Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 6

DAYTON BUSINESS

RESOURCE CENTER
IS NOW OPEN!
Paid Advertisement Paintings courtesy of Leo Hong Mao/H&M Art Gallery

Progress Continues in 2009 • Data Management buildings. In the last 10 years, the
With the recent announcement of the Dayton Economic Dayton Development Fund has
• Sensors & RFID Technology
Attraction Program (DEAP), City leaders have reinforced their allocated over $50 million to
• Aerospace & Aerospace Medical Research Dayton businesses, resulting in
commitment to revitalization and economic growth in 2009. In Supporting business growth and strengthening
fact, the Dayton City Commission and Mayor Rhine McLin’s • Regional Healthcare Services 12,000 new jobs being created in the
Dayton’s economy are the purposes of the new
Council on Economic Development have made available a city and 25,000 more jobs retained.
Dayton Business Resource Center (DBRC).
host of fresh and exciting incentive programs to assist Located at 371 West Second Street, the DRBC
business owners with finding tax breaks and Companies in the above clusters and
Main Street Corridor Program was created to simplify processes for business
financial assistance, as well as those located downtown may be
Running through the center of customers to find information and services.
connecting them with other eligible for up to a 50% or 75%
annual rebate grant, respec- downtown Dayton, Main Street
useful resources.
tively, on net new payroll taxes has long been an area where
Dayton Mayor Rhine McLin The all-inclusive, one-stop DBRC centralizes
when they create a minimum of improvement opportunities are
explains, “A strong urban core is local economic development agencies: the City
5 full-time equivalent jobs or add available to reposition some of
critical to our region’s success as we of Dayton’s Office of Economic Development,
at least $200,000 to their payroll downtown’s vintage buildings. In
look towards the future. To aid this CityWide Development Corporation, the
in a given year; companies must fact, through the City’s Main Street Corridor Program, funding is available to developers and
effort, these retention and expansion Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce, and the
also have been in business for at building owners who plan to renovate these classic buildings and add to the vibrancy that is
programs are intended to make Downtown Dayton Partnership.
least 3 years. To begin the evolving in downtown Dayton.
doing business in Dayton easier,
process, interested companies The architecture of these buildings lends a distinct look to downtown and the potential
more efficient, and ultimately
should contact the City of for their use has remarkable opportunities for developers. The goal is to create along Main Each agency is represented by staff members at
more profitable.” Now, with the
Dayton’s Office of Economic Street a high-density, mixed-use area that combines office, retail, and living space while the DBRC to meet with clients and coordinate
new Dayton Economic Attraction
Development or visit the City’s retaining the characteristics of the structures. Maintaining the uniqueness of downtown business outreach efforts. Services include one-
Program, along with additional
website for an application. and these vintage buildings is important to preserving the individuality that defines on-one business visits, zoning and plan review,
incentives and resources, business owners have even more reasons
Even if companies do not meet the eligibility requirements for downtown Dayton, a quality unmatched by any other city. construction permits, financing referrals, and
to locate in Dayton.
this program, there are still numerous other resources available business incentive education. Companies inter-
in the city. ested in learning more about the DBRC should
Dayton Economic Moving Forward into the Future contact Bart Schidecker, Special Projects
The path to economic stability in the Dayton region is ongoing, but we are continuing to
Attraction Program (DEAP) Administrator in the City’s Office of Economic
Dayton Development Fund make progress. With support from Dayton City Commissioners, the Mayor’s Council on Development at (937) 333-3629.
The City of Dayton has recently instituted a new incentive
The City of Dayton has an additional set of funds available to Economic Development, and local business leaders, development assistance
program that is specifically intended to jump-start job growth
companies looking to expand or relocate within the city limits. programs will continue to become available to company owners interested
by local businesses.
