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Animal Farm

George Orwell
Anticipation Guide
Rate each of the following statements before you read the novel, and discuss
your ratings with a partner. After you have completed the novel, rate and discuss
the statements again. (10 points)
1 ----------- ------------ ! ------------ " ------------ # ------------ $
strongly agree strongly disagree
Before After
1. All humans are e%ual. &&&&& &&&&&
. 'sually the best and brightest people are &&&&& &&&&&
leaders.
!. (ome people are smarter than others. &&&&& &&&&&
". )eople who cannot read are easier to &&&&& &&&&&
control than those who can read.
#. )eople are always free to ma*e their own &&&&& &&&&&
choices.
$. +he government usually does what is best &&&&& &&&&&
for the most people.
,. -ou should always believe everything you.re &&&&& &&&&&
told.
/. )ower corrupts those who have it. &&&&& &&&&&
0. )eople always have the ability to ma*e &&&&& &&&&&
their own choices.
10. -ou should never %uestion those with &&&&& &&&&&
power or authority.
1
(tudy 1uide2 &&&&&& 3 110
4ournal2 &&&&&& 3 11# (# pts each)
5iterary 6(2 &&&&&& 3 1!$ (# pts. each)
7ollow 'ps2 &&&&&& 3 0 (# pts each)
8ame2 &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
9efore you begin reading Animal Farm, read the %uestions below and write a short
answer to each. 'se complete sentences for your answers: (1# points)
1. 6hat freedoms do we ta*e for granted in the 'nited (tates;
. <o you thin* we have too much freedom;
!. 6hat freedoms do you thin* we don.t need in the 'nited (tates; 6hich ones
would you be willing to give up if you had to;

Study Guide
Chapters 1-2
1. 6hat human characteristics (other than speech) has =rwell given to2
=ld >a?or
9o@er
>ollie
9en?amin
(nowball
8apoleon
. 6hy was =ld >a?or so respected;
!. 6hat noble ideals are set forth in his dream;
". 6hy are the animals so e@cited about singing A9easts of BnglandC;
#. 6hy were the pigs immediately accepted as leaders;
$. 6hat was their motive for rebellion;
,. 6ho formulated the (even Dommandments; 6as it done in a democratic way;
/. Eow well do the commandments reflect the ideas e@pressed in =ld >a?or.s speech;
!
Journal esponse ! Chapters 1-2
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. <escribe life on the farm for the animals. Eow is this type of life similar to that led by farm
laborers who wor* on someone else.s land;
. +o what does =ld >a?or point to show that there are opportunities for the animals to run the
farm on their own;
!. +he pigs ta*e over running the farm. 6hy does this seem natural;
". 6hat problems does the raven, >oses, cause;
#. <escribe the behavior of the pigs, and what it might foreshadow.
Chapter "
1. <id the pigs help the other animals wor* on the harvest; 6hat did they do;
. 6ho did the animals admire the most;
!. 6hat became his slogan;
". 6hich two animals were not considered by the other animals to be good wor*ers;
#. 6hich animal.s character didn.t seem to change at all after the rebellion;
$. 6hat three things happened on (undays;
,. 6hat did the Animal 7arm flag loo* li*e;
"
/. At the meetings, who never seemed to agree;
0. 6ho formed the animals into committees;
10. Eow literate were the animals; 6hy would literacy be an issue;
11. 6ho declared that the (even Dommandments could be condensed into one; 6hat was
this one ma@im; 6hich animals would repeat this for hours;
1. 6ho too 4essie.s and 9luebell.s pups to AeducateC them;
1!. 6hat had happened to the missing mil*; +he apples; 6hat was (%uealer.s e@planation;
1". 6hat, according to (%uealer, would happen if the pigs failed in their duties;
1#. Eow does the disappearance of the mil* and apples foreshadow future events;
1$. Eow are the animals better off after the Rebellion;
1,. Eow are they worse off;
#
Journal esponse ! Chapter "
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. Fs there anything significant about 8apoleon.s ta*ing away the puppies;
. 1ive some e@amples of the pigs. clever use of language to gain their own needs. Eow do
the other animals respond to each; -ou should give at least three e@amples.
