awareness of
investment opportunities (or the capacity to respond)
National efforts to establish investment funds targeting Creative Industries - e.g.
in Film - in the Nordic region have struggled due to a lack of confidence and
interest from institutional investors
The business models of certain Creative sub-sectors do not allow for the
effective management of risk. For example, sub-sectors that rely on 'hits' for
revenue cannot guarantee a hit - so the value of musi c and film is particularly
difficult to guarantee in advance of rel ease. Investment funds that manage a
portfolio of risks are more effective here; and these are likely to prosper where
the pool of investment propositions is deeper - i.e. across the Nordic region
rather than in a specific country
The plethora of targeted investment instruments - from project funds to venture
capital - make legibility of the investment landscape difficult for Creative
bUSinesses. Simplification and coordination is required at a Nordic level.
"
Fi gure 12: Barriers to Investi ng i n the Creative Industries 45
Investment Ready?
- Creative businesses (especially start-up and early stage businesses) too often lack essential 'investment
readiness' features, such as robust business plans, an acute awareness of markets, solid management
structures/expertise, existing capital, clear realisation of Intell ectual Property Rights (JPRs), and a track
record of high growth.
- Creative businesses are innovators, developing products and services for which there is not always a
proven market. Despite the success of the sector in developing new markets and thus growing year by
year, investment is not forthcoming.
- Creative Industries businesses are often 'information poor', lacking basic routes to market knowledge,
detai ls of available specialist support, and business planning guidelines.
- Many creative businesses lack an appreci ation that there may be finance opportunities for them and thus
consider higher and faster levels of business development beyond them. An artificial ceiling is thus placed
above Creative Industries businesses.
- Too many creative entrepreneurs consider investors (from both the private and public sectors) to be
'honour-bound' to invest in their idea or concept.
- Creative businesses often lack the specialist knowledge and expertise necessary to fulfill investment
criteria: the sector is not presenting itself as the 'invostment propOSition' that, as a high growth sector, it
surely is.
INFORMATIONAL
ASYMMETRIES
Investor Ready?
STRUCTURAL &
CULTURAL BARRIERS
TO INVESTMENT
- Established investor communi ties' are reluctant to invest in small and early stage creative businesses
due to a lack of knowledge of creative business growth potential and the inflexibility of current investment
criteria.
- Long-held perceptions remain of creative businesses as too 1ifestyle-orientated'. existing to support a
way of life for the practitioner rather than as a commercially-driven concern. That Creative Industries
businesses are often managed by highly skilled and entrepreneurial practitioners with commercial return a
prime objective, is under-recognised.
- Some Creative businesses that have developed a relationship with investor communities have presented
themselves as deserving of investment without attending to basic flaws in their business practice: investors
are right to expect the Creative Industries sector to develop more 'investor-friendly' approaches for
investment to take place.
- A lack of investor expertise reduces investor confidence, where a Creative Industries business will be
dismissed as falli ng short of investment-readiness regardless of the viabi li ty of the business.
- The structural criteria of existing funds are too inflexible to engage many creative businesses - e.g. the
amount of due diligence is disproportionately expensive for a business operating in a market for which lillie
intelligence exists; and minimum investments might be too large for some creative firms.
The private equity market in the Nordi c Region is rel atively well -developed, with
business angel communities parti cul arl y vibrant yet very risk averse. Wi th
multiple investment opportunities in extracti on and technology sectors, the
Creative Industries does not feature prominently on investment portfolios .
.. This draws heavily 00 work undertaken by Tom Fleming CrC!ative Consultancy for NESTA, 200): 'Forward Thinking
- New Solutions 10 Old Probtems: Investing in the Creative Industries'.
"
Connecting pools of investors through targeted network initiatives - offering
match-making and deal brokerage - can go some way towards rectifying this,
but only if underpinned by much improved sector evidence developed and
championed at a Regional level.
- Intellectual Property: It is copyright plus a mix of contractual elements that frame
Creative Industries business models. It is estimated that 70% of a typical company's
val ue is located through its intangible assets, compared with around 40% in the early
1980s
46
The successful identification, valuation, protection, (re)negotiation, and sale
of these assets is a prerequisite for creative busi ness development and growth. In an
increasingly digitised context, these processes are more challenging and fluid, with
processes of collaboration, appropriation and convergence hard to map and pol ice.
In the Nordic Region and elsewhere, time-honoured certainties such as a stri ctl y
delineated approach to protecting copyright, are chall enged by the free-play of a fil e-
shari ng economy and 'mash-up' cul ture that outstrips every attempt at regulation and
fall s prey to markets where piracy is the norm.
An additional concern is the under-development of assessment and value chain
models for the intangible assets of the Creative Industries. Without the
development of new business models and their articulation to investors, opportuniti es
to invest in and support the growth of the sector will be missed. A concerted pan-
Nordic approach is required to develop new creati ve business models and bui ld
relationshi ps with investors.
There is also a need to assess the extent to which illicit breaches of copyright are
undermining the performance of the Creative Industries sector and to which the
opportunities brought by new types of coll aboration and convergence are providing
the very boundary-crossing dynamic that the Creative Economy requires if it is to
retain and redefine its competitive edge. Critical here is establishing a balance that
encourages creative endeavour and allows creative businesses to engage
confidentl y with the technology and content 'at their finger-tips', while ensuring that
due reward is provided to content originators and key collaborators. This is as much
an issue of legal literacy as it is of legal frameworks: a culture of compliance
balanced with a culture of creati ve endeavour depends as much on enabling
creatives to confidentl y read the legal landscape as it does on regulation and
prohibition. Emergent schemes outside the Nordic Region such as 'Own It,,17 , the
specialist Creative Industri es IPR advice and information service in London, could be
adj usted to operate successfully in the Nordic Region - perhaps driven by the
Gothenburg-based Centre for Intellectual Property Studies
48
,
<6 Work Foundation 2007 .
., See: http://www.own-it.org!
'1/1 See: http://www.cip.chaimers.sef
' S

The Shifting Creative Landscape: Digitisation
Increasing digitisation will have a profound effect on all aspects of the way individuals produce and consume
culture In the Nordic Region and beyond. To grow businesses requires that creative people cross more
boundaries and are more entrepreneurial than ever before. Consumption and production are increasingly
confialed as one; nalions of demand and supply become blurred; and there are multiple new opportunities to
enter the market place, regardless of location 01 ' size', Key elements thaI innuence the transforming Creative
Economy 01 the Nordic region include:
- Mobile media: While the downloading of TV and film to hand-held devices such as mobile phones is still in its
relat ive infancy - certainly compared to music - in the future it seems dear that viewing habits will ailer as the
'screen on the wall' becomes just one of many ways that consumers enjoy TV and film. This Is likely to lead to
even greater personalisation of viewing habits and increasingly the creation of media specifically for viewing on
small screens.
- New platforms and personalisation: As computer processing power and broadband bandwidth grow, the
computer will playas central a role in peoples' viewing habits as it does do already for many in their listening
habits. One potential effect of this is that consumers will use the opporlunity provided by more choice to expand
their horizons. The 'Long Tail' theory contends that in a world of consumer choice not constrained by physical
distribution barriers there wilt be greater opportunity for niche players in a market place which is more diverse,
fragmented and open to new players.
- Expansion of wi-fi: Whereas 5 years ago Bryant Park in New York was a novelty and pioneer in offering free
internet access in a public space, many places now operate as free wi-fi zones, allowing foot-loose creative
entrepreneurs to operate nexibly, without so many sunk costs (e.g. standard 'workspace').
- Democratisation and consumer choice: The relationShip between cultural productions . be it of film, video, art
- and consumers is changing rapidly. Consumers are increasingly focused on the 'experience' of consumption of
cultural products, a trend highlighted by the recent explosion in the popularity of live music and live music
festivals. Digitisation is allowing consumers to interact with and personalise the nature of their experience in new
ways.
- Open source and open collaboration: New models of operation bas6{j around open source models, ones
which encourage collaborative approaches to creativity and innovation.
3.2 Connecting the Drivers: Pan-Nordic Priorities for a
Competitive Creative Industries sector
The Creative Industri es sector in the Nordic Region faces a set of challenges and
opportuni ties that vary by sub-sector and location but for which a set of shared issues
and thus priorities and actions can be identified. It is of course a sector that has a
different profile in each country. By way of illustration:
In Sweden, a small number of vertically integrated larger firms use their
position as suppliers of distribution services and a global brand to negotiate
value from smaller producers (many of which are based in-house); while at lhe
same lime, they invest enormously in R&D and operate as huge hatcheries for
the wider Creative Industries sector, constantly spinning-out well-managed,
growth orientated firms. Along these terms, Ikea and H&M are both stimulants
and depressants for the Creative Economy.
In Iceland, a tiny market requires creative firms to look immediately abroad,
where they trade on their remoteness (and to an extent their exoticisim) to
develop highly distinctive products and services that rely as much on foreign
supply-chains and labour as they do on foreign markets.
"
In Denmark, a well -managed, streamlined and coordinated policy framework
provides accessible support to a globally-facing Creative Industries sector that
still struggles to move significantl y from a culture that prizes creative integrity
and independence above growth. The intrinsic and value-adding role of
creativity is very much recognized and supported alongside mechanisms
designed to grow the sector; but the latter is not as successful as the former.
In Norway, a regional agenda heavily influences sector development agendas,
with creative cluster and place-building approaches being developed to
support a sector that is populated by very small businesses and is yet to
develop its market potential in non-creati ve industries and as a value-adder to
other industries (such as food and touri sm).
In Finland, a culture of experimentation, a commitment to innovation and
creativity, and a very disciplined approach to developing physical and digilal
infrastructure; keeps the nation in an ascendant position as a leading
knowledge economy. However, opportunities to 'scale-up' are increasingly
difficult in certain activities, such as in smaller video games companies. Here,
higher returns are only possible through investment from global publishers,
which will only provide attractive investment deals once the smaller companies
have the scale to negotiate favourable terms - for which they need investment.
The challenge of being a small company in a minority language environment in
an increasi ngl y globalised and large-firm led activity has never been so acule.
In certain activities, being small, marginal and independent represents the top
of the growth curve.
As introduced at the outset, there are 4 key themes that best articulate the key policy
challenges for the creative Industries in the Nordic Region. These are re-introduced
below in Figure 13:
Figure 13: Making Connections - A Nordic Approach
Entrepreneurialism &
Creativity
Building Creative
Places
Nordic Regional
Connectivity
Growing Creative
Businesses
Building Creative
Clusters
This Green Paper is to open up a policy debate about the drivers of the
Creative Industries in the Nordic Region, and to understand the opportunities
and challenges facing the sector. It is designed to help policy-makers recognise
the potential - and seriousness - of the Creative Economy; and identify ways to
support the Creative Industries in a more coordinated, connected way. It provides an
overview of the range of Creative Industries development issues across the Nordic
Region. It emphasises that there are multiple local and national variations in sector
50
profile; just as many issues are specific to each sub-sector of the Creative Industries.
However, its chief role is to highlight those paints of commonality and - mosl crucially
- those points of commonality for which a shared policy approach is both desired and
practical. Indeed, in a Region where many very similar pOlicies are underway,
opportunities exist to coordinate delivery more effectively, to share best practice, and
make the policy landscape more navigable to the user and efficient for the provider.
In a Region made up of small, open economies with common cultural histories; and
in a Region where its individual countries are viewed by the rest of the World as very
similar; there are pol itical and market reasons for a shared approach to Creative
Industries policy.
There are two main policy opportunities here:
To connect more effectively existing policy and action - e.g. to harmonise
data/evidence collection, establish Creative education standards that are
recognised across Ihe Region, and bui ld partnerships between local clusters.
To introduce new pan-Nordic policy and action - e.g. to establish a new pan-
Nordic data/evidence programme, introduce new pan-Nordic Creative learning
and skil ls programmes, and develop pan-Nordic Creative showcasing and
market development initiatives.
However, there is also a danger thai a 100 interventionist approach can be developed
- introducing coordi nation and connectivity where it is not needed. For example,
while there are some market reasons why a Norwegian video games company would
benefit from connecting with a similar company in Sweden: the most beneficial
connection would be with markets and partners on a Global level. The 'Nordic' should
not be forced upon globally facing Creative businesses.
Key pan-Nordic policy considerations are introduced below. These are followed in
Section 4 by a Nordic Creative Policy Matri x - which provides recommendations
for further consideration.
3.2.1 Entrepreneurialism and Creativity
In the Nordic Region, cultural and structural factors mean that Creative individuals
and businesses are in many cases lacking the entrepreneurialism required to ensure
their creativity is effectively managed and commercialised. Though more pronounced
in certain sub-sectors and locations, these are common to all of the Creative
Industries and are not exclusive to the Nordic Region. Factors include:
A cultural perspective that positions (indeed val ues) creative activity as a
'lifestyle' rather than business opportunity; and gives credibility to small niche
businesses that can offer a 'personal touch'
An education sector that has historically prized excellence in creativity but not
surrounded this with entrepreneurial and management support, or market
intelligence
An approach to creative learning where 'just in time knowledge' makes
entrepreneurial skills difficult to learn at pre-graduation level - it is only when
'out in the business world' that creative busi nesses realise their lack of
entrepreneurial training
51
Weak management teams, with an overemphasis on creativity and not the
commercialisation of that creativity
Low level appreciation of markets - with a heavy emphasis on narrowly
defined local markets (e.g. classic 'cultural consumers') rather than businesses
in other industries and global markets
Informational asymmetries - where IPR issues, an inaccessible investment
market and a compl ex business support market make accessing intelli gence
and support difficult
An overdependence on local and sub-sectoral networks, with under-
developed knowledgesharing across the Creative Industries and in other
localities: entrepreneurialism through knowledge exchange and partnership is
not developing as it might
The lack of diversity and labour market chum in the Creative Industries, which
dampens competitiveness and reduces the likeli hood of boundarycrossing
behaviour.
The policy implications here are complex, attending as they do to agendas in
education and business support.
Critical i s facilitating an entrepreneurial culture through education:
There needs to be greater understanding about Creative career paths in the
Creative economy for studenls from school age upwards. The key interface
here is through national and local initiatives: establishing creative business
schools and incubation programmes; exploring knowledge exchange as a
central premise for innovation and creativity to fl ourish; linki ng management
and busi ness students to Creative students; developing work-based learni ng
that positions students inside Creative SMEs; and providing specialist
business support pre-graduation (such as on IPRs, markets and business
planning).
However, an important role can also be played at a panNordic level:
establishing a Creative Entrepreneurialism campaign; developing cross
institutional cooperation between Creative education institutions and
programmes; introducing Creative student exchange programmes;
brokering industry to academy networks so that a fit for purpose supply of
graduates and ideas is facilitated; harmonising Creative qualifications to
encourage labour market mobility; and introducing an international student
recruitment programme to attract diverse global know/edge workers to the
region.
Also criti cal is developing an entrepreneurial culture through the provision of
speciali st business support:
The current business support offer is very fragmented and under-coordinated.
Also, support is often provided with an 'innovation focus' that neglects the
Creative Industri es market despite the interdependence of innovation and
creati vity for a competitive knowledge economy. The key interface here is
through local and national initiatives: connecting more effectively the existing
offer so that the support landscape is accessible and navigable to creative
businesses; introducing sector networks that connect creative busi nesses to
52
each other and to other sectors; and developing targeted business support
programmes in areas such as IPR management and market development.
However, an important role can also be played here at a pan-Nordic level:
establishing a Regional Creative Entrepreneurship Campaign; staging a
Creative Entrepreneurship Awards Programme; connecting the existing
creative business support offer through partnership initiatives and via an on-
line Creative Entrepreneurialism Portal; developing a coherent approach
to evidence collection and market intelligence; and delivering support on
a pan-Nordic level, with a Creative IPR Support Service a priority (see
below).
3.2.2 Growing Creative Businesses
In the Nordic Region, Creative businesses are in many cases not growing to their full
potential or as quickly as they might. This is linked to overall deficiencies in
entrepreneurialism and inflexible skills that in some cases aren't fit for purpose (see
above). However, it is also due to a mix of issues related to accessing markets and
market failure:
The domestic markets for Creative goods and services are small (though
proportionately large). This places enormous pressure on Creative businesses
to develop a committed local market that continues to buy locally (including an
increasing focus on establishing other sectors as major new markets for
creative goods and services); and to develop markets internationally
New markets are under-developed: thi s applies to other Nordic markets (which
are all ageing and increasingly affluent), global markets, and new types of
market such as other industries and the public sector. Knowledge of how to
access these markets and on what terms is not widely held
Knowledge of the legal landscape for Creative business development is under-
developed; with too few businesses able to identify the scalable value in their
business, articulate, protecUnegotiate and then sell. Informational asymmetries
persist, which perpetuates a risk averse culture for doing creative business,
reducing the likelihood of collaboration and experimentation
Informational asymmetries, under-developed management skills/capacity,
unorthodox business models, and a degree of market failure combine to
establish barriers to investment to early stage (and some more mature)
creative businesses. Thi s varies by location and sub-sector (for example, the
state-supported investment market for creative businesses is more advanced
in Denmark and Finland), but this is a widespread issue and one for which
there are opportunities for Regional responses (see below).
The policy implications here relate to improvi ng the supply of specialist support for
creative businesses and increasi ng the demand for creative goods and services.