Established in 1998, the Dayton Development Fund is a source in growing their ventures or becoming a part of the Dayton
Qualifying companies
of grant money set aside by the City that can provide business business community. For more information on
must be located within
owners with “gap” financing to reduce the amount of equity these and other options, contact
downtown zoning areas,
needed to complete an otherwise fully-financed project. the City of Dayton’s Office of
OR fall into one of
Economic Development at
Dayton’s targeted industry The goal of the Dayton Development Fund is to spur investment (937) 333-3634.
clusters. These clusters within the city limits, creating an environment where employees
include: and employers can grow and increase their competitiveness in
• Advanced the market. Examples of these projects include those that fall into The Dayton City Commission:
Manufacturing Dayton’s target industries, those creating competitive locations for Mayor Rhine McLin
& Materials future development, and those renovating or reusing existing Commissioner Dean Lovelace Commissioner Joey Williams
Commissioner Matt Joseph Commissioner Nan Whaley
DAYTON’S
OFFICE OF
ECONOMIC
Paid Advertisement Paintings courtesy of Leo Hong Mao/H&M Art Gallery
DEVELOPMENT
The City of Dayton has recently • Construction & Dayton Development Fund Attracting and retaining businesses in Dayton
opened the Dayton Business Expansion Permits Established in 1998, the Dayton Development Fund is a source of is vital to the economic stability and growth
Resource Center (DBRC), the of the region. To accomplish this goal, City
• Financing Referrals The DBRC is grant money set aside by the City that can provide business owners
City’s latest initiative to foster leaders are employing a number of strategies,
also online! Visit with “gap” financing to reduce the amount of equity needed to
the growth and success of • Business Incentive Education such as creating strategic alliances with
complete an otherwise fully-financed project. The purpose of the economic development organizations and
businesses in Dayton. This all- www.daytonbrc.com
Creating smoother and more fund is to spur investment within the city limits, creating an business partners, as well as targeting advanced
inclusive service center was efficient transactions for
to access valuable environment where companies can grow and increase their technology companies to locate here.
created to put entrepreneurs in business customers was the information with the competitiveness in the market. Examples of these projects include
contact with the resources best main catalyst for the Dayton click of a mouse. To those that fall into Dayton’s target industries, those creating In addition, the City has recently opened the
suited to assist them in Business Resource Center. By competitive locations for future development, and those renovating Dayton Business Resource Center, a facility
ask a question quickly,
navigating the requirements for simply stopping by or calling or reusing existing buildings. that centralizes local economic development
starting or expanding a simply click the “Just agencies under one roof. Business owners can
the office, business customers
company in Dayton. Ask!” button, and a find services including zoning and plan review,
can now quickly find the
Main Street Corridor Program construction permits, financing referrals, and
Driven by the Dayton City answers they seek. DBRC representative
business incentive education in one convenient
Commission and Mayor Rhine will be in touch by the Through the City’s Main Street Corridor Program, funding is
location, at 371 West Second Street.
McLin’s Council on Economic Development, the DBRC conve- available to developers and building owners who plan to renovate
next business day.
niently houses local economic development agencies under one The DBRC Strategic Team downtown’s classic buildings and add to the vibrancy that is evolving
The City also has a variety of tax incentives
roof. The Center is located at 371 West Second Street. “The purpose In addition to City of Dayton economic development specialists, in Dayton. This program aims to create along Main Street a high- and financial assistance programs for companies
of the Dayton Business Resource Center is to provide a full menu of the DBRC team consists of representatives from various local density, mixed-use area that combines office, retail, and living space interested in relocating or expanding within
support services for businesses looking to locate in the city or to economic development agencies. Partners include: while retaining the characteristics of the structures. Maintaining the uniqueness of downtown the city limits. These development assistance
expand their current operations,” says Mayor McLin. “The DBRC and these vintage buildings is important to preserving the individuality that defines programs are intended to make doing
• City of Dayton’s Office of Economic Development
downtown Dayton, a quality unmatched by any other city. business in Dayton easier, more efficient,
is a place where business owners can cultivate relationships with the
• CityWide Development Corporation and more profitable.