!. <id the wor* on the farm conform to the ideal of Afrom each according to his ability, to each
according to his needC; 6hy or why not;
Chapter #
1. Eow was word sent to animals on neighboring farms;
. 8ame and describe the neighbors on either side of the farm.
!. Eow did rebelliousness show itself on other farms;
". Barly in =ctober, 4ones and men from 7o@wood and )inchfield attempted to ta*e over Animal
7arm. 6ho warned the animals;
#. 6ho has been studying 4ulius Daesar.s campaign strategies; 6hat was he in charge of;
$. <escribe the 9attle of the Dowshed.
,. 6ho said, A+he only good human is a dead oneC;
$
/. 6ho is discovered missing; 6here was she found;
0. 6hat military decorations were created; 6ho received them;
10. 6hat are the anniversary dates of the Rebellion and the 9attle of the Dowshed;
Journal esponse ! Chapter #
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6here was >ollie during the 9attle of the Dowshed; Eow does this support what you
already *now about her character, and what does it foreshadow;
. <escribe (nowball.s actions and 8apoleon.s actions during the 9attle. 6hat does this tell
you about each of them, and what might happen ne@t as a result;
!. <escribe the two rituals (traditions) that the animals used to celebrate their victory. 6hat is
ironic about their adoption of these rituals;
Chapter $
1. 6hat did >ollie do wrong; 6here did she finally go;
. <escribe the violent debates that began to ta*e place between snowball and 8apoleon.
!. 6hat did 8apoleon train the sheep to do with A7our legs good, two legs badC;
". <escribe the controversy over the windmill. 6hy would the animals be in favor of it; 6ho
was against it and why; 6ho didn.t ta*e a side on it;
,
#. Eow did 8apoleon ruin (nowball.s plans;
$. 6hen 8apoleon and (nowball disagreed on defense tactics, with whom did the animals
agree;
,. 6hat happened ?ust as (nowball had the animals agreeing with him;
/. 6here had the nine dogs come from;
0. 6hat happened to (unday meetings and debates;
10. 6hy was (%uealer sent around to e@plain the new setup;
11. Eow did the animals react;
1. 6hat is 9o@er.s new slogan;
1!. +o what did the animals now have to show reverence;
1". 6hy is it important that 8apoleon, (%uealer, and >inimus now sit above the other animals;
1#. 6hat do the animals learn three wee*s later;
1$. 6hy does 8apoleon say he pretended to be against the windmill;
1,. 6ho helped (%uealer persuade the animals that 8apoleon was right;
/
Journal esponse ! Chapter $
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6hat does >ollie lose by her actions; 6hat does this tell you about materialism;
. After (nowball.s e@pulsion, (%uealer ma*es a statement about (nowball.s heroism in battle.
6hat does he say to the animals, and what does this foreshadow; 6hat is important about this
event;
Chapter %
1. Fn August, 8apoleon announced that there would be wor* on (undays. Ft would be strictly
voluntary, but what would happen if the animals didn.t wor*;
. +he animals were wor*ing li*e slaves on the windmill, yet they were happy. 6hy;
!. 6hat was the main problem with building the windmill, and how was it solved;
". Eow did 9o@er lend e@tra help with the windmill;
#. Bverything was operating smoothly until the animals discovered shortages of what;
$. 6hat new policy did 8apoleon announce regarding obtaining articles the farm needed;
,. 6hat things might have to be sold in order to buy things for the windmill;
/. Eow would the dealings with humans be accomplished; 6hat is a bro*er;
0
0. <escribe >r. 6hymper.