Critical is establishing a coherent landscape of business support for growth-
orientated creative businesses:
This includes the introduction of accessible busi ness and management
support programmes that target scalable creative businesses (which
disproportionately position digital media at the heart of their business models).
These should be configured to accelerate creative businesses, surrounding
53
them with specialist IPR advice, management support, and coordinated
investment landscape that ensures appropriate investment is available at each
stage in business growth. For example, Kulturo is the Creative Industries
incubation, investment readi ness and investment vehicle of the Turku Science
Park in South-West Finl and. The Science Park offers over 200,000 sqm of
space and speciali st services for graduates from the 3 local universities -
University of Turku, Abo Akademi University and Turku School of Economics
and Business Administration. Creative graduates are signposted to Kulturo,
which has been given 'Centre of Expertise' status by the Finni sh Government,
which provides it with additional resources and, significantly, a type of 'quality
kite mark' . The Kulturo approach is to establish a comprehensive pre-
investment to high growth investment support and development service to
creative businesses, combi ning specialist support, advice, investment and
workspace. Thi s is conceptualised in terms of an ' investment tube' , cradling a
start-up business unti l it has the capacity and commercial partners to 'go it
alone,49.
An important policy role can be played here at a Nordic level. There are two
connected agendas for which a pan-Nordic approach would support growth
agendas. Firstly, a coordinated IPR advice and intelligence service,
operating as a Nordic-sponsored on-line portal with a set of local cluster
partners through which specialist IPR advice is provided, guides to legal
literacy in the Creative Industries are published, and new networks of
specialist supply (Creative Industries lawyers and specialists) are nurtured.
This has parallels with the Own It model in the UK. It would be most effective
at a Nordic level because it could work to harmonise IPR issueslknow/edge
and broker successful trading relationships between different firms across the
Region by providing specialist /egal support that allows, for example, cross-
territory contract and copyright issues to be negotiated.
Secondly, a coordinated investment map is required for the Nordic Region.
This would map the current investment landscape (state and private finance)
and make this visible and navigable to Creative businesses across the Region,
helping businesses to identify appropriate investment solutions. This would
operate as the development phase prior to launching two Significant
interventions: a pan-Nordic Creative Investment Fund - a dedicated equity
fund for growth-orientated Creative businesses that operates across a Nordic-
wide portfolio of creative businesses; and a Nordic Creative Investment Club
- a business angel brokerage and nurturing service that provides market
intelligence and network support to business angels across the region, and
drives this through the presentation of a Nordic portfolio of creative and
innovation businesses for which investments are placed (as opposed to being
placed on individual businesses).
Also critical Is the development of support to nurture and access markets:
This includes support that assists creative businesses to ' hit the market' and to
nurture new markets at home, across the Nordic region, and in emergent
global markets. There are multiple existing interventions here. but they lack
coordination and they operate more as showcasi ng initiatives rather than
brokers that actively enabl e new trading relationships, provide education on
shifting market dynamics. and support businesses to di versify their supply-
<9 see: www.rur1wsciencepark.com
"
chain relationships so as to produce new products and services for different
markets. Of particular significance here are growing domestic markets - such
as other industries for which there is significant existing and latent demand for
Creative goods and services; and global markets where even ti ny upward
shi fts in income in the BRIC economies introduce huge new markets. In
addition, an increasingly affluent, demographically ageing population in the
Nordic Region offers a growing market segment. For example, it is estimated
that half the population of Norway will be 50 years or older in 2012. This
consumer group has over 300 billion NOK to spend each year. The Norwegian
Design Counci l has launched a national guide for universal design. This
focuses on product design that does not alienate the seniors, for instance by
small lettering on packaging, confusing buttons on mobile phones or
unreadable displays. The slogan is "design for everyone", and the focus is
user friendly inclusive design in the Norwegian industry50.
An imporlant policy role can be played here at Nordic level. First/y. a
drive/campaign to nurture local markets and establish loyalty to a
' Nordic brand' is required. Campaigns such as that underlaken by the
Nordic Design Council (see above) would benefit from a panNordic approach,
with the wider mix of products and services and their effective integration as a
panNordic unique selling point and Brand. Opporlunities in Design are most
marked, including the promotion of Nordic Design to businesses in other
sectors that would benefit from centralising Design within their business
models. Secondly, a credible ' Nordic Creative brand' is required if global
markets are to be nurlured more effectively. Currently, coordination between
different Nordic countries is underdeveloped on the 'international stage'.
Countries that 'go it alone' lack profile and voice, although they do gain
something in terms of distinctiveness and niche reputation. A coordinated
approach to selling the Nordic Creative Offer is required to develop the
sector's profile abroad, to diversify its porlfolio, and to introduce greater
collective capacity to respond to increased demand. In the first instance, this
should be through a Nordic creativity campaign in target sectors, expressed
at world trade shows and possibly through a new Nordic Creativity Fair. It
should also be complemented by subsector specific initiatives that seek to
connect different Nordic Creative businesses on the ground (such as
through direct inter-firm brokerage and prioritised investment in firms working
through pan-Nordic parlnership) - so that there is an increased panNordic
business-led drive to develop international markets. This will give any
campaign and brand credibility and ownership.
3.2.3 Building Creative Clusters
The Nordic Region has operated as a global leader in supporting the development of
dedicated cluster initiatives in technology, innovation and - more recentry - the
Creative Industries. In addition to those more bottomup, organic clusters such as the
Cable Factory in Helsinki; there are multiple statlHiriven cluster initiatives, many of
which have a sub-sector specialism (such as film). Most are buildings-led: i.e. they
operate on a purposebuilt campus based very much on the science park model. For
instance, there is much good practice in incubator and knowledge park initiatives,
plus centres of excell ence, but less focus on supporting activity across the wider
Creative business landscape 'beyond the wall s'. However, there is an increasing
focus on conceptuaJising the cluster as constituti ng a wi der set of relationships that is
\(I See: www.norskdesign.no
55
spread across the city or region - such as the south Finnish coast; Greater
Stockholm; and Copenhagen/Malmo. This introduces an opportunity to conceptualise
of the Nordic Region as a global creative cluster, specialising in:
- The highest quality Design at the heart of the Creative process
- The highest quality content for existing, new and emerging technologies
- The most skilled and flexible Creative workforce - operating across
disciplines, managing Innovation and creativity as an inseparable process
- The most receptive, supportive context in which to operate - with a coherent
landscape of support tailored to enable businesses to grow to their potential
- The most tol erant, accepting, open Creative environment in which to work
The small individual markets and sector clusters across the Nordic Region make
specialisation difficult - unless initiatives are connected on a Pan-Nordic level
through the above agendas. In addition, current cluster initiatives would benefit from
some reform. Currenlly, the infrastructure offer is in many cases to too fragmented,
and operating as a 'passive enabler' rather than as an engaged/engaging offer that
drives creativity, innovation and growth. There is a need for engaged infrastructure
that brokers new relationships, connects (businesses, providers, markets etc.), and
drives new ways of producing and consuming culture. This means that targeted
cluster initiatives which focus on specialist support for a small number of tenant
businesses, need to connect outwardly as brokers of a much wider set of
relationships across the creative economy.
Local creative cluster initiatives in the Nordic Region should be conceptualised as
occupying both a physical and digital footprint:
The physical footprint refers in the most part to the on-si te
performance of the local cluster initiative - how facilities and a
support programme are managed and developed as an overall
infrastructure offer. This includes a focus on how the physical footprint
can be managed more innovatively, effectively and efficienlly;
covering opportunities for expansion (on- and even off-site) and
redevelopment andlor revisioning.
The digital footprint refers to the effective embrace with digital
technology on- and off-site, with an emphasis on how the cluster
initiatives are extending and can extend further their reach and role -
such as through virtual business networks, market development
programmes, and digital creative programming.
In the Nordic Region, clusters are too often developed as 'clean', 'sealed'
developments, with a high level of capital infrastructure but low levels of connection
to the wider Creative Industries sector and cultural sector. Unless highly specialised
and designed to support larger corporate interests (e.g. servicing Nokia in Finland).
clusters will need to be configured as more open, connected to the wider creative
sector. operating as hubs that connect across the city/region and beyond.
Without a dedicated approach to expanding and improving both the physical and
digital footprints of the local cluster initiatives, they will not operate as effective, fit-for-
purpose infrastructure in the digital age. Critical to the sustainable transformation of
56
the local creative clusters is that they proactively develop new delivery models,
broker radical forms of partnership and coll aboration, and embrace a culture of
innovation, experimentation and ri sk. Thi s is essential for them to operate as trusted
creative intermediaries; as the places where contemporary creative forms and
processes coll ide to produce the most interesting, absorbing and scalable media, the
best creative business contacts and ideas, and the tacit sense of creative belonging
so crucial to a Creative businesses' life.
Critical here is that local creative clusters are conceptualized as connected within
and contributing to a Global Creative Cluster. This requi res that local creative
clusters in the Nordic Region are situated as part of a fabr ic of creative
infrastructure: each cluster is recognised as a beneficiary of and contributor to the
development of a connected infrastructure offer for the Nordic Region. Each Cluster
needs to be recognised as a critical connector of existing and forthcoming creative
infrastructure, providing the Nordic Region with a clear and accessible fabric of
creative infrastructure that is unparalleled on a global scale in terms of the quality of
its mix, its critical mass, and its capacity to develop the most innovative and value
adding ideas and content.
Running through each cl uster initi ative is the need for a strategic approach to
knowledge exchange that enables knowledge (and labour) to flow across the Region
- establishing genuine economies of scale and excellence. The opportunities for a
panNordic policy response here include:
Introducing a Cluster Partnership Programme that supports
knowledge exchange initiatives through the Region, investing in
partner initiatives and brokering relationships between businesses
Developing a Creative Cluster Map - detailing the dynamics and
content of key clusters and promoJing this intelligence to other
clusters in the Nordic Region and intemationafly as a partnership and
supplychain development tool. This should include Bailie states -
such as through the Baltic Sea Region Innovation Network.
Driving IPR and investment initiatives through cluster partners
(see 3.2. 2 above).
3.2.4 Building Creative Places
Approaches to cultural and creativity planning are commonplace in the Nordic
Region, buil ding on a historicall y strong commitment to cultural infrastructure. For
example, the centrality of culture to place-making, city competitiveness and social
cohesion is widely understood and supported. However, there are genuine 'image
problems' for the Nordic Region here. Many Nordic cities, for example, have a
reputation for being dinical, clean and safe - which are not negative characteri stics
in themselves, but do not encourage the risk, experimentation and 'counter cultural
experience' so key to ideas generation. In this sense, support for marginal activity
and a full embrace with diversity is necessary for the Nordic Region to build a vibrant
creative economy capable of exchanging with global creative capitals such as
London and New York.
There are 3 key opportuni ty areas here:
57
The demographic profile of Nordic countries is diversifying (particularly in the
ci ties). This provides a major opportunity to develop new creative talent and to
explore the creative connections between different cultures. A new type of
' diversity advantage' can be achieved here, if the intercultural talent base of
the Region is engaged with as a COfe prinCiple.
Creative activities/products/services need to sit at the heart of the Nordic
place-branding offer and presented as a real attractor tool for inward
investment and as a 'glue for the retention/re-attraction of creati ve
businesses/individuals. This is best managed at a Nordic level, where the true
diversity of opportunities reaches a level thai is globally competitive.
Creative infrastructure plays a key role in supporting creative talent
development - providing the spaces for inspiration, ideas generation,
exhibition, and so on. However, in the Nordic Region this offer is not supported
as a coordinated fabric of infrastructure for the creative economy and too few
cultural institutions take a strategic creative business-facing approach. There
are also major opportunities to promote the cultural infrastructure as a real
asset for the creative economy, and to do this on a pan-Nordic level.
A Cultural and Creativity Planning Tool-box is recommended for the Nordic
Region. Each nation and sub-region should be supported to develop a tool-box that
maps the following '10 infrastructural conditions for creative growth,Sl.
" This is an applied version of Infrastructural Conditions developed by Tom Fleming Creative COnsultancy in the UK,
2006.
,.
Figure 14: A Cultural and Creativity Planning Tool Box for the Nordic Region
The Ten Infrastructural Conditions for Competitiveness and
Growth
1. A world class, high profile cultural infrastructure
2. A wide range of specialist Creative Industries support services
3. A wide range of specialist and accessible facilities for different
parts of the Creative Industries
4. A strong and specialised Higher Education Sector
5. An innovative further and school education sector, plus a strong
informalleaming sector
6. Spaces of convergence and connectivity
7. Global partnerships and trade initiatives
8. Diversity advantage
9. Strong spaces of cultural consumption connecting spaces of
production
10. A vibrant night-time economy
Evidence
Such as galleries, museums, COllcet! halls and events programmes. The wider the range of
this infrastructure, the greater the competitive opportunities for creative businesses, provided
they are connected to these institutions through networks and collaborations.
Some with a focus on growth such as bUSiness acceleration and investment programmes;
others which are focused on continuous profeSSional development of the individual.
Such as through media centres, rehearsal space, studio space, and workspace. Crucial is
affordability and accessibility - across the Creative Industries val ue chain.
With outwardfacing knowledge transfer, incubation and convergence programmes, strong
links across creative and noncreative sub-sectors, and a commitment to
approaches to creat ivity. Key is building management and entrepreneurial skills for
undergraduates and supporting them effectively into business creation,
The laller is vital to help entrants from nontraditional backgrounds, This needs to be married
with services that help people identify career paths, offers brokering and mentoring
programmes, offers in-work traini ng and education opportunities and helps develop sustainable
businesses/careers.
Where creative workers can meet, exchange and build relationships that can hel p with ideas
generation and trade. It is vital that both creative workers and other users feel ownership of
these places - allowing them to imprint their identity on the space so they can inhabit it on their
own terms.
With the most effective being based on the facilitation of business to business relati onships
and with the tone one of collaboration above competition.
Where complexly diverse communities are supported to projecl themselves as a major feature
of the creative assel base of a place. Infrastructure that effectively provides spaces for
exploring and promot ing a place's diverse assets, are vital symbols and drivers of knowledge
creation.
Consumers playa vital role in the development of Creative Industries, and most practitioners
are consumers first and foremost. The aim is to develop highly networked, high energy creative
dusters, where processes of cultural consumption are symbiotic with processes of cultural
production
As well as cultural consumption of various kinds, a leisure infrastructure is an essential part of
the urban creative milieu.
59
The reason for developing the Cultural and Creativity Planning Tool-Box is to allow
policymakers to assess the viability of particular initiatives and investment in
particular places and enables a connected approach to assessing and promoting the
infrastructure offer of specific places and their role in the wider Nordic Region.
It is by ensuri ng that a fabric of key Infrastructural Conditions are available in each
key city and sub-region, and guaranteeing that this infrastructure is effecti vely
connected on a Nordic level, that the Nordic Creative Industries sector will gain its
competitive advantage. An opportunity exists here to adopt the 10 Infrastructural
Conditions and use them to frame partnership and decision-making processes. By
connecting, for example, an agenda that supports learning and skills institutes to
establish strong knowledge transfer activities in the Creative Industries; to an agenda
that seeks to support a high quality and distinctive public realm; the key contributors
to a successful creative place will, for the first time, be effectively aligned. It is
proposed that a Nordic-wide campaign and research programme be
established that charts the existing Infrastructural Conditions from the local to
the pan-Nordic level; identifies gaps and the absence of connectivity; and
explores ways for gaps to be bridged and connections to be made.
4. The Nordic Region as a Creative Connector: Green
Paper Policy Recommendations
By establishing a set of common pan-Nordic policies for the Creative Industries,
nali onal and local policies will be beUer connected, more effectively bench-marked
and have a higher profile and wider impact. As has been shown, the Nordic Region is
well-placed to be:
A connector between different parts of Europe and the world
A connector between the Creative Industries and the wider economy
A connector between innovation and creativity
For too long, creativity and culture have been positioned to the margins of publ ic
policy-making, especially on national and pan-Nordic levels. This is despite the
Creative Industries operating as one of the fastest growing sectors in the global
economy; despite increasing understanding of the value-adding role of creativity
across the economy; and despite an ever wider-appreciation of the role of culture
and creativity in transforming places and building sustainabl e communities in
distinctive places. Indeed, this is despi te the very compelling truth that the Nordic
Region's future competitiveness lies in its capacity to utilise its creative assets as the
world's major creative connector.
To ensure that culture and creativity are afforded the strategic position their
significance requires, and to take forward the recommendations of this Green
paper, it is recommended that at a Pan-Nordic level, a Creativity Working Group
be established. This should have at least junior minister membership and it should
have a change of national leadership every 12 months. This will be the primary policy
connector for creativity, ensuring that for every policy area, the following questions
are asked:
" What is the role of creativity?"
" How do we collectively grow the Creative Industries?"
60
It may also be appropriate for policy-specific working groups to be established, led by
the overarching working group. These would have a focus on major policy areas
such as creative education, creativity and IPR and the Creative Industri es and growth
finance.
The Working Group wi ll focus on 4 Creative Connector Themes:
Entrepreneurialism and Creativity
Growing Creative Businesses
Building Creative Clusters
Building Creative Places
This approach allows a focus that elevates culture and creativity beyond that of
'value-adder' or even 'optional extra' , to a position where they are central catalysing
features and processes of a transforming Nordic economy.