organizations that will aid them as they strive for success and
profitability in the city.” • Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce
Dayton Economic Attraction Program Find more information about economic
• Downtown Dayton Partnership The City of Dayton has recently instituted a new development in Dayton by visiting
incentive program for businesses in Dayton's www.cityofdayton.org, or by contacting
Services, Resources, and Answers These professionals work together to provide excellent customer Assistant City Manager for Strategic
Business customers go through many steps when building service and timely responses to business owners’ questions. The team targeted industries, and those relocating or
Development Shelley Dickstein at
or expanding their companies, including construction permits, places a high priority on sharing information across partner organi- expanding within the Downtown zoning areas.
937-333-3611, or Deputy Director
zoning reviews, and finding adequate project funding. Now, at the zations in order to continually address the needs and issues that Qualified companies may be eligible for up to a Timothy Downs at 937-333-3805.
DBRC, business owners can find answers to these questions and Dayton businesses face. 75% annual rebate on net new payroll taxes when 5 For the Business Resource Center,
many more with the variety of or more jobs are created in the city. The rebate will contact Administrator Bart Schidecker
comprehensive services offered, be paid back to the company in the form of a grant at 937-333-3629.
including: Project Funding IS Available! for a period of up to 3 years. To begin the process, interested companies should contact the
The Dayton Business Resource Center is readily available to City of Dayton's Office of Economic Development for an application.
• One-on-One Business
help current and prospective business owners find sources of Expanding or relocating your business doesn’t have to be complicated process. Take advantage
Consultations
funding for their projects. The City has many programs available, of valuable, personalized business services by simply calling or stopping by the Dayton Business
• Zoning and including the ones below and several others. The staff at the DBRC Resource Center, and JUST ASK!
Plan Review can help determine where the best funding opportunities for
individual businesses may be. The Dayton City Commission:
Mayor Rhine McLin
Commissioner Dean Lovelace Commissioner Joey Williams
Special Projects Administrator Bart Schidecker oversees the
day-to-day operations of the DBRC. Commissioner Matt Joseph Commissioner Nan Whaley
DAYTON’S
OFFICE OF
ECONOMIC
Paid Advertisement Paintings courtesy of Leo Hong Mao/H&M Art Gallery
DEVELOPMENT
The city of Dayton’s manufacturing industries are undergoing cutting to celebrate the grand opening of their permanent Homegrown Technology The City of Dayton is targeting growth indus-
a powerful evolution. From resource-intensive, hands-on building, where business is growing substantially. Composite parts, Dayton-based Norwood Medical, a medical industry supplier, provides solutions for the tries and providing incentives to attract and
operations, the city is now moving into advanced manufacturing like those manufactured at Composite Advantage, are used in design and manufacture of complex medical instruments and implants. Capitalizing on retain businesses. Last year, the City met with
and composite technology in building structures such as local resources, Norwood Medical: over 350 businesses to assess their growth needs.
the tooling & machining, bridge decks, walls, roofs, As a result, the City leveraged $112 million in
medical device, aerospace, and temporary roads, equipment • Leads the way in improving medical private business investment.
transportation industries. With pads and airfield mats. technologies and is able to compete in overseas markets.
MEDICAL
a long history of excellence in • Invested $8.5 million to construct their third Key to the City’s strategy is the growth of
manufacturing, Dayton has knowledge-based technology companies from
manufacturing facility, a 53,000-square-foot structure.
emerged as a premier location Incubating a Dream targeted clusters, including Data Management,
Dayton is on the impressive • Has retained 524 current employees, plus created 30 new full-time positions. Sensors, Advanced Materials, Aerospace and
for advanced manufacturing
track to have four technology Healthcare. The City has also developed
industries and materials
incubators in the city. Once all strategic alliances with other local and regional
technology companies.
are completed, Dayton will Also broadening Dayton’s advanced manufacturing sector is economic development organizations and
Precision Metal Fabrication, a local company that specializes in business partners to further the City’s and
surpass the current record
sheet metal fabrication. Their expertise is wide-ranging and region’s long-term growth strategies.