10. 6ho set the record straight that the animals had never passed a rule against dealing with
humans;
11. 6hy are the humans now calling the farm by its new name;
1. 6hat rumors are circulating about 8apoleon and his business agreements;
1!. +he pigs move where; 6hy is this important;
1". Eow did (%uealer manipulate the language of the 7ourth Dommandment;
1#. 6hy do the pigs get up an hour later now;
1$. 6hat happened to the windmill when it was half built;
1,. 6ho is being blamed for what happened to the windmill;

Journal esponse ! Chapter %
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6hy is the phrase, Aeven the pigs ?oined in at critical momentsC important;
. Eow do the pigs get away with the changes in their living arrangements; Eow does this
affect the other animals;
10
Chapter &
1. 6hy is the windmill rebuilt with walls three feet thic*;
. 6ho never loses heart in spite of worsening conditions;
!. 7ood falls short in 4anuary and starvation seems near, but it is important to whom not to let
the outside world *now;
". 6hat tric*s are used to fool >r. 6hymper;
#. 1ive some e@amples of how 8apoleon is becoming a dictator.
$. +he chic*ens must surrender their eggs now. 6hile their rebellion ta*es place, nine hens
die. 6hat are the other animals told about the nine hens;
,. 6here is (nowball said to be living now;
/. 6hat tactics does 8apoleon use when negotiating the sale of the pile of lumber;
0. 6hat animals disagreed with the e@planation that (nowball was 4ones. secret agent from the
very beginning;
10. 6hat e@planation does 9o@er accept;
11. 6hat is 9o@er.s answer to the slaughter of other animals;
11
1. 1ive an e@ample of Dlover.s blind acceptance.
1!. 6hat e@planation is given for banning A9easts of BnglandC; 6hat replaced it;
1". 6hat always drowned out any animals who protested;
Journal esponse ! Chapter &
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. Bven 9o@er does not believe that (nowball was always a traitor. 6hy is his saying so a
dangerous move; 6hat clues are given in the te@t;
. <escribe the e@ecutions and confessions. Eow are these new events affecting the wor*ers
on the farm;
Chapter '
1. 6hat is the significance of the poem about 8apoleon;
. Eow has the (i@th Dommandment been changed;
!. 6hat is important about the rumor of >r. 7rederic*.s cruelty to his animals;
". 6hat is the slogan of the pigeons now;
#. 6hat else is (nowball being blamed for;
1
$. 6hy is it ironic that the windmill is named after 8apoleon;
,. 6hy is a death sentence decreed upon 7rederic*;
/. <escribe the 9attle of the 6indmill in order of events.
0. 6hat is ironic about their victory celebration;
10. 6hat is the result of the pigs. discovery of whis*ey;
11. 6hat will the retirees. pasture now be used for;
1. 6hy is (%uealer out at midnight with a ladder and paint brush;
Journal esponse ! Chapter '
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6hy did no one Acare to mentionC recalling a commandment about animals *illing other
animals in the hearing of the pigs or the dogs; 6hat does this say about the wor*ers. state of
mind;
. <escribe the battle with 7rederic*.s men and e@plain how the animals felt immediately after
the destruction of the windmill. Eow did the pigs renew the animals. spirits;
1!