In addition:
- A Research and Intelligence Working Group should be established to
commission much-needed pan-Nordic Creative Industries mapping, plus a wider set
of creative economy research. This will develop a ri ch stream of new pan-Nordic
intelligence that informs policy, sets out the cultural and creaUve offer of the Nordic
Regi on and identifies how, through collaboration and coordination, it can be utilised
more effectively.
- A Cluster Working Group shoul d be established, with a role to report to the above
Executive. This will focus on connecting infrastructure and building joint infrastructure
offers as a way of achieving critical mass. This should include representatives from
the Baltic States.
- A Nordic-Baltic Working Group should be established to take forward the
recommendations of the Nordic Baltic innovation platform for Creative Industries.
It is also important to support local 'bottom-up' approaches to sector development,
and to connect them more effectively. For example, the KK-foundation in Sweden
recently received 24 million SEK for the development of the Swedish Experience
Industry Network. Such ini tiatives ensure that local knowledge and talent is
connected more effectively towards business growth. It is important to then to join
them to national and pan-Nordic policy so that the 'bottom up' connects to the ' top
down'.
4.1 Delivery - the Nordic Creative Policy Matrix
Figure 15 below shows the basic policy structure for taki ng forwards the
recommendations of this Green Paper. It is foll owed by the Nordic Creative Policy
Matri x, which re-introduces the key policy areas and identifies key project deli very
opportunities that should be pursued in the short-medium term:
61
Figure 15: Nordic Creative Industries Policy Development Structure
Connector Theme 1:
Nordic Creative Policy
Working Group:
5 nations, 5 ministers
Del ivering policy recommendations
Coordinating interventions
Entrepreneurialism
and Creati vity
Connector Theme 2:
Connector Theme 4:
Building Creative
Places
Connector Theme 3:
E.g.
Growing Creative
Businesses
Building Creative
Clusters
E.g.
Education
Sub-Group
E.g.IPR
Sub-
Group
Creativity
Tool-Box
Sub-Group

D
Evidence & Research Sub-Group-
Underpinning all of the above
D
Harmonising data and intell igence, developing new competition-
orientated Intelligence
Regional and Locat Approaches
Better connected, more globally-focused: developing markets,
building knowledge and expertise, driving cluster and creative place-
making agendas.
62
d
Poli cy Connector Theme
Entrepreneurshi p & Creativi ty
NORDIC CREATIVE POLICY MATRIX
Poli cy Issue{s)
Under-developed awareness of
career paths In the Creative
Industries
Low-level commerclallsallon of
creative Ideas and skills
Cultural value placed on developing
Iifestyle businesses
Ellcelient locaUlnslttutionat
programmes bullittle coordlnahon &
mlerconnectlvlty
Pan-Nordic knowledge-shanng is
underdeveloped
Labour market mobil ity in the
Creative Industries is under-
developed
Diverse communities are
disproport ionately ellcluded from
the Creative industries
Learning & skills provision is nol fit
for Industry purpose. with students
lacking the flexibility &
enlrepreneuriat ism, as well as niche
skills. to prosper In industry
Policy Action(s)
Establ ish a Creative Economy Learning & Skill s
Council for the Nordi c Region - operating as the lead
policy development body & broker between industry &
education. driving creat ivity & learning agendas across the
Region.
Launch a Creat ive Entrepreneurialism campaign as an
education & economic development policy - targeting
schools, universi ties & early stage creat ive businesses;
raising the profi le of career paths & commercial
opport unities in the Creat ive Induslries
Stage a Creat i ve Entrepreneurship Awards
Programme - connecling the ellisling Creative business
support offer through partnership iniliatives & via an on-
line Creative Enlrepreneurialism Portal
Develop cross-institutional cooperation between
Creative education institutions & programmes: A
Nordic Creative Academy NetworK & delivery vehicle
Introduce a Nordic Creative Student Exchange
Programme - establ ishing pan-Nordic study as a syllabus
requirement
Introduce a Pan-Nordi c Work-based Learni ng
Programme for creative undergraduates to work in
Creative SMEs - as part of the above exchange
programme
Broker industry 10 academy networks: a Nordic
Creative Knowledge Exchange Programme - establish
an industry & academic panel to develop a networked
approach exchange. This would introduce new learning
models & manage the del ivery of, for example. workbased
learning programme(s)
63
Evidence Requirement{s)
Coord"2:!.'d cala & 1'1:e;I'gel'ce or
& sh s 'l it at vos in
Ind\..s:nes.
COOro''l<'Hed da'i.I & w:e:! gert:1:c' to
exp:ore j'lousl ry nee.:!s
Fe?slo illy study for a Learning 3 SkI"ls
COc.'1c:l
Coordinated baseline mapping data
& intelligence on seclor dynamics
across tile Nordic region.
Eviccnce nf !::.mei"' 1 coope'a!:on and
b.My research to deve:op :1"5
Coordinaled baseline mappmg: data
& Intelligence on sector dynamics
across Ihe Nordic region.
Feaslt),hly resea'ch io develoD del'very
mode;s
Coordinated baseline mapping data
& intelligence on sector dyllamics
across the Nordic region.
Fe<lslo;hly res.ea-ch :0 dc--: clo;J modc;;s
Coordillated baseline mapping data
& intelligence on sector dynamics
across the Nordic region.
Growing Creative Businesses
CreatIVe quallfrcailonS ar e not
recognised universally across the
Nordrc Region. This IS a barner to
labOur market mobility 8. knowledge
exchange.
IPR knowledge, valualJon,
realisalion, & protection are under-
developed. This hampers
collilboration, creativity 8.
innovation.
Inveslmen! provi Sion for Ihe
Creative Industries IS fragmented,
under-coordinated & In some
instances Inappropriate. Creative
businesses fi nd it difficult to Identify
ilppropriate investment
opponumtl es.
Market failure exists across the
NordiC region for early stage equity
investment in the Creative
Industries (moslly venture capital
but In some regions thiS also
appli es to seed capital), Incl udi ng
the more growth-orientated sub-
sectors.
Business angel investment Ifl the
Creative Industries is under-
developed, ...lith networks weak,
knowledge of Ihe sector poor & thus
fisk management cosily.
Creative Industries markets In the
NordiC regIOn are small & under-
developed. There IS significant
potenti al to grow markets that have
an affi nity With a 'NordlC Brand'. &
develop new market s - e.g. In non-
creative sectors.
Harmonise Creati ve qualifi cations - led by the Creative
Economy Learning & Skills Council.
Establish a Pan-Nordic Creative IPR advice &
Intelligence Service - as a web-portal 8. face-to-face
delivery mechanism that provides tPR intelligence,
provides pro bono legal support, encourages pan-Nordic
collaboration, & brokers relationships with an expanding
body of legal providers.
Establish a coordinated investment map in the Nordic
Region - to map the curren! investment landscape (state 8.
private finance) & make this visi ble 8. navigable to Creative
businesses across the Region, helping businesses to
identify appropriate investment sol utions.
Launch a pan-Nordic Creative Investment Fund - a
dedicated equity fund for growth-(lrientated Creative
businesses that operates across a Nordic-wide port folio of
Creative busi nesses
Launch a Nordi c CreaUve Investmenl Club - developi ng
a network of interested business angels & establ ishing a
portfolio of creative & innovation companies as a creative
portfolio investment scheme
Launch a campaign to nurture local markets for &
establi sh loyalty to a ' Nordic brand' ,
"
-"
Coordmated baseline miJPpmg. dma
& mtel/igellce on sector dynamics
across the Nordic regi on.
Feas bll:Y & developmenl researCI]
Coordinaled baseline mapping: data
& mtelligence on sector dynamICS
across the Nordic region.
Rese<lrch proVSIC"
Coordinated baseline mapping: data
& intelligence on sector dynamics
across tile Nordic regioll
Feaslbll ty research and part"":ersl">;p
cevelop'llent
Coordinated baseline mapping: data
& ime/ligence on sector dymlr1l1cs
across the Nordic region.
Mapping of current bus'ness angel
activity acrcss the kr.c;,!edge economy
Coordin,1fed baselillc mapping: data
& in/el/igence on sec/or dynami cs
across the Nordic region.
8H1'lc /j, mar<.et -esearch
Coordinated baseline mapping: data
& intelligence on sec/or dynDmics
across Ille NordiC regioll .
Buildi ng Creotive Clusters
Building Creative Pl aces
Nordic countries have a low profile
& relatively weak vOice at global
platforms For the Creatl'/e
Indus!nes. For selected sub-
sectors, a Nordic approach would
remedy this. as well as adding value
\0 the distinctive values of each
Nordic country.
Creative cluster initmllves are
under-connected with the local &
Regional Creative Industries sector.
While offering exceptional quality
through on-site delivery, knowledge
exchange & partnership are under-
developed.
Complementary st rengths &
resources are nol conceptualised of
or connected as a panNordic
Global Creative Cluster.
Cultural and Creativity planning
does not posi tion the Creative
Industries at its heart . It is also
fragmented & under coordinated A
Reglon-\'IIde approach to
benchmarking creative
Infrastructure is requi red
A credibl e ' Nordi c Creat ive brand' is required if global
markets are to be nurturod more effectively. A
coordinated approach to selling the Nordic Creative Offer
is required to develop the sector's profile abroad. to
diversify its portfol io, & 10 introduce greater collective
capacity to respond to increased demand.
Launch a Nordic creativity campaign in target sectors.
expressed al world trade shows & possibly through a new
Nordic Creativity Fai r.
Develop sub-sector specific initiatives that seek to
connoct di fferent Nordic Creative businesses on the
ground (such as through direct interfl rm brokerage &
prioritised investment in firms working through panNordic
partnership) - so that there is an increased panNordic
business led drive to develop international markets. This
will give any campaign & brand credibility & ownership.
Develop a Creative Cl uster Partnership Programme
that supports knowledge initiatives through the
Region, investing in partner initiatives & brokering
relationships between businesses
Develop a Creative Clust er Map for the Nordic Regi on
Ihat showcases strengthS & launches the proposition of
the Nordic Region as a Connected Global Creative
Cluster
Develop a Creativity Tool-Box for the Nordic Regi on -
testing each city & sub-region for the availability of 10
specific Infrastructural Conditions & joining them together
as a unified Nordic offer.
65
Bra' 8. nlilrk.d
Coof'dma/od baseline mappmg, d:J1J
8. inlelligence on sec/or dynamiCS
across the Nordic region.
of eXls\:ng.'for\ 'lcor->,ng clus:er
l'l it'atvcs - for profile. dynamics and
ccrneCI'ons
Coordinated baseline mappmg: dllra
& fnlef/igence on secror dynami cs
across the NordiC regloll .
Tes! :'l C :0 infras\r,lc:u'al cO'ld.'tion,:;
across \'10 \. orOle reGion and dcvcloD a
Nordic Tool-Box iha!
exp'esses the Nordic C'ealive 1'1"',IS'(I<;'5
Glotla: Offer
Coordimlled baseline mapping data
& intelligence all sector dynamiCS
across the Nordic region.
99
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norden
Nordic Innovation Centre

'"
April 2006
NORDEN - A CREATIVE POWERHOUSE
Professionatising creative industries
[PR are the goods of th(! new economy
Facilitating inv['stments
~
Authors: Petra N I I ~ o n & Nrna [t(>I.J. Nordic Innovation Cl'ntrf'
Project contributers:
Denmark
Copenhagen Business School
The Royal Academy of Fi ne Arts
Wonderful Copenhagen
RJ Computer consulting
Gamalocus
Zenaria
Cavi
Arhus Sygehus
OTI
Danish Producers Association
Learning lab Denmark
Finland
Helsinki School of Economics
University of Art and Design Helsinki
UtAH
elM Creat ive Industries
Management Ltd
Helsinki Tourist & Convention Bureau
Planmeca
EOS
Oeskartes
TKK
Helsinki University
Hypermedia Lab University of Tam+
pere
Neogames
Icela nd
University of Iceland
Iceland Academy of Arts
lmpra Innovation Centre - IceTee
Visit Reykjavik
Kine
GLoboden!
SmartVR
LazyTown Entertainment
CCPgames
leeTec
Norway
Eastern Norway Research
Institute
NIFU-STEP
Oslo School of DeSign and Architec-
ture
Cultiva
SIVA
University of liLlehammer
LiLlehammer Knowledgepark
Oslo Promotion
Surgetech Norway
Leksvik Teknologi
10M
Gri..inderparken
Sintef
Kunnskapsparken Hedmark
Sweden
Uppsala University
VINNOVA [Swedish Agency
for Innovation Systems)
University College of Arts Crafts and
Design
Gothenburg University
Film i Vast
Stockholm Visitors Board
Goteborg & Co
Malmo Turism
Dikon
Avatanchesludios
Acma
Sensegraphics
Karotinska Sjukhuset
IV'
Interactive Institute
Spelplan.se
Baltic countries
Latvian Art Academy
Estonian Academy of Arts
\f -
Pet ra Ni l sson
Nina Etela
CuLture is business
- And we ar-e talking big business
A fact that meets us in the post-industrial reality is that one of the most
promising and emerging markets is the creative one. Creat ivity and innovation
is now the driving forces of both the economy, and the society.
The map needs to fit the terrain
We need to orient ourselves in the landscape we actually are In. Thi s IS not
optional, but a given. At the Nordic Innovation Centre INICel we have recently
carried out 6 extensive mapping analyses together with 65 Nordic knowledge
environments. We have done this to gather vital information regarding the current
status of the Nordic creative indust ries lell. and i ts fut ure aspirations. Worl dwide
t he creative industries are growing fa ster t han other economic sectors, thus
I'cllect ing the changes in today's wealt h-generating economies.
With concerted Nordic effort and cooperation, the Nordic region has the capaci ty
to become one of the worlds most dynamic and important regions for creative
i ndustries, but this chance only comes around once, We must act now, or accept
defeat ,
No longer is the Nordic region marked primarily by its industrial features, but
are characterized by the shill from IndustnaL manufacturing to service Industnes
centred on information technology, Defined as a permanent process 01 developing
and applying new knowledge to work, life, products and services - rnnovation has
become society's driving lorce. There is a rapid growing demand for the products
the creative industries sell . Firms and jobs based on these activities are an
important future source of economic growth and competlliveness for the NordiC-
Baltic region.
Culture is drivmg the economy
Cul ture plays an increasingly important role in the knowledge economy, The
creative industnes provide potential for economi c growl h and prosperi ty. II
is a growing sector thaI conti nues to provide more jobs, and adds i ncreasing
value to products and servi ces wi thi n t he Nordic region. This potential is not yel
sufficiently recognised. We need to connect creative willl other sectors
in the economy in order to help creative entrepreneurs turn innovative ideas into
profi table business
Culture as a domain for expression, reflection and eXChange is becoming the key
conlext from which social and economic developments obtain their value What
is called for is a new agenda, which recognises the interplay between culture,
rnnovation and the public domain;n the knowledge economy.
Recommendations for success
We propose t hree core areas where actions should be taken with regords to the
creative industries; t hese are paramount if we are to position ourselves in the
fo refront of the Cl - sector.
Proll'ssion:llbinq crc:Jtiv0 inclustncs
First ly we must focus on the creative ent repreneur: establiShing awareness wit hin
the creative sector that these industrial players operat e in an economic playing
field that necessitate business knowledge, The creative actor needs to acquire
business smarts and interact. learn and benef it from other industr iat areas.
IPR arl' Ille goods of the new economy
Secondly, there is a need for an intensi fied focus on the area of intellectual
property rights IIPRj, This can be viewed as the raw material fuell ing the creative
age, The commercial opportuniti es in this field must be realized,
r.lolitoltmg
Thi rdly, in order for the Cl -seclor to grow to its full potential , the flow of capital
needs to be increased. For this to happen. financial venture capital needs to be
enticed to invest in the creative industry It is necessary 10 facil itate an open
dialog to generate a common ground and meeting place for investors and creative
industries ali ke.
We strongly recommend a Nordic policy for the CI- sector that fac il itates these
st rategic moves, If we are to posit ion ourselves in the global race for creative
indust ries dominance. these strategi c implementa tions are not opt ionaL They are
necessities.
,
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Petra Nilsson
Senior advisor
The Nordic Innovat ion Centre
Nina EteUi
Senior advisor
The Nordic Innovation Cent re
6 PROJECTS
Creative Directions
- A NordiC fr,l mcwork for suppor tmg t hf' Cl"t'dtIVC Induslnc"o:>
The Nordic region has the capacity to become one of the world's most dynamic and
important regions for the creative Industries [CI]. The objective of this project IS to
create a framework for how poticymakers can think about the creative industries, and
deals with the creative industries from an industnal and economic perspective.
In Search of the Experience Economy
ThE' reality 01 tounSrTl is changm9
Throughout Europe all the major cities compete intenSively to attract and host
international events. The ai m of this project was to demonstrate the economic
importance of events, show the empLoyment effects that events manif est, and
produce knowledge from actual events in the NordiC cites. This was done through
both a quantitative and a qualitative study focusing on 19 events in the NordiC region.
Creative Capital
Bridging the gap between the creJltvc and vcntillf' (')pltJl
The Nordi C economi es have in recent years seen increased economic contributions
been made by the creative industries let): the media, entertamment and artistiC
sectors. The shift to a creativity- based economy has not successfully managed to
bring with It the investors, the fmancial insti tutions of banking and the venture capit al
funds. Three educationallools aimed at bridging the communication gap between
investors and the creat ive Industries has been created by this project.