Partnerships for holder, San Jose, California—
Manufacturing the tenth largest city in the includes:
The City is now in the process of creating the
The City of Dayton’s strategic Mayor McLin attends the Composite Advantage ribbon cutting. nation. DC-AMT, Dayton • Custom work for the machine tool and special machines industries. Business Retention & Expansion Center to
plan, CitiPlan 20/20, focuses RFID Convergence Center, The
• Displays for museums and convention centers. provide the focus needed to keep local
on reinforcing the key partnerships needed to build on Dayton’s Entrepreneurs Center, and the Institute for Development and businesses in the city and attract new companies
strong standing as a leader in the advanced manufacturing and Commercialization of Advanced Sensors Technology (IDCAST) • Stainless steel waterfalls at the Oklahoma Bombing Memorial, looking for space and resources to grow.
materials industries. are incubators focused on nurturing companies that are on the the Holocaust Memorial, and elements of the 9/11 Memorial.
“By encouraging partnerships between academia, the business leading edge of technological developments. Information about economic development in
community, and the public sector, the City of Dayton’s Office of Through the Third Frontier Commission, the State of Ohio is the City is available at www.cityofdayton.org,
Expanding the Edge through the Assistant City Manager for Strategic
Economic Development has been able to work with strategic allocating more than $1.6 billion to support world-class research, As Dayton’s advanced manufacturing Development, Shelley Dickstein, at 937-333-
partners to create centers which assist start-up companies that commercialization, and training in advanced manufacturing and base continues to grow, more and 3611, or Deputy Director Timothy S. Downs
use advanced manufacturing technologies,” says Max Fuller, materials. Dayton’s IDCAST was recently awarded a $28 million more companies are searching for at 937-333-3805.
Senior Development Specialist with the City’s Office of grant from these funds for sensor technology research, development, space to locate their businesses. To
Economic Development. and commercialization. To date, the Dayton area has received more help with this task, a new website is
One example of these collaborative efforts is the Dayton Campus than $30 million in grant funding from the Commission. available to use in locating City-owned
for Advanced Material Technology (DC-AMT). In partnership commercial properties and other real
with the National Composite Center (NCC), DC-AMT provides estate in the Dayton area. Visit
Collaborating for Advancement www.cityofdaytonproperties.com
businesses the capability and infrastructure necessary to develop
A prime example of open-source collaboration is the Wright
advanced materials and manufacturing processes for quick to customize your search for The City’s new Commercial Property Manager website:
Brothers Institute’s Tec^Edge. Utilizing a neutral environment,
commercialization. The campus is home to national and interna- properties for sale, lease, or build-to- www.cityofdaytonproperties.com
this unique partnership of Air Force Research Laboratory
tional tenants in the aerospace, automotive, marine, and infra- suit land available within the Dayton
work groups, local university work teams, and private
structure industries. city limits. The website is a gateway to the many business development resources offered by
industry professionals is designed to find rapid solutions
the City. The Dayton City Commission:
Recently, one local company completed the steps to military and public safety concerns. The new
Mayor Rhine McLin
necessary to leave the NCC to become an facility, located in Old North Dayton, is the next Dayton has always been a manufacturing leader, but now our city is evolving even further.
Commissioner Dean Lovelace
independent business. Composite Advantage, a step in that process—rapid prototyping and With Dayton’s depth of knowledge and experience base that advanced manufacturing firms
Commissioner Joey Williams
company specializing in producing large, fiber- fabrication with an initial focus on the Air Force’s need to succeed, the region is poised to become a global leader in advanced manufacturing
Commissioner Matt Joseph
reinforced composite parts, recently held a ribbon unmanned air vehicles. technologies.