Chapter (
1. Eow is 9o@er hurt; 6ho helps him;
. Eow far away is 9o@er.s supposed retirement;
!. 6hat word does (%uealer use to describe the reduced rations;
". <o the animals still believe they are free;
#. 6hat special rights do pigs gain in this chapter;
$. 6hat is ironic about the pigs gaining so much weight;
,. 6hat is a (pontaneous <emonstration; 6hat is the purpose;
/. 6hy was 8apoleon elected president;
0. 6hat propaganda is spread about (nowball.s wound in the 9attle of the Dowshed;
10. 6hat is significant about the reappearance of >oses;
11. 6hat type of building is going on now;
1. 6hy does 8apoleon ma*e arrangements to send 9o@er to a AhospitalC;
1"
1!. Eow do the pigs e@plain the *nac*er.s truc*; <o the animals believe them;
1". Eow do the pigs continue to use 9o@er.s strength after his death;
1#. 6here did the pigs get the money for the case of whis*ey;
Journal esponse ! Chapter (
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6hat is significant about only the young pigs being educated and their being discouraged
from playing with the other animals;
. 6hat is the tragedy of 9o@er;
Chapter 1)
1. 6ho is left after all these years;
. Eas anyone retired; <o you thin* anyone ever will; 6hy or why not;
!. 6hat has happened to the animals. promised rewards;
". 6hat do the pigs have to wor* on, according to (%uealer;
#. 6hat does 9en?amin remember about the past;
1#
$. 6hat new song does 8apoleon now have (%uealer teach the sheep; 6hy;
,. 6hat does the wall of commandments now say;
/. 6hat is the similarity between 8apoleon and 4ones;
0. <escribe the conversation at the card game.
Journal esponse ! Chapter 1)
+he following %uestions should be answered on a separate piece of paper. +hese %uestions will
not have right or wrong answers, but will re%uire you to thin* and formulate a well-written
answer. Bach %uestion should be answered in at least one full paragraph. -ou will need to use
e@amples from the boo* to support your answers.
1. 6hat does 8apoleon.s announcement that Animal 7arm will return to its original name,
A>anor 7arm,C reveal about his character; 6hat is the final irony at the end of this chapter;
. Fn chapter 10, the commandments are reduced to one2 AAll Animals Are B%ual, 9ut (ome
Animals Are >ore B%ual +han =thers.C <iscuss this phrase as it applies to the novel. +hen,
discuss it based on your own e@perience, observation, or *nowledge of situations or
circumstance.
1$
Characteri*ation +Chapters 1-#,
DharacteriGation is the means by which an author reveals a character.s personality. An author
can develop character in several ways2 indirect characterization H showing the character acting
and spea*ingI giving a physical description of the characterI revealing the character.s thoughts
and feelings or what others thin* about the character H and direct characterization H
commenting directly on the character.
Orwell characteri*es -apoleon. Snow/all. and S0uealer as three different types of
leaders. each with positi1e and negati1e traits2 3ro1ide two outstanding positi1e traits
and two negati1e ones that characteri*e each pig2 4hen. underneath the traits cite an
incident. action. or speech that illustrates each characteristic2 +1' points,
3ositi1e -egati1e
-apoleon
Snow/all
S0uealer
Follow 5p6 7n your opinion. which of the three pigs does Orwell characteri*e as the
strongest leader8 9rite a short +2-" paragraph, essay that e:plains your choice2 Be sure
to gi1e details from the te:t that support your choice2
1,
Conflict +Chapters $-&,
Donflict is a struggle between two opposing forces or characters in a literary wor*. Donflict can
ta*e one of these forms2 (1) a character versus another characterI () a character versus
societyI (!) a character versus natureI (") two or more emotions or ideas struggling for mastery
within a character.
For each item /elow. identify the ;ind of conflict in1ol1ed. the causes of the conflict. and
the outcomes of the conflict2 Create a <ulti-Flow map for each item2 +2) points,
Follow 5p6 =ow does the e:ecution of animals /ring a/out a conflict of ideas within
Clo1er8 9rite a short +2-" paragraph, essay that e:plains the conflict in her2 Be sure to
gi1e details from the te:t to support your ideas2
1/
Clo1er confronts
<ollie a/out <ollie>s
contact with humans2
+ype of conflict2
-apoleon disagrees
with Snow/all>s plans
for the windmill2
+ype of conflict2
4he animals struggle
with how to /rea; up
the stones to /uild the
windmill2
+ype of conflict2
-apoleon ma;es a
policy in opposition to
Animalism. trading with
?the enemy2@
+ype of conflict2
-apoleon ma;es a
policy in opposition to
Animalism. trading with
the enemy2
+ype of conflict2
Summari*ing +Chapters '-1),
+he (even Dommandments of Animalism created by 8apoleon and (nowball before the
rebellion eventually are bro*en. 7irst to be shattered is number four, which is revised to ?ustify
the pigs. move into the farmhouse.