Nordic Baltic Innovation Platform for Industries
- Focusing cspcciully on design
Societal and market trends have led to an increased indust l'i al reliance upon creati ve
skills as a major source of value creation, Design has increasingly been recognized
as a strategic tool for companies in t he Nordic Baltic region. and design is a key
field to bridge the gap between creative disci pli nes and tradit ional busi nesses, By
establishing a Nordic Bal tic platform for creati ve industries [eli. the interaction
between traditionat industries and creative di sci pl ines across the Nordic Balt ic region
coul d be st imulated and st rengthened.
Nordic Playground
- Conno:'(tlllq computer Industry Jnd flame r050<l 1-ch
With NordiC culture
To compete in t he global market the Nordic countries need to foster the development
of new products created in t he convergence between computer games. toys and
game research. educational resources and cultural production. A joint NordiC effort
can offer a wi der and more credible select ion of game rel ated knowledge. in addition
to a forum for the dissemi nat ion of research results_
Medical Imaging
How to Imng cutting edge 3D grc"lph:r;s to
The technology utilized in gaming is expected to emerge to a new worl d industry
sect or wit h a fast annuat growth. This project' s scope was a closer investi gation of
the possi ble synergy effects between the two sectors medical imagi ng and computer
games, This was facilitated in order to search for new business chances. cost savings
and faster progress in t he development of new medical imaging products,


The following researc hers have
participated in the proj ect :
Denmark
Or. Mark Lorenzen
Prof. Peter Maskell
Copenhagen Business School
Finland
Docent Anttl Alnamo
HelSinki School of Economics
iceLand
Margret Sigrun Siguroard6ttir
University of Iceland
Nor way
Dr. Tone Haraldsen
EaSlorn Norway Rosearch
Institute, Lillehammer
Markus M. Bugge
NIFU-STEP
Sweden
Docent Dommic Power
Iproject leaderl
Or. Jo);.)n Jansson
Prof. Anders Malmberg
Uppsala UniverSity
Pernrlla Rydmark
VINNOVA [Swedish Agency
for Innovation Systems I
Creative Directions
. A Nordic framework lor slipportinC)
the creative industries
Background
The Nordic region has t he capacity to become one of the worlds most dynamic
and important regions for the creative industries [CII. This is something we must
work together to achieve.
Worldwide governments and regional aut horit ies have begun to take seriously
the notion that cultural and creative activities are crucial areas of economic
activity. The Nordic economies have in recent years seen increased economic
contribut ions been made by the creative industries; the media, entertainment.
design and art istic sectors. These secLors are seen to be increasingly worthy 01
not just cultural ~ o L i c y but also industriaL policy support. The creative industries
have attracted much attention due to the fact that they seem to be at the forefront
of a series of wider industrial and market changes affecting Nordic industry.
The Nordic countries have seen a large number of manufacturing jobs disappear
from lhe labour markel over the last dec<ldes, and many observers believe that
for all industries based in high-cost advanced countries, the rol e of creativity and
innovation has become more important t han ever. There is a widespread bel ief
that knowledge intensive industr ies offer the best prospects for economic growth
in countries suffering from increased global compet ition.
However, the Nordic countries <Ire not alone in noticing the potent ial such
indust ries have for generat ing new Jobs. and for contribut ing to overall industrial
competitiveness. Many countries are investing heavily in their creat ive industries.
The Nordic countries are faced with ever more fierce economic competition
from countries which often have the same qual ity technologicaL and production
standards, and considerably cheaper l abour and general costs. It is therefore
important for Nordic firms and economies to seek out new opportunities and new
ways of sell ing, designing and promot ing our products on global markets.
Scope
The objective of this project is to create a framework for how policymakers can
think about the creative industries. The report deals with the creative industries
from an industrial and economic perspect ive: taking our point of departure in
research on industrial competit iveness and transformation Ibusiness strategy.
inst itut ional and evoluti onary economics etc.! in general and modern research
in particular. The aim was to produce a series 01 pol iCy recommendations and
concrete measures to help the creative industries further develop. The approach
has been to separate from cultural or art ist ic appraisals 01 creativity, and to focus
only on these activit ies as commercial and industrial endeavours. It follows from
# .
""
-
I
this that non- profit cul tural/creative organisations at'e not generally Incl uded.
Creative Industries thinki ng reflects an attempt to widen the debate on t he value
of cult ure In policy. away from a traditional focus on cul tural policy as funding for
fi ne arts and heritage institutions.
ConclusIons & RecommendatIons
Policies implemented and coordi nated at a Nordic level have J great potential to
Improve the compet itiveness of t he creative industries .
I . !, \'1',
Polley r'ecommendatlons are presented that address frve dist inct but interrel ated
areas'
11 Knowledge and innovation In t he creat ive Industries; 21 Cooperation and
collaboration between creative indust ries frr ms; 31 Connecti ng creative Indust r ies
fi rms with ot her i ndustri es; 41 Helping Nordic creat ive i ndustries reach the
market. and 51 Encouragi ng and investing in entrepreneurshi p.
fJ", d;( H''IlJl f' 1 .110\
Wi th concerted Nordic effort and cooperat ion the Nordic region has the potent ial to
become a globall y Important centre for educat ion. research and innovation in t he
creative Industries.
I. f I '"
We bel ieve t hat It IS crUCial that the Nordi c countries start building i mmediately
on the st rengt hs and opportUnit ies t heir Cl"eallV(! rndustries represent. and
contribute In a meaningful way to the fur ther expansion of these important
industrres. Coordi nated and collaborative action at a Nordic level can greatly
benef i t t he compet itive base for Ihe fi rms that make up these exci ting growth
indust ries.
Ceo,I"e D"",hon> _. /Iordic
lor ' UPP"! 'ho ,,* ... vo
W\'/w.;)or til(llll1C1vdtlon.n'
The following researchers have
partici pated in the project:
Denmar k
Peter J. Hansen (project Leader]
Lars Ramme Nielsen
WonderfuL Copenhagen
Sweden
Mattias Rlndberg
Stockholm Visitors Board
Claes BJerknc
Gdteborg & Co
Lars Carmen
Malmo Turism
Finl and
Plrkko Nyman
Helsmkl Tourist & Convention
Bureau
Norway
Heidi Than
Oslo Promotion
IceLand
Svanhl ldur Konradsdottlr
Visit Reykjavik
In Search of the Experience Economy
- The reality of tourisill is changing
Background
Events are big business. Throughout Europe all the major cit ies compete
i ntensively to attract and host international events. In comparison. all the Nordic
cit ies are Just European provi ncial towns. But t he event -economy presents a
big opportunity: Sports and cul tural events have become means to generate
tourist turnover, foreign -exchange earnings and jobs. In addition. events have
been recognised as a way to mobilize urban development. and to manifest cities
culture and identity internationally. This is why most big cities in Europe compete
intensively to attract and host international events. The Nordic cit ies have already
entered the event-economy. host ing some of the most prest igious i nternational
sports. - and cul tural events over the past decade. But events can also be a
risky business. Knowledge and tools are paramount when cities are to dec ide on
invest ing i n the event economy
Scope
The objective for the projecl was to clarify the signific<'lnce of events for
destination development, clarify the tax effects as a result of a given event. and
map the si milariti es and diflerences between events wit h regard to proportion of
tourists. export proport ion, average length of stay. average tourist consumpt ion
and so forth.
In addi tion. the scope was to demonst rate t he economic imporlance of events.
show the employment effects that events manifest . and produce knowledge
from actual events i n the Nordic cites. An event study of a comparative nature
was carried out on 19 selected events i n Nordic cites. The events ranged from
conferences. to sport events and concerts. The study consi sts of bot h quantitat ive
and qual itative elements.
The project as a whole aimed at strengthen the Nordic cities compet itiveness as
event destinat ions, and to lay the foundations for long-term cooperation between
these cities that may result in more joi nt projects i n the event area.
-;,.. .,-::-=-.

Conclustons & Recommendations
Main n::os ulls from the quantitative study show t hat events creilte growth, The
maj ority of growth is created withi n the trade. hotel and restaurant industry.
- in addition to within the act ual event organisation i tsel f. It was also shown that
events create employment. the specifIC tourism economic turnover for the 19
events st udied gave rise to around 1,300 Jobs
tJ ,'f It:- I, .1J;>!:llrt
The mai n resul ts from the quantit ative case studies show the Importance of
cooperatIOn and suppor t by involve d players. both In public and pr ivate sector,
Furt helmore, the budget ing for new events showed to be a challenge. and i n
such Sit uat ions it would be good to draw on the experience of prevIous host
organrsatlons.
',1,11 k Illl] 'P"rt.11
For large publ iC events. market ing is a key factor In order to reach the full
potential of the event. It is theref ore import ant that market ing has Its own budget.
which is not used even if other cost turns out to be higher than expected, Different
types 01 events reqUire different types of market ing. and event organisations
shoul d be provi ded with budgets and skills that correspond to the task,
r; r ,rl/\1> >:!
There IS also need fOl' more detai led knowledge of the tnar-ketrng of events and
theil' contribution 10 t he desl mal lon's brand work. In addition, a st udy of how the
event affects i nhabitants' perceptions of t heir own town, and what is required
for t he local population to have a pOSit ive atti tude to the organisat ion of events.
IS deSired, Benchmark st udies should be carried out foc usi ng on the condit ions
that must be met m order for European Ci ties to be "event destinatlon5", It IS atso
recommended to produce a competitor analysis wfl h focus on event arenas,
Cooperation bet ween the Cities IS the only way fOr\'JiJrd, The NOl'dic tourism
economies are already linked and Integrat ed In sense of infrast ruct ure, major
players and catchments areas, This gives an excel lent starl ing point
nn,dcn
In 5. ,,, ' h oJ lif" hp'l ",ft '" E. "".'my
- -
I'JWW.!lOI uicionOwlIioll.nrt
The followi ng researc.hers have
participated in the project:
Sweden
lars Andersson
Toma5 Faxheden
Gothenburg University
Mart in Svensson
Film i Vast
Finland
Heikkl MasaLin
CIM Creative Industri es
Man.:lgemcnt ltd
Iceland
Slgur !)ur Stemgrf msson
Impra Innovation Centre - IceTec
Norway
Ivar Mykland
CultivOl
Bente Ronning
SIVA
Sissel Rathke
Jens Uwe Korten
Universi ty of LiUehammer
Jorgen Damskau {project leader!
lillehJmmer Knowl edgepark
Denmark
Lars Fredri ksen
Cope hagen Business School
Creativity meets Capital
-Bridging the gap between the creative industries
and venture capital
Background
The Nordic economies have in recent years seen increased economic
cont ributions been made by the creative industries (ell; t he media, entertainment
and art istic sectors. Product s based on cultural product ion have gained
increasi ng ground, both in national and international trade. In the last 10 years,
the creat ive industries have consistently outperformed the general economy in
employment growth and new firm start -ups. Va lue creation in t he knowledge
economy is increasi ngly being based on intangibles such as ideas and knowl edge.
Ideas, knowledge. artistic expression, expertise and talent hold qual itative
different characteri stics from traditional tangible goods. It is the ability to
generate, commercia lise and protect such intangi ble values that will generate
economic growth for creative industrial firms, industries and countries in the
creative age.
However, the shift to a creativity-based economy has not successfully managed
to bring with it the investors, the financial institutions of banking and the venture
capital funds. Within the CI-sector, investment capital remains difficult to attract
due to the specific nature of intangible assets, which conveys challenges in terms
of determi ning value and profit potent ial. It is necessary to lacilitate an open
dialog that can generate a common ground and meeting place for investors and
creat ive industries al ike.
Scope
The objective was to provide a bl ueprint for the creative industries on how to
present themselves to investors, and how to think of new ways to capitalize on
intellectual property r ights. The proj ect set out to develop increased awareness
between the two groups of entrepreneurs (creative and capitalisti through
developing learning. communication and awareness generating tools.
Intellectual property rights (iPRi were the main area of focus and exploration.
IPR can be seen as the goods of t he new economy. and are what creative
entrepreneurs need to capitalize. The right granted by intellectual
property legislation, creates opportunities for investing in cul tural activities.
Industries heavily resting on intellectual crealions run the risk 01 fail ing to achieve
it s full potential, if the value of intangible assets fails to be communicated to
capital providers and potential partners.
"".
.....,
... ... .
...,
Conclusions & Recommendations
The project devel oped t ll ree educational tools ai med at bridgi ng the
commUl liCutlon gap between Invest ors and the creative mdustrics. The first tool
15 a teaching DVD pI'oviding a concrete benchmark for how a successful creat ive
activi ty [i,c. a bookl was deve loped into a huge economic package of IPR products.
The second tool is a 360 degrees interview wit h representatives f!"Om one 01
the few venture capital lirms in the Nordic countries specializing i n developing
business opport uni ties wit hi n Cl"eat ive indust ries. The third learning-tool is an
I P R ~ role- play and accompanyi ng teaChing manual .
NOfdK Investor Survey
The creative industries in the Nordic countries need strengtheni ng by
empowering the entrepI"cneur s wi th IP- tools to use i n the dialogue with investors
und ot ll er Imancial actors, Furthermore. the incubators need 10 be reinforced.
There is also a need lor Increased Information on the investment side, somethi ng
that could be reached by imitating NESTA' s survey of the interpretat ion 01 the
Investment oPPoltunlt ies in the creative industries. NESTA is the UK national
endowment agency for science. tec hnology and t he arts. worki ng to increase
national innovation capacity. By asking 100 invesl or companies i n the Nordic
countries a speCially designed quesl ionnai re. essential investment informat ion
could be gat hered.
IPR and Aestheltcs
MOI'e work should al so be done on the interpretat ion of t he products and services
of t he creat ive Indust ries In t he contmuum bet ween IPRs and aesthetic vIsions
<) nd st<)lernents. Especially comparing t he Nordic countri es and the UK/ US 111
Ihese matters woul d be useful In order to adopt Jnd adapt certain model s fo r
Invest ment In IPRs.
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The following researchers have
partfcipated in the project:
Finland
Juha Jarvinen (project leader)
Emilta Koski
Umver51ty 01 Art and DeSign Hel -
Sinki UIAH
Sweden
Per Berglund
University College of Arts Crafts
and DeSign
Norway
Simon Clatworthy
Oslo School 01 Design and Archi-
tecture
Denmark
Thomas Dickson
The Royal Academy of Fine Arts
latvia
Aip Frelmalne
LatVian Art Academy
Estonia
Halldor Gislason
Ruth-Helene Melioranskl
Estonian Academy of Arts
Iceland
Soley Senna Slefiinsdottir
Iceland Academy of Arts
Nordic Baltic Innovation Platform
for Creative Industries
- Focusing especiaLLy on design
Background
Design has long been an integral part of cultural lives in t he Nordic and Baltic
countries. Societal and market trends have led to an increased industrial reliance
upon creative skills as a major source of value creation. Design has increasi ngly
been recognized as a 5trategic tool fo r companie5, and de5ign is a key field to
bridge the gap between creative disciplines and traditional businesse5.
By establishi ng a Nordic Baltic platform for creative industries (Cll. t he
interaction between tradit ional industries and creat ive disciplines across the
Nordi c Balt ic region could be stimulated and strengthened.
Design is often presented as being in the centre of three factors overlapping each
other. business. technology and human factors. Creative industries can provide
new means of differentiation for companies. and assist to create new products
based on cultural understanding and values. This is why there is an increased
industrial rel iance upon creative ski lls as a source of value creation.
Scope
The purpose of the project is to examine the possibilities the current status of
the creative industries the Nordic Baltic region provides. and explore design
innovation systems that would contribute to the building of an innovation
platform for this region. To illust rate the prevail ing situation. this project reviews
creat ive industries. design innovation systems and actors. design promotion and
measures taken in each country. - 5uch as research programmes and innovation
transfer systems.
The project aims in reviewing and discussing the possibilities of whether a
Nordic-Baltic network could be developed further. and if this would provide
means for a platform. The aim of the platform would be to strengthen the
creation and development of strong Nordic and Baltic creative businesses. and
to create new businesses of similar types as wetl. The platform would offer
new possibilities for t he traditional"" industry in the Nordic and Baltic area. in
their constant struggle for improving their competitiveness. In addition it would
contribute to overall economic devetopment.
Such a Nordic and Baltic platform could stimulate the interaction between
traditional industries and creat ive disciplines (especially design!. bot h within the
respective countries itself and across the region. The outcome could be a win-win
situati on for all involved.
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The following researchers have
participated in the project:
Sweden
Maria Aresund Iproject leader!