Commissioner Nan Whaley
— A D V E R T I S E M E N T —

New High-Tech Businesses Business Incubators Will Help


Redefine the City
Focus on Strategy
and Simplicity
Help Define Dayton’s Rebirth Business incubators are
designed to help emerging growth
companies like IDCAST survive
Equally as important as the
number of incubators - and the new

City’s Office of Economic Development Leads Charge


businesses and jobs they bring with
and grow during their start-up them - is that the Office of Econom-
periods, when they are most Above: 444 Second Street serves as ic Development has strategically
vulnerable. Along with IDCAST, the temporary home for IDCAST. targeted specific high-tech indus-

E veryone talks about growth.


The City of Dayton’s Office
of Economic Development is
actually doing something about it.
The Office of Economic
of the winning Third Frontier pro-

a lot of credit for helping IDCAST


get off the ground and solidifying
its long-term success. IDCAST is
Dayton has three more incuba-
posal, “The City of Dayton deserves tor/accelerators in various stages
of development. When all four are
completed, Dayton will surpass
the record currently held by the
In addition to IDCAST,
the City’s current incubator
projects include:
try collectives that are critical to
Dayton’s economic future. IDCAST’s
advanced sensor technologies are
just the beginning.
To attract new companies and
Development has taken a practical, about collaboration, tenth largest city
The Entrepreneurs Center,
one of ten business incubators
help existing businesses thrive, the Dayton’s Office of
proactive approach to bringing
businesses to Dayton and keeping
so it’s fitting that the
collaborative efforts “The city of Dayton in the nation: San
Jose, California.
supported by the state’s Thomas
Office of Economic Development is
also making it easier to Economic Development
Edison program,
them here. By targeting growth
industries, including existing
of academia, industry
and local government
deserves a lot of credit The fact that
Dayton is closing in
provides a nurturing Dayton will soon
do business with the
City. Assisting with Our Goal Is Growth
businesses, the Office has been are at the foundation for helping IDCAST get off on San Jose -
environment for tech-
nological companies. surpass San Jose for low-interest loans, site The City of Dayton is targeting growth
effectively attracting new of its creation.” population 974,000 selection and land ac- industries and providing incentives to
companies to the City while The IDCAST the ground and solidifying and home to more
The Center currently
houses 14 companies the most high-tech quisition are all part of attract and retain businesses. Last year, the
City met with over 275 businesses to assess
its long-term success.”
helping existing businesses grow, incubator celebrated than 6,000 tech- the City’s services...and
encouraging new investment and its Grand Opening on nology companies
that benefit from be-
low-market rental rates, incubators located soon, all of the City’s their growth needs. As a result, the City
leveraged $112 million in private business
creating new Dayton-based jobs. January 31, 2008, as - speaks volumes Economic Develop-
it moved into its temporary home at about the Office of Economic
as well as training, sup-
port and networking
within a city. ment services will be
investment through 25 key economic
development projects.
IDCAST Represents 444 E. Second Street. IDCAST will Development’s forward-thinking
opportunities.
available through one
Collaboration in Action eventually become the anchor strategy of attracting knowledge- central Resource Center. Key to the City’s strategy is the growth of
A perfect example is IDCAST tenant of Tech Town’s Creative Tech- based technology companies and Dayton RFID Incubator Dayton’s future is bright. knowledge-based technology companies
(Institute for Development and nology Accelerator, currently being workers to the region. Corporation, which will be located Growth is happening all around us. from targeted clusters, including Data
Commercialization of Advanced constructed at the corner of Monu- in Tech Town. The Dayton City And the City of Dayton’s Office of Management, Sensors, Advanced Materials,
Sensor Technology). A $28-million ment Avenue and Taylor Street. Below: Mayor McLin, IDCAST and Air Force Commission approved a $1.4-mil- Economic Development continues Aerospace and Healthcare. Progress only
dignitaries cut the ribbon for IDCAST’s new occurs when partners come to the table.
grant from the Ohio Third Frontier downtown location. lion, 4-year agreement with City- to do something about it.