7n the chart /elow. write when the commandments are /ro;en. and e:plain how they are
altered. if they are altered2 +1# points,
Commandments 9hen Bro;en e1ision. if any
12 6hatever goes upon two
legs is an enemy.
22 6hatever goes upon four
legs, or has wings, is a friend.
"2 8o animal shall wear
clothes.
#2 8o animal shall sleep in a
bed.
$2 8o animal shall drin*
alcohol.
%2 8o animal shall *ill any
other animal.
&2 All animals are e%ual.
Follow 5p6 7n 2-" paragraphs. illustrate how the single remaining Commandment is
Chapter 1) sums up the attitude of the pigs that ena/les them to /rea; all se1en of the
commandments2
10
Aiterary Blements6 Fa/les
A fable is a brief, often humorous literary form which conveys a moral or message. =rwell
strengthens his animal fable by developing commonly held notions of animals. ApersonalitiesC in
his characteriGations.
7n the chart /elow. identify the traits for which the animals are ;nown and how Orwell
uses that trait in his character+s,2 +( points,
Animal Animal 4rait B1idence of trait in no1el characters
3igs
+e:ample,
7ntelligence C traditionally
considered greedy
7t is the pigs that form the idea of Animalism.
/ut after the e/ellion they immediately /egin
to hoard the riches of the farm2
12 (heep
22 9en?amin
the <on*ey
"2 <ogs
0
Aiterary Blements6 Foreshadowing
7oreshadowing is the use of hints and clues to suggest what will happen later in the plot.
7n the chart /elow. e:plain how the passage pro1ided foreshadows a future e1ent in the
no1el2 +1) points,
12 4he shed where Snow/all had drawn his
plans of the windmill had /een shut up and
it was assumed that the plans had /een
ru//ed off the floor2
22 -apoleon too; them DpuppiesE away
from their mothers. saying that he would
ma;e himself responsi/le for their
education2
"2 ?7 /elie1e the time will come when we
shall find that Snow/all>s part in it DBattle of
the CowshedE was much e:aggerated2@
#2 4ired out /ut proud. the animals wal;ed
round and round their masterpieceF the
walls were twice as thic; as /efore2
-othing short of e:plosi1es would lay them
lowF
$2 ?And remem/erF that in fighting
against <an. we must not come to
resem/le him2@
Follow 5p6 e-read Old <aGor>s speech2 9hat are two more e1ents or actions
foreshadowed in that passage8 9rite a short paragraph a/out what is said in the
speech. and the e1ent that the statement foreshadows2
1
Aiterary Blements6 7rony
Frony is the difference between appearance or e@pectation and reality. Verbal irony occurs when
someone says one things but means something else. Dramatic irony occurs when what a
character believes to be true the reader *nows is not. Situational irony occurs when there is a
difference between what is e@pected or what would be appropriate and what really does
happen.
7n the ta/le /elow. identify whether the passages are 1er/al. dramatic. or situational
irony. and e:plain the irony in each passage2 +1$ points,
3assage 4ype of 7rony B:planation
12 +hen there were lamp oil and
candles for the house, sugar for
8apoleon.s own table (he forbade
this to the other pigs, on the ground
that it made them fat)J
22 =ut of spite, the human beings
pretended not to believe that it was
(nowball who had destroyed the
windmillJ +he animals *new that
this was not the case.
"2 9ut the lu@uries of which (nowball
had once taught the animals to
dreamJ 8apoleon had denounced
such ideas as contrary to the spirit of
Animalism. +he truest happiness, he
said, lay in wor*ing hard and living
frugally.
#2 K+Lhey were happy in their wor*I
they grudged no effort or sacrifice, well
aware that everything that they did was
for the benefit of themselves and those
of their *indJ and not for a pac* of
idle, thieving human beings.