Johnny Friberg
Interllctlve Institute
Sten Selander
Spclplan.se
Norway
Elisabeth Frydenlund
Kunnskapsparken Hedmark
Denmark
Klaus Hansen
Danish Producers Association
Thomas Duus Henrikssen
Robi n Engelhardt
Lotte Klint
Lealning Lab Denmark
Finland
Frans Mayra
Hypermedia Lab University of
Tampere
KooPee Hiltunen
Neogames
llkka KaakkoLammi
Icetand
Bryndis Haraldsdottlr
8rynj<1 porbJornsdotllr
lmpra Innovation Centre Ice Tee
Nordic Playground
- Connecting computer game industry
and game research with Nordic cuLture
Background
If the Nordic count ries are to compete in t he global market in t his growing
industry. fostering the development of new products created in t he convergence
between computer games, toys and game research. educat ional resources
and cultural product ion is vital. One of the fastest growing markets today is the
interactive entertainment industry. In some countries this market has already
exceeded welL-established industries as film and teLevision. The Nordic region
has in recent years gai ned ground on bigger game development countries such
as UK, US and Japan. A joi nt Nordic effort can offer a wider and more credible
selection of game related knowledge. in addition to a forum fo r t he dissemination
of research results.
Scope
The overall purpose was to arrange and take part in cross- disciplinary meetings,
workshops and seminars in the field of interact ive entertainment in order to
create Nordic synergies. By faciLitating meetings bel ween different actors in
the network, the aim was to neate a base for further research, and project
applications. The extract ion and dissemi nation of knowledge and experience
between researchers and companies is seen as vi tal. Identifying areas of game
design. modaliti es and technology development also held high priority.
Conclusion and Recommendations
Nordic Playground recommends further investments in cross-disciplinary events
and proj ects in the interactive entertainment industry. In addit ion. networking is
a fundamental strategic tool in order to creat e a dynilmic and competit ive Nordic
interactive entertainment industry. A valuable network channel has been created
through the project. facilitating croSS-disciplinary contact across the Nordic
countries. It is essential that this channel remains open.
Emerging Markets
There are some areas wi thin interactive entertainment that are viewed as
especially emerging markets. namely mobile games and pervasive games. The
mobile game market has expanded during t he last years, and is estimated to
conti nue to expand over t he next couple of years. This presents an excellent
business opportunity for the interactive entertainment industry in the Nordic
regIOn.
-
....
"
A newcomer in the market is pervasive games. The Swedish game company
previ ously known as ""Irs Al ive!"" , now "Oaydreilm", gave life to the fi rst
commercial l ocation- based game. In doing so, they coined the defi nit ion
"pervasive games" , Now game academics use the term "pervasive games" to
describe games that pervade into reality through e- mai l correspondence, fake
websites or location- based act ivit ies
This type of new gami ng ex perience i s viewed as t he most interesting game
resea rch area to explore. bot h currently and in the futu re . In a pervasive game,
the game interi.1ction stretches beyond t he compu ter screen- together wit h
spat ial. temporal and social aspects i n the gilme. When playing a pervasive
game, you might as well use your mobile phone, physical objects with augmented
computi ng funct ional ity or other locat ion-based activities,
Til'''''' [,,. T,h'lt'1lo('jI'
Buil ding,) pervasi ve game is a challenging engineering task tJ ecause it touches
many aspects of software computing and game design, from networ king to the
fh: lds 01 human-computer interaction, Pervas ive games are built upon thl'ee core
technologies: mobile devices, wi reless communication, and sensing technologies
thaI capture player's' contexts, The Nordic countri es have a world leading posit ion
t hrough Nokia and Ericsson when it comes to the infrastr ucure needed to make
pervasive games a reality, namely wireless communicat ion, mobile devices and
sensing technology able to pick up changes in the players environment. Besides
the exist ing inf rast ruct ure, research is needed to find a balance between the
pervasive game conducted on t he streets and the non-players who inhabit them
801h mobi le gaming and pervasive gami ng are areas with grea t potential for the
Nordic countries. The financial investments need to match the areas' economi c
possibi lities.
Nord;,
WWW.nordIClflrl0V<ltlon.nf.t
The following researcher s have
participated in the project:
Sweden
Dikon
Avalanehestudios
AemJ
5ensegraph! cs
Karolinska SJukhuset
IVF
Norway
Surgetceh Norway
Leksv!k Teknologi
10M
Grunderparken
S!ntel
Finland
Planmeea
E05
DeskarteG
TKK
Helsmki University
Oenmark
RJ Computer eonsultmg
Gamatoeus
Zenana
Cav!
Arhus 5ygehus
OT!
Iceland
Kine
Globodent
5martVR
LazyTown Enterta!nment
CCPgames
leeTee
Medical Imaging and Computer Games
- How to bri ng cutt ing edge 3D-graphics to surgeons
Background
Computer game fans have enjoyed superb 3D-graphics for qui te some lime.
The same has not been the reality for reconstructive surgeons. These surgeons
must work within t!ghlt!me scheduLes to redeSign ti ssue to new shapes. The
patienfs damage or deformity is pre-studied slice by slice from CT -scans, which
give a poor 3D understanding. During Ihe operations, the surgeons information
is Limited to whatlhey Can deduct from the sight of the patienfs open wound. To
complicate ma1lers more, the presence of blood limits the Visual understanding.
Currently most surgical operati ons are carried oul this way. but a fast technology
deveLopment is taking place. In addition, the training of future surgeons is time
consuming and expensive. The use of simulation tools can speed up both the
education. and the Gurgical skills.
Given the fact that computer games are mass- prOduced. the assumption was
made that the economic advantages of mass production could be exported to the
area of medical imaging. The perceived effect was faster development of imaging
products. and a reduction of costs. These two factors are also highLy related to
each other. since high costs sl ow down market introduction 01 new technology.
Scope
A closer investigation of the possible synergy effects between the two sectors
medical imaging and computer games were called for. The technology utilized
in gammg IS expected to emerge to a new world industry sector with a fast
annual growth. The project focused on whether cooperation between these two
sectors could resul t In new business chances, cost savings and faster progress
In the development of new medical imaging products. In addition. the possibility
of a more efficient surgeon education. and improved surgi cal 3D-tools were
prioritised areas. Potential synergy effects achieved by merging knowledge.
contacts and business Ideas and by identifying relevant challenges and barriers.
were investigated. Networking in this cross-diSCiplinary field of medical imaging.
surgeons and 3D-game developers was seen as imperative for the project.
Conclusions & Recommendations
By researchi ng t he current synergy possibilit ies between medical imaging and
t he gami ng industries, we identified that direct cooperation was not advantageous
at present, For the medical imaging industry to take advantage of technlcalJO-
animation expert ise. other options of collaboration shoul d be ident ifi ed in order to
benefit from the potential synergy perceived_
f,duC-ltINl,ll-ocu ... lmpoll,lIlt
Wit hin I'eseal'ch the focus shoul d be at educational packages, with emphasis
on smaller projects that can work as pre- projects and entrance ti ckets to later
EC-projects_ There should be a wider spread of the use of physical models. but
the tec hnology itself also need to develop for even more complex applications:
An optIOn could be mOl'e complex scanni ng applications. such as cardiac and
combined scanner technologies where dif ferent current scanning technologi es
are ut ilizer!. ThiS could for Instance be the combination of Computerised
To mography scanning with Magnet Resonance (MR! scanning or Positron
EmiSSion Tomography (PET) scanning.
IndU,.til,lt flub
The indirect synergies by simi l ar" technologies are strong. and fur-ther I-esearch
programmes in these areas shoul d be implemented_ Three areas shoul d be
especially in focus: namely haptic design of implants. simul ation and rapi d
manufact ur ing of implant s,
The Nordic countries are Industrial f rontier s ;n computer games. haptic
technologies and rapid manufacturing of implants: by allocating additional
research funding. world-leading possibil ities are Wit hin reach,
It is recommended that research programmes in t he Nordic countries hi ghlight
the complete road frum Si mulators In surgeon educat ion. pre-operational
planning and Implant design. - to implant manufacturing by Rapid Manufact ur ing
technol ogies, By building on these areas where the Nordic region already is
strong, we could posit ion ourselves even stronger for the future.

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Laboratorio de ideas ESKO AHO: Como construir un Silicon Valley en Europa
EtlYladO PO' Mmn! 0 l1<lm 20107r.lOOe 0\1
... torio da Ideu ESKO AHO: COmo o;onalflll , un SIilCOOl Itn Europ.
E. Allo, presidenle de SITAA dellondO de InnoYaCioo de F",landl., y ex pnmer IlInislro de Fmlandla .,$ III
pnme, Iimlanl., del articlllomaruneslo. Son COilUtoreS l1IIembros del ConsejO de
CienaalEmprnsa J . Frank Brown, Oecano deINSEAD. J .. p Courlols, presodente (Ie Micro",,"
P. Cox, pre.idente del Mo';miento Europeo y ex presidenle del Europoo; R. Oollve"., consajoro
delegado presktcnio (10 UCB; O. consojllro (lelegadO de Klafa y cofundado' de Business Obj ect5, P.
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dinallllCaS en torno a III1I.ersodadesc.onside,adas del mllJOmo de IIna Imporlamia will para eI bito .,con6n'oeo Cambridge, Qodord.
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sectores mas promete<!On!s la nofa 110 apoyo
J . Serablarl oa. Mentar It las personllS 0Jf1 talenlo, sa hllien en la reglOO del mundo en Ia que se haDen. a que !rOOi)en en los cIIJslell!S de
Europa. P,omovcr l a abierla enlre uniw,sodaoos. empre&as y ragoones en la CQnS8CU06n de flnana;ooOn Promever que las
personas. las Ideas, disdpll nes cientlficas y lOS &e<;\oras industriales auoon la. Irontcras
http://firgoa. usc.es/drupal/node/404 79
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. I " . , ; i U l l . ' : > P ! . I I " I ( ; i n o . u ( l X l I ' ! l l l a . , . , J F " P ( ; ) 1 " " " 1 " f i l i i '
s s . . . . J d X " 0 1 A I ! U n l l O ( k k ) a ' ( I a . " ' l ( 0 1 [ [ I I l U l l . " I
' S 1 l ; ) j l l 1 l ; , . ' ! J t ! ; ) f I 9 1
! I ! P I ! ' I . ' l o O l I ; ' s . t ' : I . I ; ) S ; ) ! l ! , I I I 1 J o - c . l d o P : I , ' " I l ' I U ; ) J f I ! . w J d 0 1
a , , ! W , ' J . , J " ' p O p u e S I l l ! ' s l u m p s
m . 1 I ' 1 " 1 ' 1 . 1 1 : ' I . ' ! I I t ! ) ! " ! d ! ' l s . I a U I J " c l : I . ' ! ! I I : l J : ) : I ' P \ l O ! m ' U
o h ' . ! " p . . . . . l \ m O l l l l l l I J I l J . l l S I t ( . I t l l f I I ! . 1 ' [ . " S ! I E l I . 1 .
' S I I I " [ I ! I J I I ! l I ! ! ! . ! ! " ' n , r " I : I . , . 1 P 0 1 I I . 1 . l I ' I ! ' I " J n o
1 I 0 ! 1 " . J l I P . . . . J O 1 1 1 1 . 1 ' 1 : I , p 1 . 1 . I 1 ! . I ! l " a J J s n ; ) , " ) S t i l I U ' l . 1 I I
S I I I ; ) I I I \ [ o l a . " , p . \ J l w ) d l U ; ) I I I I . . . I m ! J ' ! ! . , p U l l ; ) s 1 1 ' I I I 1 . ' p n I S ! ' 1
I l ' I I ' M I 1 1 0 . " " J I ' 1 I l ' . 1 a . \ \ I I 0 1 1 1 l \ l 1 t ! " J
p . 1 . ' J . 1 s a p - l I a . " " a . w l [ : l A \ S . 1 ! 1 ! I I I I I J < x k k . s n U ' U J O I l " ; ) ' p
S J ; ) j l " S ! ' 1 . 1 . . I " . l 1 \ l l m b " ' ( 1 ; ' . ' < > . l d , " \ ( ' 1 1 1 1 s . ) I l S S ! ; ' I J t . ! " 1 " I
s . C , : . " . w ) u : i 1 l ! J t f > 0 1 S ; ) ! P P O S 0 1 ' . . . . : i p . , a . ' ! l ' I : w . l l m . . . I !
} l U I J t ; ) , ) S < I I - M U , } J , " ! U ! I ' ' } ' I I a J t ' " ' ' I i ! ' " . ( I ! " ! I I l . ) J : )
S ; ) " " J . ' ! ) e ; : l l . ) ; X I I I ! . I I . ( J I 1 I U a . , ) . J ! ! . \ j l l " . " 1 a ' i l " ! S . 1 ! 1 " ! ' ' ' ' S
p l m . . . 1 1 \ ! S S . 1 . , . ! ! I S I S " ' " : 1 , [ . 1 . s : l ! . ' I S I 1 P " ! : l S ; ) ' P
J O a l I I - . \ 1 ! " ! l ' t a J . ' l u u ! - ' ' j ! J " I I t 1 ; ) ! ; J I I ' I . I J "
' ; , ' ! S ! ' I J J O I I V ' \ I I I t 1 U 1 1 . ) . . . . s . ' ( " f I < ' l l I ! . ( a J t "
I ' " " . l J O l S S S : I . ' . " I S I ' P ' ! " a l C . \ ; : 1 ' 1 . 1 . ' S : I ! l I S n p l l ! a . I I ) I ' . 1 . ' . ' . 1 1 ' " . 1 0
S S ; ) . ' . ' I I S , h ' ! 1 I l 1 ! I U O . , : I ! [ ) s a l l l . l l s u " , U : l P S ! ! [ . I .
' [ l l ! I 1 , a l ' x I 1 1 " . 1 J p ' p a . ' ; ) ! ' I " " 1 1 1 1 , ) s . } \ . I l s n l ) U ! ; : I . \ ! l l ! . ) . . . , . t l l < '
) " ' ( 1 o s ' U n I U ; ) ! ! " " U " ! " l l l I l I I ' a . " : l J n s l l " p l l l l ' W I ( l I ' " P I ! n q
I S I l l I l : ' 1 . \ 1 . \ l O l l 1 " ' 1 ' I J I ' I S I " M , l 1 I I : l P ' " U : > . ' I l ' 1 : 1 , \ \ ' S J t l l l l ' ( \ . l I I l
u o s s ! ! d [ , u a l [ l J < I 1 I 1 l 0 . 1 . I U " ' U l I J a . l ! i l i [ l 1 1 I ! s J ! - ' i s n p U ! . 1 . 1 \ 1 " " " . )
. 1 ' 1 1 ' [ 1 0 < 1 U ! J I ( h > < . 1 . I " J : I ' I , u n l l J : i J l l l " . ( 1 , U f ! I P [ l " "
J O 1 " " 1 ' " 1 1 I 0 0 ( 1 ! . \ \ p . . . . 1 I . . " l d , , ' I " ' ' ' " 1 1 ' ' ' ' P l n o . , \ I l I P I I V
; ) 1 1 1 0 1
s ; i l i u ! - y < l < [ I ' " 0 . Y W I . " M U a . I L ' l 1 a . I ! I " a J . ' . 1 ' 1 . 1 . s l " ' . l a j
1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 " 1 , , , ! f f ; ) . 1 ' 1 1 l l ! ( ' ! I " u I C I U : l I U d o l . 1 . l a p . ( . ' ! I , , , I
U ! ; " ) l U ' U ; ) . 1 1 1 S a ! l ) S n I ' U ! ; : I S : I ' P J " S p . . X I U . . . . . l s
: > ' P 1 ' 1 1 1 1 . \ [ U O I I I I I I I I . , S ! ' 1 I 1 ' l ' l . " [ I l U " ! I ' l 1 I 0 1
S . 1 ! J I S n p ' , ! : l S ; ) ' ( I . 1 0 : I . ) U I I U I " I I I I ! : 1 ' ( 1 : I } l P . . . .
1 1 " ! p I l i ' p a s l I . I I : 1 ! ' ! . I I : l J < J 1 U S ! " ' J : l 1 ' ' ' ( 1 \ I ' i j } t , . 1 .
P . 1 . " : J k l l P S - l n s s l a l j l I " ' ' ' : l I p
( I I ; : I p l l l l l . \ . 1 ' 1 1 " " ! i I I ' I ! J I " O ' ) . 1 ' 1 1 ' s a ! . l \ s n p u ! a l p . ! " S S . 1 U : l . U l . I I I !
; ) S ! " J " I s n " , " " ' ( 1 1 ) ; ) ; ) " " 1 1 . 1 . / I M t u l l . l f l ( f J i l l . I I J J / , I \ '
I < l . I I / ! , l . I J J a . \ . . . . a l p p a 1 j s ! 1 ' l m l : 1 . 1 1 ( 1 . 1 \ 1 J a . \ l I I S l 1 r

$ , 3 1 V 1 5 : 1 0
BACKGROUND
THE CREATIVE INOUSTRIES
The firs t C1Yalillt! Indlls/ries Mapp;IIK
plllJli shcd in Nm'cmlJ.cr 1998, was Ihe lirst C\'cr aUcmpl
to mea sure the ccullomic cOll t rilnlli oll of these
to the UK, all d to identify the opportunities
ilnd threats they nlccd. The JUIIPP;lIg DoclIlI/('II1 also
hclpctl sct a blueprint for action fur both GuvcmmcnI
and the industri es.
Over t he past I WO years the Creati ve InduSlriC5 Tas k
FOTce has in\'csli g:II Cd generic issues which impacted Oil
the creative industries and has made recommendations
fur change in arca s s udt as skills and training. finance
for creative YCnlurc, int ellectual pruperly ri ghts,
c:o.: port promoti un.