The City has developed strategic alliances
Commission helped bring IDCAST Wide Development to create this
with other local and regional economic
to Dayton. This collaborative for-profit incubator for new and development organiza-
effort of the University of Dayton small businesses in the RFID tions, Wright Patterson Air
Research Institute involves many (Radio-Frequency Identification) Force Base, the Chamber
partners, including the U.S. industry. of Commerce, and busi-
Air Force Research Laboratory ness partners to further the
DC-AMT (Dayton Campus for City’s and region’s long-
Sensors Directorate and Ohio Advanced Materials Technolo- term growth strategies.
State University. gies) is an extraordinary coopera-
The Office of Economic tive effort between local, county Information about
Development was instrumental in and state groups. It is funded by economic development
attracting IDCAST to the city. the City of Dayton, Montgomery in the City is available at
According to Larrell Walters, County, CityWide Development, www.cityofdayton.org, or through the
Above: IDCAST will be the anchor tenant
Director of Technology Partner- upon the completion of the Tech Town Assistant City Manager, Shelley Dickstein,
the State of Ohio, and the Dayton Creative Technology Accelerator.
ships at the University of Dayton at 937-333-3611.
Development Coalition.
Research Institute and co-author
DAYTON’S
OFFICE OF
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Paintings courtesy of Leo Hong Mao/H&M Art Gallery

As economic and cultural both the region and to jobs, $258 million in amenities, and The City of Dayton is targeting growth
The Efforts to Come industries and providing incentives to attract
needs evolve nationally, our evolving needs. $70 million in housing. Examples of this Downtown’s Repositioning Strategy still
the roles of urban The downtown of success can be seen in the development and retain businesses. Last year, the City met
has many goals to meet, but we are well
cores, like tomorrow will of Tech Town, downtown housing such with over 350 businesses to assess their growth
on our way. The City of Dayton and
downtown Dayton, be built on this as Cooper Lofts, the new CareSource needs. As a result, the City leveraged $112
economic development partners,
are also changing. strategy, blending corporate headquarters, and the million in private business investment.
including CityWide Development
For most of the jobs, housing, and revitalization of vintage buildings. Corporation, the Downtown Dayton
late 20th century, amenities to create Key to the City’s strategy is the growth of
Partnership, Montgomery County, and
downtowns served the sustainable, Other projects are also breathing new knowledge-based technology companies from
business leaders, are all collaborating to
mainly as a place to mixed-use, high life into the downtown area, including targeted clusters, including Data Management,
continue this ongoing effort.
work, filled with density urban core infrastructure projects such as the new Sensors, Advanced Materials, Aerospace and
office buildings and needed to compete Oregon District parking lot and the Healthcare. Progress only occurs when partners
The nonprofit advocacy group
parking lots while in a vibrant market. Convention Center renovation. Plus, come to the table. The City has developed
Downtown Dayton Partnership is tackling
options for housing and Offices will cohabitate there is good news regarding safety; strategic alliances with other local and regional
the office and housing arenas.
entertainment shifted to Dayton’s important urban core is being with retail ventures, and statistics continue to show that economic development organizations and
supported through the Downtown Architectural studies to illustrate adaptive
the suburbs. Now, instead Repositioning Strategy. new downtown housing downtown remains one of the city’s business partners to further the City’s and
reuse and redevelopment opportunities are
of being simply a desti- will mingle with urban safest neighborhoods. Coordinated Arts, events, and cultural experiences comprise a region’s long-term growth strategies.
underway, as are studies to identify niche significant portion of Dayton’s unique appeal.
nation for work, downtowns are trans- architecture and strategic parking. efforts between law enforcement, tenants for multi-use office buildings.
forming to become thriving areas where businesses, residents, and Downtown The City is now in the process of creating the
people want to not only work, but live These activities represent a tangible Ambassadors continue to address this With a revitalized and reborn downtown, Business Retention & Expansion Center
Meanwhile, the City of Dayton is busy Dayton’s core will continue to attract
and play as well. economic strength for Dayton. In fact, important issue. to provide the focus needed to keep local
providing incentives for job creation, the “creative class” consumer: younger,
economic activity for the businesses in the city and attract new companies
retention, and reuse of vintage office creative workers who want to work, live,
According to a recent study by the downtown area is The New Downtown buildings. In addition to facilitating and play downtown. Entertainment
looking for space and resources to grow.