$2 KELe personally congratulated
the animals on their achievement
and announced that the mill would
be named 8apoleon >ill.

Hoca/ulary Acti1ities
A2 Circle the letter of the word or phrase that most nearly defines the italici*ed word in
each e:cerpt from Animal Farm2 +2$ points,
1. At one end of the big barn, on a sort of raised platform, >a?or was already ensconced on his
bed of strawJ
a. asleep c. covered
b. settled d. standing
. Preeminent among the pigs were two young board named (nowball and 8apoleon, whom
>r. 4ones was breeding up for sale.
a. largest c. superior
b. preferred d. famous
!. Ee did his wor* in the same slow obstinate way as he had done it in 4ones.s time, never
shir*ing and never volunteering for e@tra wor* either.
a. stubborn c. hesitant
b. painful d. obliging
". KELe would say only, A<on*eys live a long time. 8one of you has ever seen a dead don*ey,C
and the others had to be content with this cryptic answer.
a. reasonable c. senseless
b. 9lunt d. puGGling
#. (nowball also busied himself with organiGing the other animals into what he called Animal
Dommittees. Ee was indefatigable at this.
a. frustrated c. encouraged
b. tireless d. insistent
$. Any animal caught singing it was given a flogging on the spot. And yet it was irrepressible.
a. incessant c. respectable
b. not restrained d. not pertinent
,. And so within five minutes of their invasion, they were in ignominious retreat by the same
way as they had comeJ
a. haphaGard c. irrational
b. shameful d. unoriginal
/. Fn glowing sentences he painted a picture of Animal 7arm as it might be when sordid labour
was lifted from the animals. bac*s.
a. dishonorable c. harmful
b. sic*ening d. difficult
!
0. Fn sheer malignity, thin*ing to set bac* our plans and avenge himself for his ignominious
e@pulsion, this traitor has crept here under cover of night and destroyed our wor* of nearly a
year.
a. premeditation c. malice
b. disloyalty d. secrecy
10. Fn the late summer yet another of (nowball.s machinations was laid bare.
a. foolish ideas c. schemes
b. misfortunes d. mechanisms
B2 Circle the letter of the antonym that is most nearly opposite in meaning for each word
in /old type2
11. /ene1olent6 (a) e@pansive (b) cruel (c) compassionate (d) wise
1. 1i1acious6 (a) lifeless (b) spirited (c) lifeli*e (d) effective
1!. tracta/le6 (a) adhering (b) easily followed (c) traditional (d) uncontrollable
1". conciliatory6 (a) unfriendly (b) appeasing (c) diplomatic (d) wor*ing as a group
1#. superannuated6 (a) overwor*ed (b) new (c) managed (d) obsolete
C2 <atch each word in the left-hand column with its meaning from the right-hand
column2 9rite the letter of the correct meaning in the space pro1ided2
1$. ma@im
1,. cynical
1/. posthumously
10. prete@t
0. intermediary
1. retribution
. categorically
!. incumbent
". capitulated
#. censured
A. surrendered
9. rule of conduct
D. go-between
<. after death
B. punishment
7. sarcastic
1. absolutely
E. condemned
F. re%uired
4. e@cuse
"
Hoca/ulary Aist
Below is a list of the 1oca/ulary words you are responsi/le for from Animal Farm2 Iou
might want to write definitions or use of the 1oca/ulary strategies for your regular word
list to learn them2 4he definitions that will /e used on your test can /e found in the
1oca/ulary acti1ities in this pac;et2
ensconced
preeminent
o/stinate
cryptic
indefatiga/le
irrepressi/le
ignominious
sordid
malignity
machinations
/ene1olent
1i1acious
tracta/le
conciliatory
superannuated
ma:im
cynical
posthumously
prete:t
intermediary
retri/ution
categorically
incum/ent
capitulated
censured
#

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