TIlesI.' changes hun', fl)r examl)lc, resulted in better
carccr.s guidance on til e creath'e i ndustr ies; mo re efforts
at regional level to provi de appropriate Iinal1 cc for
crc:lth'e businesses; iml,roved information scrvit; es on
intellect lIal property for c reators, users and t he general
public; and a more stre:llulined alld focused range of
sup)>ort for creative export ers, The Task Force also
looked specifically at increasing sales of tcle"i sion
export s and the OPI)ortllllit ies and threats 10 creath'e
busi nesses from the !1I(('met,
Some two yea1's lalcr, there is significa ntly increau'ti recognition of the importance of these industries:
wit/lin /Ilf l\Tinislrr/'11 Crf<l liw indll slrirs Slnll,)!.,)' GrollP Itrlps lu a moonlimllf" rf.,pOMf /ll 1111'
lIuds I!t 111,,(, indus/rir.<. ading iI.' ,/ "d,aring IWII.'''" Jur i llili<l/h't's <III/ladion. MOr,,01!I'(, 111i" fflll<lin.' a /llI/ilJl/,11
illililllh. ... , witlt Minislfrs/romllt" ,,'WIlI:,1t KruuliV<', /ltr NIJrlltrrn I ff/,m" E rt'(lIlh't'. '"I1I/lir /( (/.<11
inwhV'.J. SI'1V'n,1 ",pa,lmrnli a"d a,wnfirs hat.,. lal',,, inililllitY's which largd llir ,.,.,.d/il.,. indus/ri,s;
'wilhin Ihl' indu.<lrirs, III,"" is a ... il/in),'1II'5.. 10 ulld in parlnl'rsllip tvilh gm,""RIIll'nl ,1/1'/ tJlhl'('J III I.u/;/r A-0' i$SlIt'S.
i':,,,mpll's ilfdlldr III/' Mu.<f,/lIdll.<lr:y "'mUll lind Ihe Cmllh.,. IndusiriN/':rporl ProlllIJIWI/ .-hh'i$Ol)' Group;
,II rr!{iw,," ''''1'1, II"Kioll<l1 /)nJl'/tl/JIIlml .4Krnrir" ,lIId !lrKimlil1 Clllillmi Consorlilllll" """ !wrkillK wilh olh((
kf)' p,lTlnfTJ 101'n'<lIff IIIf df't'flopllll'111 Itt ,.mllh." i"du.,lrifs ill Ilirir rrgioll.<;
d/l i"('I',,i"K 1I1111111/'r (1' 10...,1 "1I1/wrilifs l",!.,. ruugniSl'd II" ,'IJn/rilllllion crt'uli 1ll' imJII$/ril's In lII"kl' in I'('onolll;"
dn'f'lnpml'nl. frwnfnlliun "nd .f{Ki,,/ 1IIt'lllsion. " ;"-"mp/,s illr/lld, III, Clllillm/lmlllsiril's Qllart,r ill Sh1Jirl.l,
Ihl' .I1'1.L't'1I"I)' QIIII,II" in IJirminxll"'JI, (;winW' 'Iitu:n in Nt1w"sllr, Ih, Cdllt,,/w/ Qlli/fll'r in I k!fd.il "nd IIII'
(11)' !'rinK' III.,.,,'!! 1.0ndoll.
T
I I ! < i , h 1 I U / ' l . \ ! 1 e ' l . I J / "
I U a l ' l u l l ' : , ' C s l 1 , l O d , ) J S I ' I l . l 0 U I I \ S J ; ) , . J ! U O J I J ; ) I "
I I V a l I I I I ! p < l l l I I F I I I ! S ! " S I : I
S ! ' I 1 O I I M I I I I I ! J ) U I I ' ) 1 1 1 1 . \ \ S P C l U U . ) P i l i :
S J ; : l 1 p . 1 e < l S < I , 1 . I I I I S ! ! V " P O , \ \ J l < 1 ' l I l I l ' I n : ) a , w ' l
' ' ' I - ' ' I ' U I : J , I I I I I ) " " " ! I C j , I O S S I !
, 1 1 " : . 1 I ' S , ' ! ! ' I J < I J O I . ) a s , ) 1 / 1 1 1 1 , t i l l " A \
I I I I I l , \ : 1 1 1 0 , 1 S l J V . J O 1 " , l I l 1 l J I l J < I ( 1 s , , , o p I I O ' 1
. \ 1 ! S , I . J . ' \ L 1 n . \ I J : ) , ( 1 1 1 M ! ' , l { ) \ S C : l J O " I ' l l L 1 U ' S C M C I C I '
, 1 1 1 1 I l U l : J O " . 1 1 1 . \ \ l C I I I L I \ ; ) I I J ,
' S ; ) \ , l I s n l l U l a . ' I I C < l J : I ; ) 1 1 1 1 1 0 C I I : I ' I s n C l o J
' ' \ 1 , 1 1 1 1 \ 1 a , l U l l l , 1 1 ' ! , \ l U c ! I I I , \ \ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S I W P C I I I W I U I I I I J , l a , 1
' ! I ! ' \ \ 1 , ( 1 ) { I , I . 1 1 1 . 1 1 : , ' , ( ' I ' l l J ; ) H : 1 1 ! S W 1 1 I I 1 I l P ' ; 1 , \ \ I ' " "
C ' ) . 1 C s l l l I I I I e l l : I ' " I s ; ) 1 l l n a l U 1 P , ) 1 1 1 I I :
, \ I I U , ) , I J I I < I S \ . l n n , I D . \ \ . I ! " , ) ) I V ' . \ I I ( h : J . : J I I ! I I I ! H < 1 1 1 1 I I ! p " l s H
, ) . 1 I ! I ' ' ' S I l S " : ) J I l O S J a l j , ) 1 1 . 1 . ' ' ' ! p u " d I I V ; 1 1 [ 1 t i l S ! I I I 1 I , \ \ I ) 1 I S
, ) , ' e 1 1 , 1 , \ \ ' 1 1 1 ; ) 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 0 1 1 S ! I I I " ! P , I I I 1 , I S ' ) . 1 d 1 1 : ' 1 1 t i l ; ) I ' I I : , I I : t ! I I I I I , '
S \ I C I I \ 8 6 ( ; 1 J O . l C l c l ' I l s l I ' l l l l s a I I c a a , \ \ a . 1 . ) I I . \ \ ' , 1 . 1 " . 1 , \ \ 1 1 1 1
' S ' ) l I a l l l l l a 0 l ' " , \ \ 1 , ) I I I 1 I , ) ' ) , \ \ l a ' l . 1 ' : 1 0 ' 1 ' \ . \ \ J " ; U l I ) I I I : , ' l I o d n
" . \ \ ' ! J I ' S . ) , ) . l I I 1 1 S , \ I I C I U ; l I p ; 1 , l u l s " H 1 I , I t I I l J u t l r . u ! S !
J I I , I / I f J I ' ) O ( l ' i l u , u 1 < I " H ' H ( ; ( l l , 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 \ . \ \ 1 I / ) $ p r . I I U l o a j : J , I J ! I J V
' S a ! J l s " I ' U ! a " I I ! ! ; ) ' I ; ) , 1 1 1 0 J O " I ! ! I S I U ; ) . I , I I I ; ) a l { 1 . I I I I I C ; ) < 1 . \ \
! f U ! l l U I : J S J a l l l l l l I S ' ) ' I < 1 1 1 1 S I I d p l { 0 ) [ 1 " P U P I l ] I I , ' } ; " {
I i l l ! 1 ' ; ) l l ! I ' * n l . . . . 1 1 I 1 1 U 1 : , I I C ] , l d o , U I t l I i I S O I I ) " I I I . u n s , , ; )
0 1 S ; I J . 1 n n s J O , \ 1 " 1 . 1 < : , \ c I M S I ! a , \ c l l . ) , \ ' ' , W 6 1 ' J I I " I I I 1 1 ' ) O ( l
f . l f . ' / $ / I / J l l j . I ' I ! I " " , I : ) . l I p ' ! I \ < " s V ' ' ' ' ' ! . 1 I S I l I I I 1 \
a . I ! l e . l , u . l I p , 1 ) ! I I 1 . l I ' ! , \ [ , I I C J c < I , I S ' P l l l , \ \ " 1 ' : 1 '
U ! s a ! I I " : l W ! I ' 1 I ! I S . 1 J , J I { I o s ' J [ I I . 1 W ! 1 '
U O j l ! " I P ] l " : J U ! I " a p " , , S " I j C I I I " . I \ J I S n p U ! . l . \ ! I C , l J : J ; ) 1 1 1
. I " : < 0 : ; ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 , 1 I C P W o J O 1 I 0 \ S l " " . 1 d
" 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 " . \ 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 \ . l l l l n s l I a ; ) ' 1 S I : I I ; ) , " " 1 1
' ) J o d s P " C ' S ' ) \ , l o I l l e j j '
I I U C S l U I J : ' I s n l U " \ l l I l ! l ] d s O I I ' 1 1 1 , , \ , 1 1 1 1 1 1 " I : , [ : ) I I S S J O P , ) S , I ; I I P O
1 1 1 \ , \ \ s d l I I S I I I I \ I C j ; ) . l : I \ 1 I I 0 1 l 0 a , ) ; ) S O P ; ) 1 1 1 , ) S \ I I 1 I O : J < l . J o S l c " i \ \
' I l . ' l J / l , I I ' U I I I I I I , I S , I I " ' ! " 1 ' , ' . I J ! I L l i J S
" " ! , l I l w O J f ' ! l V . . . u m l 1 / i Y ; ' ' f f ' I , I I / S , I / f / I I I I ' s / , I U J i l l
" ' ! S I I I I f ' ; U ' M I U i J s . I , l I / f , I . l 1 i J t I . ! P V J J / I l ! ' f u I J . M / J I I V 1 I I 1 ! j " I I 0 ! ' l s o f
, l i J l I . . f I ! S J / J " / J ' i ! S i l l ' ' s l f w , ) ' / , I . Y U ' / I I U " / ' f / ' w I " ' " j . l l ) , J I l l
' i J . I l l P i J l . I I I J J V ' X I / ! r ! p " " I ' " . ' P U P " ! 0 1 S ; ) 1 , I I S I I I ' I I ! , ) , \ ! ) I I ; I J J
, ) 1 ( 1 } I " \ , , l n ; ) ! I I p . s ; 1 I 1 1 1 1 \ r . I . U a , " " \ I . 1 r . l l 1 1 ' ! S
' . . ( " , , , J o , J < 1 J V " P ; I / P I I I ! j i l / W ! I I I I , t o ! J , I ' , I / I I W I I O ! I I I , " I / / ' ' ' ' ' ' 1
J i l l ' I X m W / l l l o , I I / I " , O ' I I J / ' P U I } ' 1 1 1 1 1 . M I ' ' ' ! ! ! " , I I ' ' ' ' I ' ' ' '
I I . J I I I " / ' / J , I I / . J l I ' I H I / I " ' j l l l l " I I I I / , l l f s ' . \ i , I I I , I I V 3 . I ' ) j l m l J , I I 1 . 1 l } j / , 1
I I ! 1 I ! 1 J ! . 1 f J , I ! " I " J l U I I I ' / J ! ' ! , ' 1 1 J . / J l m I J / l , 1 S l i S . 1 ! , ' l s " I " ' !
a . ' ! I c ; , . 1 . l , l I J i . I " U ( ) \ l \ I I L P I ' l P . U j } l P " ; l ! f 1 1 h I l l J l n ; ) , 1 . . . . ,
I I I J I I I I U I I ( f f i l l , I J J V ! \ , , ' J ! . 1 / s I I I J I I I a l p " I

BACKGROUND
M [ M8ERSHIP DElAILS - M INISTERIAL CREATIVE INDUSTRIES $TRAT(GY GROUP
Ht II"" Chri s SIII;d, r-. Il'
It t lion IliIa!'y
Il ewill "11'
Stl'pht' ll Timlll s ,,11'
J<lIl CI Andersun ,\ 11'
Dr lii lll Howell s ilo ll '
T
':/ Sid/r.l;,' Clllluf ... ,\I,-di, / ,111,1 SI,,,r,.
_H;IIM/.., '!t -"!.llf'. Ik /"'I"/III' III./;" ,11,- r ;III 'imNIllt'nl,
" 'id III,
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l'i//'hulI"II/,I') I ;ntl,/ , s ''''''/'''')" 'l S'''lf .
V"/'oIrllllmlji". CII/till)" ,\It'lli,, ,lIId
Hlfh;,m,.nt.II')' Und.., S,-, -rr/,,,)' 'II S/<"<',
f) ,,!,"r/lliml '!l T'Hdp ,"n/ illdus',:\',
I / - " . / J I W . , ' , ' ) 1 1 1 1 ' 1 . ) 1 1 1 1 "
H ' . 0 1 1 " " ( 1
' , ' / 1 ! 1 ! J ' ! / ( i ' / I I I " ' ' " f I I I ' I I f 1 . 1 I " N
. . / I J ( ) I I . , ' " ' " ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 . , , " . { U I " . ' U ! J I . "

n / N " / I ' U " s p l ' . J J / / l j n . ) ) , 1 J " , f . l U . l H '
. . . ! l l i ) ' 1 1 1 " < ' J ' : . / / O l l l l U U . ) I ' l l "
' ' ' I I ' I S , F , , ' : H ' I " . I . ' ' ' . \ " . I " l m n
/ " " " , . v , / 4 1 1 1 : . / 1 ' ' ' ' ' l I o . t / I ' . m l ' : , / . l ( ! ' / I I . ' / I I / . I , ' 4 . , ( /
' , ' / 1 ' 1 , \ ' . I i ! ' : " ' I " . l N S . U / ' " ! !
J .
I " ' " ; V " . I P ! , , . f o . A l d J ( ) ; > ' I . L
' 1 < ! I ! J U < l I . !
I ! " ! I A J ! I ' H t i l ' O N
' < 1 " " 1 1 1 1 , . , ' ; . 1 1 ' . I . " " I V . I ' l l I I I W / < 1 " ! J ! l J i ' " ' 1 1 ' . I I . 1 " , , ' ; . . S
. I S I ' > ! " U O S I ! A \ U I ! I I V
E 2 : 0 0 - L L : O O 3 1 1 1 1 J 3 d S H 3 d
9 1 ' 0 0 - 0 1 ' 0 0 M 3 1 1 1 H 3 1 1 0
1 Advertising 1:01 - 1:06
2 Archit ecture 2:01- 2:08
3 Art & Anti ques Market 3:01-3:06
4 Crafts 4:01- 4:04
5 Design 5:01- 5:06
6 Designer Fashion 6:01- 6:04
7 Film & Video 7:01- 7:08
8 Interactive Leisure Software 8 :01 - 8: 08
9 Music 9:01 - 9:16
1QPerformingArts 10:01- 10:14
11 Publishing 11:01-11:12
12 Soft ware & Com'lter Services 12:01- 12:06
13Television & Radio 13:01-13:14
-- .

-
-"
APPENDI X 0:01- 0:05
BIBLIOGRAPHY 0 ;06 - 0 ;14
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 0:15 - 0:18
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REGIONAL OVERVIEW
Alc hnu}!h l.u",lo" ami I],., SnlUh Ea."1
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;'; .. rll,<:rl1 1,..1;",,1. S. .. daml '"HI \\al,s
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w"alth j.!;'IlHali"" ,lilt!
l"llIl'loym"1l1 n!'I".rtll nil;"'" to s,,,: ial
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IMPACT OF E-COMMERCE AND
THE INTERNET
1-:-<' " " 1111':11''' m ... 1 lhe Inl.'rl1<:\ loa\"('
1",01 a sil-:l1ili",ull iln!';o .. 1 on ,,11 '"I"e;oli\'"
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" ""1111;111"'''1 I .. Ih,' l>t' rt, ... al'ls.
Th" 1:,Jilllnll';.:-h 111"ntali,,"al F,"I;,,,I
is hy 1;,1' tll{' la r,L;" "1.
As " ""1'1111 ,11',' th"
d,,,'s 1101 ,1",""l1slr;oh' slrollg-
):'1'0\,111, TIll' highly oI .. n:\"I>t'tJ ,.kills
"I' I't'I'l;II'IlL<'I's '"UII<...III, i"i",," ;olld II",
('apil,,1 "I' 11,'\1 alltl
nf,'''''1 I,,iug IIII'
fldl. TJwrc is a hi):,l ... r fen,1 "I'
d{'I"'IIIk,,, ',> ,,11 tua"k..c Ih,,"
ill ,,1 10,,1' Eur"]"",,, "'>llUld,'S,
i,, ;t fe"r "I' ''f,'al,\'<' ri,k-I"king.
Th.:re ;0 111..:11 III
Il L"l'e I'ril''' I{' ,'111'1 "' 1'1, and ti".
.1,,1" "11 Ill<'
Publishi ng
Hel;oi1 sal,'" or ill ar,'
I" han' 1>)' 111" ..