Brookings Institute, the office space in projected to be in Dayton’s downtown neighbor- reinvestment in downtown infrastructure,
central cities has contracted from 74% in excess of $1.5 billion venues, including Fifth Third Field, the Information about economic development in
hoods are a vital element in the City is also leading the charge in
1979 to 58% in 1999. Office development between 2001 and Schuster Center, and the Neon Movies the City is available at www.cityofdayton.org,
creating a strong city center, creating a safe, convenient parking
has also been moving from urban centers 2010. In addition, have proven to be attractive to both city or through the Assistant City Manager for
and while several have supply. CityWide Development
to reside along interstate corridors. In between 35% and and suburban residents. Cities are shifting Strategic Development, Shelley Dickstein,
developed into desirable Corporation continues to provide
response to these national trends, Dayton, 40% of the City’s to this type of urban core and people at 937-333-3611.
mixed-used areas, they are financing for businesses and
like other major metropolitan areas, has tax revenue is are moving downtown to be a part of
often overlooked as a whole. neighborhood development.
been focusing on ways to reposition and generated within the excitement.
Despite their close proximity,
revitalize our own downtown. the geography of the areas such as Webster Station,
greater downtown area. Bringing the vision of tomorrow’s
Cooper Park, Monument Avenue,
downtown into alignment across core
The Shifting Downtown Tides With figures like these,
New downtown destinations such as
the Riverfront, Fifth Street and
business and neighborhood stakeholders
For several years now, the greater Dayton the importance of the Boston Stoker help to create and the Oregon District all seem to
downtown cannot maintain a vibrant downtown. will not be an easy task. But the
downtown area has been in the midst of stand independent of each other.
be overlooked. milestones already achieved speak
a long-term renewal and reinvestment Developing connectors such as
volumes about the potential for
plan fueled by CitiPlan 20/20, the public walkways and convenient parking,
This long-term plan has already been the future.
economic development plan for the City along with office and residential projects,
of Dayton. Created by the City’s Office of well worth the effort. Over the past 10 are all part of the plan to help evolve
Economic Development, the Downtown years, the City’s contribution in resources Dayton into a unique place where
Repositioning Strategy is focused on the has helped create public and private neighborhoods are integral to the
economic impact downtown represents to investments of over $299 million in overall downtown atmosphere.
DAYTON’S
OFFICE OF
ECONOMIC
Paintings courtesy of Leo Hong Mao/H&M Art Gallery
DEVELOPMENT
While some outside sources may not recognize Dayton’s growth, standard city favorites, are continuing to thrive throughout The City of Dayton is targeting growth indus-
the real truth is that the city is on a path to reinvent and Dayton’s central business district, including: Caitlin Bortolotto, 25, is a two-time tries and providing incentives to attract and
revitalize itself as it makes stride after stride towards becoming a • Sidebar, new high-end cocktail lounge graduate of UD and now works for retain businesses. Last year, the City met with
community known for its unique living options, wide variety of CityWide Development Corporation. over 350 businesses to assess their growth needs.