Il,'el' Ihe 1'1'," ' ;"11' .r";"', Th"
"10""",,, a h"I "",' " "I' Il'ad,' ""l'plll ,' or
,0;,'") milli"" in (h','r 11(1 .... "f
UI\ ",lulls u , '''IIMIIU,,!' ltI' I!-!iIl,;U\',
all.l Iho: UI\ is f,'r
sixlh " I' ,.I I ",.\\' "",.Ii" till,',. ",'ailal>l,>
"or It", itl,', ( ;'" , 'I' nnlt'1l1 i,,;1 i"I;' " " ""
Ii leI'''' y un' 1T,'alil'l-! ir ... 111 ,,,,],0,,
l'''I'Y''I);,hl ,",, 1

p . " k l ! " I . , J U I I l ! : : i ! l ' . I 0 ' [ 1 ! " J I ' ' ' '
I I ! \ \ " " 1 " , 1 l ' t I . U " I I I 1 " " , '
. " " , , . , , " I " " ! " ' ' '
. : - I I I ! S ' I ' ' ' P ' : " " " " ' \ " 1 1 " ! I " ' ' 1 , , \ ! : 1 U '
. I " 1 ' : . 1 1 . , . " , P , ' I ! ' : " " \ I I I . . . ' l l " 1 I " " " " 1 [
o t l ' ' ' . 1 1 1 I " I ' " , , , b p U l . ' I I : i " I " W : . " . H I
I " ! J \ " ' J ! I ! " 1 1 , , , . 1 \ . , , 1 , . 1 " , ( I ! W l " I ! ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '
' ' ' ( 1 " " ' : ' 1 " I 1 . ' ' ' ' ( ' ' ' ) ' [ 1 " I
I " I I I ' ! I ! I ' ' ' . I I
s . , ; 1 " . I I 1 " ' I ' . 1 ) ' I I I l ! 1 . ' 1 1 : : > . 1 . ' I I I "
( s " " I ' . ' ' ' ' u . , " " ! S ! . ' ' 1 1 1 [ I : I I " s . , . , , 1 P \ I I I I U . ' I '
" " " " I ' ! . ' ' : : i ' . , ) " " ' 1 : 1 0 1 ' ' ' ' ' 1 , ' ' 1 ; 1 1 1 ! ; 1 p , u . ,
' ' ' ' ' ! I ! P I H ! " I ' 1 " . " " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' " I " . ' l x . . l s
I " ' " s P ' I " ' " ' ; I " ! : - ( . . H " < > . ' . I " " " ! l " I , , ; 1 ) J
' d ! ' ( S J . 1 I I \ \ " J " " " ! I " I , , ; 1 ' J
" 1 ' ' ' 1 - ' " 1 " " " 1 . 1 . . , . . 1 " , 1 . . . . ' ' ' [ 1
P t l S S ! " ! " 1 1 ' ' ' ' 1 1 S . I : > . ' ' ' . ) . h ) ( h : . [ , ) I ! ' I . \ \
. , ' 1 1 0 ' / 1 ' - ' . 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 " . ) m . . ' . \ . > 1 1 . 1 .
, 1 ,
" ! P ' : I ( l U i : , \ . 1 .
' \ ' 1 \ J " ' ! ! - ' I ' ' ' ! \ . I . ' S . I "
; ' . I ! W ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ! I ' " " " . ' " . I " . I " I ' l l n " "
: : i l l ! ' ' ' ' I I . ' . 1 1 1 ' - U " ' l I t . > l l I l I I l I u , n . ' 1 " 1
I I ! I ' l l " P I I . l ' I " 1
' ' ' 1 1 ' . 1 ; 1 " 1 0 1 1 1 1 ' . ' 1 I I I I ! ; 1 ! ( 1 ' ( " , , ( : 1 )
" ! " ! ( ' . l U l . . . . , [ 1 " . 1 " ' 1 1 : . ' ' l ' p . " , ! , \ ) 1 1 1
w . . . : i " I \ 1 s , O ! I " , . I [ " 1 . , . 1 . ' 1 1 ' " 1 " . )
' . W I , . . ! . , , , ! < > 1 ' ' ' l I P I I ' ' . " ' . H " ' H I I I "
" 1 ' 1 " " P ' ' ' ' , ' I ! l l , ' I " S ' . , ! " " " , J p
s . " ' ( " J " : . , . I " . , " " s l ! 1 " , ' , i I . ' 1 " " 1 1 ' 1 - ' "
S ! I I " . S I , \ , ' [ , ' I . > l l . 1 .
p u e U O ! 5 ! . . . . " 1 " 1
' p . " O J ' , i I I I . I " ! , ' , " " I " H ! " , " . ) J " I . ( [ " 1 I ! 1 S I
' " l l ! l I
S
. . . . . I " , l l ! ! ! ' I I I I ! " " " . 1 " l I ' ' ' ' 1 ; l ' I . 1 .
s . s n ; l ' P ' I I ! " . 1 . , , [ " 1 1 " )
1 " " . 1 " ) 1 1 1 . . . p " I 1 . ' 1 . . l . I " ' [ " ! ' I "
P S " " " ! S ' H I U ! l I J " " " " u S . , J " I ' l o u . ,
. I " U " O l l ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ! I I ' ' W
" ! . } j ' . , ' I I l " U " S ' ! H ' . " ! ' . 1 " 1 ' "
1 " , , 1 " 1 " ' ' ' ' 1 ' m i ' ) . I n
' ' ' 1 . 1 . ' I I ' " . , ; 1 1 ! ; 1 ! I ' ) [ ' ( " " 1 1 \ I , " I <
" 1 " 1 1 I I ! 1 1 1 . " " . 1 " 1 , 1 1 " .
[ l U l l s l . , . . . h ; . , " I I ' . ! I S . l l 1 , . . . . . . > . , . I ! " I I
. I " I ' . U ' [ 1 - ' ' ' ' ' ' ) , 1 1 " " . ( 1 : , u l l . ' S . > l W l . i t U " . ,
. ( I I " t l l . , . " " 1 . 1 1 : . " 1 , , . 1 1 1 : ' 1 " ! 1 , " \ . 1 1 : 1 1 1
. 1 . 1 ' ' ' 1 1 s '
" J e M l j O S
. . . ' ' ' ' 1 ' 1 ' ' . 1 1 : 1 . l . l l l . . . . . ' i l : l I I i 1 U ' \ 1 ' 1 1 ' 1 < 1 : . '
" J J . ' I - I . ' ' ' I I S I > l U : I 1 p m . l . . p , . , p
. " ' J " . ' l I I : w . . 1 ' l U l u ' " ' [ ' r , . l t l l ' . , , , , . I I 1
s " ' l ' ( 1 \ 1 < , . , ; 1 P ! , i t , . , . 1 . 1 " 1 { "
' : : i u l ' I " ! I I { u t l . l l l l " . ' I . ' ) ! , ' " ! . I I . 1 1 : I " ' ! I . I I : < I
\ " I . I ; l ; 1 " ' ' ' ' I ' ' ( ' ' ' ' ' I " " ! ' ' ' I , ' ' I 1 1 1 ' ' ' 1
' s m l l s . 1 " 1 " " ' I ' " 1 1 M - I I ' " " ! , " ' , " 1 . 1 . . . " , [ 0 1
. : - I " \ l I l i l . ' . 1 " ( ' I I I : S J . , : : l . . 1 I 1 i
' I - ' ! ' I " l " ( , . . . , , 1 < . " 1 1 S I I . ' . ) . " " . '
. ' . W : > ' 1 " ' 1 . 1 . ' ) 1 " ' 1 1 1 " . ' . I ' ! ! n l o l m . ( l : d < " ' 1 '
S o : < . ' I I S " J " l I U ! I : I I I . ' . 1 < 1 ' 1 ) " 1 1 . 1
REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE
KEY ISSUES
III 1"0-1:11;"11 in dl<"T,,"li,"o.:
ind",< tri,", i",,,,,, I'('rlint 'lli 1" 1110.'1 "I'
"II "I' the in tho: Uli illd ll<k:
llit n'"I/.lil ' 11111/.,. mapping Iv f'rm';d" "
II<'I/tl'/,Idl"" '!f'rdl<ll i.< fI"/>/>f'lIing 011
II" gmund "11,/ 11,-'" !'t,ft,:"
,jl'(,'I'/'J/mI,nl. Til,. IIId/'Pillg ,,1.<rIII'/" I"
/0" /I(I,('-'{ "', " mlllll/flil Ulld" I:f/ll lldill,l! '!f"
Ih,' .... '!f' Iii,' frl', I/ Il',. lIu/u;/I",r.<;
Ih( "I'(d.li,r ,T,."fh." Inrl/H/,.;o
,,1Y11/I'Kir., to in/t'}!llI/" wil li ",h",.
" ./",.-,{ .'If''/I'ldr . ,
1Jr."'""",,"1 ! lgl'lI,ir.<.Ufgirlll.,J
{'lIltuml COII,,,,r/illlll ,i, 1. MI"/IIIK ,'lIrI
Skill,( (mll/I"/'/.' ,/lId Ih" Sill,'"
fllI .,i1/.":< S,,",'/a;
III( "f",llo illl/,ml'" "".,int.'.' "'II/'/'<Jr/
,'g"no'n ,"(11/)'1/,',(' ,!I'aMliI-,.
,m,ll" />Ilwi& .<111'1'0,.1
",,,,".llIi.<III.'. inri//,IIng Ilw n,wll" lid/,
.-rM/II'" I"I_"/IIN,''' . /" n"',UlI'J;
" lIr""nlgilig ffllIIlIIlIlII;,I/illll
,IIU{
l/i,' ",.,..1 I .. im/!Ilf11' ,,,I1,j,,, 1;11 imm,..,
,/iIMII')' <ll11i/"I",. ,,/Ill /" '/r."'(1' l ..
,-,nl/n-.. indu.<I,;",. _"'i1",rl """k",i.,,,,,,, _<",-1,
,',f ('""Ih ... / /dH/1/I,'g" 1f ;",1 ,lfMI,l/ulr;
o III .. /10-,',1 IIJ .,lrmglll,.11 ,.,-i.<lill).!. lind
dr.II,,/, ..n/fr)!lf1).! ,., ... "lia- :,,;/11
"!'I'/'fI,.,.i,,/,. .<11/'/'0,.1 .,11"11,-/11"".' /0 h,"1'
I//flll "'1/,.,.,.,.,1,
0
111,. 111'1''' /" mall/mgt' ",11'11/'1>1' ,!r
,'I'.IIIl>' I,d",/I ill '"I'gliJl/i.
Mapping
\V" I" (:"",11',' II ... 1'1'''' i . i"" <or
rohusl dala Oil Ih" <'I"<'ali,... indu.' ll'i('s
;1( h .. t h "'gi"" ,,1 ",ul
I.:,,,,-Is. S<IIII<' ,!lil\"l.' Inat/,
I" map II,, 10"1 ,,,. ",,01 1<>
"I IS'll" : this IH<.rc 'OI ' .,i.' '':I I\
a,.,. .. " . I],,, UI\ . :mll tlom
1J1"'d"I'Ulell ! "W'II<";"" ill 1-:1l1-(lal1l1.
l b,' N.wll,,rn Ird:!l1d 1,,0.I1I,'rial
U""d"I"'Il'l lt l!-r ,anl, So,.,llis),
EIII.'r!,ri,,' Hnd Ih{, \\'dsh
D, '\(lnpuIl'tl l I,m, :'s 1;111: ,
I'i<'l lll'<- HS possihle "II "lIid, 10 has"
I""lky llt-nl"plIllnt .
Strategies
, \ 1:01").:\' IHlI1d'cr (If (lI"!-foflli.,ali(llls
hal'" a 1'"1,, I" jll:t)' ill ,l(',..Jupin).: Ih"
tTmli,'" ;nduslri,'S :' /{cllda. '11"'M'
in.-1ullc, in 1-:1I).:l:iIlIl, 1Iq,i",ml
U('I't' I"I"''''I'1 AW" ... i,,. Ik).:i,ul,, 1
('1I!tllr:, I ( :"".,,, .. liu11O.<. 1":'l"l1il)).: :,,,,1
!'1,i11s IIII'
Sen ' in', alld L'l lIh'all'1I1 ill
N""tll,'rn Ird;u " I, So'"lla",1 :1I1c1
\ V;, I..,. amI" ",U1),\"" (II' IM.hll<l,)' ',"111,'11
il1<1l1>ll".I' ... h:os lloe
.. \l"l s C"uIHi1. Dc,i),\"" CO'''l<' il :md II,,
Film ('''''')\';1. \V" "II.'lIre tll:lt
Ih"; 1" .... c;ol; ' " imlu.'lrils Slralt'I-\""s
inll'rl""k, 1:").:'liu).:"
<II' cll(lI'l .11111 :"'oidi,,1-\' "'Hl'" ('.,,:IIY
dupl;, "ti"". :\1."', "here " ppropri:lk.
\Ie " ..... ,,, ""sur,' "r Eli
lillldill).: 10 ""l'l'o!'1 fT,'at ;" ,-
Business Support Mech,lnisms
Thc "]';011':111-\'1: Ii.r Ih" S\1I:,1I
Ser\'i,'\' i., I" d"" ,:I ,,1' ils 1\l1t!, r.<I:lIlJi,,).:
"'I"
,,1' Ill\' 11\','d, uf rn:ltil"IHls;nn .,,,.',
and I" d"\'I'I,,1' ""ys "f .l d;" "ln).:
SII I'I" ,r\ "hkh th,,,,o.: ;1I11w
"""I - Ilois ",ay "OIlail ).:, ... "1",. II,,,, "I'
g- .... "I' "lid Ill'l"""killg'
I],,,, , "ill. ot l,,'" iudu.'lri,s; ;0 '111 II",
,,, ... Itl 10,.]1' ,,',':01;,, hlls;",., ... s I ..
n,,\ lI'ol"l, 111"''''
""n""""i<':.,i, ." "",I " );.-i,all;':-'-.
Finance
A 1;".1' 1;1<" 1"r in ''I"'I";n;':- II":I"< "llillll<,1
>:;I'<>\\'tll "I'll", n ca ti\'(' illol'lslri.,., is 10
p ... ". idc :ll'prnl"im,' tin:I1I..;;,1
;j( ,,11 pl",,,,:s of Iousill"ss d.,,.d"lllI,,'"t.
ere;,I ;,'" ,\,1, ;'1]1:11-(" \V"sl ,\1 idlallol"
(.'o.:e SllIdy) pr",i<l.,,, "too.:
.. I' tiU1Uil1/{ \\ I,idl is t"il .. r{-d I ..
Ih .. 'll'nL, .. f " r,,;ni,,'
T b" i'lwll"I1,!!;" \\illlo .. If) ""sllr,' Slid,
PI'''' is\"" is ;o\' ;oil:,I01<- ",or .. "iddy.
CASE STUDY
Creative Advantage West Midlands
'I'll .. ("""/iz.,, ,'lrhUII/"gf V,md /,1111.'1'/'-.,
1'<'"'",'" ml'il,d III III,' If ,.", ,\[idl,'N/' /1/
" .(f':,/Ilir glv-:dll 'tf III l/i"
,',"'<llh, illd/l"'l r;,,.,'. ''''/,)illld /i" .,' /",'11
... <1"1>"-<',,,,1, 1,'illl t-:II,,,"'-,III
IIrgi."",I I ),,.,./"l'lIIrllf /'/11/.1,10 flrl,.
,"M .... ,,'(III'" '!f II,,, ,lttli, '/lNit., /1",/
(fI1II/,.l1l/' -" ill IiiI" 1'''''/11'" IIId".",,.i,',<
,'/Z,'/II/llkr In "IIr.II"/II/K 1 ... nIHl)' ,-,,/,i/dl
.!;III,hlll[ /", ,111,<1' ,!r (""ir . ",,,11,, , (111,1
I)'/,,(il,' illl/u:'.lfJllIIg .<r(/,,,:
Thr.!;lIId 'iI 'illl'";;',,I,' ,,,!l/I,d im" ,<IIIIPlti_'
I!/ II/, /" ,L' I:IIM)()()ji,' 1Ir.;; .1IIe1 ",/,,/oIi.</i,''/
,'r""'it,,, 1'/I'III,:<SIt'oI \/"',,, '/d,u', ,I"" "I:
1)'d/ll\'-d, h, I"/ ,,g"7fit l/l/., Y</Ik
Clust ers
Tin' n ... l1 tl.l' UTI ClIl.<hI'.<
.\Iap' d"II,onstrakd (hc "I'rclid " f'
"'''.'hI".< ;nTll . Ih .. Uli.
S" ... . fil1 .-1,,'1<"1' , 1.,\{ .. I"pm("u ""11
I", a key tf> n>:I<>IIal ""mpd;I;,,'
;,,1\ .. ;111 ,1 is h.,11
t" lilt' ,,,,![illll ... 1 " " .... 's ,,1
"\iSlill;':- "'uslns IIi HI IHlrlUI'<' til<'
).:.1''''' th "I' "1I"-'I').:;CI11 dusters.
Retention
. \ , "tlltllflll ""I"I,l;uIII ;'nt"lI).:; ..... alile
I",,,,,,s.'<'.< is l ilt' .It-ili " I' l:oholll I"
1."".1011.:\ h'T cl,:tlkll).:;" I,p" I"
d,', "'''P juiliatil,'" \, hkh II ill "IISU!'<'
;1I.li, iUII;lls 1't,t11;I ill ItI;I
'::1\ .'" !'<').:iul1.
Overview
. 110,,1'., i,< a
""I!<"'1l1r<tli,,,, "I', t"';'I;"C i",I",'lri.,s ;11
(AUI,lolI "lid Ih, S"ulit E;'si - l"t"llt er
11\.,)' " ... .. U"I I;,, S'HUc "r all
in tl,,' rn'ati",' indu.'tri<;.,
"' (;n';11 llrit"ill , 111111 hoth loa",,;,
,h;,r. <II' ill! "I\'"OI'C .
,'ml'h'YIlI""1 II"m :tn.im]".,I",\'
"'''I'I''Y"l<'lIt - il ".",M I ... "l'<'"1!
III p"rll'ay tin' ,n';I[iIC industries it.'
""I,V a I A"ldoll alld S"ulh E; ,sl
1'11\"" 1I11<'IU,n. 'I'll<' I'\'alil y
II", ( 'n':oti,,,
Iml".'ll'i,,,,, T" . I, 10'01'<',:" r"porl
'17,, ;IIlJ 110"
('I"sit'rs plIl,lisl,..d
I,y III<' 1)"1';11'1111<'111 " I' TI' ;"k ;",d
Inoll"ll')' - is lit,,! n"ali,,' I",s;'" ... """
11,,,1,,, a "Olllril,utitllL In
.. < ill 1111: UI\.
English Regions
In III<' Ik,e;i'''lal
I)l',d"I'III"111 A,e;"n,;"., ( IU)!\S) !la,'c
.,11 II ... ,,,,,',,Ii,',, i,,,III,,I1'i,.< :' s
II1'l', .rtalll nllllril>lU"l's I,.
,x"llollli, ' d"""'I"p"ll'nl \\"rkill).:
illll;lfllll'r.,ltip "jtlt tlt e i( q.(i"llal
\.. 'ull un,1 Com"ol'\ illlllS alld ,,1 her
play,')'S, lite .. fi", Ill<' HI)I\s
is 1<1 "">111'<' Ihat the
,''''llrlhulitlll .. f II .. , 'T";tl l\',,
is maxillli., ...... !. 1 ... ll'in.!!: tlt elll It>
... '"\<' 1"'"'" w""lth ,,".1 "II 'I,I"y"";It.
'1')". 1."lI doll 1)''''''I''I'IlI' 'nl I""
110,' 'T,;,ti,c a
k"y ami is .I,,,d"pill).( !O
.'",un' HI'I '''''l'ri"tc is g-,\'"n
10 II ... ill.I,,"lrll-s In hdplhl'lll . ",.,., ..... 1.
Scotland
St 'oui . h Enlerprise I,a . till'
H(';ui,,' illdu.'l1'i,'.' "S" I."y dU.'I"r ill
tl,c S.:"ui,h It.. (,lusI,,1'
DCI'l'I"l'uWIII Slr"ttXy, in
1;0.'1 y,'ar, n"t li""J pia liS In
im','st IIlillit>1l in til<' .<,"'101' ",','r
thc 1l.'XI fil" )''';01'.,. TIl<' Iltlli.-,\'
I" "IISnl\' I!r,,\, III .. I' 10"" " ),";' 1' '" "r
lite '''':\! ;$-,; )',';'1'.'<. ;11,,1 1" itwn'as,
(T"ali\ t' t" ""nll'i l>"I" 1:-,"" "I'
l"lal exp"ns ", .'1' lit" saull'
l"'l'i"d. 1"'cHI ""1\I is 1" Itl'
"n .Iynamit' jlll ,<it",-,S
" Il"ir<>lltlll'IlI, d""",' lopin).\: ;11111
t'XI l;UIl!i,, ).( llw 1.,lcl11 am! h;"'l';
in,-r,'asillg ;,,,,," ';Ili,,n; alld
I),,; inl," " lm; "ll al 1'l'J"'I;'l in" ,tI'
S",'llal1.t' s ' Teali",'
Wales
T h,' jluhlisIK'(! Clllllln'in
C/JiJiIIl/J1! nnotllllll'udc,ll hc
,"labli"hlllt'''1 "I' \\'ak" ('n'illi llg ,III
.mlltl'dla 1<1 devel"I' allJ .'''ppon
II". ,Tcal;\'(' mlluslri,'s ill \\'Hk ... 'I'll<'
'lL'1' Nal;",];,1 C""",i l,;,.. EIIII(,;Ili""
;,,,,1 TI'"illill).( I;". \\'"Il's will h,'
i)),,,h ... 1 in Ir;,ininK ,,,,,I
J I,,,,,l" I" II"'11 Sl l'al,).:; II'-" I,,,, II,.. 'Teal in'
i",hl.<II';"'<. A sl"dy, 1':,MI,mli.-
/1II/,,1'/I!{ , / 1'1,< dll,1
1. 1),1'1. /,-..bn"":,, '-/001: /I",,;,,,,, I 'h,,,,,, ,./M ,'j,' -
I Joil'>l
''I''
ill inl;'l'm
targ,'lillg in ,d lld, gr""11t
is sll<'h '1-" ",,,,i,', !'!'ali>,
1..I",i . i. '" ;"Ill I';,dio,
Iwrl;,n"llIl!.' an ami Iilm.
Northern Ireland
In !I'dalld, Ih" J)"pan"ll'1I1
j,,1' Clllt" ... , Arl" a"d I.ei"" I'(,. in
l'anlll'l'sitil' "illt litl' .. " "II",),
d"i,anlucllls ( Edll<'ali",,; I !i KI,,'1' :1Il,J
Furllwr Eoh",ali,,", ,mil
Eml'l"ym""I; EII 1t't'priSl', Trad., allli
(' I,,'slll"1I1) p"I,Ii,I,,,,1 ill N.,,,,,,,h,,1'
1;'''1 ),(';'1';' ,""" '1 ,11"1;,,,, ']'''' ''' '''' '11
I 'nf'HMI!}: ('/'IoJlh.il)' - . I ,\'IHlI<'K,'j"f
n" lyl"I'ml"1I1 "I,kll "mlilles II''''
K"nhern 11'''';<11<1 ,' all Illlrllln'
alld Iml'lIc . s imli, idlHlI 1'I',,;,li\' il y
li'''111 "du,ols I" III<' ""rlipla ... '.
( '01111'1,'111< 'Ill ill I! litis ill i t ial i, ,', I)C .. \ l .
hIlS ... d a ,Tu . s-dq>Hrlnlt'III;,1
( ''''';oIi, ,. !lulu,'lri,'s ' \"(i"" t i,..",1' ttl
,lc,d"I' '' .'In'l<')o I;.r r;lIsi"g til<'
1'i'"liic "r tilt ;l1ltlrcali . ill).(
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ANAlVSIS OF CONCENTRATIONS. ClUSTERS AND DEVELOPMENTS BY REGION
REGION CONCENTRATIONS AND CLUSTERS NOTES ON DEVELOPMENTS
Nor th fa st Publishing. Archiu.'cture. SOftware. Devt>lopments aroood the m.ljor cultureled schemes at
MullimNla. film. Crafn. (Balik (entre for <onttmporaryArts and Musk and Graingeo- Town in
Newca"le.
dusters of (feative at Pink lane and OUstbUfO WJrehouse.
Newc"stle upon Tyne. and the Multionedia Exchange in MiddlMbrough.
A :;rTlilU but Vf!f'j active and critkatIy acdaimed film duster. suppming 40--50 :;ma\\
IMlnI'SSM in Tynes;oo and NOitflumbertand.
Significant dusters around glass in SLWlder13f1d (e.g. Nationaol Glass and
tourisn. rel.1ted flJral crafts (giflware eld in Northumberland and Durh.Jm.
Strong ntultintedia tiusters on Tyneside and Teeside. rec:ognised and identified by the
IIDA as a priofily tlu"er in the Regional EtoflOmte Strategy.
Development of mull'mNialsoit wart duster is identified as ooc of five pdofity
tlusters for Objec:t ive? Eu ropean r"nding.
Nort h West Television. Music. PerlormingArts. The North We-st Regional Dewlojlment Agency with the NorthWest Cultural
int eraclive l eisure Softwire. Crafts. Consortium is currently under taking a cultural duster mapping 01 the! regioo whith
will the creative induwies.
Ma lu concentrations around the Manchester and Liverpool conurbations. the
Cheshire corridor and SOuth but a wide range of local and sub .egional
strategies recognise value and nteds of uealive industries as a key growth

Medi.J duster ounide london and South hst.
one of the nlOSt important citi es fo r computer
M .... seyside <e-se3f(h t.as srgniliant growth In de-sign and vis .... 1 atiS.
and in museoo.s. galle.-ies and conservation.
Cluster is 3 major S1<alegy pr ior ity for the Nor th The
NWOA is committw to substantial in ..... stment in the creative industries se<:tOf as
one if its by g' (Wt\h opportunitie-s Sl'ttOf5,.
''I''
Yorhhirc and Archill'Cl .... e. Soflware. PerformingAru, Notable wnctnlr.lll<>m in,
Hvrnberside Web Design. Internel Servicu.
Sheffield Quarler) .. ,ound media, nl'W media, yilual
Int eractive Software.
a, IS, music;
Hudd"sfit'ld Town inilialive around soltware. music and
North hn lincolnshire and NOrchYork5hire OlroUnd arts and cralu .
Substanl ial resta"h on the wntribvtion of Ihe ,reotive and (ul wral indulI ' ies
undert al"!n by Brenon Hall. of on t>ehalf of Ihe ROA. Yorkshl'e
FOfw.'lrd iN1d tke Regional Am Ilo.1rd.
,*U Midlands Software. ImpOflance 01 performing ;111.110 IOlHism reu>gnised. OeveIopmenl of Jewellery
film. Art & Anti,!ues Market. Adverciling. Quarter in Birmingham as a crealive duller.
Per forming IIrt s,
A number 01 local aulho, iliel in the region emphasise the de-;elopment of the
creative industrit's as pa't 01 their onomic and regenerat ion St rategies. e.g.
Birmingham. Cow!ntry. WoIvemampton. and Stoke on Trent. Creative
dusters are being dewloped around rtgeneration initiatives suc:h as the Custard
factory and Big in Birmingham and Ike Ughthouse Media (e.ntre in
WoIvtrhampton.
induWy d!'Velopmellt being puml!'d in and Shropshire.
Ellst Midlands Archilt...-e. Adverusing. film. Pub!;v,ing. lincoln and NOtlingham developing formal (ultural quartefi.
TV & Radio. W,"" o.tsign. ' n'''"'''t
developing cultural strol1egy may propoo;e Ol cu1!Uf3I,ndvstries quarter !or
the ci ty, to act as a (ultural pro<luction !or Ihe Ent and a regiol'lill
!Iigship for and the creative induSirles.
The ROA. East Midlands has undertaken r""",arch on the
induslries. and rariy resulls ale positive in 01 growth. EMOA has
agreed to invest in nll'W initiat ives to suppOrt and develop creative talent
T
Easttrn Softwllrt. Publi!;hing. f ilm and TV productIOn is conctntrattd in Henlordshire and HSlref!
Studios) and Norwich. Natab!@mMiaandsoftwareduste<'S centre
Cambridge and E,stl<.
ROA the rolt of tlte creativt industries in providing employment and
economic dev<.>lopment , and !><Is a Crf.'atiye Indunr les Sector
Regional Cultural Strategy wi ll support Ihe dcvelapment of industr ies
networks. h,itiatives and incubator ooits 10 lacilitate bus iness growth and
supply (hain man.agt'ment.
The rtglon has a numw 01 strong network and development agencies within ,''''
5('(:tor. notably the eastern Multimedia Alliance and the Mult imMia Training
ConSOftium.
Film. TV and MOIling Image lMineM <kvt'lopment will benefit by t"" planned
01 the Moving Ir""ge Oevelopment Agency. supported by t"" f ilm

South West film. TV & Radio.Architecture. Software. Cult .. e Soolh West (Regional Cul tural Consorlium) has established a (feal M:!
Publishing, Art &. Antiques industries forum 10 acl as focal point for developments in the region,
Culture Soutll Wesl has proposed 10 undertake a mapping exefcise 01 tile (leati""
in l"'fI.r>HVlip witll tM RegOonal Devclopment Agency.
A Skills De""lopmenl fund is planned by Skillnct South West and South Wesl Arts
focusing on t he ans. film and media.
South Ean
A.rlvt-rtising. Publishing. Per/onning ArIS.
Existing iInd eml'fging crealive industry fealu'e slrongly in the fiflot group
Inte ractive leisure Softwa'e. Art &
of five Enterprise Hubs anoouncerl by lhe Regional Oevelopment AgeflC)' (SHOA)
Anti qyu Mln ket. f ilm & TV product ion.
in Stpt 2000:
Web Design, Internet Se .... icu, Software.
8righlon & How: new mMi<I and creat ive industries:
Soul hampton: film and TV prOOUClion;
North o.fordshioe: media and rrotorspon (loc:usN on the SilVl'fitone cirwit).
In JUr'll! 2000 Ihe creative industries sector won 3 out of the II granlS awarded Irom
the SEDA Fund for learning and (over (SOOK OUI of B.SM awarded):
management development fOf the culturaL heritage _tor.
Earshot: training and development lor people in 'sound journalism"
iIXluding commercial radio and production: uses radio to train people
across all medi<l pl,ulOfmS {inlernet. digital. inleractive medid TV. CO
ROM); b;)sed around 8righlon duster:
NediaBuJi"es" Ner II; web.ite dedicated to media and new
;"dultrits <Kross the SOUlh Nst; creat;"g new ;"IO'""'tion resources.
learning networks and supply <hain link21gM: eKl ending the
mNiabusiness,net leadership Fo rum 10 create online community:
"'I"
bi llIng irKIustry cont,nue to and expand in B.ighlOn &
Hove, Guitdlord of interactive leisure software Oxlord
(publishing, IltCj ,
london film, TY & Radio, Music. Performing london Oeo;etopment in u>njooctkrn with the
Ans. Design. Advertising. G,oup,1i drawing up p.opowls to ensure the needs of the creati-.e industries are
Architture, Cralt, fashion. fe llect('d across the london Authonty's onomic, traMport, spatial
Att Ind AIItlquM Ma. kel. lnteractwe cultural str.neglM,
l eisure Sof twllfe, Photography,
Emerging creati"" industriM dllSters in East london around film and a cultural
quarter in Strat ford.
In Oeptford, emergence of a conctntration around arts (visu.ll and
performing).
City fringe eative du'ter around deSign, new nledia and music.
Northern Ireland fil m & V!d@O,Television & Radio, Software, DeAL has commissioned a Creative Industries fl"S('arch and dewlopment programme
and a strategy for ha'nel.sing ",dividual "eativity from "hao!<; to the
workpl.'Ke,
S;g,.,focanl . esearch ilI1d deveIopme<rt apabilil;es. e.g, Cent.e for Sonic Arl QoeE'n',
University and University of both UppO(t Nt for Entrepr_urVlip
(NI((Nf),
Oevelopment of Cathedral Cultural Quarlt. in Belfast,
Cultural tourism initiative being PUfSUI!<! b)' Nonhern Ireland Tourist Board in
association with AflS Council of Northern Ireland.
Growth in film production and in C<lpiKlty of local production sector. Paint
Studios II a major new contribution to fi lm and teleo;ision infrastructure.
lire Nerve C('flUe in londonderry is now .ecogniled as one ol fhe dynamic
and innovative multimedia {Mires in fhe Isles.
Scotland Ar(hilecWrt. Publishing. TV & Radio, l hf xoUiloh (nterprise Network il.;
Adver lisinglPR, IlIIffitCti .... .. e
Cluting a campus envi. onment for fhe c.eative indumies in Tayside. This
S"ftwa'f,
a combined project which comprises,)n international (Mire 10' computer
GimfS and a virtual enlertalnment centre at Abertay Univers ity and a
partnership between private, public and academic sectors to faCilitate the
development of the area's digital media induwies .
developing PiKi lic Quay on the RiVl'f Clydt> at Glasgow as an internat ional
media cent re with the emphas.is on new media. all( Scotland and Channel 4,
Natiorn. and Region\. are committed to rl1lM! 10 tIM' site (o;ubject to planning
lisues).
''I''
in _ious d,S\:uSSions with major patine", COn<:erning Ihe
(If inlcraClNe website for the creative induwies which will
become III\! source (If exchange of intellectual property
etc, for all of the (ountry's creative industries,
Wales Arl Ik Ant iques (ratl, Design, A new c(lnsorlium, (ymru'n (reu (Wain be>ing established (ombining
Performing Arts, Mus,c, all cult...-al sponsored bodies in Wales and pattners. induding Wales Tourist
Welsh Welsh ASwc;"t ion. Nat ional
Council for Education and Training in Wales and the voluntary se<tor, One of the
first priorities of the consortium will be> to lake a d05e look alIne crealive! (ull"'''''
induslries in Wale:s and t(l <ielfflnine a W"ltgy for 5UWOfl and de'Veloprr'Oefll
Advice and guicla!'l(l! is {Urr('f1lly available 10 sm.'Ill busineues on lhe promotion 01
Internet use and on inlellt'<tual properly r'ghu.
Wa les Trade International have dt"<e lopt'd a d uster group on the creative industries
to develop participants' interr>3liOn.l1 trade potential.
The projeet "Know How Cym."Wales" ,s promoting e/feelWe hrob between (011tge'S
and bminesses,
NOle: Clusters iMnrilied '" Bu.iness Clust." in !I'e UK- A Fim Assenmelll, 011. fe bruary 2001 , j " bold.
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