• Blind Bob’s, new restaurant and tavern
professional opportunities, and a vibrant central business As a result, the City leveraged $112 million in
Caitlin lives in the Oregon District and
district. It’s this vital mix of live-work-play that is at the heart of • Dayton Theatre Guild’s renovation of Dayton Gym Club private business investment.
is involved in a variety of activities,
the city’s quest to drive the economic • Practice Yoga including the Junior League of Dayton
development of Dayton into the Key to the City’s strategy is the growth of
• Playthink Learning, participatory and the Dayton Ballet. “Dayton is great
future. As Dayton progresses along arts center knowledge-based technology companies from
the path of reinvention, there is because it has a big town atmosphere
targeted clusters, including Data Management,
already a diverse population of • Inn Port-Vino, new bed and with a small town feel,” says Caitlin. Sensors, Advanced Materials, Aerospace and
breakfast “There’s so much to do here and it’s so
residents, workers and visitors who Healthcare. The City has also developed
are enjoying and contributing to the • Jimmy Modern, furniture and easy to get involved.” strategic alliances with other local and regional
city's urban life. décor retailer
economic development organizations and
The City of Dayton’s Office of business partners to further the City’s and
Economic Development continues region’s long-term growth strategies.
Young Professionals See the Andy Reitz, 30, is an attorney who
to execute CitiPlan 20/20, a long-
term renewal and investment plan
Bright Side of Dayton resides at The Landing downtown. The City is now in the process of creating the
Dayton offers so much more than Andy admits he’s a Midwest boy at Business Retention & Expansion Center to
intended to breathe new life back
most people in the community heart and is happy to have settled in provide the focus needed to keep local
into the city. Between public and
realize. In fact, the region is full of Dayton after growing up in Indiana. businesses in the city and attract new companies
private investments over the last 10
bright, creative people who believe in the city and live in “I love it here,” he says. Andy is an looking for space and resources to grow.
years, nearly $630 million has already been funneled into the
communities committed to the stability and growth of their
community to attract companies and create jobs, support and active member in the young profes-
neighborhoods. To continue this trend, the City of Dayton Information about economic development in
maintain amenities, and to develop new and renovated housing sionals scene, serving as Chair Elect
reaches out to college students and young professionals through the City is available at www.cityofdayton.org, or
within the city limits. This plan recognizes that Dayton is a for Generation Dayton. His advice?
its annual Summer In the City program. Under the leadership through the Assistant City Manager for
multi-faceted city and one that is continuing to evolve day “Get involved! There are wonderful
of City Commissioner Matt Joseph, this innovative program Strategic Development, Shelley Dickstein, at
by day. opportunities to get plugged in here
introduces young workers to the many amenities of Dayton-area 937-333-3611.
living through 11 weeks of events and activities. in Dayton.”

The Proof is in the Progress As if to prove the point, Dayton has recently been recognized as
Attracting jobs, businesses, and residents to the city is no easy one of the top 10 U.S. metropolitan areas for singles to relocate. Jen & Drew Fuller, both 27 and
task, but the good news is that progress continues to happen A variety of factors led to this rank: attorneys, moved to Dayton after
every day. Here are some of the recent successes seen in • Excellent cost of living and beautiful neighborhoods graduating from the University of
Dayton: Cincinnati Law School. Active in
• Frequency of concerts and other entertainment
• Construction of Tech Town underway the community, they both agree that
• Availability of health clubs and sporting events
• New CareSource headquarters Dayton has a lot to offer. “The people
• Quality of nightlife
here are cultured, creative, and inter-
• New RFID incubator to locate in Dayton
• Rental market esting” says Drew. “There’s so much
• Revitalization of Fairgrounds neighborhood The Dayton City Commission:
• Low crime rate to do, like a great jazz scene and lots
• Renovation of the Dayton Convention Center Mayor Rhine McLin
of sports.” Adds Jen, “Plus, Dayton is
Long-time and new residents alike are invited to get to know the Commissioner Dean Lovelace
• Construction of Litehouse energy-efficient homes city of Dayton. With so many changes for the better, along with so much more accessible. We love that
Commissioner Joey Williams
the continuance of city favorites, the city is a living, breathing we can walk to work and to go out Commissioner Matt Joseph
Along with these advancements, many independently owned
businesses that serve the community are succeeding as well. entity. Whether you want to live, work, play—or all three— on the weekends.” Commissioner Nan Whaley
New retail, restaurant, and entertainment options, along with Dayton has something for everyone.